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Top 10 Wildlife Trust reserves along the coast

Martin Aaron Martin Aaron | 11:15 UK time, Thursday, 3 May 2012

There are 32 nature reserves managed by local Wildlife Trusts in Wales that are on or within easy walking distance of the Wales Coast path.

Some are internationally known such as the Skomer and Skokholm islands off Pembrokeshire. Others, like the Solutia Meadows in Gwent are less well known but provide equally enjoyable destinations for walkers along the path.

Ten of the best Wildlife Trust sites along the Wales Coast path are:

1. Skomer/Skokholm (as one reserve)
2. Cemlyn (Anglesey)
3. Solutia Meadows (Gwent)
4. Port Eynon Point (Gower)
5. Cema
6. Gwaith Powdwr (Gwynedd)
7. Lavernock Point (Glamorgan)
8. Penderi Cliffs (Ceredigion)
9. Spinnies (Gwynedd)
10. Goodwick Moor (Pembs)

Wildlife Broadcaster, Iolo Williams said: "These top ten sites will give tourists a unique chance to see the some of the hidden wildlife treasures we have here in Wales."

"While I love the world renowned sites like Skomer with its amazing birdlife and unknown marine life, I'm also pleased that less well known reserves like Cemlyn on Anglesey are so high up the list because it's the most important breeding site for terns in southern Britain."

"Wales' amazing coastline is home to some of our most spectacular wildlife;" explains Rachel Sharp, CEO of Wildlife Trusts Wales.

"These reserves are home to not only a huge variety of birds, (more than 185 species have been spotted at the Wildlife Trusts Abergowan Spinnies in Gwynedd for example), but also rare butterflies such as the purple hairstreak at Lavernock Point in Glamorgan and scarce plants like the southern marsh orchid on the Solutia Meadows in Gwent.

"There are also 'hot spots' for watching bottlenose dolphins and porpoises, such as at Cemaes Head, and the northern most reserve, Cemlyn, on Anglesey is internationally renowned for its bird life."

The Wildlife Trusts Dyfi Osprey Project is also only a short distance inland from the path and the Ospreys have already laid eggs this year.

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