There was a story in The Irish Times recently about a DVD cover that misused a review by me to sell a film as hilarious when I had actually found it pretty unfunny.
It's happened to lots of critics and here I give you a few other examples of cheeky selective quotation.

Hear Mark Kermode review the week's new films every Friday from 2pm on BBC Radio 5 live. Kermode & Mayo's Film Review is also available as a free podcast to download and keep.

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  • Comment number 54. Posted by Donald

    on 14 Aug 2011 14:24

    @48

    I'll try again.

    In an irony that hardly needs further explanation, my previous attempt to complain about this racial stereotyping -- and belittling of a distinguished paper -- was removed for including a caricature of the very attitude to which I was objecting.

    What exactly is the supposed "joke" here, cybermyth? I assume it is the near juxtaposition of the words "Irish" and "intelligent". I will refrain from hitting the "complain" button.

    Anyway, it's nice to see that Mark is paying attention to The Irish Times.

    -- Donald Clarke, Irish Times Film Correspondent.

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  • Comment number 53. Posted by Donald

    on 14 Aug 2011 14:10

    This comment was removed because it broke the house rules. Explain

  • Comment number 52. Posted by aviddiva

    on 10 Aug 2011 07:57

    I've noticed the 'Austin Powers 2' credit when ITV show 'The Spy Who Shagged Me'.

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  • Comment number 51. Posted by porkchopexpress

    on 5 Aug 2011 09:13

    I didn't think anyone actually believed the quotes that are on posters and dvd covers. I thought we all knew they were taken out of context or invented.

    I mean, has anyone decided to go and see a film based on a poster or a quote? If so which film and why?

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  • Comment number 50. Posted by James Morton

    on 1 Aug 2011 15:25

    Re: using negative quotes-

    My original R1 Fight Club DVD booklet has, peppered throughout it, both glowing and scathing quotes from reviewers.

    In particular, quotes from a notorious review by Alexander Walker - http://www.compsoc.man.ac.uk/~heather/mustard/walker.htm

    Which I also noticed, in the Social Network extras, David Fincher has quotes from on his office walls.

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  • Comment number 49. Posted by Killian

    on 29 Jul 2011 22:34

    Not a film, but the late comedian Jason Byrne's Edinburgh Fringe show was given a 1 star review by The Scotsman, to which he put on all of his posters "A Star!"

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  • Comment number 48. Posted by cybermyth

    on 28 Jul 2011 17:45

    Some film posters use quotes from less obvious publications. The one I remember was:
    "An intelligent film", The Irish Times.
    I did wonder if this was someone's idea of a joke.

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  • Comment number 47. Posted by I_am_I

    on 27 Jul 2011 20:56

    I thought they had banned this kind of deliberate lying on movie posters? Then, I'm not shocked it's still going on.

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  • Comment number 46. Posted by Daniel Craig David James

    on 27 Jul 2011 20:11

    oletaolyta wrote:

    It's not a film so a bit off-topic, but a good example of a well-used quote.
    On the back cover of the recent Banksy book 'Wall and Piece', there is a quote from the Metropolitan Police: 'There's no way you're going to get a quote from us to use on your book cover'
    ----------

    Argh! I was going to say that, but you beat me to it! I'll link to a picture of it instead.

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-hyZzEybwJKs/TcaOJEryfMI/AAAAAAAAEJ8/zeW-_2-as4A/s1600/IMG_4223.jpg

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  • Comment number 45. Posted by pozzo2010

    on 27 Jul 2011 17:58

    It's not so much when critics' words are taken out of context that bothers me; it's when TV trailers try to sell you an entirely different film, often by changing its title. You can understand "Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me" becoming "Austin Powers 2" for the purposes of TV trailers and "Inglourious Basterds" becoming "Quentin Tarantino's Inglorious" - even if that did sound like a completely different film. But advertising "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" as a fluffy rom com called "Eternal Sunshine"? And trying to pass off the soundtrack to "Spirit: Stallion of the Cimmaron" as a new Bryan Adams album called "Spirit" (which is not a film as such, but, you know...)? Surely, however, the most bizarre example was the TV trailer pretence that "How To Tame Your Dragon" - a critical and commercial success - was really entitled 'Dreamworks' Dragons". Compared to such idiocy, misquoting the odd critic is a minor crime. Although I did enjoy the quotation on the poster for "Sharktopus", supposedly from a Daily Mirror critic, to the effect that the piece of dreck in question is the "greatest octopus / shark film ever made": at least tongues had been surgically implanted in cheeks before that poster was designed...

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