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How damaged is England's brand?

Robert Peston | 09:32 UK time, Monday, 5 July 2010

Would you pay good money to look like members of the England team? Would you bank with an organisation whose values are those of England's £160,000 per week "stars"?

I suspect that many of you would prefer to pay good money to distance yourselves from footballers who've been widely criticised for failing to perform as a team and as individuals, and for behaviour off the park widely seen as churlish and selfish.

In modern times, I cannot remember a similar descent from hero to zero of any sporting individual or team, even those accused of cheating.

And the reason, of course, is that the high hopes of a nation were dashed not simply by an incompetent performance, but by a collective inability of the players to show esprit de corps and national pride, or to apologise and explain.

Steven Gerrard and Wayne RooneySo when the players were filmed still wearing their official Marks & Spencer suits as they disembarked in England last week, having been trounced by Germany and then not bothering to thank the thousands of England supporters who had paid fortunes to cheer them through thick and thin, all I could think was that Mr Marks and Mr Spencer would be gyrating rapidly in their tombs.

Also, quite how comfortable does Nationwide's board feel that their logo is impossible to miss when England players are interviewed or when supporters click on to the official England website?

This England team represents the diametric opposite of what the M&S and Nationwide brands are supposed to embody.

The Nationwide, as the largest building society, characterises itself as the antithesis of supposedly high-charging, bonus-driven banks and - by implication - the antithesis of footballers who won't get out of bed for less than 100 grand.

As for M&S, it would be a frail thing if its reputation for offering quality at an affordable price was seriously impaired. Yet the 23 members of the England squad, whose collective annual earnings (including sponsorship) are considerably more than £100m, are symbols of something else.

It will be fascinating to see whether the market as it relates to the earnings of the FA and footballers will operate in an efficient way.

If it does, the sponsorship earnings of individual members of the England team will collapse. And the FA will suffer a significant fall in income, when it seeks to persuade the Nationwide to renew as official team sponsor or tries to find a new sponsor (the deal with the Nationwide expires this month).

Were the FA and the team hit where it hurts, in their wallets, there would be a pretty powerful incentive for players and FA to learn the lessons of the debacle in South Africa. Market forces would spur renewal rather than embedding decline.

If however the money continues to gush in, then - as David Bond implied in a recent post contrasting regulated German football with free-market England -we would surely have to conclude that the global commercial success of the Premier League etiolates the national team (although the relative success of the Spanish team challenges the idea that it's utterly impossible to build a great national team on the back of phenomenally wealthy club teams).

Comments

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  • Comment number 1.

    A bunch of highly paid prima donna's who cant play as a team - resonance with the boards of many of our free enterprise corporations!

  • Comment number 2.

    Excellent timing for the Nationwide - sponsorship contract up for renewal just as the world cup results are known.

    Pure luck or good judgement?

    Either way, I don't think this is the only area where the England/UK brand is going down the pan.

    As millions are made unemployed, public services collapse, thousands of freed criminals go on a crime wave and the economy goes back into recession - surely no one is going to want to associate themselves with any aspect of a failing state.

  • Comment number 3.

    Well, they are rather like bankers - absolutely useless to us. But at least they are entertaining, and you can tell they are really trying, even if they are rubbish.

    But bankers are just rubbish.

  • Comment number 4.

    The England team was not a team it was a collection of individuals with too many of those individuals wanting to be the boss, hence the result.

    But I despair of this blog, is business simply stuff like banking or football. Is there no UK topic that does not involve overpaid underperformers.

    BTW German footie turns over less than the UK footie but spends significantly more on youth development. But perhaps that is the UKs mentality all over. Lets not worry about tomorrow.


  • Comment number 5.

    Claire Fox was on R4's Moral Maze defending UK footballers £5m + p.a. salaries. She seemed to consider it a natural state of affairs. Not to me. Yet more excess payment for failure. A stroppy, untalented group representing England.

    Compare that with Rafa Nadal's charming, humble win at Wimbledon and his truly devoted English fans. A superb ambassador for his sport and for his country. I'd think he's done a power of good for the Spanish brand. I don't know what he earns but because of how he is, it's not the first question to enter my head. What a guy and what a gentleman.

  • Comment number 6.

    Don't mention the cricket.

  • Comment number 7.

    aww Robert, its only a game.... your team lost.... and as an industry it is very small beer, though often sloshed. The cricketers are not doing bad, Red the Scot reached the semi final, and the Rugger b's are doing alright.

    What it shows for the marketeers is that free to air TV is highly risky and Sky's audiences are hardly worth it.

  • Comment number 8.

    4. At 10:09am on 05 Jul 2010, YellowBrickRoad wrote:

    > is business simply stuff like banking or football. Is there no UK topic
    > that does not involve overpaid underperformers.

    Very few. Look at the BBC (!), NHS managers, top civil servants, expense gouging MPs, gluttonous Sir Greedies, coppers retiring at 45 on full pensions, bone-headed oil barons...

    The tail is wagging the dog. The people actually doing work are paid peanuts, while those managers who just talk about work live in luxury!!

    Look, if we want business to prosper, we must pay the workers who work businesses, not the silly, ineffectual chit-chatters, button pushers and pen-pushers at the (so-called) “top”.

    Let the muck settle to the bottom.

  • Comment number 9.

    Interesting article. I also suspect that the likes of Ashley Cole and Wayne Rooney will not find away grounds very nice places to ply their trades in this coming season amongst others. Shame.

    I don't think many hold M&S or Nationwide responsible for the mess in SA although, I don't blame either or all sponsors of the England team for ditching their support in favour of other "more worthy teams or individuals".

    I have watched every minute of this world cup and can honestly say that this tournament has been an utter disaster. And its not just Englands performance. Too much cheating. Too many errors by officials. The new ball. The way FIFA behave. The quality of the football. And so on.

    With any luck, folk will start to see the comparisons with the Premier League and support and sponsorship will dwindle there too [i hope].

    At the end of the day as a once football mad inidividual, I am delighted that my friends have persuaded me to follow other sports which now bring me pleasure.

    RIP Football.

  • Comment number 10.

    @ 5. At 10:15am on 05 Jul 2010, LostatHome wrote:

    > Claire Fox was on R4's Moral Maze defending UK footballers £5m + p.a. salaries.

    Is that person notable for her football knowledge in any way? Or for something else?

  • Comment number 11.

    at 5. At 10:15am on 05 Jul 2010, LostatHome.

    Always liked the guy. A proper profesional sportsman. Very nice of him to applaud the Wimbledon crowd who seem to always try and be impartial.

  • Comment number 12.

    England's football team underperformed only slightly. The squad was not
    as strong as any out of the 2006, 2002 or even 1998 squads. They
    did better than either Italy or France, and just a bit worse than
    Brazil and Argentina.

    It's hardly a big deal, particularly for the BBC Business editor. Don't
    you have a double dip, plus an economy being run by schoolboys, to
    worry / write about?

  • Comment number 13.

    stay out of football Robert, the malaise involved is and goes far deeper
    than our banking,problems.

  • Comment number 14.

    Money corrupts, a lot of money corrupts completely.

  • Comment number 15.

    Look, if we want business to prosper, we must pay the workers who work businesses, not the silly, ineffectual chit-chatters, button pushers and pen-pushers at the (so-called) “top”.
    ------------------

    Very good idea, Jacques, but will not happen. Everything boils down to the way money is created and the sheer nature of money to corrupt. This where the change must start.

  • Comment number 16.

    The EPL is a remarkable success aboard particularly in Asia and a great introduction and marketing tool for the UK; especially at a time when we need to grow business in Asia for future growth and jobs. However the England team are spoilt, under-performing group whose salaries should be reduced to reflect their failure, just as we demand with public servants or Union leaders who are getting 6 figure sums compared to average salary of 20-30k

  • Comment number 17.

    Leave the players alone.
    They went, they did their best.

  • Comment number 18.

    Does anyone really notice whose logos adorn the walls behind whichever sportsman is being interviewed? And, more importantly, even if they notice are they going to change their buying habits?

    Or is this just a fantasy in the minds of advertising executives, who like footballers seem to be paid large salaries for doing nothing productive whatsoever?

    You want to see enterprise and pride in good workmanship, 9pm Sundays BBC2 "How to build..." - last night Rolls Royce aero engines, the week before, nuclear submarines. We've lots of things we do well that we can celebrate, so why don't we?

  • Comment number 19.

    @ 15. At 10:38am on 05 Jul 2010, plamski wrote:

    >> Look, if we want business to prosper, we must pay the workers
    >> who work businesses, not the silly, ineffectual chit-chatters,
    >> button pushers and pen-pushers at the (so-called) “top”.

    > Very good idea, Jacques, but will not happen.

    Well, sorry, but it has to happen, else working isn't worth
    people's effort.

  • Comment number 20.

    Does 'etiolates' really convey what Robert Peston wants to say. He is presumably using it in its figurative sense but its real meaning refers to the way a plant responds to darkness. When it's dark there's no point having chlorophyll. Instead the plant puts all its effort into growing tall and finding light. Etiolation is a positive, survival response. It's the opposite of lack of vigour. Is this what Robert thinks is going on with the England team?

  • Comment number 21.

    etiolates

    Thanks for your article Robert, I like to start the week with a fresh thought and didn't previously know the meaning of this word.

    As for the rest of it, I'm surprised you haven't managed to use the story to highlight the clear analogy to the overpaid bloated public service and general fat-catness of UK business.

  • Comment number 22.

    I agree with all these comments. It's high time the FA and the premiership were hit where it hurst. Our footballers are not worth the money they get paid a week - they contribute nothing useful to society and cannot, under any circumstances, be worth their exhorbitant salaries. They should be paid no more than £2,000 per week. They are a bunch of prima donnas who want all the financial rewards but actually, deliver nothing, have no sense of responsibility to anybody including their country and have failed, as you point out, to either thank the fans who went over to support them or to apologise to them. They are NOT that good - they showed themselves to be mediocre players with a bad attitude on and off the pitch.

  • Comment number 23.

    To all those droning on rather predictably about the England team being 'over-paid':

    Please check your facts. Capello is paid £5M a year (more than twice the salary of the next highest paid manager in the world cup) to manage the team. He keeps all of his wages. In contrast the England team have had a policy for a number of years of donating all their international appearance fees to a colorectal cancer charity. In effect they were paid nothing to go to South Africa because they gave it all away.

  • Comment number 24.

    I noticed all the "come on England" banners, advertising and associated promotions, offers, etc, had all disappeared from my local "official supermarket" Tesco, within hours of England exiting the world cup

  • Comment number 25.

    Well Robert this is not really your subject is it. Let us remember that France and Italy went out well before England. Brazil are also out and Argentina performed even more poorly than England against Germany in completely failing to score.

    All brands eventually become tarnished as you well know from your reports on BP.

    However unlike BP the England team will not dent the BBC pension fund!

  • Comment number 26.

    What the hell is wrong with the people of this country?
    Why feel the need to attack the England Team at every chance?

    Firstly, based on World Cup performances, as a whole, I feel that it wasn't a poor English display that resulted in our early exit, but more a very in-form German team (the same German team would go on to devastate Argentina even worse than us).

    Secondly, why feel the need to blame all 23 players? What about the one's who didn't get the chance to contribute to the team effort? Joe Hart, Michael Dawson, Steve Warnock, and the other few players whose roles were so insignificant that I can't take the time to remember their names. Do they simply deserve to face this media response just because they were there? No, they don't. Wait another 4 years for them to fail this country please, that's all I ask.

    Thirdly, I'd like to draw attention to the Algeria game. Sure it was a boring atrocity to watch, but that doesn't mean that the so-called fans should boo the players at the end. Rooney had every right to question their loyalty to the team and from that moment on I considered every single booing fan, a non-fan, someone too self-centred to put some faith in their team.

    Please Robert, do not claim that the supporters "had paid fortunes to cheer them through thick and thin", because they obviously did not cheer through thick and thin.

    I must agree with you, however, that the players are over-paid. But considering that the last time I checked the International wages of the England squad were being donated straight to charities and, assuming these donations continue, I think it's actually kind of good that they are over-paid, because that gives more money to organisations who could do something beneficial with it.

  • Comment number 27.

    I would love to know what influence sponsors had in the past in requiring certain high profile players to make appearances in friendlies.

  • Comment number 28.

    I have felt like this about English football and business for a long time.

    Nice clothes but shame about everything else....

    It's about time we don't down the Germans and learn something from our continental neighbors.

  • Comment number 29.

    Where are the GDP figures?

  • Comment number 30.

    I couldn't put it better myself.

    Thing is, though: unless people start deserting the EPL as well, most of the players will still be in serious rich-man's land.

    The Nationwide should be sponsoring clubs which set up as fan-owned clubs, retain surpluses and are answerable to members. To date, that's not too many in England.

    Perhaps they could lend fans of a Championship club the funds to buy their team, with the money repaid like a mortgage through a generation? Especially if the club agreed to focus on youth teams, a sensible number of home grown players and a strong and cooperation-based relationship with the junior England teams.

  • Comment number 31.

    22. At 11:05am on 05 Jul 2010, kitkatdreams wrote:

    Do you mind if I paraphrase your comment?

    > It's high time the bankers were hit where it hurts. Our bankers are
    > not worth the money they get paid a week - they contribute nothing
    > useful to society and cannot, under any circumstances, be worth
    > their exhorbitant salaries. They should be paid no more than
    > £200 per week. They are a bunch of prima donnas who want all
    > the financial rewards but actually, deliver nothing, have no sense
    > of responsibility to anybody including their country and have
    > failed, as you point out, to either thank the custmers who use
    > thier branches, or to apologise to them. They are NOT that
    > good - they showed themselves to be mediocre workers with
    > a bad attitude on and off the job.

    Hm... I can clearly see the link, now. It's utterly impossible to
    build a trustworthy banking system on the back of phenomenally
    wealthy City bankers.

  • Comment number 32.

    I am quite sure that the reason Nationwide sponsors football is that some directors are keen on football and they benefit from free tickets, etc. It has absolutely nothing to do with the best interests of the company. After all, Nationwide has been sponsoring football for as long as I can remember and a sensible marketing strategy would be to target each major sport for a few years and then move on to another sport in order to bring your message to as large an audience as possible.

  • Comment number 33.

    10:21 Jacque wrote:

    "Look, if we want business to prosper, we must pay the workers who work businesses, not the silly, ineffectual chit-chatters, button pushers and pen-pushers at the (so-called) “top”."


    So are you a "silly, ineffectual chit-chatter" at the "top" with time to spare, or are you just skiving off when you should be doing YOUR job?

    If it's the second, don't start crying when you get made redundant. We're in a recession, don't you know?



  • Comment number 34.

    #21

    The reason Robert does not want to comment on over paid Public sector worker is because he works for the BBC (public money!!!) Instead he spouts on about football with no real understanding of what it means to the real people.

    Another Ivory tower article from a man who has no touch with the real world.

    Cuts in public spending!! Look no further than the BBC fat cats, public school old boys club, eh Robert!!!

  • Comment number 35.

    "Were the FA and the team hit where it hurts, in their wallets, there would be a pretty powerful incentive for players and FA to learn the lessons of the debacle in South Africa."
    --------
    Except the FA don't pay the players, their clubs do - most of the match fees for England players are given away, as they are very small compared to what the Premier League clubs pay them.
    And therein lies the problem, the players' loyalties are to their clubs, their paymasters, and not to their country. Although the Premier League supplied more players to the World Cup than any other, only 8 players out of the 107 involved in the quarter finals played regularly in the Premier League last season.
    So the failure of the England team may actually be a failure of the Premier League to supply World Cup winning footballers - either because they are too tired, as Mr Capello and others have said, or because, well they just can't be bothered if they are not being handsomely rewarded!

  • Comment number 36.

    There has to be serious concerns in the UK real World as to whether the current representation of the people at all levels and in all spheres of society can continue as is.
    Football is the distraction of the masses, and in the England team a group of highly remunerated and regarded people failed to do either of the 3 things their audience (and paymasters) expect. These are entertain, inspire, and represent national passion/pride. They failed in all tasks.
    Then there is business. For it to survive it has now stripped so much money from the people that the very services government provides in order to seal the deal of social cohesion have to be pared back to the absolute basics.
    The civil unrest of the early 80's most demonstrated by the miners strike stands every chance of being just a tea party compared with what could come.
    Across all of society the people who work, live, and die to make a select few very comfortable if not fantastically wealthy are worried about how they again have been exploited, ignored, over-looked, and generally just insulted.
    Lastly there is government.
    If any one company (excluding a bank for obvious recent historical reasons) or individual had run their own finances in a similar way to how our Government has, they would have been bankrupted years ago.

    What a truly sorry state Britain has put itself into. And the most amazing fact that the Conservative party could not muster a majority in parliament after Labour left the mess they did.

  • Comment number 37.

    The problem is that the FA seems to think that money can just be plucked from thin air.

    It just proves that for some reason/s they are not running English Football properly.

    They forget that Britain is in a recession and people will be losing their jobs over the next 12 months so there will be less money coming in.

    They paid way over the odds for a national stadium that needs to have its pitch changed more or less after every single game and goodness knows how much the construction of Wembley cost. Arsenal's Emirates Stadium cost a lot of money but they are running it a lot better and their debts are decreasing at a very good rate.

    The problem is that one day the FA will find out that the English Fans and therefore the potential sponsors and maybe even Sky (and whatever other broadcasters) will tell the FA, we are not going to pay that much for English football.

    Tough times are going to come to English football (and in particular the English Premiership and the National team) just as they found out in Scotland when Setanta went bust although the lower leagues will also find just as tough.

  • Comment number 38.

    Football is just a tiny part of Britain's branding problem... think Brand Britain re tourism, a neglected industry in need of total reform.

    Britain's fragmented tourism industry accounts for 8% of the UK's gross domestic product (GDP) "which you may be surprised to learn" according to the UK Treasury is exactly the same 8% as the financial sector contributes without the risk.

    In 2008 I spent 6 weeks in New Zealand funded by a Winston Churchill Travel Award which opened tourism doors so that I could fully compare Brand New Zealand re Brand Britain.
    In N.Z everyone - accommodation providers, restaurants, attractions, activity providers, shops, National Transport Carriers and National Sports Teams, all sing in tune from the same branded hymn sheet.

    Britain is marketed in bits, and has a wasteful, fragmented, marketing policy which puts UK destinations in direct competition with each other.
    Tourism has suffered a 13 year period of benign neglect, during a period when the internet has revolutionised the marketing of global destinations.

    The conclusion I came to in my report was Brand New Zealand is strong and fit for the future, Brand Britain does not exist.
    This must change, because we live in a consumer led age where ... Brand Strength is everything.

  • Comment number 39.

    #33

    Great point well made.

  • Comment number 40.

    Megan,

    My Dad used to help make Rolls Royce aero engines. Before migrating to Australia in 2005, I took my daughters to the science museum to see the displays of open jet engines. I pointed out to them the bits Grandad helps to make (he was [retired now] a quality engineer). It was for me incredibly fascinating to actually see where his intellect and labours were directed, and to know the responsibility his quality work had directly on peoples lives. He made it so that the planes people were travelling in the World over not only took off, but stayed up and landed safely.
    I was truly gutted when my girls (9 and 13 at the time) yawned and followed up with the question, how long are we going to be here Dad?
    Ah well. Kids eh!

  • Comment number 41.

    The England team actually did ok.

    It's important to keep things in perspective and let's be honest, England is not an athletic nation these days.

  • Comment number 42.

    Hmmmm, thoughtfull article, not sure what the author thinks "etiolates" is meant to mean in this context.

  • Comment number 43.

    Robert, you have missed one group that have had an even more disastrous descent. Jacques Cartier has posted several times and unsurprisingly is equally quiet on the subject.

    I do refer to our close neighbours France and their football team who have managed to make our under achieving bunch look positively world class.

    Robert, surely you can't have missed their debacle and M. Sarkozy's immediate action. Just in case you have I would suggest you read the following.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/world_cup_2010/8764077.stm

    No signs of a Government enquiry over here yet.

  • Comment number 44.

    @ 33. At 11:28am on 05 Jul 2010, Out for Lunch wrote:

    > So are you a "silly, ineffectual chit-chatter" at the "top" with time
    > to spare, or are you just skiving off when you should be doing YOUR job?

    Neither - I'm waiting for a job to finish!

    (PS: I automate jobs, to put others out of work!)

  • Comment number 45.

    But the question is - what brand should take on the England football team?

    Amusing answers below...

  • Comment number 46.

    ..........and half of them could not even be bothered to sing the National Anthem........

  • Comment number 47.

    I guess RBS would make quite a good fit as new sponsors, the team would look quite good in comparison to that expensive failure.

  • Comment number 48.

    "41. At 11:45am on 05 Jul 2010, inacasino wrote:
    The England team actually did ok.

    It's important to keep things in perspective and let's be honest, England is not an athletic nation these days."

    England may not be #an athletic nation' but Britain still is. We had our best ever haul of medals in Beijing. We've had a Brit in the mens semi's of Wimbledon, a brit actually win in the doubles and the Rubgy teams do O.K too. Not bad for a small wet cold crowded island that pays peanuts towards grass roots sport.

  • Comment number 49.

    My understanding is that the FA attempted to enter a bargaining war with this sponsorship and turned the original offer from Nationwide down! They probably banked on a decent World Cup (but then, we always flatter to deceive at those. Mostly,) and forgot that, unlike football, the rest of the world is not awash with money and is in the midst of a period of austerity.

    As Richard Caborn has stated, the FA are not fit for purppose.

    This has nothing to do with the players. This time!

  • Comment number 50.

    Robert,

    If brand UK is simply a case of marketeers talking up the hype, and branding "executives" colourising it, then we surely are in a lot of doo-dah!

    Alas, I note the true point is missed here on many! If we are unable to produce anything of value, then what next? Re-advertising the same seems to be the current de rigeur, but there is only so much below rate products the good consumers of this nation (and the world) will buy.

    Which brings me to the main point: can this analogy not be expanded to business and government: Example: Sheffield Forgemasters. Top quality niche British product looking like going down the pan, not as a result of bad management, but greedy corporate enterprise.

    Why are the similarities between the footie team and Sheffield Forgemasters disturbing?

    If best for Britain no longer equals best for business, then indeed how should we align value back into Britain??!

    --

  • Comment number 51.

    For me the problem with being associated with the England "team" is that there is no England "team". Results are one thing, attitude is another and quite frankly the attitude some of the players (John Terry being the worse example) demonstrated clearly shows that they think more about their own ego than the team as a collective being. Capello failed to get to a grip and the FA in usual fashion failed to show leadership and dithered. Who would seriously want to have their name associated with all this - maybe British Leyland.

  • Comment number 52.

    I blame Andy Murray and the ABE campaign he started. LOL

    Even he couldn’t reverse 75 years of mens failure at Wimbledon, carrying such a chip on his shoulder.


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/10357018.stm

  • Comment number 53.

    The German approach reflects the different "continental" socio-economic model, whereas the UK's is the transatlantic free market one, in which the community (ie in the case of football, the Enlgish national team) plays second fiddle to the interests of the most powerful egos (in this case, the Premier league). But the parallels - e.g. with the money poure dinto the banks paid for, not just by public sector workers, but by all of us - are immediate & don't need labouring.
    But for all those who comment about the "overpaid primadonnas", let's not forget that we are happy to support them by attending football matches & buying team gear (overpriced, naturally) & therefore supporting the present system. Our problem is essentially that those who control football prefer to buy a reliable product (often foregin) rather than develop our own talent. Thus English players are less skilful than their foreign counterparts & we value speed & physicality rather than technique. Now doesn't that have parallels with much of UK industry over the last few decades - & the UK economy as a whole. (compare the German system of apprenticeships & and economy based on high tech high spec products which sell world-wide & generally give the Germans a large trade surplus).
    The English team just reflects UK society, the choices we have made & continue to make. Unfortunately, I don't see anyone with any serious ideas how to get out of this rut, one which the Con-Lib coalition is deepening.

  • Comment number 54.

    Bad at saving and second rate quality all round - I'd say there are actually quite strong synergies between the England football team and those organisations?!

  • Comment number 55.

    Steady on Pesto!

    You gave the kiss of death to Northern Rock, sparking off Credit Crunch I.

    You hallmarked Credit Crunch II for us a couple of days ago.

    Now you're going to destroy English football.

    Is nothing sacred? Give the poor lambs a break.

  • Comment number 56.

    If you don't like how much footballers get paid, then I assume you'll never pay to attend a game or watch on TV again? It's like arguing against how much movie stars get paid. If you don't want to contribute you don't have to go to the cinema/ rent a DVD. The fact is, these players are the pinicle performers of an industry that generates a lot of income. Based on the worldwide football turnover, these players are paid fairly for their contribution, regulated by free market pressures. If Rooney was not considered to be good value for his wages, the contract would not have been offered. Learn to live with your jealousy.

  • Comment number 57.

    @ 51. At 12:10pm on 05 Jul 2010, Guzzie wrote:

    > For me the problem with being associated with the England "team" is
    > that there is no England "team".

    Or perhaps there is no England? Is there any similarity between, say, Mayfair
    and Middlesborough? Or Wythenshawe and Winchester? They've been selling
    England by the pound for years now. Maybe it's all gone?

  • Comment number 58.

    The crucial aspect of branding with sport is high visibility coupled with a successful team and for service companies the opportunity of attracting customers from the cohort that supports the sport. The sponsor has minimal impact on the players.

    Taking all this into account why would anyone want to sponsor Team England (soccer)? Nationwide has made the right decision.

  • Comment number 59.

    As a Nationwide customer I've always been very proud that they sponsor England, but I have to say that having had the £20M turned down by the FA and then seent he abject performance in South Africa I can't blame them for withdrawing.

    The FA really are utterly incompetent and really should be replaced with a more professional body.

  • Comment number 60.

    You somehow just knew that some people would look at the Germany/Argentina result and say that this means we’re better than Argentina, because we lost by fewer goals!! The same people who will probably say that we’re better than France and Italy because we qualified from the group stages and they didn’t. Unbelievable. You're not Blair's ex spin team by any chance are you?

    On to the main point! For now, something has broken. Advertisers surely can’t cash in on the images of Rooney et al when they have been exposed as gutless primadonnas. I haven’t seen the (Danish!!) beer company advert since the Germany match, and as much as it probably cost to make, it would be embarrassing to show it now. If I were M&S or Nationwide, I’d be dropping this team like a hot potato too. Advertisers, magazines, sponsors… all will have to look elsewhere for their heroes. We have built up a whole genre of advertising that basks in the reflected glow of footballers. Who will buy something endorsed by Rooney, Terry or Lampard now? With every failed pass, every drop of their heads, their off-pitch financial value dropped! Maybe Capello should have told them this at half-time! Don’t talk football tactics, talk revenue streams! That might have got more of a reaction. It will be interesting to see how the failure of these players on the pitch will be played out in the boardrooms and on the balance sheets.

  • Comment number 61.

    Hey folks, 6 was meant to be ironic not an instruction.

  • Comment number 62.

    17# the problem was they didn't try their best - in fact at some points it looked like they couldn't give a rats a**. If it was simply a case of being outplayed I and many supporters would not feel so angry towards them.

    23# maybe they shouldn't give all their money away to charities - they might play well if they got something for it (clearly pride is not worth running around for).

    46# I wouldn't sing the national anthem either - I don't care for God or the queen.

    Too many players tried to be the 'hero' instead of working as a team - like Germany did. Individually most of the English team were far more skilled than their opponents but one man does not make a band.

    47# BP. Same reason.

  • Comment number 63.

    #10 Jacques

    Oh yes, as we both know, our Claire is famous for her opinions. She has lots of them but I've never discerned a common thread. Far more entertaining than the footy boys though.

    When it comes to Foxes I prefer Megan.

  • Comment number 64.

    The fact that these dreamers and creamers get paid so much money to kick a ball around on some grass, with the goal being to put a ball in a net, very much sums up the actual value of money. And the intelligence level of most people, for that matter, for just going along with it. It would make a lot more sense if:

    a)Players were paid in balance to football’s actual value as an activity. I think anything over £30,000 per year per player is way, way too much for what they do. I played football for nine years and was signed to a team – I would have never dreamed of being paid this much.

    b)Players should be paid related to their performance. Don’t score? Half wages. Don’t save? Half wages. Get sent off? No pay. Act offensively to the fans? No pay. Etc. I think, that then, players might try a little harder, and lose that smug, holier than thou attitude they all have.

    c)This situation sums up humanity quite nicely really. That footballers can ‘earn’ so much money, when there is huge levels of unemployment, a ruined economy, child poverty, a crumbling infrastructure and huge cuts on the way – something has gone wrong with our society.

    Yeah...makes perfect sense really.

  • Comment number 65.

    I blame the journalists for breking everything! Afterall they talk people up to levels way above their station then destroy them as soon as they get a chance.

    It's the English Press and the BBC that are damaging England, not the football team!!!

  • Comment number 66.

    The priorities of football clubs and governing bodies are completely misplaced. This was summed up perfectly a few months ago when Portsmouth went into administratio. They were making people redundant who get paid in a year a fraction of what the footballers get paid in a week but are the ones who need that money the most. Quite sickening really. Star players do not make a team as England proved.

  • Comment number 67.

    Like bankers the owners of clubs and players have extracted huge sums of money from 'fans' and media such as the BBC and Sky. It's time to get out of the mindset started back in the late '70s and early '80s that failed to recognize education or hard work as a way to succeed, but recognised greed and shafting everyone else as legitimate. Many footballers seem to belong to that grop in society tht would rather cut school and spend their days kicking a bag of wind around instead. If the 'heroes' get to be seen as avaricious morons that would be no mean feat. Their similarity to our best friends is an outstanding feature of this season. Really it's time English football took a look at its unnacceptable face. Clubs have huge debts serviced by high ticket prices and luicrous fees from Sky, ITV and the Beeb. Player wages are astronomical and rarely meet the normal ratio of cost to prouctivity. If a few more suppots were pulled football might have to realize that it's only a game.

  • Comment number 68.

    Instead of the usual comparisons with sport in Europe, how about a comparison with the US? Sports there are showered with many, many millions of $$$s, promising sportsmen and women are given heavily subsidised, if not free, entry to universities, and many educational institutions lavish huge funds upon stadiums.

    I'm not saying this is the right way of doing things, quite the opposite. This is perhaps the worst way to treat sport, with the UK football scene not far behind and maybe the German model the best example.

  • Comment number 69.

    There's actually a number of brands involved here: the England football team, the English FA and of course the individual player brands. The England football brand has certainly been tarnished over the past month, but fans are very emotionally attachment to the game. A few changes to the team, a few good wins and the brand will bounce back strongly. Perhaps also worth mentioning that the 'England fan' brand has grown in stock following great support and good behaviour in South Africa.

  • Comment number 70.

    Well football is the clearest indication that 'money ruins everything eventually'.
    Capello and Sven both suggested a winter break - but guess why that will never happen? - it's clear that the financial requirements of clubs will always be put before the good of the game. The premiership wouldn't allow it for they would fear the loss of income from the break.
    So profits before progress - sound familiar does it? - well it's in all walks of life now - oil, finance, supermarkets - all put their need (profit making) before all moral and ethical codes (although they all spend a lot on advertising trying to convince us how ethical and moral they are - which of course would be unecessary if it were true)

    The Nationwide 'get out' is merely convenience - their decsision less swayed by the failure of the team (well I mean they've hardly got a good past record) - and much more swayed by their desire to cut costs and cut down on advertising spend.

    How about you spend less time on the advertising of this particular building society and talk about the £10 they are now charging for all counter cheques less than £100 from June this year. Nationwide are by no means the worst - but this is how it's going to be - squeeze the consumer to repair the balance sheets.

    In addition, the change Lloyds have announced to charge customers for simply making use of their overdrafts is yet more evidence of this 'financial crime' which is ongoing and currently uninvestigated. The authorities are more interested in stopping and searching members of the public than they are in stopping the biggest fraud in history.

    I noticed John Humphries on Radio 4 'accidently' nearly spilt the beans when he asked a member of the shadow mpc "so where are all the banks profits coming from?" - when confronted with the low BoE rate and yet an average 7% for SME's to borrow at connundrum.

    ....fortunately the interviewee was quick enough to blow over that so we never actually got an answer - for the answer would be it's coming from you consumer - thanks a lot mugs!

    Don't think spending cuts and tax rises will be the only method the wealthy recoup their losses from the poor. The fact that you need a bank account to get most benefits these days and to get the best deals on your energy supply etc. - they now have you right where they want you You will have to have a bank account and they will force you to pay for it - we didn't tax the banks quick enough and now they've turned the tables on us. I can categorically assure each and every one of you that after the inital outlay of the system, the cost of running an electronic based account (with or without an overdraft) is 0. That is an undeniable fact that the banks contiue to claim isn't the case. Claims that they incur costs for running accounts is total fabrication - and yet they continue to get away with it.

    When you're backed into a corner, the only solution is to come out fighting. Don't be fooled, the banks are the enemy, it's them or us I'm afraid - there simply isn't enough wealth for the both of you to exist.

  • Comment number 71.

    In Ireland this weekend, we had the Connacht Senior Football Semi-Final and the Leinster Hurling Final. The players involved in these sports have a fitness level that would leave any Premiership player wheezing in minutes, and a commitment to Club and County that the Permiership Player would consider an utterly alien concept. Not to mention that any player that rolls around as if in mortal agony after even the slightest of contacts would be laughed off the pitch and rightly so.
    Both Hurling and Gaelic Football are amateur sports. The players maintain this commitment and fitness without getting paid at all, fitting in their sport around a day job.
    Compare that to the prima donna antics of those in action in South Africa and it's easy to see why I have nothing but utter contempt for Professional Soccer and all those involved with it.

  • Comment number 72.

    Much of the sour taste left in the mouth after the English team's abject performance has to do less with the flavour of the result and more with the dashed expectations on the menu, where the description of the dish greatly exceeded the aroma or the reality.

    But let's face it, what can you say about an event or a sport where in the same tournament:

    a) One team (France), undeservedly there in the first place due to the arrogance and cynical partisanship of the game's great sultans in ignoring an obvious and cynical handball, revolts, loses and goes home in disgrace
    b) These same stubborn poohbahs ignore the universal clamor for technology until mind-blowingly awful decisions against England and Mexico force them to reconsider
    c) They change the Ball, which is the only equipment they CAN change, without consulting anybody;
    d) One team cynically parries (volleyball style) a clear goal on the last act of the match, which doesn't result in that goal being awarded, but instead puts the pressure ON the victim to convert a penalty which he duly misses as his team crashes out.

    And so on and so on.

    The game is rotten to the core,and the rules so grotesquely unfair or administration so inept as to make England's footballers look talented by comparison. And I am not talking about the FA. The rot goes much higher than that.

    As for being overpaid, well that can be answered with two words: Hedge Fund.

  • Comment number 73.

    Jacques Cartier {3, 18, 10, 19, 57 (...)}:

    This is a good article from Robert.

    Why are you so jealous of bankers?

    Bankers and footballers have a market price; just as your blogs have a market price (perhaps zero !..)

    Cheers

    Barry

  • Comment number 74.

    29. At 11:24am on 05 Jul 2010, SeanBroseley wrote:

    Where are the GDP figures?
    ==========================================================================

    I second that. And why the deafening silence from the BBC on the subject? I think we need to know what's going on.

  • Comment number 75.

    " 3. At 10:05am on 05 Jul 2010, Jacques Cartier wrote:
    Well, they are rather like bankers - absolutely useless to us. But at least they are entertaining, and you can tell they are really trying, even if they are rubbish.

    But bankers are just rubbish."


    would it be fair to say you are a one-trick pony?

  • Comment number 76.

    At 09:57am on 05 Jul 2010, watriler wrote:
    A bunch of highly paid prima donna's who cant play as a team - resonance with the boards of many of our free enterprise corporations!

    ------

    Maybe, but I bet that most company board members know how to use an apostrophe ...

  • Comment number 77.

    Jacques Cartier

    Jacques - someone in a bank really bothered you once in the past I think. The bank are not to blame for everything and I think you should maybe just move on!!

  • Comment number 78.

    #73 Barry,

    I'm sure JC will speak for himself. For me:

    I loathe bankers and think the only thing they are good at is piling up cash for themselves. We can all see they are hopeless at the profession they claim to practice. 2008 was not a one-off, it was the culmination of years of disgusting practices.

    But I'm not 'jealous' of them. That would imply I want some of what they've got. No, I don't want a single bling from them. I do want them to put right some of the mess they've caused. The best way they can do that it is to support a Tobin tax.

    The 'market price' of something is not a natural law. It's simply the price that can be screwed out of someone by any means. I think you'll find the whole concept undergoes something of a 'makeover'.

  • Comment number 79.

    The parallel story - "Executive pay rises 5% despite share price falls" http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/10507836.stm - seems to me to be a kind of commentary on this.

    I mean, I keep hearing the phrase 'shareholder anger' but none of the shareholders seem to actually be doing anything about it, do they?

    And why not? Seemingly, because they are not sufficiently miffed off about these 'outrages' to sell their shares and walk away from it. Why? Because they still consider those shares to be 'nice little earners' thank you very much.

    Which is what is all comes down to just about all of the time. In the main people will take the moral high ground only when it is not to their perceived financial detriment.

    That being the case, just where might misaligne, inappropriate or just plain inept sponsorship deals end? The mind boggles.

    The Nationwide may well think they can do better than the UK National football teams now, but they've had plenty of mileage out of these deals that are coming to an end this month.

  • Comment number 80.

    #76

    I d'ont.

  • Comment number 81.

    I’m an England fan, I rate the team members, and I look forward to the European Cup qualifiers.

    Link below shows some of the positives achieved.
    http://www.teamenglandfootballerscharity.com/index.php?page_id=5

    What I don’t rate is the constant negative media coverage, in this and other articles about the England team.

  • Comment number 82.

    73. At 1:09pm on 05 Jul 2010, Barry wrote:

    "Bankers and footballers have a market price; just as your blogs have a market price (perhaps zero !..)"

    ...which just goes to show how bankers still don't understand the failures of the market - especially pricing.

    Produced anything lately Barry? - no I don't mean a bank statement, I mean actually produced something of value

    ...or maybe you don't understand value either - wouldn't be surprised - I mean your Ego must be getting in the way of all the remains of rationality you have in your brain.

  • Comment number 83.

    79. At 1:36pm on 05 Jul 2010, Sutara wrote:
    The parallel story - "Executive pay rises 5% despite share price falls" http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/10507836.stm - seems to me to be a kind of commentary on this.

    I mean, I keep hearing the phrase 'shareholder anger' but none of the shareholders seem to actually be doing anything about it, do they?

    And why not? Seemingly, because they are not sufficiently miffed off about these 'outrages' to sell their shares and walk away from it. Why? Because they still consider those shares to be 'nice little earners' thank you very much.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    The shares are held by our pension funds. Our pensions are small enough already. If we sell them and put the proceeds on deposit we'll get 1/2% interest and our pensions will shrink some more. Oh woe! Thrice woe!

    Rita will write on this and cheer us all up. I hope.

  • Comment number 84.

    75. At 1:20pm on 05 Jul 2010, HaslemereBoy wrote:

    "would it be fair to say you are a one-trick pony?"

    Would it be fair to say that bankers are in banking because they couldn't get a job anywhere else?

    What tricks ydo you have HaslemereBoy? - got a sore neck from all that adulation of 'those better than yourself' do you? - I call that self loathing.

    Never mind, better luck next system.

  • Comment number 85.

    TAMPAX have offered to sponser them on account of this being THE WORST PERIOD in English football!

  • Comment number 86.

    77. At 1:33pm on 05 Jul 2010, windchrisleeds wrote:

    "Jacques - someone in a bank really bothered you once in the past I think. The bank are not to blame for everything and I think you should maybe just move on!!"

    I see the banking apologists are out in force today - sure the banks aren't to blame for everything, but if you actually bothered to see what was to blame for everything then it would blow your tiny little mind into tiny little pieces.

    Maybe you should check on the latest charges down at your local bank and get back to us about "banks not being to blame"...

  • Comment number 87.

    England failed because of their style of play. BUT lost this game because they showed they were NOT quick to learn from their mistakes!

    Muller's 67th Minute goal, (the 3rd German goal) showed this up glaringly. No one thought to look for him and left him totally unmarked. The entire English defence was looking the wrong way. I had to smile, (no I'm not German, it just made the English defence look Monty Pythonesque.)

    By the 4th goal the Germans had learned how bad England were and could confidently go forward in numbers, (in part helped by a 3 goal cushion.)That's why there were about five Germans all queuing up for the 4th. They'd gone off script themselves, and couldn't contain their excitement anymore, all burtsing forwards! (Fancy that, Germans showing a bit of raucous emotion! Anyway I'm sure they were ticked off for it.)

    By that point I'd started laughing. As usual the Germans had sent a football team, England had sent a circus!





  • Comment number 88.

    5. At 10:15am on 05 Jul 2010, LostatHome wrote:
    Claire Fox was on R4's Moral Maze defending UK footballers £5m + p.a. salaries. She seemed to consider it a natural state of affairs. Not to me. Yet more excess payment for failure. A stroppy, untalented group representing England.

    Compare that with Rafa Nadal's charming, humble win at Wimbledon and his truly devoted English fans. A superb ambassador for his sport and for his country. I'd think he's done a power of good for the Spanish brand. I don't know what he earns but because of how he is, it's not the first question to enter my head. What a guy and what a gentleman.

    -----------------------------------------------------------
    Couldn't agree more - an excellent post. Significantly, top tennis appears to be rehabilitating itself after some low moments in the past thirty or forty years. Hope for other sports? Other activities? Other nations?

  • Comment number 89.

    England's top tier Football scum, are the same as our top tier banking scum and our top tier Executive scum. The clue is in the pay packet.


    The more they demand to be paid, the less they are actually worth.



  • Comment number 90.

    I think that we need to seriously question the ammount of money these people are paid & their personal behaviour. They should have walked over the other teams if they are as good as we beleived them to be. But they are not.Football is in a crash crisis. They are the weakest links. GOODBYE

  • Comment number 91.

    There are players in that are a disgrace to english football and football as a whole. If im going to sit and watch championship football I would rather see it with some passion and drive and some pride ship lampard,gerrard,terry etc. out and get some players that actually want to be there in. To not aknowledge the mistakes and to thank the fans who worked the socks off to pay to get there is terrible.

  • Comment number 92.

    It does lighten the load a bit to consider the symmetry of sport and business.

    Football is a simple game, like many sports it is all about folk playing for each other. Hedgies for example don't play for England, just themselves, so they will lose one day. Idon't know what damage they will do in the meantime.

    These players decided that playing with each others wives and promoting themselves was their best game. So they will go in the name of efficiency savings. New blood will come in. No individual is bigger than the team. England will rise again like the kraken to make us all despair and hope. I suffer more emotionally with the Rugby and Cricket that football. The English football team is something i have never really found a great passion for. I support, but have no love for the English football side. Norwich now that is a different thing altogether.

    There is a national characteristic, this ingerlish disease is playing team games is like 'herding cats'. Until something big enough and ugly enough comes into the players area then nowt will change.

    This new season will see reduced crowds,and some of the players will receive and understand the views of their customers. The English brand is not lost, but 23 young men have lost a substantial interbrand value. Anyone want these players in their team now?

  • Comment number 93.

    They need to find a sponsor whom the public could readily associate with them. Have they tried contacting Armitage Shanks, the well known loo manufacturers?

  • Comment number 94.

    This blog and many of the comments are typical of the uninformed football fans we have in this country.


    How the German system works;

    Who owns the clubs ?


    No German club can be owned or controlled by a company or an individual person, so there is no chance of a Chelsea or Manchester City situation. But because German teams cannot pay expensive wages and transfer fees they focus more on young talent. For instance, Mesut Ozil was at the youth academy of Schalke, then Werder Bremen bought him for £3.8million - now he's worth around £18m.

    Do kids get into the first team ?

    Bundesliga sides use their second teams to bring on their youngsters. A year ago, Bayern striker Thomas Muller - who hit two goals against England - played for Bayern II in the German third division. The same is true for defender Holger Badstuber.

    How many youngsters make it ?

    Of Sunday's victorious team four players - Manuel Neuer, Jerome Boateng, Sami Khedira and Mesut Ozil - were in the Germany Under-21 side that beat England 4-0 last summer to clinch the European Championship. Only James Milner upped his status for England.

    How much do clubs pay in wages ?

    Top flight clubs in Germany paid 51% of revenue in players' wages compared to 67% in our own Premier League.

    Do clubs fold ?

    No teams in the German Bundesliga are in danger of entering administration - unlike debt-ridden Portsmouth were last season. And, in another indication of financial strength, more than half of the 18 clubs make a profit.

    Must clubs develop youth ?

    To obtain a licence to play in the Bundesliga you must run an academy and, as a result, the top two divisions spend £60million a year on these programmes.

    That has helped raise the number of German-qualified players under the age of 23 playing in the Bundesliga from six per cent to 15 per cent.

    How well do German teams do in the championships ?

    Germany's success in bringing through talented youngsters has been highlighted by the displays of their national youth teams. In the last couple of years Germany have won European titles at Under-17, Under-19 and Under-21 level and Joachim Low's squad which humiliated England in Bloemfontein was their youngest to go to a World Cup in 76 years, containing six of the Under-21 championship-winning side.

    Do fans pay high prices ?

    German gates are on average nearly 8,000 higher at 41,000 but ticket prices are much lower, with giants Borussia Dortmund - who won the European Cup in 1997 - charging as little as £13 compared to the average cost of £39 to watch a Premier League game. Figures for the 2008/09 season showed the Bundesliga had overtaken the Premier League as the most profitable in football.

    How many Germans in Bundesliga ?

    The proportion of Englishmen playing in the Premier League stands at 44%. In contrast, the Bundesliga's German representation is a more healthy 51% per cent.



    The English Premier League has become an entirely financial establishment that exists purely to make money, everything else is an irrelevance and that includes developing young players.
    Even when a top club gets a good player they have to be as good as Wayne Rooney to get a decent run in the first team and even then this will only happen if they play for one of the non-top four teams as no manager of a top four team is ever going to risk putting out a young inexperienced player for the 15 or 20 games they need to get used to playing in the first team.

    The England football team never stood a chance at the World Cup and it was irresponsible of the media to ever suggest they did, the Golden Generation have been let down by their coaches, managers and pretty much everyone else who has ever been involved in their national team careers, blaming them for their performance is frankly a joke and fails to take into account what it actually takes to make a good team in the modern game.

  • Comment number 95.

    Where does the money paid to professional footballers come from? I do not suppose it is based on seat sales, at all? These salaries are based on accumulated revenues of the clubs involved. Each player for the most, only has a career of 15 years ....... tops. It also shows how much profit is being garnered by each successful club.

    The results at this world cup for the English side are an accumulation of a system used by the FA. It has been pointed out that countries like S.America regularly lose their players to european football. That they have developed the younger players in domestic leagues, to replace this lost talent. Perhaps England should develop a national team, using players outside of the League system? ........ Not likely, therefore the status quo will remain.

    BTW. I thought that as a whole, this years team played well. I was not too disappointed with the outcome, it was consistent with previous attempts. It seemed as though they were missing an essential ingredient ........ luck!

    My thanks, to all the players and team members for their efforts. ..... Cheers!

  • Comment number 96.

    It's a game, not Goldman Sachs gambling up the price of basic foodstuffs leading to desperate hunger around the world.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/johann-hari/johann-hari-how-goldman-gambled-on-starvation-2016088.html

    And as for who or what puts their name on the shirts! I mean, who just takes out a savings account on the basis of a football jersey? No, you look at the interest rate, surely? Where is the data? I mean would anyone change their loo roll of choice if a well known loo roll company gave the team a cute puppy as a mascot and piccie on the shirts? Really?

    I just don't like to seen national teams with sponsorship deals - it just hints at nations being owned by business, rather than nations and people owning business.

    How long before we have sponsorship deals for nurses, teachers, police, soldiers, even the queen, etc?

  • Comment number 97.

    The England players don't get paid to represent England - unless you count consequent sponsorship money – so all the indignation over this is baffling really. We went out to a very good counter-attacking side that took advantage of our makeshift defence. Had Green not made that blunder in the first match we'd quite likely be in the semis right now.
    In two years time, qualification allowing, all will be forgiven as we head into the European Championships on another wave of foolhardy optimism and the sponsors will be back in force.

  • Comment number 98.

    "89. At 2:10pm on 05 Jul 2010, warwick wrote:
    England's top tier Football scum, are the same as our top tier banking scum and our top tier Executive scum. The clue is in the pay packet.


    The more they demand to be paid, the less they are actually worth."

    Ignoring the fact that the BBC never lets me call anyone "scum" (even the English Defence league who caused a million pounds in damage to my home town "protecting" me from extremists) your point makes no sense at all. I can barely kick a ball in a straight line. I'm worth about 1p a year as a footballer but you suggest that makes me a better player than Ronaldo because I don't expect any pay.

    You clearly didn't read my post #23. If you did you'd realise the England squad give their fees to cancer research.

  • Comment number 99.

    #96 "And as for who or what puts their name on the shirts! I mean, who just takes out a savings account on the basis of a football jersey? No, you look at the interest rate, surely? "

    Not really. In most cases the products on offer by the high street banks are pretty much the same as each other. Most people do not carefully consult the data from 30 or 40 providers and weigh up the differences between a 0.1% interest rate difference. Most people go to the first 'big name' that pops into their head. In fact most Brits a far more likely to trust a meerkat with a Russian accent over Robert Peston when it comes to getting financial advice.

  • Comment number 100.

    At least bankers don't spit, at least in public.

 

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