Lest there remain scinitillae of doubt in your minds, be assured that howsoever your natural human curiosity compels you there is not a single reason to be found for seeking out and watching Let Me In, the English-language remake of Tomas Alfredson's Kermode Award-winning Let the Right One In.

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  • Comment number 89. Posted by Rosko

    on 9 Jan 2011 07:32

    I have a dvd called 'the messenger' starring Anthony Quinn - bit of a historical curiosity because it's Americans and Brits portraying the history of Mecca and Islam before the whole clash of cultures thing became an issue. It is a double DVD - one in English and one in Arabic - two different sets of actors filmed on the same set with the same director/producers and cinematographers, with identical translated scripts. Both films are really good, if with a few dodgy costumes and sets in a couple of scenes. Comparing them shows you how films are understood differently in your native tongue compared to the language of the original characters. One film certainly helps you understand the other better in terms of the story and issues, but it is far easier to get lost in the Arabic version - to suspend disbelief and submerge your mind into the story - even though the English speaking actors are excellent too. That said, it's the best and cheapest method I've ever seen for a remake - a simultaneous remake- controlled by the same writer. The English version had an authenticity, integrity and dignity which I did not expect - it was not some foreigner's take on another person's culture.

    Nobody likes reading subtitles - it's annoying, especially at first - but it is definitely worth it in order to lose yourself in the film. If something engaging has been turned into surface entertainment, backround noise, a pantomine version of the original, then that is a total insult to the original work and culture which it came from. Scandinavian crime novels have a very particular feel and outlook, as do their horror films. Kenneth Brannagh judged his interpretation of the BBC's Wallander very well and retained it's Swedishness in English. To remove that context is not just to make a film easier to digest - it is to rip the soul out of the film. That doesn't mean that there has to be something terrible about the replacement scenario, but hollywood is denying people the benefits and beauty of the original work and culture which it came from. Of all the English speaking nations to set a Scandinavian horror like NZ, Australia, Canada, England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland, Alaska, Falklands, Hong Kong, South Africa etc.. they had to choose the USA and the same desert setting where they love to pitch their horrors. It's not a remake, it's cultural brainwashing. And I say that as a big fan of SOME american horror.

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  • Comment number 88. Posted by aviddiva

    on 26 Dec 2010 14:04

    The title of Let Me In just has me thinking of the Osmonds' song of that name!

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  • Comment number 87. Posted by Icecold

    on 21 Dec 2010 22:10

    "Do you think that there is such a thing as evil?" If the opening line to this clip is anything to go by, then this movie is best avoided. My toes curled at this line. Let the Right One In, is a subtle movie with a powerful beating heart. Is one of the reasons for remaking this movie really to appeal to a larger audience? or for people who don't like to read subtitles whilst viewing a film? I role my eyes in your direction if you are one of those such people. You deserve a film like Let Me In.

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  • Comment number 86. Posted by TheFilmFanatic

    on 27 Nov 2010 17:31

    Do you think it should have been rated 18?

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  • Comment number 85. Posted by TheFilmFanatic

    on 27 Nov 2010 16:57

    Mark, your views are sound. If someone came up to me and said what you said about "Let Me In", I would have total understanding.

    However, I thought it was good: 7/10

    Of course there are many many flaws - the relationships doesn't work, it is not as isolating and haunting as the original, it has some dodgy CGI moments, and there were parts where I couldn't help having a little chuckle. BUT, if this were released in a world where "Let The Right One In" never happened, I would give it a high mark.

    The fact I enjoyed it whilst in a cinema screen which had some of the worst teenagers in - texting, talking loudly, moving about, being a genuine annoyance - must be a testament to how this film did a good job.

    One more thing - they pretty much wrecked the end scene in this film and there was no need to have the man die at the beginning to then have a "3 weeks before" title come up.

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  • Comment number 84. Posted by information1st

    on 24 Nov 2010 02:40

    I think this discussion of remakes is a VERY interesting and topical one. I also think Dr. Mark Kermode disentangle's the debate very admirably as several things are going on here or could be. In fact I agree 100% with each comment made. Completely impressed.

    #15: Hollywood is the real vampire, leeching ideas from the past and other cultures instead of trying them out themselves.

    Or reminds me of copying another school mate's essay/answers into your own words! "Sorta". The scenes I have seen of the remake (several trailers): Just looks like a complete RIP-OFF of the original film, with puppets reenacting what was done in Swedish.

    But in this particular remake case, the reason to remake is to change the language to ENGLISH which makes more MONEY.

    English speakers unwilling to watch subtitles are missing out on great stories from around the world in film and will have to do with reconstituted versions.

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  • Comment number 83. Posted by LSJShez

    on 22 Nov 2010 20:44

    I've got to ask Doc; if someone's seen Wages Of Fear, why should they go and watch Sorcerer? And in terms of remakes, is Sorcerer better on it's own than Let Me In? We know that remakes rarely measure up, but the question has always to be asked - Is it any good on it's own merit, and will I enjoy it on that?
    On a side note; is there any chance you can go through Friedkin's work and tell us why you like what you like out of it, and why you don't? Forget the two good ones, as we already know your love for them and it's justified. But Friedkin as made some real crap too and I'd love to hear your fanboy POV on them, if only for the smile I give when you praise Cruising.

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  • Comment number 82. Posted by MarkHeng

    on 17 Nov 2010 20:39

    For what it's worth, the writer of the book and the original screenplay had this to say (copied from Wikipedia):

    John Ajvide Lindqvist, author of Let The Right One In, who also wrote the screenplay for the original Swedish film, was pleased with Let Me In. He said

    I might just be the luckiest writer alive. To have not only one, but two excellent versions of my debut novel done for the screen feels unreal. Let The Right One In is a great Swedish movie. Let Me In is a great American movie. There are notable similarities and the spirit of Tomas Alfredson is present. But Let Me In puts the emotional pressure in different places and stands firmly on its own legs. Like the Swedish movie it made me cry, but not at the same points. Let Me In is a dark and violent love story, a beautiful piece of cinema and a respectful rendering of my novel for which I am grateful. Again.[45]

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  • Comment number 81. Posted by Paul Arman

    on 17 Nov 2010 12:43

    @brightonrock @Stephen Glass
    I'm so glad to read all of your comments. You managed to put into words everything I was thinking about a) The Film, but perhaps more importantly for me b) DrK's review.
    In my opinion this review, and his review on R5, was something approaching disgraceful. His R5 review almost got to the point of blaming the audience for this film existing...really DrK is that where the problem lies?
    Let's be honest, not everyone likes subtitles. But just as important is that people can't always get to cinemas that show subtitled films. LTROI was something of an exception because it was popular and did get to cinemas that don't normally show foreign films. But on the whole a lot of people don't watch foreign language films because they simply don't have access to them, and just because one film happens to come out at the multiplex doesn't mean they are going to change their habits. And why should they only watch it on DVD. They want to see films at the cinema not on DVD so the first real opportunity that they get to see it at the cinema is the English language version. Let's just be glad that LMI is so good.
    For the record I have seen both at the cinema (I like those weird foreign films!) and I liked them both. I don't think either one was better. I liked the mood of the first, but there were bits I liked more in the second - I didn't pick up on the grooming of Oskar/Owen in the first but it was in the second - I believe because the child actors were better in the second film so they communicated it much better.

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  • Comment number 80. Posted by mister_dee

    on 17 Nov 2010 00:35

    I really cannot be ar*ed to watch subtitled movies so I'm glad they do remakes in English. If the original of this film was that good and the makers wanted everyone to see and appreciate it they should have made it in English. Germans speak English, the Japanese speak English - even the French speak English (although they pretend not to.) If you want the World too see your film - do it in the worlds universal language - ENGLISH! If not, then fine. Just don't cry when you rake in 10p for your efforts because most people like me don't like subtitles! Lets hear it for ENGLISH!

    I'm Scottish by the way.

    Not really.

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