BBC BLOGS - Mark Easton's UK
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
« Previous | Main | Next »

Crimes they are a-changing

Mark Easton | 16:45 UK time, Thursday, 22 April 2010

After all the warnings of a recession-fuelled crime wave, today's figures are evidence that, even in a downturn, England and Wales continue to become increasingly safe places to live.

I have written before about the myth that when economies go down, crime goes up.

The latest data shows, although many people will choose not to believe it, that in almost every category, crime is down or stable.

But there is one area of criminality which is rising and significantly - credit-card fraud. In a separate publication [346 KB PDF], new statistics show that, last year, 6.4% of plastic-card owners had fallen victim to fraud compared with 4.7% the year before, making it now the most common type of theft.

Plastic card and other bank or building society fraud in the last year, 2005/06 to 2008/09 BCS

With far greater use of plastic cards, the percentage figures disguise a big increase in the number of crimes. By my calculations this means that there were 2.4 million card fraud victims in 2009 compared with 1.7 million the year before - a rise of over 40%.

One area the researchers wanted to investigate was whether victims were being defrauded when using cards online. But, given that people may not know when or where the crime occurred, the question was not put and the best they could do was look for a correlation between fraud and internet use.

Plastic card fraud victimisation by level of internet usage

The link seems clear enough but, as the paper concedes, it is not apparent "whether the pattern of victimisation by internet usage suggests that the internet is a less safe environment for plastic card use, or that those who use the internet more frequently are also more likely to generally use plastic cards more frequently in other locations, such as shops, bars, restaurants and petrol stations".

Another finding is that card fraud, unlike most other crimes, hits the rich more than the poor. Those households with incomes in excess of £50,000 a year were almost twice as likely to be victims than the average card user.

Proportion of plastic card owners who were victims of fraud in the last year<br />
by annual household income

Just over half of those who fell victim to card fraud said they suffered no monetary loss, although 25% were more than £150 out of pocket.

Personal monetary losses reported by victims of card fraud

Plastic card fraud is not included in the BCS count because, when the survey was started in 1981, plastic-card ownership was low and there was little evidence of related fraud. The researchers argue that there remains a case for not including it because the BCS is a "victim-based survey" and "the cost of the crime is often borne by commercial organisations".

However, the sharp rise in card fraud may reopen the argument that the system cited as our best measure of crime trends should do more to reflect the changing nature of crime.

Update 1829: An earlier version of this post said that households with incomes in excess of £50,000 a year were more than twice as likely to be victims than the average card user; this should of course have read "almost twice as likely". Apologies for the error, which is corrected above.

Comments

or register to comment.

  • 1. At 5:33pm on 22 Apr 2010, Forlornehope wrote:

    I have had a few calls from my bank (the excellent First Direct) over the last few years querying payments. Some of these have turned out to be fraudulent. On two occasions they have called me to tell me that my card had been "compromised" and that they wanted to cancel it and send me another. I have never lost anything through this. All in all, they seem to do a good job of looking after my interests and are invariably polite and helpful about it. However, my experience would indicate that "there's a lot of it about".

    Complain about this comment

  • 2. At 5:36pm on 22 Apr 2010, ch21ss wrote:

    Isn't there a possible other cause for the link between internet use/fraud - more internet use could also coincide with more internet banking, and thus people that keep a closer eye on what is going in/out of their account than when you used to only get a statement at the end of each month or whatever. Probably both affects are real, as we know lots of people have trojans on their systems sending out emails/viruses and capturing personal details/bank account details and the like.

    Complain about this comment

  • 3. At 6:25pm on 22 Apr 2010, Paul in Crawley wrote:

    Did anyone else think it peculiar that the Home Office report does not ask about the number of different "plastic cards" that people owned? I would expect that if you have a large number of different cards that you are more likely to be a fraud victim. The fraud per card could be going down, while the total quantity of fraud is going up!

    Complain about this comment

  • 4. At 6:28pm on 22 Apr 2010, watriler wrote:

    Unless this large increase is mainly due to Internet usage there has to be a question about the effectiveness of chip and pin. Clearly more analysis is needed of on-line use of credit card payments.

    Complain about this comment

  • 5. At 9:36pm on 22 Apr 2010, JanetLG wrote:

    I run an online business, and the card security measures that I have to have to satisfy the banks and card merchant providers is intense, to say the least. I am therefore wary as to why all the media articles about card fraud keep suggesting that it is the internet where the most risk is - could it be that bricks and mortar businesses are worried, and using their 'clout' to negatively influence the public?

    And how are the various kinds of online fraud defined? If someone is daft enough to email their bank details back to a 'phishing' email, then more fool them. It's not the same as ordering through a supposedly legitimate online business and finding that your card details have been sold on, is it?

    Complain about this comment

  • 6. At 10:31pm on 22 Apr 2010, The Animal wrote:

    I have lived through more elections than I can count and crime ALWAYS goes down before polling day. Where I live it continues to go UP, we just don't bother to report it anymore. Yyes, its nice to get a letter from the head guy in the police telling us how much he regrets, etc, etc, but really, I've got better things to do than fill in a two-page A4 questionnaire every time I report a crime. And anyway, nobody comes, nobody investigates, nobody gets caught.They're laughing at us. Check your crime statistics history, Mark. And keep the door locked.

    Complain about this comment

  • 7. At 10:37pm on 22 Apr 2010, threnodio_II wrote:

    "But, given that people may not know when or where the crime occurred, the question was not put and the best they could do was look for a correlation between fraud and internet use".

    Exactly - so how do we actually know that a crime occurred at all? There are a number of reasons why anomalies might occur in credit card statements including staff or computer errors, owner error and so on. Granted these will only account for a small proportion but is it not dangerous to confuse reported or alleged offenses with proven ones when doing statistical analysis?

    Complain about this comment

  • 8. At 11:39pm on 22 Apr 2010, Forsythia wrote:

    As I see the report (Symantic) that the problems of viruses and malware has increased by 71% in the last year.
    The reasons for all the viruses and malware is obvious enough - money.

    But I do wonder, what is the point? when we have proper computers running Unix or Linux where these Microsoft problems simply do not exist, and cannot.
    A computer should be secure by design as the designers of Unix determined in the 60's. Yet there is no security on the Microsoft system. Apple went over to a more secure Unix based system in 1996 and yet in 2010 the Microsoft system remains heavily flawed. And do remember that no amount of anti-virus can stop all the problems, after all which comes first, the virus or the anti-virus?

    There is the myth that the only reason Unix does not have viruses is because nobody uses it. What a strange belief. The Unix design remains based on the two criteria 1/ Good Security and 2/ Good Networking.
    And as we should remember Bill Gates stood up in 1992 with the launch of his first version of Windows and declared that nobody wants to use the Internet - what far sighted thinking! Engineers including myself were using the networking across continents in the early 70's.

    And just to point out; the BBC now uses Linux on their servers whereas previously they were using Solaris Unix. And of course, most websites use either Solaris or Linux. It is rare to find one using Microsoft.

    So finally if people would simply stop using Microsoft then the fraud on-line would dramatically diminish, probably to nothing.

    Complain about this comment

  • 9. At 01:05am on 23 Apr 2010, Lee wrote:

    Number 8:
    " when we have proper computers running Unix or Linux where these Microsoft problems simply do not exist, and cannot."

    "There is the myth that the only reason Unix does not have viruses"

    Utter Tosh, actual wild virsus/malware exist for Unix based systems and academically they have also been shown to be more than possible. Just as anti virus cannot stop all problems no amount of security can stop all the problems.


    It is ludicrous to suggest that if we all went to unix based systems that on line fraud would dimish to nothing. Malware exist now for them, why would they stop attacking unix if became so prevalent?

    Complain about this comment

  • 10. At 01:54am on 23 Apr 2010, ady wrote:

    Crime isn't decreasing.

    The REPORTING of crime is decreasing.

    Most people don't waste their time reporting crime nowadays.
    Spend a few Fri/Sat nights in any hospital casualty dept around the country and be shocked at how little is officially reported.
    Broken jaws etc never reaching the official statistics.

    Complain about this comment

  • 11. At 07:59am on 23 Apr 2010, fascistMikeP wrote:

    Surprisingly nobody has mentioned a simple means of significantly reducing the risk of being a victim of CC fraud. As the greatest risk occurs at 'bricks and mortar' merchants, rather than on-line, I have scratched the CVV (3/4 digit security number) off the back of my cards, and memorised them. They are not needed when making 'cardholder present' purchases, so any fraudulent use can only occur via an online merchant who has requested the information. It also means that anyone who steals the plastic would be restricted in their use of it.

    Complain about this comment

  • 12. At 08:38am on 23 Apr 2010, Simon wrote:

    The way I protect myself against internet/card fraud is simple. I have a seperate bank account which has no overdraft and I have no more than £100 in there at any one time. When I order anything online I use that account to pay for it, not my main bank account, which I never use online. That way if my card/account is compromised, I will not lose my entire funds, just the limited amount in that account.

    Complain about this comment

  • 13. At 08:43am on 23 Apr 2010, Daisy Chained wrote:

    Organised crime is a business where money raised in one area is used to create revenues elsewhere. As Bertrand Russell said "Life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim." How far has criminal activity, corruption and collusion spilled over into governance, education, health, and finances?

    Anyone who has spent time in organisations collecting, manipulating and peddling data, public or private sector, will know the somewhat rigid attitude there is to performance, where quantity rules over quality. So whilst the crimes are somewhat misguided rather than vicious, they are crimes nonetheless.

    So answer me this Mr Easton. Are you not guilty by association?

    Complain about this comment

  • 14. At 1:04pm on 23 Apr 2010, FarnesBarnes wrote:

    Bricks and mortar attacks are still far more likely than Internet based ones. As third party encryption has yet to be broken, an attack in the middle of a secure online transaction is virtually impossible which means a criminal has to compromise either your home pc or the online e-commerce server.
    You can protect yourself from the former by using a user account with no admin right to surf the net. No trojan or malware can install itself on an account that has no admin rights to install them.
    If more people did this or if Microsoft made it easier to set up we'd have virtually no online crime.

    Complain about this comment

  • 15. At 2:23pm on 23 Apr 2010, HardWorkingHobbes wrote:

    Most people I know have been the victems of credit card fraud.

    When my mum was she cancelled the card, got a new one (from the same company) put it in a draw without activating it, a month alter she got a bill with fraudulant use on it.
    The only was this could have happened is from inside the bank itself (or one of their offshore call centres).

    When a friend had his card cloned he was billed for airline tickets for a budget airline, he called the bank saying "The people who cloned my card will be at this place at this time (of the flight) but they didn't want to know, he called the police and they didn't want to know, he called the airline and they weren't interested, it wasn't until he pointed out that they were going to have people on the flight who had commited fraud and the airline had no idea about their actual identities that they started to take notice.

    No-one in authority takes credit card fraud seriousely, the police say it's the banks responsibility, the banks blame the cardholder and just claim on the insurance. If they started arresting people and prosicuting them then the fall would be dramatic, it's not hard to find the culprits, most times they buy things online and get it delivered to their home address.

    Complain about this comment

  • 16. At 4:00pm on 23 Apr 2010, Carl Showalter wrote:

    8. At 11:39pm on 22 Apr 2010, Forsythia wrote:

    But I do wonder, what is the point? when we have proper computers running Unix or Linux where these Microsoft problems simply do not exist, and cannot.
    A computer should be secure by design as the designers of Unix determined in the 60's. Yet there is no security on the Microsoft system. Apple went over to a more secure Unix based system in 1996 and yet in 2010 the Microsoft system remains heavily flawed. And do remember that no amount of anti-virus can stop all the problems, after all which comes first, the virus or the anti-virus?


    OK genius, can you then tell me why "mac antivirus" in google gives me quite so many results advertising, guess what, antivirus products for mac? the first non-proof-of-concept OSX virus was discovered in the wild in 2006. there's well over 50. Linux isn't exempt either, it's got it's own section in the VirusVault site. if you're going to make fanboy claims about OSX, please make sure you can back them up:

    have a read from this mac forum

    and read the comments by SiliconAddict and PCMacUser.

    no security on the "microsoft system" as you've so technically put it? what about UAC, Windows Firewall and Windows Defender? Address space randomization? RootkitRevealer from Microsoft's Sysinternals Suite is just a dummy application I suppose?

    you're assuming every windows user is daft enough to log in as administrator all the time. UAC removes the need for this, as does the context menu entry "Run as Administrator..". so you can use a windows PC in much the same way as a UNIX box after all, by logging in to a restricted account, giving yourself admin rights as needed, analogous to su to root in FreeBSD, but you knew that anyway, didn't you?

    There is the myth that the only reason Unix does not have viruses is because nobody uses it. What a strange belief. The Unix design remains based on the two criteria 1/ Good Security and 2/ Good Networking.
    And as we should remember Bill Gates stood up in 1992 with the launch of his first version of Windows and declared that nobody wants to use the Internet - what far sighted thinking! Engineers including myself were using the networking across continents in the early 70's.


    and I think the early 70s is when you stopped learning about IT. did you know *NIX variants are actually more susceptible to Rootkit infection due to their security model?

    And just to point out; the BBC now uses Linux on their servers whereas previously they were using Solaris Unix. And of course, most websites use either Solaris or Linux. It is rare to find one using Microsoft.

    CodeProject.com
    Microsoft.com
    EasyJet.com
    tfl.gov.uk
    fco.gov.uk
    www.collins.co.uk
    www.carbonfootprint.com
    www.hmg.gov.uk
    www.britishmuseum.org
    www.nhs.uk
    www.celticfc.net
    www.talktofrank.com - you should..
    www.teamviewer.com
    www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk
    www.highways.gov.uk
    www.aboutcookies.org
    www.ico.gov.uk
    www.mypyramid.gov
    bing.com
    websoilsurvey.nrcs.usda.gov
    amd.com
    www.jisc.ac.uk
    www.messagelabs.com - an antivirus company using microsoft
    www.thinkfinity.org
    www.csharp-station.com
    www.weightwatchers.com
    www.oddee.com
    fulhamfc.com
    www.jobbank.gc.ca
    www.conservatives.com - webcameron runs on M$
    www.loreal.com - because M$ is worth it?
    www.libdems.org.uk - I agree with Nick, and I'm sure Nick agrees with me that there is at least one M$ web server out there, namely his.

    I would keep copying and pasting, but I'm getting RSI. it seems there's a fair bit of "rare" M$-based web hosting going on, including, it seems, the entire .gov.uk domain. you're also forgetting about the thousands of companies that have SharePoint or DNN based extranets and microsoft software that runs on *NIX, under MONO for instance.

    So finally if people would simply stop using Microsoft then the fraud on-line would dramatically diminish, probably to nothing.

    are you implying that non-Microsoft users are less susceptible to fraud that requires user interaction such as phishing? would you care, once again, to back this up? even just a bit?

    I'm so glad you're nowhere near my development team, although I'm certain I've worked with your ilk before. I'd practically carry you out of the building myself. WTF.

    Complain about this comment

  • 17. At 4:01pm on 23 Apr 2010, Wicked Witch of the South West wrote:

    You are joking that crime has gone down. Reported crime may have gone down because those whom it affects most have stopped reporting it due to lack of action & complete lack of protection after reporting it.

    Complain about this comment

  • 18. At 6:37pm on 23 Apr 2010, Graphis wrote:

    Depends on your definition of "crime": it's a catch-all term, and includes such things as a drunken assault, vandalism, graffiti, sexual assault, trespassing, racial insults, homophobia, etc etc. I don't believe any of these can necessarily be linked to the state of the economy, and they will continue to go either up or down according to many other factors.

    But property crime and credit card fraud can. In a down-turned economy or recession, lack of money is THE major motivational factor in almost any crime involving stealing something valuable. It's not kicks. It's not people looking for a third plasma screen TV for their second home who are committing these crimes, but people desperately seeking anything they can sell for quick cash, or just quick cash itself, because they simply don't have enough to live on.

    A better set of statistics might be gathered from ascertaining the income level/quality of life of those who commit these kind of crimes. While there very well might be the odd multi-millionaire who's just getting greedy, in most cases I'm willing to bet it's people earning a lot less than average before they make the decision to do something illegal. And that's the root of the problem: what drives people to take such risks? It's not a 'criminal gene', it's not even their upbringing as such: it's a simple, often desperate, need to survive, and if they have to do that by scavenging around the rich, then that's exactly what they will do. And of course, once they've crossed that moral line, it's a lot easier to do it again, especially if they got away with it the first time.

    So I think it's ridiculous to describe a link between a recession and crime as a 'myth': it may be, in the sense of "crime" overall, but not when it comes to crime involving cash or things that can be sold for cash. The only way to reduce crime is to take away the need for it i.e. make sure everyone has enough to live on (and that won't ever happen).

    Complain about this comment

  • 19. At 00:17am on 24 Apr 2010, sevenstargreen wrote:

    Is crime going down? Is it stable? Maybe worse? Mmmh.Difficult one eh?
    So thought that I would check out the BBC website itself to try and get
    some answers.This is what I found reported.

    3 people found guilty of murdering a man after treating him as a slave
    Man arrested for murder of 2 people.
    18 year old arrested for burglary and injuring Police Officer.
    Man held at knifepoint by 3 armed raiders.
    15 year old arrested after hit and run leaving pedestrian with serious
    head injuries.
    2 men arrested for disturbance with air guns.
    Funeral held for murdered mother and baby.
    Man gets 6 year sentence for murder.
    2 youths arrested in possession of high powered air rifles in street.
    Footballer arrested for a stabbing.
    5 people arrested after teenager found dead.
    3 robbers found guilty of murdering a man for his blackberry.
    Teenager dies after being stabbed.
    89 year old woman raped in own home.
    3 robbers break into home of 2 elderly sisters,attacking one.
    33 year old jailed for stabbing 2 people.
    2 boys,11 and 12 charged with arson and criminal damage.
    36 year odl man remanded in custody charged with sexual assault of 5 girls.
    62 year old disabled man beaten to death.
    Woman attacked in pub by 2 men who stole her cash.
    Woman arrested for assault on man leaving him with serious head injuries.
    2 people arrested for armed robbery at a jewellers.
    2 men,one woman accused of the death of a gay man.
    Man murdered his ex-wife.
    Murder inquiry launched following incident outside restaurant.

    Thats just the crimes that the BBC have reported on for just one day.

    Complain about this comment

  • 20. At 1:48pm on 24 Apr 2010, Andy wrote:

    sevenstargreen wrote: Is crime going down? Is it stable? Maybe worse? Mmmh.Difficult one eh?
    So thought that I would check out the BBC website itself to try and get
    some answers.This is what I found reported.

    -----------------------------------

    How many of the crimes on your list would you of know about if it wasn't for the internet and 24hour news channels? One reason that people 'wrong;y think' crime is going up is because they find about about more due to the 24hour news access we now have. Before this people only got there news from a national or local newspaper or from news broadcasts, normally lunchtime or evening, followed by local news information. Stories from other areas did not find its way to the vast majority of people unless it was important enough to do so, and then it became national news. Now 24 hour news channels need to find up there time with stories which otherwise would make it onto the regular news shows, and the internet means we can read about every local bit of news from around the UK. For example on today BBC news there are the current headlines in the North section, Teenager held over stab murder, Man sentenced on Bulger rumours, Footballer arrested over stabbing and Man murdered 'divorce party' wife, none of the stories are deemed important enough to be classed as national news yet I can still easily read about them thanks to the internet.

    In a survey carried a few years ago which asked if people believed (as opposed to them knowing for sure due to reading the facts) crime was going up found out something surprising. In the areas the survey was carried out in people believed crime across the UK was going up, but when asked about crime in the area they lived, they said they believed it was going down.

    Complain about this comment

  • 21. At 4:58pm on 24 Apr 2010, Have your say Rejected wrote:

    "Crime isn't decreasing.

    The REPORTING of crime is decreasing."...

    Can you provide some statistics to back up this? If some one breaks into your house or car and steals something belonging to you, you would need to report the crime to the police to be able to claim loses back on insurance. Crime may or may not be decreasing, though stats point to it dropping, stats also say peoples fear of being a victim of crime is getting higher, do you think that has anything to do with how certain media outlets report their crime 'stories'.

    Complain about this comment

  • 22. At 9:56pm on 24 Apr 2010, judy wrote:

    Simon, thanks for the info. Makes sense.

    Complain about this comment

  • 23. At 11:21am on 25 Apr 2010, BernardW wrote:

    With regard to credit card fraud what about the people who give their card to frineds who are going abroad. The card is used to withdraw cash from ATMs whilst the card owner is in the UK. He then claims it has been used fraudulently in a foreign ATM while he remained in the country and claims the cash back. The stolen cash is shared between them.

    What are the banks doing to stop this?

    Complain about this comment

  • 24. At 2:42pm on 25 Apr 2010, tacrepus wrote:

    There are lies, damned lies and statistics. As the police attend fewer crime scenes and now simply give out crime numbers over the phone for insurance purposes, low or zero value crimes, where the perpetrator is unlikely to be aprehended, are no longer reported. Teenagers who are assaulted for their phones or ipods will often not admit the act from embarrassment. Drunken fights will not get reproted if the police are not present. No one reports graffiti or many forms of anti social behaviour. To say crime is decreasing is a gross untruth. The reporting of crime is decreasing, but the petty criminal acts that blight many people's day to day quality of life are more prevalent now that they ever were. In the past, conscientious and responsible journalists would go into the community and report on the every day difficulties in the lives of the people - now they just seem to sit behind a computer and report based on statitics that that are skewed towards the intentions of that statistician's paymaster. The responsibility of the press is to find the truth, rather than to re-write a government funded department's press releases.

    Complain about this comment

  • 25. At 2:57pm on 25 Apr 2010, barryp wrote:

    I have problems in accepting that a simple four number PIN gives any security at all. When will the Banks get round to installing proper security systems into money tranfers. Security based on the person, not on a simple number and a plastic card, perhaps fingerprint reading coupled with an implanted chip?
    The current Chip and PIN gives no security worth mentioning, even the signature was better proof in face to face sales.

    Complain about this comment

  • 26. At 3:16pm on 25 Apr 2010, MrWonderfulReality wrote:

    Maybe if all those MPs who flipped their houses and profitted at taxpayers expense were actually charged with fraud then crime figures wouldnt be as positive.

    As someone mentioned in their comment, crime is most often shown to be down at election time, just as many other facts and statistics are manouvered to show positivity pre-election.

    Watch closely AFTER the election, I bet whoever gets in will report MUCH worse statistics on a range of subjects so that they can then make themselves look better without actually achieving anything or hide the fact of things getting worse.

    Crime figures have got progressively worse over the years which actually correlates as more liberalist ciminal justice policys have been implemented and conditions for prisoners have improved, the growth in crime also correlates with easier and cheaper access to alcohol and also especially with increased access to illegal drugs, including easy access within the prisons system.

    The crime figures in 1997 were attrocious in themselves and what makes them worse is that The British Crime Survey estimates unreported crime; in 1997 - 56% of crimes were not reported to the police, which is basically adding over 50% to attrocious crime numbers.

    Since the abolition of the death penalty in UK in 1965, the homicide rate per million population more than doubled upto 1997 from 6.8 per million to 14.1 per million.

    We are so often told by liberalist do gooders that being nice to criminals is the better way and achieves better results. This is TOTALLY and UTTERLY FALSE and basically a blatant lie as official crime figures figures of the past 100+ years, since 1900 actually prove beyond ALL doubt the EXACT opposite.

    It is pure fantasy to even suggest that crimes are a changing, the VAST majority of serious crime is unchanged, also the reality is that a theft is a theft whether it is someones credit cards or shoplifting or burglary, the nature of crime may change or adapt to new criminal opportunitys but the fact remains that a crime is a crime is a crime, regardless of what cynical pretences and avoidances are attached to it.

    I hate the way the media and government relate so much to recent times and try and compare like for like etc, when in the overall historical terms , the statistics are actually an attrocious outrage of attrocity, in little over 50 years crime rates have risen by around , NOT 10%, NOT 50%, NOT 100% but by around a FULL 1000%, which is an outrage and anyone who say things have improved is a complete and utter muppet because overall, NOTHING has improved since 1950s/1960s.

    Complain about this comment

  • 27. At 1:50pm on 29 Apr 2010, Val wrote:


    8. At 11:39pm on 22 Apr 2010, Forsythia wrote:
    "There is the myth that the only reason Unix does not have viruses is because nobody uses it. What a strange belief. The Unix design remains based on the two criteria 1/ Good Security and 2/ Good Networking. "

    My understanding of it is that computers running Unix (or its derivatives) don't get viruses because the people actually writing the viruses generally use Unix machines.

    It only makes sense that a criminal writing viruses wouldn't:
    a) use an insecure operating system such as Windows OR
    b) write viruses that could infect his own systems!


    Complain about this comment

  • 28. At 09:50am on 04 May 2010, Lewis Fitzroy wrote:

    "Crime has not gone down on Plastic cards, the banks deal with that not the police, or any other petty crime it is just not report anymore? I know two young people, students, who were scamed by hole in the wall gangs' from eastern europe.

    Complain about this comment

  • 29. At 3:59pm on 28 Jan 2011, Darvydas wrote:

    That is a nice conclusion that you made up with. Thanks for the information, I love it.

    Complain about this comment

  • 30. At 2:28pm on 05 Apr 2011, ahlohan wrote:

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the House Rules.

  • 31. At 4:30pm on 05 Apr 2011, Lewis Fitzroy wrote:

    The police dont deal with plastic card crime, Many crimes are not reported The police can not cope with the increase in petty crime in the U.K The Gangs are too mobile in the E.U.

    Complain about this comment

  • 32. At 6:52pm on 12 Apr 2011, milvusvestal wrote:

    If white-collar crimes are on the increase, and others such as rape, assault and murder are on the decrease, I'd feel more secure than I do at the moment.

    With technology continuing to progress at breakneck speed, however, it's hardly surprising that the crooks are so far ahead of the game and that the boffins who devise ever-more security hurdles are lagging far behind. They clearly possess more brains.

    So far, by limiting myself to one credit/debit card, I have avoided the horror stories I continually hear about. Having to remember so many passwords and numbers merely to gain access to what is already mine has its limits, especially at my age, and I'm warned never to write them down. Life was so simple when I started work.

    Complain about this comment

View these comments in RSS

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.