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Mobs, music and martial arts: The latest political trends

Rory Cellan-Jones | 12:11 UK time, Monday, 3 May 2010

On this Bank Holiday Monday all sensible people are hiding under the bedcovers, but for political campaigners - and the Daily Politics - there's no rest for the wicked. Our latest film for the programme does though have a somewhat light-hearted holiday feel.

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We start with a look at some of the latest digital campaign techniques. They include Liberal Democrat attempts to organise political flashmobs, a Facebook campaign to stop David Cameron becoming prime minister which has already attracted nearly 200,000 people, and a rather more practical approach from the Conservative blogger Tim Montgomerie, who's running a fund-raising campaign for Tory candidates facing LibDem opponents.

Then we have a section on the use of music. The Conservative Greg Knight - who is the drummer with the parliamentary band MP4 - has a catchy tune on his website. Have a listen and work out whether this is a real musical breakthrough for the Conservatives. Labour has a perhaps better known drummer as a candidate, though Dave Rowntree of Blur hasn't put any music on his website. And the Liberal Democrats may or may not be pleased that the team behind the Cameron Girls video has now done the same for Nick Clegg - sample lyric: "you travelled the country from Glasgow to Truro, spreading your message about joining the Euro..."

Mr Clegg and the other party leaders might prefer to take a trip to the Downing Streetfighter site where they can punch the living daylights out of each other. Thank goodness the real world of campaigning is so much more civilised.

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    "All sensible people are hiding under the bedcovers" on this bank holiday but there is no rest for wicked moans Rory Cellan-Jones. Well I've got news for you Rory, millions of people are working this bank holiday and work all the others and have no choice about it

  • Comment number 2.

    Is a flash mob democratic?

  • Comment number 3.

    Political flash mobs?? Well if that doesn't help reduce voter apathy in UK then I don't know what will!

  • Comment number 4.

    @ #2 Gordon Joly - lol, hardly - visions of organised marches in Communist China come immediately to mind!

  • Comment number 5.

    Rory, you've covered the Lib Dems and the Conservatives but it seems you've left out the million pound answer to the question facing Labour in the last days of frantic electioneering, viz. How now Brown cow? I dread to think what Mr Brown will come up with in retort this time.

    I've just read a post on the BBC's Have Your Say item covering the BNP's recent radio interview on BBC2 over the weekend. It seems the Nick Griffin cartoon is raising enough publicity for the BNP although probably not the kind they'd like!

  • Comment number 6.

    You could always check how voting is going on at the new site by @kieronb1 www.twitvoteuk.org.uk for a mashup of Twitter opinions and Google maps to visualise opinion seat-by-seat. Also check out how it started here http://kieronb1.wordpress.com/

  • Comment number 7.

    Why didn't they do another spoof music video like they did last time?

    I loved the very cleverly done remix to Shaggy's "It Wasn't Me" featuring Tony Blair and George Bush, does anyone remember it?

  • Comment number 8.

    Yes, nice and 'lighthearted', though this one does seem a bit mean-spirited, not to mention selective, but fits nicely with a few in the 'positive until negative is required' politico-media establishment telling me what not to do:

    a Facebook campaign to stop David Cameron becoming prime minister which has already attracted nearly 200,000 people

    Thanks for the link. Maybe this mention from the BBC will help them get a bit more than the current 177k (being generous, but not as generous as some - hope you have no ambitions to be a returning officer). I wonder if the author had money on the bet he'd get a million. One can only wonder what result might have been generated with a similar sentiment applied to other, perhaps even less popular candidates?

    Maybe the BBC might consider covering a twitter campaign on that, and then boost it to the main news? Just an idea. And, like the funding it enjoys, possibly unique, if not too objective.

    ps: Tried the link to M. Rowntree's site, and it doesn't seem to currently even have a site.

  • Comment number 9.

    The internet has certainly helped me decide who to vote for - the lack of Lib Dem propaganda through the letter box led me to dig a bit and discovered that a 25 year old girl who works as a nurse in a town 50 miles away and outside the constituency is their candidate.

    A pertinent reminder that one doesn't elect a prime minister but runs the risk of electing a dork as ones representative in attempting to do so.

  • Comment number 10.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 11.

    The internet has certainly helped me decide who to vote for - the lack of Lib Dem propaganda through the letter box led me to dig a bit and discovered that a 25 year old girl who works as a nurse in a town 50 miles away and outside the constituency is their candidate.

 

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