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Your letters

16:58 UK time, Tuesday, 13 November 2007

Re Random stat, I was intrigued by this seemingly massive increase in rates of liver disease, and that increasing taxes on alcohol, an idea being floated around by the government, will help turn this around. But to see how big a problem this was I checked the National Statistics site (PDF file here) . And of all the deaths in 2005 only 0.8% seemed to be caused by alcohol related liver diseases. Although this is surely terrible for those with the illnesses and their family and friends, it does not seem like we have an epidemic. But when you see that the drinks industry is worth £36bn in this country, it is all the more appalling that the government would use such emotional issues to increase their tax revenues.
Tom Webb, Epsom, UK

Never mind passwords. As a webmaster for a company which holds registration details for over 250 organisations, I have had more problems with people having their "SECRET ANSWER" guessed. The reason for this? Well, your secret answer could be for example "Mothers Maiden Name", hard for just anyone to guess admitted, however, when people are prepared to reply to chain letters telling you to forward your "jedi" name in the subject, which is your mothers maiden name backwards + your pets name, you find that people immediately have access to two of your potential answers. I ended up removing the "forgot my password" feature from my site, as so many of my users were silly enough to fall for these tricks.
Adam, Manchester

I just wanted to say that the article about children of the Great War, and in particular Donald Overall's story, was the most moving thing I have ever read on the BBC News website - and I read it a lot. I will think about him and his dad when I put my one-year old son to bed tonight. I already knew how lucky I am, but that's really driven it home. Thanks, all of you who made those sacrifices.
John Bratby, Southampton

Re the debate on adverts on BBC.com, the trouble I find with the adverts for us international readers is the delay they cause in the page loading which makes it skip upwards after a few seconds. The number of times I find I've clicked on a link a good three inches below the one I was aiming for.
Spike, Canberra, Australia

To all the overseas readers who dislike advertising on the BBC website, might I suggest a compromise. How about paying a subscription to see the pages in their original, unadulterated form,. The fee could be a nice round number, say, £135.50 a year?
JFK, UK

Re allowing international perusers to subscribe to the BBC website. I say "hear, hear!" I would love to be able to watch BBC TV online, and keep up with my favourites, but can't. So I have been waiting two years for the second series of Life on Mars and our local channel chose to replay the first and haven't even scheduled the second.
Emily, Adelaide, Australia

So Paper Monitor berates Monday's Daily Mail for gratuitous use of a Nigella photo. Erm. pot-kettle-black, anyone? And I'm glad Monitor readers have pointed out that Spock's mum was from Earth (Monday letters). But it takes a true Trekkie to point out that, by coincidence, Kirk's mum was called Winona.
Alex D, Southampton, UK

May I volunteer another candidate for the needless caption underneath a picture?. Hopefully, for Emma Watson, people can be trusted to guess the female.
Lydia, Lancaster

At 1745 on Monday, two consecutive headlines in the video and audio news section of news.bbc.co.uk were "Aardman releases new animals" and "Kangaroo runs amok in city". Where's Gromit when you need him?
Dick Hobbs, Punnetts Town, UK

To be even more pedantic than Bas, London (Your letters, Monday), the phrasing is "it has a mass of 1kg", not "it masses 1kg". I'll get my labcoat.
Teresa, Norwich

Despite striving earnestly to make as many bad puns as possible, the article on Tutankhamun's queue-jumping lovers fails to note the final irony - that as a result of the pharoah's exhibition, Maja herself became a mummy.
Edward Green, London, UK

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