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16:17 UK time, Monday, 2 April 2007

Re Cocaine trafficking boss guilty. "A drugs baron has been found guilty of running an international cocaine smuggling empire." So, a drugs baron has been found guilty of being a drugs baron... Any more scoops?
Chris Kenny, Southampton

Could someone please explain to me how, according to your How to say guide, Xishun can be pronounced "SHEE SHUUN (to rhyme with book)". No matter how often I say it I can't get it to rhyme with book. As the tree said to the logger, "I'm stumped".
Louise, Dublin, Ireland

Sorry to be late in on the act but I always thought "back to square one" (Friday letters) was a reference to the fact that the square (and indeed square root) of one is one, so the result will always be the same as what you started with.
Annya

Re shameless attempts to suck up to the boss (Friday letters). Gareth, I’d say advertising your boss’s web entry to all and sundry beats the original Wikipedia effort.
Nick Rikker, Barcelona, Spain

In Speaking Clock gets a new voice , we are invited to watch the new voice. How does that work then?
Ralph, Cumbria

I see the phenomenon of ever-shrinking celebrities has now, perhaps inevitably, taken a new turn. On 5 March, the BBC news website announced that Mylene Klass (29) would be fronting a new film show on CNN. Three weeks later you announce she's pregnant and lost a year (28) rather than a dress size. Size zero celebrities are off-putting enough; the prospect of age zero celebrities is just too scary for words.
Kris Siefken, Leicester

Andrew of Malvern, just to be pedantic back (Friday letters), I would hold that P.S. not only requires two FULL STOPS (as opposed to "two periods") but also TWO CAPITAL LETTERS.
J Paul Murdock, West Midlands

Re: Armed robots that can tell the difference between trees and people (10 seemingly spoof stories). Isn't the ability to tell the difference between South and North Koreans a more vital skill?
Sara, Malmo, Sweden

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