Blogging about Mark Cousins' documentary The First Movie made me think about the experience that made me fall in love with cinema. In my case it was Krakatoa East Of Java - but what was the film you remember seeing that changed everything.

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  • Comment number 201. Posted by alec

    on 16 Jul 2012 16:27

    No question about it.

    Yul Brynner's clicking footsteps echoing down through the tunnels of the film Westworld, and horrific soundtrack that accompanies them. I'm pretty sure that movie affected my perception not only of movies, but of sci-fi, storytelling and acting too. I was quite young at the time and it was terrifying.

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  • Comment number 200. Posted by information1st

    on 16 Jul 2012 13:17

    Watched enough movies growing up to consider it part of mainstream culture and nothing exceptionally more interesting than a lot of other things. It's not easy to declare what the "spark" was for my interest in movies to slant closer towards being more like a "hobby", although it never went so far to become a "life-style"!), but if the 'test' is to recreate the experience of that "first love", then I would have to choose Takeshi Kitano's Sonatine (1993), which changed my view of film/cinema/movies ever afterwards, and in particular,

    Scene by the beach: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9JTtx07oveY

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  • Comment number 199. Posted by zingzangspillip

    on 7 Jul 2012 02:03

    For me, the film that changed everything was Terry Gilliam's film, 'Brazil'. It's not necessarily my favourite film anymore, since I watched it so many times that it has lost its shock factor. But I was 16 or 17 and unsuspecting, and I cried several times during that film. Not only did it change the way I look at film, but it changed the way I look at life. It did the same thing that Orwell's 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' did.
    Also, Gilliam's battle with Universal over the film's release is a fascinating story in itself. As a young artist growing up in Australia, I am very aware of the lack of control that I have over my life, because I know that my chosen profession is not one where I will often be in control. The story of 'Brazil's' release really resonates with me in that sense as well.

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  • Comment number 198. Posted by YourMessageHere

    on 5 Jul 2012 18:26

    I have no idea what the first film I saw in the cinema was. It might have been when I was eight and went to see the Jungle Book. It was alright.

    That's not the point, though. I never saw a significant difference between TV/home video and the cinema until I saw The Matrix. The big deal wasn't anything specific about the film itself, but how it as a whole made me feel afterwards. I felt like nothing was real, that maybe the world really was a fabricated simulation. The experience of seeing it in the cinema made that happen, and I realised the real potential of film.

    Relatedly: I didn't understand how fabulously flexible and suited to storytelling animation was, how much more and better it allowed you to suspend disbelief than live action, until I saw Ghost in the Shell. I didn't even realise it immediately; but after the film just wouldn't leave my brain and I kept turning it over and over, I realised that a live action version would never work.

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  • Comment number 197. Posted by Don_Vito

    on 5 Jul 2012 15:36

    I watched Dial M For Murder when I was 10. It was the first film that made me realise that filmmaking was an art and the first that I felt I could watch multiple times and always see something new. Ray Milland is definitely my favourite of the archetypal Hitchcock villains, offering his captors a glass of brandy after he is arrested. The film remains one of my favourite Hitchcock films and definitely the one that changed how I thought about cinema.

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  • Comment number 196. Posted by rongood

    on 27 Jun 2012 22:55

    @elena...My favorite is Metropolis too! It changed my life in the way that I knew that I loved science fiction from the moment it started. It practically started the Science Fiction genre, and the original was a masterpiece itself. I looked at your link and it looks like I will finally be able to see the Giorgio Moroder version for the first time! I cant wait to go to watch the stream on july 23 at metropolismovie.co.uk, thanks for your post!

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  • Comment number 195. Posted by elena

    on 27 Jun 2012 20:10

    METROPOLIS! one of my favs movies of all times. cant say that it changed my life, but definitely influenced it. and im really excited for all the sci-fi fans in UK, cause u guys will be able to see it pretty soon at metropolismovie.co.uk! so go and check it out, its worth ur time.

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  • Comment number 194. Posted by wittonnez

    on 26 Jun 2012 15:57

    For me, as for most of my generation, it was STAR WARS:THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK. As a seven year old, seeing these magnificent spaceships, vehicles and planets, on the big screen, was truly mesmerising. I just wanted to be there, with them, fighting the Empire.

    I remember seeing the poster, outside the cinema, in Dudley, a month before it opened, and being so excited. That was one long month for me, and my long suffering parents, but finally the day came and the whole family went. The queue was enormous, stretching, from the cinema, up the hill, past the zoo and onwards towards town, but finally we got in and took ours seats.

    Since that day in 1980, I've loved films. Their ability to transport you to other worlds, to the past, or even the future, as well as being able to lose yourself within them, is just fantastic, and i wouldn't be without them for anything.

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  • Comment number 193. Posted by Del

    on 26 Jun 2012 07:48

    for me it was not going to the cinima to see something as one movie becouse as a young child i was taken to the local cinima to see dumbo, but it was being allowed yp late on a few occasions as a youngster to watch what i now think of as classic works of subtle comedy, Harvey with james stewart and Arsnic and old lace with cary grant these for me were my defining eye opening movies.
    since i have seen many and collected thousands on dvd video tape etc and i find pleasure in the obscure rather than the mundain.

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  • Comment number 192. Posted by kaithefilmgeek

    on 24 Jun 2012 11:17

    Having seen many Disney films as a young kids...as some others have commented on it wasn't until 1975 that the cinema burst into my life...and it was Jaws that had such an effect on me...;)

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