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It's just not cricket

Mark Mardell | 22:07 UK time, Thursday, 3 June 2010

Armando GalarragaA bad call by an umpire has become a lesson in good sportsmanship that Washington could do well to emulate, according to White House spokesman Robert Gibbs.

As far as I understand it, which is not very much, the Detroit Tigers' pitcher Armando Galarraga should have had a perfect game, not only getting all his Cleveland Indians opponents out but without any one of them even reaching a base.

But the umpire made a bad ruling which deprived him of this triumph. It's a big deal: there have only been 20 perfect games in more than 100 years of Major League Baseball.

This article is a superb take on the emotion after the game, even if the details of the play are written in a language that completely eludes me. But the point is, the umpire was kicking himself for the mistake, apologised and the apology was accepted with good grace.

About to walk out of the room after his regular briefing, Robert Gibbs was asked a question about the match and came back to the podium.

Baseball fansJoking that he was speaking with the full weight of the federal government, he said he hoped that the pitcher would be awarded a perfect game by the baseball authorities. When the assembled hacks, obviously kept up-to-date on their blackberries and iPhones, chorused that that wasn't going to happen, he joked again - that he'd seek an executive order.

His next remarks were unexpectedly serious. He reflected he had a six-year-old who had just started playing baseball and that this was an example both to seasoned fans and to children like his son.

"To watch an umpire take responsibility, to watch a pitcher do what he did, that type of sportsmanship exhibited was tremendously heartening."

He continued: "Somebody made a mistake, somebody accepted that apology. It's a good lesson for baseball, perhaps a good lesson in Washington."

"It's just not cricket" is a common, if old-fashioned, English expression for something being unfair, but perhaps Galarraga's graciousness should become a new byword for accepting the unfairness of life.

Play up, and play the game, chaps, and football (soccer) players take note.

Comments

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  • 1. At 10:58pm on 03 Jun 2010, GH1618 wrote:

    It's a travesty, and unfortunately it will encourage advocates of instant-replay in baseball, which has already been introduced in a very limited context.

    The commissioner can't overrule the umpires. This would set a precedent which would be a huge problem. In my view, the umpires should have conferenced and corrected the call at the time. Sometimes calls are reversed in this way, but it is not generally done for plays at a base, which for the most part are the sole discretion of the base umpire.

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  • 2. At 11:13pm on 03 Jun 2010, GH1618 wrote:

    What I find interesting is the increased rate of perfect games. When Don Larsen threw his famous World Series perfect game in 1956, it was the first in about 30 years. In the last 30 years there have been about 10. This year there have been three, counting this should-have-been.

    I like the idea of the executive order. Better yet, Obama should grant a presidential pardon to umpire Joyce, and invite all three pitchers (Braden, Halladay, Gallaraga), and any others who achieve the same feat this season, to the White House for lunch.

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  • 3. At 00:11am on 04 Jun 2010, Andy Post wrote:

    The annals of baseball should include an asterisk next to the number of complete games in perpetuity.

    As for Mr. Gonzales, as far as I'm concerned he can claim to have pitched a perfect game.

    [Actually for that matter, Rich Gannon can claim to have the record for the longest string of completions a game.]

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  • 4. At 00:14am on 04 Jun 2010, Andy Post wrote:

    ... oh, and Miss Budweiser was the first car to break the sound barrier...

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  • 5. At 00:18am on 04 Jun 2010, MagicKirin wrote:

    Kudos to the pitcher for his sportsmanship, Kudos to the umpire for admiting his mistake and not hiding or blaming others.

    That is a lesson President Obama could learn

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  • 6. At 00:20am on 04 Jun 2010, timohio wrote:

    Mark, you need to watch some baseball. Graciousness in not universal in the sport. It's not unusual at all for a manager to have an in-your-face argument with an umpire, nor for said manager to be ejected from the game by said umpire, nor for both dugouts to empty as the players engage in a roaring fight in the middle of the playing field. You should hear what gets shouted by the parents at Little League games. What makes this episode special is that both Armando Galarraga and the umpire acted like gentlemen.

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  • 7. At 00:47am on 04 Jun 2010, Dazzini wrote:

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the House Rules.

  • 8. At 02:42am on 04 Jun 2010, David wrote:

    what is wrong w the moderators ...sick day?????

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  • 9. At 03:06am on 04 Jun 2010, Interestedforeigner wrote:

    6. At 00:20am on 04 Jun 2010, timohio wrote:

    "Mark, you need to watch some baseball. Graciousness in not universal in the sport."

    ____________

    Reminds me of a particular scene from the film "Bull Durham".

    Mark, if you're not familiar with this film, you might rent it. One of the best sports films ever made, a film about baseball.

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  • 10. At 03:45am on 04 Jun 2010, GH1618 wrote:

    InterestedForeigner (#9), Mardell might not understand the baseball aspects of it (but might enjoy it anyway). I recommend that he attend a Nationals game now and then with someone who can explain the goings on.

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  • 11. At 04:03am on 04 Jun 2010, Brian Woods wrote:

    I feel badly for Mr Galarraga, but I have some appreciation of Baseball's desire to let the rulings stand.

    That said, when it's such a big mistake, there should be flexibility to set things right.

    As stated by others, though, I am truly impressed by the professionalism displayed by the pitcher and umpire. If only more people were willing to accept and forgive mistakes...

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  • 12. At 04:31am on 04 Jun 2010, cheng wrote:

    so large

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  • 13. At 04:59am on 04 Jun 2010, powermeerkat wrote:

    This comment has been referred for further consideration. Explain

  • 14. At 06:25am on 04 Jun 2010, wolfvorkian wrote:

    The Kirin said:

    Kudos to the pitcher for his sportsmanship, Kudos to the umpire for admiting his mistake and not hiding or blaming others.

    That is a lesson President Obama could learn


    You could politicize a wet dream.

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  • 15. At 07:06am on 04 Jun 2010, Scott0962 wrote:

    No, it's not cricket and all the apologies in the world can't undo the umpire's bad call. Definitely a lesson in life for that six year old.

    Mr. Galarraga's gracious sportsmanship reminds me of the line from the Tom Hanks movie, A League of Their Own: "There's no crying in baseball!"

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  • 16. At 07:15am on 04 Jun 2010, Scott0962 wrote:

    While an executive order would be of dubious legality the president could recommend to Congress that major league baseball lose it's exemption to Federal anti-trust laws so I imagine a quiet word with the commissioner of baseball would carry some influence.

    Whether the voters would appreciate a politician interfering in America's national pastime is another matter.

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  • 17. At 11:26am on 04 Jun 2010, gordon_craig wrote:

    Of course one would expect a modicum of sportsmanship in a game the British invented.
    But just in relation to powermeerkat's comment is the systematic torture of prisoners an example of fairness in the land of the free and the home of the brave? Fortunately the rule of law and the principle of fairness and compassion still have a place in the British legal system, and whilst we do not always agree with the decisions made (this being one of them for me) the principle behind the decision is sound.

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  • 18. At 12:48pm on 04 Jun 2010, BluesBerry wrote:

    Detroit Tiger RHP Armando Galarraga pitched a perfect game. His performance deserves to go down in history – along with 20 other perfect games pitched in the 134-year history of Major League Baseball.
    But here's the problem: Umpire Jim Joyce's (truly rependent) mistake were to be overturned, baseball would never be the same.
    To even think about overturning, you need to solve this puzzle:
    When you look at the box score, Cleveland Indians' leadoff batter Trevor Crowe was 0-for-4. That means that 28 batters took a turn at-bat, not 27. If Galarraga were to be awarded a perfect game, how could you explain the extra batter?
    No cheating...work at it...

    Answer: Galarraga retired 26 straight Cleveland Indian' batters. Pitcher Armando Galarraga is perfect through 26 batters and nearly 27 until the infamous call by Jim Joyce... After the mistake, Galarraga struck out the next Indian = 28th batters.
    So what needs to be done is
    1. correct the Jim Joyce error,
    2. change the score card from the single awarded to an out
    3. Voila: no need for a 28th batter because 27 outs make the game.

    As things stand: Armando Galarraga - commplete Game, 1-hit shut-out on June 2nd, 2010 in front of 17,738 fans in Detroit who should be chest-inflated and boasting: "I was there when Armando Galarraga pitched his perfect game!

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  • 19. At 1:12pm on 04 Jun 2010, csgators wrote:

    "ground ball to first baseman Miguel Cabrera, throw to pitcher Armando Galarraga, Cleveland shortstop Jason Donald out of first."

    should read "out AT first"

    Was that the confusing part Mark?

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  • 20. At 1:37pm on 04 Jun 2010, HabitualHero wrote:

    Mr/Mrs/Ms powermeerkat - You recently left a bizarre comment about Islam and communists on a thread about a mission to Mars and now you've made a bizarre comment about Libyans and terrorism on a thread about baseball.
    Are you familiar with the phrase "losing it"?

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  • 21. At 2:26pm on 04 Jun 2010, radiorat wrote:

    It is a sad day when two unknows teach the world what forgiveness is.

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  • 22. At 2:39pm on 04 Jun 2010, carolinalady wrote:

    Dear Mark: if you learn nothing else from this string, you see how seriously Americans -- liberals and conservatives -- take THIS issue! And most of us agree the Commish ought to award Gallaraga a perfect game, although we're going to disagree over if and how often instant replay ought to be used in games. Baseball is where we first learn our sense of fair play and good sportsmanship as children: that life isn't always fair but that we still have to play by the rules and that crying about an unlucky hop doesn't change the score. The suggestions made for various baseball movies have all been good ones: 'Bull Durham' and 'Field of Dreams' are not only good baseball movies, they are good movies, too.

    Wolfvorkian: I agree...he could politicize anything, the creep!

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  • 23. At 2:43pm on 04 Jun 2010, Philly-Mom wrote:

    Congratulations to Armando Galarraga for a game well played and for his excellent sportsmanship.

    Unfortunately, as the POTUS's authority over baseball is merely ceremonial, I can't imagine that an executive order could affect a ruling in baseball. There truly IS such a thing as too much power, don't you think? Baseball... is sacred.

    But some kind of honorary accommodation sounds great.
    Or, perhaps a few beers in the garden.
    Maybe Obama could have Galarraga help him with his pitch....?

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  • 24. At 3:21pm on 04 Jun 2010, arclightt wrote:

    @11 (bw): "As stated by others, though, I am truly impressed by the professionalism displayed by the pitcher and umpire. If only more people were willing to accept and forgive mistakes..."

    Yes indeed. There was a column written years and years ago by a Washington commentator to the effect that the reason no mistakes were ever admitted to in Washington was because there was no forgiveness.

    The lesson for me is this: If I think so highly of the interaction here (willingness to admit fault and willingness to forgive it in others), then it's up to me to practice the same behavior, isn't it?

    Arclight



    All I can say out of my life experience and my is that forgiveness is one of the most important

    I wish that I could tell my soul and spirit one time to maintain a posture of forgiveness, but unfortunately I can't.

    The funny part about it is that we tend to hold on to grudges and fail to forgive others because we think we are losing something important if we let them go. Most of the time

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  • 25. At 3:40pm on 04 Jun 2010, ghostofsichuan wrote:

    This is about stupid businessmen who make a lot of money off of baseball and have a monopoly. Although baseball is a sport known for statistics, they do little to protect the integrity of those statistics. Baseball knew about steriods for a long time, tested, but were making a lot of money because of more home runs, so did nothing. It is a corrupt business that is why it maintains that it is traditional...everything has changed so they claim that everything is the same. This is about drama and keeping the sport in the news, it has nothing to do with the individuals, the records or the sport. The only lesson to be learned is that most large busineeses are unfair, feel no obligation to correct wrongs even when provided with overwhelming evidence and care less what the costumer thinks as they have a monoply. Congress already acts that way for big business so this will have no impact. The bankers appearing before congress were well mannered thieves as if that will somehow relieves them of their criminal activities.. Integirity is not about dignity in the face of a wrong, integrity is the willingness to right a wrong.

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  • 26. At 3:48pm on 04 Jun 2010, BK wrote:

    Mr. Gibbs was, of course, guilty of "politicizing" a real-world victory of moralality over revenge. While it IS possible for two men to meet on a field of play and do the right thing, it is not possible for 545 elected individuals to find a simultaneous and collective moral position, because they are too representative of the society from which they emerged.
    One man can act morally and ethically toward one other, and perhaps two people on one side can act with morality toward two others, but Congress, and the society it represents cannot, and God help the man or woman in Washington DC who first offers the moral hand to another because it will be ripped off their arm, and used to beat them before the TV cameras of C-Span, ABC, and the BBC.
    Gibbs of course, ever the Sophist, was simply using his podium to win a small victory of words at the expense of his Boss's adversaries, a demonstration of what he would do if the "moral hand" were extended to him.

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  • 27. At 4:02pm on 04 Jun 2010, GH1618 wrote:

    CarolinaLady (#22) "And most of us agree the Commish ought to award Gallaraga a perfect game, ..."

    I don't. The game must be decided on the field at the time of play. Although it would be possible to adjust the score for this game without further play, in many cases it would not be. That would be a mess.

    There is no benefit to having thrown a perfect game except being remembered for it. It's not even an official statistic, merely something notable. Gallaraga is more likely to be remembered for this game than most of the pitchers with recorded perfect games, so he has not actually been injured by the bad call.

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  • 28. At 4:04pm on 04 Jun 2010, GH1618 wrote:

    A couple of posters above don't seem to realize that the executive order idea was a joke.

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  • 29. At 4:20pm on 04 Jun 2010, PursuitOfLove wrote:

    ""Somebody made a mistake, somebody accepted that apology. It's a good lesson for baseball, perhaps a good lesson in Washington.""


    Never a truer word spoken. Unfortunately the chances of that lesson being learned in Washington are slim to none. Politicians still seem to think that when they get into a hole, the way to get out is to keep digging.

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  • 30. At 4:26pm on 04 Jun 2010, arclightt wrote:

    All: Apparently I left the remains of thoughts behind on my last post. Sometimes I fail to clean up my desk after work as well (grin).

    I really DO wish I could tell myself to stay in line once and have it happen forever, but it requires continuous maintenance.

    It really IS stupid that we think that if we forgive we are going to be giving up something.

    And finally, out of my life experience and knowledge forgiveness really IS one of the most important things in life.

    Maybe next time I'll clean up my stuff before I post (sigh). I have no excuse, but I'm doing this with one ear monitoring a testing activity on a conference bridge...

    Arclight

    (and this time the trash has been emptied...)

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  • 31. At 4:27pm on 04 Jun 2010, publiusdetroit wrote:

    Ref 24 archlightt-

    "The funny part about it is that we tend to hold on to grudges and fail to forgive others because we think we are losing something important if we let them go. Most of the time"

    And the unhappy weight of accumulated disappointments and grudges are a burden carrying us to a miserable grave.

    Galarraga knows he pitched a perfect game. Why not acknowledge that to err is human; and forgive, as he did, Jesse Joyce for his human error? Why carry the burden of a grudge? Will that ever change the past?

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  • 32. At 4:31pm on 04 Jun 2010, GH1618 wrote:

    I just discovered that Jim Joyce is umpire number 66. Maybe the devil made him do it.

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  • 33. At 4:43pm on 04 Jun 2010, PursuitOfLove wrote:

    Gordon_Craig #17: '"Is the systematic torture of prisoners an example of fairness in the land of the free and the home of the brave?"

    Not to Democrats it isn't. I never thought I'd see the day (I'm only 24, but still) when the issue of adhereing to our constitution and our international obligations would become politicised. We have truely hit rock bottom, and I seriously doubt if there is any way out.

    "Fortunately the rule of law and the principle of fairness and compassion still have a place in the British legal system."

    Hold on to that. Don't let any politician try to convince you that it should be altered or curtailed in any way. Oh, and while you're at it, distance yourselves from us. I know we claim to share your values, but actions speak louder than words, and our actions have proven for at least a decade now that we clearly don't. I mean Obama acquitted Bush for these war crimes for crying out loud!!! Would that happen in Britain? I'm guessing not. So until both parties protect and defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign and domestic in deed as well as word, as well as actually take that obligation without mental reservation or purpose of evasion, watch how closely you aline yourselves with us.

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  • 34. At 5:38pm on 04 Jun 2010, MagicKirin wrote:

    ref #14
    wolfvorkian wrote:
    The Kirin said:

    Kudos to the pitcher for his sportsmanship, Kudos to the umpire for admiting his mistake and not hiding or blaming others.

    That is a lesson President Obama could learn

    You could politicize a wet dream.

    ___________

    Merely giving advice to a man who claims he want the people to have a voice.

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  • 35. At 5:56pm on 04 Jun 2010, powermeerkat wrote:

    Re "Are you familiar with the phrase "losing it"?"



    Yes, it pertains more often than not to the Lunatic Left's activists.

    ["We Don't Need Another Hero"]

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  • 36. At 6:44pm on 04 Jun 2010, LucyJ wrote:

    Once a game is done, it is done.

    It's the same with American football. Although we have best in the world instant replay, there are still some calls that are so close to call that they could go either way. There is always some sort of controversy. Was his foot really in-bounds? Or was it right on the line? The refs are there to make the best calls possible. Humans are not perfect and we cannot expect perfection. We can expect them to do their best and that is what the ref did.

    I agree that he did have his foot on the base before the runner, so it was a perfect game but I do not think that they should change the ref's call, because once the game is done, it's done. If you change this one, it would leave room to change others in the past and future. Just not worth it to go through all of that.

    So the commissioner made the right call.

    I would despite it if politicians stepped in and messed things up.
    Politics have no place in sports or beauty pageants. That Los Suns thing, the LA Mayor trying to put politics into basketball, and the question asked to Miss Oklahoma are all ridiculous and insulting. I am hoping that the LA Lakers lose myself. Go Celtics!!!

    Go Blackhawks!!!

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  • 37. At 6:54pm on 04 Jun 2010, publiusdetroit wrote:

    One cannot "lose it" when they confine themselves to small, predetermined ideas and stifle themselves with large, angry obsessions. They are already lost.

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  • 38. At 7:27pm on 04 Jun 2010, publiusdetroit wrote:

    Ref 36 LucyJ-

    "Go Blackhawks!!!"

    Sorry, Philly-Mom. I'm in support with LucyJ on this call. Go 'Hawks!!! Western Conference Champions!

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  • 39. At 7:36pm on 04 Jun 2010, CamberwellBeauty wrote:

    The Kirin said:

    Kudos to the pitcher for his sportsmanship, Kudos to the umpire for admiting his mistake and not hiding or blaming others.

    That is a lesson President Obama could learn

    You could politicize a wet dream.

    ************************************************

    Aw,now come on. Robert Gibbs White House spokesman alluded to the same thing, according to Mark, not necessarily Obama personally, but rather Washington 'collectively' could learn something from this incident.

    Well done! Two fine Gentlemen, indeed. Let's not sour grape this, ok?

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  • 40. At 7:41pm on 04 Jun 2010, CamberwellBeauty wrote:

    32. At 4:31pm on 04 Jun 2010, GH1618 wrote:

    I just discovered that Jim Joyce is umpire number 66. Maybe the devil made him do it.

    ******************************************
    Doesn't he need 3 6's to qualify??? I'm pretty certain, coz I have 3 under my hair at the nape of my neck!!!

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  • 41. At 8:01pm on 04 Jun 2010, publiusdetroit wrote:

    Ref 40 CamberwellBeauty-

    "Doesn't he need 3 6's to qualify??? I'm pretty certain, coz I have 3 under my hair at the nape of my neck!!!"

    I always thought the 6's were supposed to be imprinted on one's forehead. Are you a closet hedonist? ;-)

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  • 42. At 8:51pm on 04 Jun 2010, allmymarbles wrote:

    It may not be cricket, but it is just as boring.

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  • 43. At 10:05pm on 04 Jun 2010, GH1618 wrote:

    "It may not be cricket, but it is just as boring."

    It can be, for those who lack the intellect for it.

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  • 44. At 10:13pm on 04 Jun 2010, Interestedforeigner wrote:

    8. At 7:27pm on 04 Jun 2010, publiusdetroit wrote:

    Ref 36 LucyJ-

    "Go Blackhawks!!!"

    Sorry, Philly-Mom. I'm in support with LucyJ on this call. Go 'Hawks!!! Western Conference Champions!

    ___________

    Yes. Given that Stan Makita was the mainspring of the team the last time the Blackhawks won, it's probably about time.


    And then that would leave another team as the one having gone longest without winning the cup.

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  • 45. At 10:28pm on 04 Jun 2010, allmymarbles wrote:

    43, GH1618.

    The intellect for it has to run on slow. It could never handle ice hockey

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  • 46. At 10:39pm on 04 Jun 2010, mabelwhite wrote:

    And it's not just a sinkhole

    http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2010/06/what-caused-the-guatemala-sinkhole-and-why-is-it-so-round.html

    "For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much - the wheel, New York, wars and so on - whilst all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man - for precisely the same reasons."

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  • 47. At 00:29am on 05 Jun 2010, Scott0962 wrote:

    re. #Gordon_Craig #17: "Is the systematic torture of prisoners an example of fairness in the land of the free and the home of the brave?"

    Of course not. Now look me in the eye and with a straight face tell me that British security services have never used coercive interrogation techniques when questioning a suspected IRA terrorist.

    We all want government to give us our full rights and treat us properly if we're ever arrested but though we don't speak about it we expect our governments to do what ever it takes to keep us safe when it's some other guy that's the terror suspect. And we rarely question their methods as long as we can pretend to be ignorant of them.

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  • 48. At 00:33am on 05 Jun 2010, Scott0962 wrote:

    re. #28. At 4:04pm on 04 Jun 2010, GH1618 wrote:
    "A couple of posters above don't seem to realize that the executive order idea was a joke."

    I was pretty sure of it but you know how politicians love to meddle if they think it will boost their approval numbers.

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  • 49. At 02:56am on 05 Jun 2010, csgators wrote:

    "I was pretty sure of it but you know how politicians love to meddle if they think it will boost their approval numbers."

    It could be real enough, baseball is already regulated by the Feds and given an anti-trust exemption. There is nothing our government won't stick it's paws into.

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  • 50. At 1:37pm on 05 Jun 2010, powermeerkat wrote:

    Re #37

    'One cannot "lose it" when they confine themselves to small, pReredetermined ideas and stifle themselves with large, angry obsessions. They are already lost.'






    That, again, pertains, more often than not, to certain Dearbon residents.

    [they've already banned minarets in progressive, liberal Switzerland]

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  • 51. At 1:41pm on 05 Jun 2010, powermeerkat wrote:

    Those who complain about cricket have obviously never had to watch curling.

    [let alone 90 minutes long scoreless socccer matches]

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  • 52. At 1:44pm on 05 Jun 2010, powermeerkat wrote:

    M: "Play up, and play the game, chaps"


    Or, on the other hand: "spill baby, spill!"

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  • 53. At 3:39pm on 05 Jun 2010, MarcusAureliusII wrote:

    The next posting is a link to the famous Bugs Bunny baseball episode. If they don't allow it you can find it on Youtube.

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  • 54. At 3:40pm on 05 Jun 2010, MarcusAureliusII wrote:

    Here's the famoud Bugs Bunny baseball episode;

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzqxIql0Pnk

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  • 55. At 3:49pm on 05 Jun 2010, MarcusAureliusII wrote:

    The next posting will give a link to Abbot and Costello's most famous routine "Who's on first" If they don't publish it you can look it up on YouTube

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  • 56. At 3:50pm on 05 Jun 2010, MarcusAureliusII wrote:

    here's a link to who's on first;

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wfmvkO5x6Ng&feature=fvst

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  • 57. At 4:29pm on 05 Jun 2010, precy wrote:

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the House Rules.

  • 58. At 5:00pm on 05 Jun 2010, MarcusAureliusII wrote:

    An outstanding and fascinating interview that gives great insight into baseball;

    http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/10638

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  • 59. At 6:09pm on 05 Jun 2010, powermeerkat wrote:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzqxIql0Pnk


    Yep.

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  • 60. At 7:29pm on 05 Jun 2010, Interestedforeigner wrote:

    51. At 1:41pm on 05 Jun 2010, powermeerkat wrote:

    "Those who complain about cricket have obviously never had to watch curling."

    ____________

    Ahem!

    Curling is a very fine game. While perhaps lacking the hard hitting immediacy, speed, and raw athleticism of hockey, it is, nonetheless an exceptionally exciting game of strategy and skill, full of nail-biting suspense.

    I might add that among our many friends and acquaintances from the UK, the Windies, South Africa, India, Pakistan and Australia cricket is considered to have no lack of excitement. On the contrary, it seems to be the cause of very strong emotions. I have seen West Indians play this game, and they bowl as if it were a blood sport.

    Further, if I am not mistaken, the recent thumping victory in The Ashes was a cause for rejoicing in England not much short of the defeat of the Armada, or doing down the French at Blenheim or Waterloo. From the accounts on the BBC you might have thought they were about to command the ringing of every churchbell in the realm, and to proclaim a national holiday of thanksgiving.

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  • 61. At 7:53pm on 05 Jun 2010, Interestedforeigner wrote:

    56. At 3:50pm on 05 Jun 2010, MarcusAureliusII

    Recorded so many years ago, and still brilliant.

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  • 62. At 11:34pm on 05 Jun 2010, wolfvorkian wrote:

    It could be real enough, baseball is already regulated by the Feds and given an anti-trust exemption. There is nothing our government won't stick it's paws into.

    This is a waste of time gators and I know it but you've got this assbackwards. MLB has an anti-trust exemption meaning the Feds are NOT sticking their paws into the affairs of this monopoly.

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  • 63. At 09:33am on 06 Jun 2010, powermeerkat wrote:

    IF: " Curling is a very fine game. While perhaps lacking the hard hitting immediacy, speed, and raw athleticism of hockey, it is, nonetheless an exceptionally exciting game of strategy and skill, full of nail-biting suspense."





    So is chess and even bridge.

    Although high stakes poker is a riskier discipline.


    P.S. Judging by reports from S. Asia cricket is almost as corrup...er...
    exciting a game as soccer.

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  • 64. At 1:02pm on 07 Jun 2010, Wannabeyankee wrote:

    Most Americans cannot handle a game that lasts for 5 days and can end in a draw (cricket). They even had the temerity to try to alter the rules of true football (soccer) so that there would be a penalty shoot-out at the end of a league game in the event of a draw, just so they could have a "result".

    Cricket may well appear boring to such people, but to those of us who have a mental capacity for it, cricket is, and will remain, a very good game to watch.

    For the record, I also like baseball and American football, NASCAR and Indycar racing, as well as Formula 1. Ice hockey can be quite exciting when the fights break out, but basketball (?). 10 guys playing pat-a-cake with a ball is not exciting.

    Instant replay has been a boon and a bust for American football. I can think of any number of games that have been altered by bad calls, even when instant replay was available.

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