Paul Greengrass is one of the best directors working and his first film Resurrected has a particular significance for me.

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  • Comment number 11. Posted by Woodgnome

    on 28 Sept 2013 16:04

    "Being nice about that film reflected better on me than it did on him." Eh? Surely you mean the reverse?

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  • Comment number 10. Posted by information1st

    on 27 Sept 2013 17:45

    I think this blog is making a subtle consideration that's evasive to pin down.

    I'm going to go with: "How important is it for a critic to see potential where it does not yet appear or where it is not yet acknowledged?" To inadvertently guide the audience towards something that might become "a name"? Or is the point made that as Woody Allen said recently in an interview: "80% is just showing up," and another 10% is being downright lucky? So does that leave 10% down to an uncanny ability or talent?

    I have some friends in the book business and they tend to spot really good stuff before it's well known or suggest it could become a best-seller. I think that is a useful skill for a critic of any sort to have to bring value to their audiences, particularly if that audience is really using film more than for just entertainment, supposedly. It's a bit like with music bands: There's something "extra" for people who saw them before they were big/famous that brings a great deal of satisfaction. I wonder why and what exactly is going on there?

    I have not seen much of Mr. Greengrass and can't say that I think much of what I have seen apart from with Bourne he can make very captivating blockbuster action movies. Evidently if you're a film critic and you recognize that Hollywood are going to be thanking you/keeping an eye on your reviews. It's perhaps also a consideration if a director, in this case, brings something different to the conversation. You could argue that Malik with Sansara/Bakara or whatever it's called does perform here from some people's almost stupified reactions of awe of these rolling photo-collections, no doubt for best results view stoned. I'm not so sure there, though perhaps they're right: It's so raw and extreme from the samples I've seen that it barely qualifies as a film and more as what they call in the art world with a fancy name: "An Installation" piece or what reddit would slap straight into "EarthPron" or it's affiliates. Critics often trip-up on these types of films however calling them masterpieces that the public generally hate (though not so with the two mentioned). But, it is different.

    I seem to remember Alan Hansen saying on MOTD: "You can't win anything with kids." and being proven wrong when Manchester Utd did win with their remarkable generation of youth players - but this actually sort of made Hansen as a pundit/critic of football in way. In the games industry they just cannot let go of Richard Ebert's quote-unquote: "Games can never be art," to the point of distraction!! He either cursed them or blessed them with that comment.

    To boil the question down to a question of "So many films, so little time": George Orwell's Confessions of a Book Reviewer:

    http://www.george-orwell.org/Confessions_of_a_Book_Reviewer/0.html

    >"The best practice, it has always seemed to me, would be simply to ignore
    the great majority of books and to give very long reviews--1,000 words is
    a bare minimum--to the few that seem to matter. Short notes of a line or
    two on forthcoming books can be useful, but the usual middle-length review
    of about 600 words is bound to be worthless even if the reviewer genuinely
    wants to write it."

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  • Comment number 9. Posted by Lewis Boom

    on 26 Sept 2013 13:22

    Interesting how this coincides with your reviews around the place of Sean Ellis' Metro Manila which you preface with the observation that, with his two previous films, "praise [was] poured too early upon the emergent film-maker"... praise poured by perhaps similarly green critics who will just as similarly go on to see Ellis get them out of jail free as his career develops?

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  • Comment number 8. Posted by Brian - New Forest

    on 26 Sept 2013 00:22

    Of course one of the downsides of your career (with which you ostensibly will need a sense of humour), is that your opinions become part of the public record, and you can expect to go through life having them quoted and mis-quoted at you, taken out of context, and made to account for even those opinions which you may over time have revised. While this has probably put you at a certain disadvantage in conversations with people who've already formed counter arguments for the positions they think you hold, you have been saved by the internet which has introduced a babble about all films so that your quotes, good and bad, may be lost in the static of the volume of information. Maybe the NSA can work out what your bad calls have been over the years, but I'm hoping they have other priorities (although, of course, now that I've mentioned them in conjunction with your blog, you may now be on their radar, sorry).

    Are you sure this blog was about Paul Greengrass, I'm detecting a level of neurotic anxiety which is much more Woody Allen....

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  • Comment number 7. Posted by mike b

    on 25 Sept 2013 23:09

    Greengrass was good on the Bourne films, but many directors are up to speed with his methods now. He won't go down as one of the greats. But that's neither here nor there as this clip is really about film critics. I would disagree with your central point Mark, actually nobody remembers your quote for Resurrected (except you, obvs). Or any critics quotes for any movie. If it ever had any worth it's been totally devalued. We live in a world where Baz Bamigboye of The Daily Mail will give a rave for any old piece of crap, thus automatically making it to the movie poster.

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  • Comment number 6. Posted by CORNISH DARREN FEWINS

    on 25 Sept 2013 12:03

    Hold on, we owe Greengrass for Mark not appearing to look anything less than serious?

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  • Comment number 5. Posted by Danny Dyers Oscar Speech

    on 25 Sept 2013 10:55

    That's a very strange piece, Mark. You spent 4mins of what was supposed to be about Paul Greengrass, talking mainly about yourself. Mmmmm!

    As for Greengrass, he is a terrific film-maker. I love Bloody Sunday, I adore United 93 and I've just this moment ordered Resurrected, as I really now want to see it. I also want to see Captain Phillips so I can put it up against A Hijacking. Which will come out on top, I wonder?

    However, Greengrass's almost ubiquitous use of shaky-cam grates me to the core. I wanted to slap him when I learned he grabbed a hold of his Bourne camera operator and physically shook him to get the desired effect. AAAGHHH!!! If I was a cinematographer and the director tried that with me, I honestly think I'd chin him and walk off set. It has to be the most annoying and disrespectful thing (to both DP and audience) in modern cinema and I'm glad to finally see it's being used less and less - and I hope to God Greengrass hasn't repeated it in Captain Phillips.

    Having said that, any new Paul Greengrass film is usually worthy of the excitement it illicits and I can't wait for his next 10yrs. Just hope he finally cuts out the ridiculous wobble nonsense.

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  • Comment number 4. Posted by R E ffolkes

    on 24 Sept 2013 22:27

    Kind of passed me by....will have to reassess.
    Was Resurrected not made for telly or am I getting mixed up with Tumbledown or somesuch ??
    Its the whiskey damaging the grey matter again.......

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  • Comment number 3. Posted by Alex_Temple

    on 24 Sept 2013 18:49

    This comment was removed because it broke the house rules. Explain

  • Comment number 2. Posted by edward

    on 24 Sept 2013 17:22

    He is an exceptional talent; not just in the U.K but globally. I always look forward to a Greengrass directed film; he has taken the '"Cinema Verite" approach to new levels. I was first taken by the riveting 'Bloody Sunday,' and also 'Omagh' in which he was credited as writer and producer; It boasted a fantastic and honest performance by Gerard McSorly. As with many of his actors - along with David Thewlis, in the little seen Resurrected' - he has this knack of coaxing out natural performances from his actors, especially in high-profile pictures, which is why It'll be interesting to see how Tom Hanks will tackle 'Captain Phillips.'

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