« Previous | Main | Next »

What's getting you talking?

Rabiya Parekh | 10:06 UK time, Wednesday, 13 September 2006

A bit slow today on the news agenda, although there seems to be plenty of news around. Your challenge this morning is to turn the stories in to talking points you think we should be debating.

I have a smallish list, but I'll let you decide.

NATO

NATO says the rest of the world has to pull its weight on Afghanistan. Why is your country so reluctant to help out? Could be because NATO says Afghan suicide bombings kill 173 since January?

Zidane

FIFA President Sepp Blatter has said that efforts were being made to bring together French captain Zinedine Zidane and Italy defender Marco Materazzi in a move of reconciliation. Zidane was sent off in the second period of extra time in the World Cup final in July for head-butting Materazzi, who had insulted the French midfielder. One suggestion is to send the pair to Robben Island in South Africa where Nelson Mandela was in prison for 27 years. Good idea?

Apple

I believe this is the talk of tech town. Apple have launched a super mega gyga player that will allow users to download movies. eMusic is also due to be launched soon as the first rival to iTunes. Have we reached the "core" of Apple? How many people still want to take a bit out of Apple? (I'm here all week).

Spying
California's attorney general has said, there is enough evidence to indict Hewlett-Packard (HP) staff over an internal inquiry into media leaks. HP chairwoman Patricia Dunn has stepped down amid criticism for her part in the scandal, which included hiring undercover consultants. In a bid to discover which employee had leaked "confidential" reports to the press, investigators obtained the phone records and other data of journalists and HP employees without their permission. Is it ever right to spy on your employees?

And keep sending us your suggestions on what you think we should be talking about.

Comments

  • No comments to display yet.
 

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.