BBC BLOGS - The Editors

The Editors' blog is moving

Post categories:

Host Host | 14:00 UK time, Thursday, 18 April 2013

As of Thursday, the Editors' blog will move to a different address on the BBC News website.

While this page will no longer be updated, it will stay here for reference.

BBC Arabic and the complexities of the Arab world

Host Host | 15:22 UK time, Friday, 1 February 2013

Faris Couri

By Faris Couri, editor of the BBC Arabic Service


It is no secret that recent Arab uprisings have placed enormous burdens on the shoulders of BBC Arabic journalists responsible for reporting news from the region.

Covering the Arab world is not always an easy task - we need to mix sensible caution with a dose of courage in covering political issues that attract so many disputed views among Arabic-speaking audiences.

Our guiding principles are the BBC's values, its editorial guidelines, its ethical code, which are our reference points to maintain impartial, balanced and accurate reporting.

Across the Arab world - whether it's Tunisia, Yemen, Egypt or Libya, Bahrain, Syria and Iraq or the many other countries in the region - we know that audiences want access to objective and independent news, far removed from an agenda that favours one party, religion or sect against another. That is why audiences are turning to BBC Arabic.

Last year, our latest figures show that overall audiences to BBC Arabic have risen by more than 17% to a record high of 25.3 million adults weekly. That includes a big surge of 2.9 million in Saudi Arabia and 2.7 million in Egypt, where TV viewers in particular turned to the BBC to better understand the events happening in their own country. Our radio audiences are also holding up despite the reductions in transmission. Online is proving to be more of a challenge, but we are working hard to understand the needs of digital audiences and those for whom social media plays an increasingly important part in their lives.

In 2011, following the fall of the Mubarak leadership, we watched as ordinary Egyptians carried banners saying "Thank you, BBC!" But meeting the high expectation of audiences has a price and sometimes it's been a heavy one.

March 2011 brought a strong reminder of the risks that our staff face in covering the news - one of our reporters was arrested and tortured by Muammar Gaddafi's forces during the Libya uprising. In early 2012, our reporter in Yemen was beaten and received death threats from supporters of the outgoing president.

We are also challenged by those who disagree with our coverage. In countries such as Syria and Bahrain, BBC Arabic has been accused of bias.

The criticism comes from opposition and government alike. It may be a valid argument to say that getting criticism from both sides, in the case of Arab world certainly, is an indication of balanced coverage.

On Syria, for example, we had a series of documentaries looking at the civil war from a number of perspectives.

The first one, exploring what it's like to work for a Syrian television channel that's the mouthpiece of the government, was the butt of criticism and threats from Syrian opposition quarters. We followed it up with a programme charting a day in the lives of six Syrian women, five of whom were anti-government activists.

In our day-to-day news coverage, presenting a variety of voices from Syria is essential to us. And that is what distinguishes BBC Arabic from many media outlets in the Arab world which promote political views and agendas, and that is what we are determined to keep.

BBC Arabic marked its 75th anniversary in January. Arab politicians and ordinary people have expressed their appreciation of our track record of impartiality and trusted news. I am confident that the coming years will see further achievement on all our platforms - TV, radio and online.

Jimmy Savile and Newsnight: A correction

Host Host | 10:48 UK time, Monday, 22 October 2012

The following is a statement issued by the BBC

The BBC has launched an independent review, led by former Head of Sky News Nick Pollard, to determine whether there were any failings in the BBC's management of the Newsnight investigation into allegations of sexual abuse of children by Jimmy Savile.

However, on the basis of material available now, it is apparent from information supplied by the Newsnight editor and programme team - that the explanation in a blog by the editor of his decision to drop the programme's investigation is inaccurate or incomplete in some respects.

By way of correction and clarification:

1.The blog says that Newsnight had no evidence that anyone from the Duncroft home could or should have known about the allegations. In fact some allegations were made (mostly in general terms) that some of the Duncroft staff knew or may have known about the abuse.

2. The blog says that Newsnight had no evidence against the BBC. No allegation was made to the programme that BBC staff were aware of Mr Savile's alleged activities, but there were some allegations of abusive conduct on BBC premises.

3. The blog says that all the women spoken to by the programme had contacted the police independently already and that Newsnight had no new evidence against any other person that would have helped the police. It appears that in some cases women had not spoken to the police and that the police were not aware of all the allegations.

The BBC regrets these errors and will work with the Pollard review to assemble all relevant evidence to enable the review to determine the full facts.

Update 23 October 2012: The BBC has published an additional statement which it issued to Panorama on 22 October 2012. You can read it here.

External linking: How are we doing?

Post categories:

Host Host | 12:31 UK time, Friday, 7 October 2011

Last year we at the News website were tasked with doubling the number of click-throughs to external sites by 2013, as part of the BBC's Strategy Review.

Screenshot of BBC News external links

This was something I discussed at a panel session I was taking part in at yesterday's News:Rewired conference, organised by Journalism.co.uk, and I wanted to write briefly here about our ongoing efforts to improve the ways in which we link externally from our news articles.

Having asked for the figures from our research team for my presentation, it was great to hear that we appear to be well on track to achieve the goal set for us.

Looking back at the third quarter of 2010, we had an average of around 2.9m external click-throughs per month from UK users. That period - last year's July, August & September - was around the time of the redesign of the News website. That meant, among other changes, that the 'From other news sites' and 'Related internet links' sections moved from the right-hand side to the bottom of news stories. And we have also been doing more linking to external sources from within the text of story pages.

The figures for the third quarter of this year show that all this has had an effect, and it looks as though we've been getting something right. The monthly average is now around 6.1m click-throughs i.e. more than double what it was last year. One caveat is that there have been some big news stories over this period, including the August riots, Norway shootings and Amy Winehouse's death. Another caveat is that we are using a different method to measure the figures now, so whilst the comparison should be pretty accurate, there's a small margin for error.

It's interesting too when looking at the figures, to see where the traffic goes - who are we linking to? Around one-third goes to other news sites via 'Moreover' - the technology behind the 'From Other News Sites' box which is included on many BBC News stories. The top destinations for external click-throughs in any month depends largely on what the top stories are for that period, for example in February this year there was news of the street-level crime maps being published (www.police.uk) , ITV footage of an elderly lady confronting armed robbers (www.itv.com) and stories about tickets for the Olympics in 2012 (www.london2012.com). Those sites all showed up high in our list of onward referrals.

And just to be clear, it’s not that we don’t want you to stay with us - we do, of course . There’s lots of great content around the BBC site, we're proud of it and want you to explore it, but helping you to find relevant and useful information , whether on other news sites or from non-news sources, is also a key part of what we should be doing as a news provider. From this latest snapshot of where we are with external linking it does look as though we are getting better at doing that, but there’s always room to do more, so if you have ideas on this, let us know.

Update, 10:49: Tuesday 11 October: Thanks for all the comments on this post, I wanted to reply to a few of them briefly:

Kit Green: No reciprocal agreements, we are assuming that by and large if we provide a good link, people will come back – at some stage.

Josh: You are quite right: The link should be www.police.uk to get the postcode search for local crime maps and data. Sorry about that.

Christina, Whitefall: Yes, point taken. We are acutely aware of the benefit and value of linking to source reports, and will continue to aim to do this whenever we can. There are sometimes practical issues which make this difficult such as when the report is under embargo at time of writing, or there is a paywall. But in principle I quite agree it is the right thing to do.

Horsenanny: Very glad you have found the site useful and informative.

Bluesberry: I don’t have a reply to hand on your South America query, but if you get in touch I can seek one.

Maddyn10, Shakygorilla1: We have been covering the US protests – for example here and on the related links to our other coverage from this story.

Eddy from Waring: Yes – quantity is a crude measure, but it is a start. Relevance and quality are clearly key. We measure clickthroughs, so the fact that someone has followed a link does at least imply some value.

Pratish: I have passed your correction on to WHYS.

David: On the reasons for the linking targets – there’s more here and in the link from that post to the Mark Thompson Strategy Review document.

Steve Herrmann is editor of the BBC News website.

Guest presenters on Newshour

Post categories:

Host Host | 08:34 UK time, Friday, 23 September 2011

Through the coming week, five commanding international broadcasters are each presenting an edition of Newshour, the BBC World Service's award-winning current affairs programme.

Jeremy Paxman

Jeremy Paxman sowed the seeds of the idea, though he didn't realise it at the time. "My hero: the BBC World Service", he declared to the Guardian earlier this year.

He went on: "I don't suppose there are many heroes who wear a cardigan and cords. But that's how I imagine the BBC World Service, an ageing uncle who's seen it all."

His heroes at Bush House wanted Jeremy to stop by and say hello - and see for himself that while we're not (all) fashionistas, the cardies and cords have long since been discarded. With a younger audience profile than, say, Radio 4 or Newsnight, we're more like the cutting edge cousin than a snoozing uncle.

And from that came the idea of getting Jeremy Paxman and other eminent news broadcasters to present our flagship programme. A statement of our ambition and success - an expression of the World Service's rude health in spite of Foreign Office cuts in our budget - and a bit of sparkle for our millions of listeners around the world.

Newshour has a fantastic team of regular presenters, of course. Two among them, Lyse Doucet and Owen Bennett Jones, have won Sony gold awards for news journalist of the year. Editor Lucy Walker's talented team of producers and anchors, along with the best studio managers in the business, have taken Newshour to two Sony radio gold awards for best news and current affairs programme in the past four years. An unrivalled achievement.

That's helped to deliver a growing global audience to the network. Last year, the English World Service gained a 10% jump in listeners to 43 million, with the biggest numbers in North America and West Africa. In Britain, a spate of big foreign stories and the increasing reach of DAB digital radio has led to even more rapid growth in audience - up to around 1.7 million weekly World Service listeners.

So our guest presenters could well be reaching a much bigger audience than they are accustomed to - they will have to find a tone and touch for live current affairs which works equally well in Lagos and Los Angeles - we are sure they will enjoy the experience, and convey that enjoyment.

And the line up, all live at 14:00 BST (13:00 GMT):

• Newsnight's Jeremy Paxman gets the ball rolling on Monday 26 September as our first guest presenter.
• On Tuesday 27 September, Christine Ockrent, one of France's most respected news broadcasters, will be in our Bush House studio.
• We come from Johannesburg on Wednesday 28 September, with Redi Tlhabi of Talk Radio 702.
• Christiane Amanpour, ABC's hugely experienced foreign correspondent, presents from New York on Thursday 29 September.
• And on Friday 30 September, Today's Evan Davis takes the helm.

As well as pursuing the day's news agenda, Newshour's guest presenters will be conducting interviews and exploring themes which reflect their own interests and expertise. And some are using their personal contacts book to get big name guests on to the programme.

Do tune in.

Andrew Whitehead is the editor of BBC World Service News.

Responding to big stories at Radio 4

Host Host | 09:20 UK time, Monday, 29 June 2009

At the Radio 4 Blog, controller Mark Damazer writes about recent programmes responding to current events, namely Iran (The Report and Uncovering Iran) and MPs' expenses (Moats, Mortgages and Mayhem).

You can read more and comment at the Radio 4 Blog.

The role of the BBC's News blogs

Host Host | 12:01 UK time, Monday, 27 October 2008

Radio 4's Feedback programme had a discussion about some of the issues surrounding the BBC's News blogs. You can listen to the discussion below.

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. Visit BBC Webwise for full instructions. If you're reading via RSS, you'll need to visit the blog to access this content.

Graphic footage

Host Host | 19:20 UK time, Wednesday, 9 July 2008

The BBC has issued a statement about the footage shown on the BBC News at Ten O'Clock last week of the shooting of a man in Jerusalem following a bulldozer attack. You can read the statement here on the BBC Complaints website.

Social networking

Host Host | 16:35 UK time, Thursday, 20 March 2008

You may remember that Steve Herrmann, editor of the BBC News website, has written about the BBC's use of photos from social networking sites. Head of editorial policy David Jordan has now written further guidance for BBC journalists, which you can read about on the BBC's Internet blog.

Comment problems

Host Host | 17:41 UK time, Monday, 25 February 2008

Apologies for the ongoing problems with leaving comments on BBC blogs, including The Editors. A post by Jem Stone on the BBC Internet Blog explains something about our plans for improving matters.

Site anniversary

Host Host | 10:03 UK time, Thursday, 13 December 2007

As part of the celebrations to mark the tenth anniversary of www.bbc.co.uk, Mike Smartt, founding editor of the BBC News website, writes here on the BBC Internet blog about some of the background to the site.

Newswatch

Host Host | 15:41 UK time, Monday, 22 October 2007

In this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC News, deputy director general, Mark Byford, answers questions about how planned cuts at the corporation will affect viewers, listeners and readers of BBC News.

You can watch the programme here.

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:38 UK time, Friday, 12 October 2007

The Guardian: Reports that Sir Michael Lyons has told leading BBC broadcasters to keep out of the public debate over proposed budget cuts. (link)

Press Gazette: Article on Gordon Brown's exclusive interview with Andrew Marr over his election decision. (link)

The Times: Analysis of the current difficulties facing Mark Thompson. (link)

Metro: "Burma's military rulers have accused the BBC of provoking the anti-government demonstrations in the country." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:24 UK time, Thursday, 11 October 2007

The Times: "Mark Thompson, the BBC's director general, was today forced to backtrack on comments in which he said that employees at the broadcaster would be "pleasantly surprised" by the level of job losses to be announced next week." (link)

Daily Telegraph: Reports that leading BBC radio presenters have signed an open letter to the BBC Trust complaining about proposed job cuts. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:08 UK time, Wednesday, 10 October 2007

The Guardian: Reports that funding has been approved for the BBC's expanded 24-hour Arabic TV news service, as well as a news channel in Farsi. (link)

All papers: Report the news of anticipated job cuts at the BBC. (link, link, link and link)

Daily Telegraph: Leader article on the threat of strike action at the BBC. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:45 UK time, Tuesday, 9 October 2007

Financial Times: Reports that at least 12% of BBC jobs are to be cut. (link)

The Times: David Aaronovitch writes that "the BBC story has shifted from being one about scandal to being one about panic". (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:41 UK time, Monday, 8 October 2007

The Guardian: Alan Yentob, the BBC's creative director, speaks about 'Noddygate'. (link)

The Guardian: A report on the ability of news organisations to deal with the demands of a snap election, had one been called. (link)

The Guardian: An article on the architect behind the BBC's new studios in Glasgow. (link)

Sunday Telegraph: Former BBC business editor Jeff Randall comments on management at the corporation. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 11:47 UK time, Friday, 5 October 2007

Financial Times: Philip Stevens writes about the recent row over Newsround's guide to 9/11. (link)

The Sun: Leader article accuses the Today programme of having an EU bias. (link)

Press Gazette: Reports that the BBC is to launch a broadcasting award in honour of World at One presenter Nick Clarke who died last year. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 11:29 UK time, Thursday, 4 October 2007

The Guardian: Reports that Alan Johnston will take part in an hour-long Panorama special, telling the story of his kidnapping and release. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:18 UK time, Wednesday, 3 October 2007

Daily Mirror: Reports that newsreader Moira Stuart is leaving the BBC. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:38 UK time, Tuesday, 2 October 2007

Daily Telegraph: Gillian Reynolds on the 40th anniversary celebrations of Radios 1, 2 and 4. (link)

The Times: Reports that BBC Worldwide has acquired the travel guide publisher, Lonely Planet. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 12:29 UK time, Monday, 1 October 2007

In this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC TV News, home editor Mark Easton, defends a recent report that was criticised for making too much of a link between migrants and crime.

Also on the programme, Ben Rich, a deputy editor of daytime news, discussed why a story about a baby who was born with the help of a 999 operator was newsworthy.

You can watch Newswatch here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:29 UK time, Monday, 1 October 2007

Daily Telegraph: "A top BBC Radio 5 presenter was rejected as a replacement for John Humphrys on the Today programme allegedly because he was not posh enough." (link)

The Times: Reports that the Nicholas Sarkozy would like the French broadcasting system to be modelled on the BBC. (link)

The Guardian: Interview with Radio 4 controller, Mark Damazer, as the station celebrates its 40th birthday. (link)

The Independent: Rageh Omaar writes about his mentor, George Alagiah. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:15 UK time, Friday, 28 September 2007

The Sun: Reports that the BBC is to pay its celebrity presenters less. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 11:26 UK time, Thursday, 27 September 2007

The Guardian: Reports that one of the kidnappers of BBC journalist Alan Johnston was killed yesterday in Gaza City. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:00 UK time, Wednesday, 26 September 2007

The Independent: "The BBC Trust has approved the corporation's plans to launch a high definition television channel, saying it would be of 'significant public value'." (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that the BBC paid John Prescott and John Reid for interviews at the Labour conference. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:04 UK time, Tuesday, 25 September 2007

The Guardian: "At least one member of the BBC Trust is unhappy with the mild disciplining of Alan Yentob over "noddy shots" he performed." (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:56 UK time, Monday, 24 September 2007

The Guardian: Columnist Steve Hewlett says that the BBC has to cut the amount of programming that it produces by 10%. (link)

The Guardian: Peter Wilby on the constant criticism of the BBC in the right-wing press. (link)

The Independent: Interview with Newsnight presenter Kirsty Wark. (link)

Daily Mail: "BBC executive Alan Yentob has got away with misleading viewers on a flagship arts show while more junior staff have been sacked in the storm over deception at the corporation." (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:21 UK time, Friday, 21 September 2007

The Guardian: Reports that the BBC has pulled most of the journalists out of its Baghdad bureau following a "serious and credible" threat to staff. (link)

Daily Mail: There are claims that the BBC's new mini-bulletins must only be presented by young and pretty women. (link)

The Times: "Two senior producers were forced to quit the BBC yesterday, after the corporation admitted that producers had fixed four more audience votes and competitions." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 12:25 UK time, Thursday, 20 September 2007

The Guardian : A columnist asks if the BBC should simulcast TV programmes such as Newsnight on the radio. (link)

The Times: "Blue Peter was accused yesterday of deceiving children for the second time in a year as the BBC removed staff blamed for a series of scandals." (link)

The Guardian: Mark Lawson comments on international coverage of the Madeleine McCann story. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:20 UK time, Wednesday, 19 September 2007

The Independent: Ofcom gives BBC go-ahead for an HD channel (link)
Daily Mirror: Former BBC reporter Clarence Mitchell leaves civil service to become spokesman for Gerry and Kate McCann (link)
Daily Telegraph: Jane Garvey joins Woman's Hour
Marketing: Freeview launches £5m advertising campaign

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 13:21 UK time, Tuesday, 18 September 2007

The Guardian: Reports that a former BBC journalist has been hired to act as a spokesman for the McCann family. (link)

Financial Times: A blog on the newspaper's website comments on coverage of the Northern Rock story. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 11:39 UK time, Monday, 17 September 2007

The Guardian: A columnist writes about how the demands of 24-hour news have added to the woes of the McCann family. (link)

The Guardian: The BBC's former business editor Jeff Randall comments on his time at the corporation. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:03 UK time, Friday, 14 September 2007

The Times: Reports that the BBC will not be hosting any parties at this year's political party conferences. (link)

The Jewish Chronicle: Interview with the BBC Political Editor Nick Robinson. (link)

Financial Times: Reports on the culture secretary's speech to the broadcasting industry on their public service responsibilities. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 11:24 UK time, Thursday, 13 September 2007

The Guardian: Reports on a speech given by the Culture Secretary James Purnell on broadcasting. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Leader column on the row between John Humphrys and Jeremy Paxman. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 11:29 UK time, Wednesday, 12 September 2007

The Telegraph: "The BBC has denied claims that is biased in favour of the McCanns as the hunt for their daughter continues." (link)

The Independent: A column takes a look at the output of the BBC's digital channels. (link)

The Times: A columnist criticises BBC reporting on Iraq. (link)

Daily Mail: "Jeremy Paxman and John Humphrys have turned on each other over where the BBC should aim its budget cuts." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:49 UK time, Tuesday, 11 September 2007

Daily Telegraph: "A Radio Five Live phone-in was abandoned yesterday morning because of the unexpected degree of anti-McCann feeling voiced by callers." (link)

The Times: Reports on Ofcom's current review into the future of radio. (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC was yesterday censured for showing footage of the 2012 Olympic logo which could have triggered epileptic seizures." (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 10:43 UK time, Monday, 10 September 2007

In this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC News, Sue Nix, a senior editor at News 24, responds to the suggestion that the tenth anniversary of Princess Diana's death isn't news.

Also, College of Journalism Editor Kevin Marsh talks about the importance of reporting military terminology correctly and Business Editor Robert Peston discusses the BBC's business coverage.

You can watch the programme here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:37 UK time, Monday, 10 September 2007

The Independent: Raymond Snoddy writes about the forthcoming budget cuts at BBC News. (link)

The Independent: Head of the BBC's news obituaries unit, Bob Chaundry, writes about the job of reporting the deaths of public figures. (link)

The Guardian: Peter Preston argues that the BBC should tackle subjects like climate change rather than take an impartial stance. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:13 UK time, Friday, 7 September 2007

The Times: Reports that the BBC can't decide what to call Holyrood's new administration. (link)

The Independent: Matthew Norman writes that the BBC has had "a blind fear of being attacked" ever since the Hutton Inquiry. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that the BBC has admitted that the BBC's creative director Alan Yentob filmed a number of "noddy" shots for interviews which he didn't personally take part in. (link)

Daily Mail: Comments on the the number of informally dressed BBC newsreaders and reporters. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:48 UK time, Thursday, 6 September 2007

The Guardian: Reports that the BBC has cancelled plans for a day of programmes dedicated to environmental issues after senior news executives said (link here) that the corporation needs to be impartial. (link)

Daily Express: Columnist Virginia Blackburn accuses the BBC of having a left-wing bias. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:50 UK time, Wednesday, 5 September 2007

The Times: Article accusing the BBC of an anti-London bias. (link)

The Independent: Terence Blacker on the recent furore about newsreaders showing their legs. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 11:29 UK time, Tuesday, 4 September 2007

Daily Telegraph: Reports that documents released by the National Archive have shown that George Orwell was monitored by MI5 when he worked at the BBC. (link)

Financial Times: Brian Groom writes in support of BBC Four, following John Humphreys' comments that it should be axed. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:38 UK time, Monday, 3 September 2007

The Independent: Interview with Today presenter John Humphrys in which he suggests that the digital channels BBC Three and BBC Four should be axed in order to cut costs. (link)

The Guardian: John Cole asks whether journalists or politicians should be blamed for the current state of the media. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:01 UK time, Friday, 31 August 2007

The Times: Report on Panorama's investigation into dog fighting. (Link)

The Independent: Debate about Five News banning TV editing shots known as "noddies". (Link)

Daily Mail: Richard Littlejohn writes about Newsnight's Stephanie Flanders' interview with David Cameron. (Link) (see comment, below)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:49 UK time, Thursday, 30 August 2007

The Guardian: Reports that the BBC is to consider banning the use of staged shots in news reports. (link)

Daily Mail: Columnist Keith Waterhouse praises senior BBC executives who have criticised plans to hold a day of programmes dedicated to environmental issues. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:48 UK time, Wednesday, 29 August 2007

The Independent: Columnist Terence Blacker on the BBC's climate change coverage. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:24 UK time, Tuesday, 28 August 2007

Daily Telegraph: Anna Ford accuses the BBC of ageism. (link)

Daily Mail: Columnist Richard Littlejohn praises Newsnight Editor Peter Barron's criticism of the BBC's plans to have an entire day of programmes on environmental issues. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:33 UK time, Friday, 24 August 2007

Daily Telegraph: "Jeremy Paxman will deliver a blistering attack tonight on the television industry's pursuit of ratings." (link)

The Guardian: BBC Director General Mark Thompson writes about what the corporation must do to restore the public's faith in it. (link)

The Times: Article looking ahead to Jeremy Paxman's MacTaggart lecture in Edinburgh. (link)

The Guardian: Guide to the Edinburgh TV Festival. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:11 UK time, Thursday, 23 August 2007

Daily Mail: Former BBC arts correspondent Rosie Millard on the commotion over how female newsreaders dress. (link)

The Independent: Reports that YouTube is to show adverts during video clips, which will include the BBC's commercial content. (link)

The Times: Figures published by Ofcom reveal that women spend more time on the internet than men, and that the BBC's website is one of the most popular used by them. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:09 UK time, Wednesday, 22 August 2007

Daily Mail: Reports that some viewers have complained to the BBC about a Ten O'Clock News trailer featuring newsreader Emily Maitlis. (link)

The Sun: "The BBC is to rerun Princess Diana's funeral in full to mark the tenth anniversary of her death." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:08 UK time, Tuesday, 21 August 2007

Daily Mail: Columnist Richard Littlejohn accuses the BBC of being afraid of offending Muslims but not other religious groups. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:02 UK time, Monday, 20 August 2007

The Independent: Newsnight editor Peter Barron on his life in the media. (link)

The Guardian: Interview with Panorama reporter John Sweeney. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Reports that the BBC had to remove comments from a Radio Five Live message board after complaints from religious groups. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:06 UK time, Friday, 17 August 2007

The Independent: Columnist Terence Blacker on why the BBC shouldn’t always feel the need to apologise. (link)

Press Gazette: Despite radio listening figures being at an all time high, the BBC’s audience share has fallen.(link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:30 UK time, Thursday, 16 August 2007

The Times: Reports that the BBC has apologised to the Conservative party for using old footage of John Redwood in its coverage of Tory plans to cut red tape. (link)

The Guardian: Marista Leishman talking at the Edinburgh international book festival about her father, Lord Reith. (link)

Financial Times: Reports that the BBC is selling its outside broadcast units, post-production suites and costumes. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:03 UK time, Wednesday, 15 August 2007

The Times: Reports that the BBC was forced to apologise after Blue Peter presenter Konne Huq appeared with Ken Livingstone as he made a political speech. (link)

Daily Mail: Columnist Stephen Glover accuses the BBC of constantly demonising Margaret Thatcher. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:30 UK time, Tuesday, 14 August 2007

The Telegraph: Reports that the launch of the BBC's iPlayer, as well as other video services, could affect the amount people pay for their internet connection. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:22 UK time, Monday, 13 August 2007

The Guardian: Debate on the devolution of Scottish broadcasting. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that the BBC World Service Trust has trained several journalists from Liberia and Sierra Leone so they can cover the war crimes trial of Charles Taylor in the Hague. (link)

The Independent: Reports on the success of the BBC's iPlayer trial so far. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:13 UK time, Friday, 10 August 2007

Daily Mail: "The BBC may be forced to scrap one of its television channels to help meet a £2billion cut in its budget, its chairman has revealed." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:31 UK time, Thursday, 9 August 2007

The Guardian: Interview with Sir Michael Lyons, to mark his first 100 days as chairman of the BBC Trust, in which he responds to criticisms of the corporation following recent scandals. (link)

The Scotsman: Reports that Alex Salmond has set up an independent commission on Scottish broadcasting. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:05 UK time, Wednesday, 8 August 2007

The Guardian: "BBC News 24 has continued to increase its lead over Sky News." (link)

Daily Record: Reports that Labour has attacked Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond's call for a Scottish Six News bulletin which he's expected to announce today. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:18 UK time, Tuesday, 7 August 2007

The Guardian: Article criticising the BBC for trying to target particular types of people rather than engaging the audience as a whole. (link)

The Sun: Reports that the BBC paid nearly £20 million in staff bonuses in the year to 30 June 2007. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 12:58 UK time, Monday, 6 August 2007

This week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC News, comes from Northern Ireland. TV News editor, Angelina Fusco, talks about the challenges facing BBC News there.

You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:11 UK time, Monday, 6 August 2007

The Independent: Conor Dignam, editor of Broadcast magazine, defends the BBC and other broadcasters against the criticism received in the press after recent scandals. (link)

The Herald: Reports that former BBC director-general Greg Dyke has said that he was in favour of a Scottish Six news bulletin. (link)

New Statesman: Letter from the director of BBC News, Helen Boaden, responding to an article written by John Pilger on the BBC's Middle East coverage. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:00 UK time, Friday, 3 August 2007

Daily Mail: "Government ministers were given too much opportunity to influence the selection process behind the appointment of BBC chairman Sir Michael Lyons, an all-party select committee has said." (link)

Press Gazette: Kevin Marsh, head of the BBC's College of Journalism, on impartiality. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:52 UK time, Thursday, 2 August 2007

The Times: Profile of BBC political editor Nick Robinson. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:22 UK time, Wednesday, 1 August 2007

The Guardian: TV critic Jim Shelley on the role of the newsreader. (link)

Press Gazette: Reports on the BBC's use of interactive tools, including Google maps and Twitter. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:20 UK time, Tuesday, 31 July 2007

Financial Times: Columnist Jonathan Guthrie on the amount of coverage given to news stories about the media. (link)

The Times: Praise for Evan Davis as a presenter on the Today programme. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:18 UK time, Monday, 30 July 2007

The Guardian: Reports a poll which indicates that public trust in the BBC has fallen sharply in the wake of recent scandals. (link)

The Telegraph: "The BBC's long-awaited internet TV service - iPlayer - has successfully passed its most important test: remaining fully-functional for its first 48 hours." (link)

The Independent: A reporter spends a day with the Ten O'Clock News team. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:15 UK time, Friday, 27 July 2007

The Telegraph: Former BBC business editor Jeff Randall writes about working at the corporation. (link)

The Guardian: A blog on the newspaper's website praises Evan Davis for his recent appearences on the Today programme. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 08:27 UK time, Thursday, 26 July 2007

Time magazine: A report on the recent scandals affecting broadcasting in the UK (link)

The Telegraph: A preview of the BBC's on-demand iPlayer service, which is due to launch tomorrow. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:35 UK time, Wednesday, 25 July 2007

The Guardian: A sketch on the appearence of BBC executives in front of a select committee. (link)

The Telegraph: Reports that all BBC staff will be required to take "a new training programme to teach honesty to BBC staff". (link)

Daily Mail: "BBC bosses have been accused of wasting licence-fee money on teaching their staff not to lie." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:28 UK time, Tuesday, 24 July 2007

Daily Mail: Reports that the BBC has been forced to abandon plans for a documentary about a mentally impaired young mother. (link)

The Independent: A columnist comments on the reporting of the cash-for-honours allegations, with comments on the BBC. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 10:36 UK time, Monday, 23 July 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC TV News, Adrian Van-Klareven, deputy director of News, talks about the need to reassure audiences following a series of editorial misrepresentations.

You can watch the programme by clicking here

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:59 UK time, Monday, 23 July 2007

Daily Mail: Reports that the BBC has had to apologise for a Newsnight survey which suggested that most of the UK's leading businesses were against Scottish independence although no poll was ever formally conducted. (link)

The Independent: Five Live presenter Victoria Derbyshire on the station's role in connecting with audiences that the rest of the BBC fail to reach. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 12:03 UK time, Friday, 20 July 2007

The Economist: Article criticising the BBC Russian service's coverage of the Litvinenko story for being too cautious. (link)

The Independent: Former BBC director general Greg Dyke on the recent problems at the BBC. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 11:15 UK time, Thursday, 19 July 2007

All papers: BBC announces a suspension of all competitions, an investigation into programmes accused of faking phone-ins and all staff are to attend an integrity course, following Mark Thompson's meeting with the BBC Trust. (Google news link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 11:41 UK time, Wednesday, 18 July 2007

The Times: As Mark Thompson meets the BBC Trust today, he is expected to suggest tighter quality controls following recent editorial errors. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:36 UK time, Tuesday, 17 July 2007

Daily Telegraph: "The independent production company at the centre of the row over misleading television footage of the Queen today issued a grovelling apology to the BBC." (link)

The Times: Columnist Libby Purves blames the BBC's current culture, created by the enforced outsourcing of much of its production, for the recent mistakes made at the corporation. (link)

Newswatch/Feedback

Host Host | 13:15 UK time, Monday, 16 July 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC News, Deputy UK News Editor James Buchanan responds to claims that the flooding in Hull was largely overlooked, whilst the coverage focused on Sheffield instead. You can watch the programme by clicking here.

On Radio 4's Feedback this week, the editor of the Today programme, Ceri Thomas, discusses why so much time was devoted to Alistair Campbell’s diaries, despite the fact that interviewer John Humphrys hadn’t been given the chance to read them beforehand. You can listen to it here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:47 UK time, Monday, 16 July 2007

The Times: Columnist Carol Sarler on the row over the documentary about the Queen, and why in a business the size of the BBC it's impossible for one person to be held responsible. (link)

The Independent: Interview with David Dimbleby on what the BBC means to him. (link)

The Guardian: Leader article praising Ceefax. (link)

Western Mail: BBC News has been criticised by the Audience Council for Wales for its poor coverage of the Welsh assembly. (link)

Press Gazette: Jon Williams, the BBC’s world news editor has promised to rethink the way that the kidnappings and murders of foreign journalists are covered by the corporation. (link)

Mail on Sunday: Row over footage used by Newsnight in a film about Gordon Brown. (link)

Scotland on Sunday: Reports that Mark Thompson wrote to BBC staff telling them that the corporation has to put “its house in order”. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:36 UK time, Friday, 13 July 2007

All papers: BBC apologises to the Queen over promotional clips apparently showing her angry with photographer Annie Liebovitz. (Google news link)

Times: Andrew Marr told to stop writing a column for the Daily Telegraph. (Link)

Express: Frederick Forsyth claims BBC News is "dominated by a claque of hard-Left, anti-British republicans". (Link)


BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 11:06 UK time, Wednesday, 11 July 2007

Financial Times: Reports on a speech made by Mark Thompson in which he attacks commercial rivals for the declining quality of their news and current affairs output, saying that if it weren't for the BBC some foreign stories would go uncovered. (link)

Daily Mail: Columnist Stephen Glover criticises the coverage that Alistair Campbell's recently published diaries received on the BBC. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:57 UK time, Tuesday, 10 July 2007

Financial Times: Columnist Philip Stephens argues that the BBC should concentrate on appealing to its middle class audience instead of going head to head against commercial competitors, trying to do everything for everyone. (link)

The Guardian: Article asking whether the BBC is impartial on climate change, after its coverage of the Live Earth concert. (link)

The Times: Reports that the BBC has been fined £50,000 by Ofcom after the results of a Blue Peter phone-in competition were faked. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 12:51 UK time, Monday, 9 July 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC News, Kevin Bakhurst, controller of News 24, defends the coverage of the London and Glasgow terror attacks, including the decision to send reporters from London to Scotland to cover the latter incident.

You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:37 UK time, Monday, 9 July 2007

The Independent: Article on the importance of the World Service, both in the UK and abroad. (link)

Daily Telegraph: "The BBC ordered Jonathan Ross to remind viewers of Live Earth that climate change may not have been caused by human activity, as the broadcaster tries to stay neutral on current affairs." (link)

The Guardian: Annual chart of the top 100 people in the media, including several people from the BBC. (link)

The Guardian: Former hostage Brian Keenan offers his advice to Alan Johnston following his 114 days in captivity. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:08 UK time, Friday, 6 July 2007

The Guardian: Columnist Mark Lawson predicts that TV news will soon be determined by viewers being able to pick and mix the news they watch, replacing the traditional running order. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Reports that BBC correspondent Alan Johnston travelled to the West Bank to thank Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas for his part in helping to free him. (link)

The Times: Article on new Culture Secretary James Purnell and the decisions he faces regarding broadcasting, in particular the BBC. (link)

The Guardian: Interviews with John Simpson and Rageh Omaar celebrating the release of Alan Johnston. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:47 UK time, Thursday, 5 July 2007

Daily Mail: John Humphreys on Alan Johnston and how he'll cope with his newfound fame. (link)

The Guardian: Reports on Ofcom's warning that impartiality rules for TV news may be axed in order to connect with more young people and ethnic minorities. (link)

Financial Times: First newspaper interview with Sir Michael Lyons since he became BBC chairman. (link)

The Times: Columnist Camilla Cavendish on what the BBC's priorities should be in light of the corporation's annual report. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:20 UK time, Wednesday, 4 July 2007

Daily Telegraph and others: Reports on the release of BBC correspondent Alan Johnston, who was held captive in Gaza for 114 days. (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC Trust noted research from pollsters Mori indicating that 76% of the UK public said they trusted the corporation's news programmes over any others." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:25 UK time, Tuesday, 3 July 2007

The Independent: Reports that a spokesman for the Palestinian militant group, which claims to have kidnapped the BBC correspondent Alan Johnston, was detained by Hamas in Gaza yesterday. (link)

The Guardian: Review of the new Iranian English language news channel, commenting on how its website is “emulating the design of the BBC News site to an almost spooky degree”. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 11:22 UK time, Monday, 2 July 2007

In this week's Newswatch, the programme about viewers' complaints about BBC News, Breakfast editor David Kermode discusses claims that Breakfast's agenda is too soft. The curtailing of Tony Blair's final prime ministers' questions on the Daily Politics, discussed by Helen Boaden here, is also debated. Watch the programme here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:50 UK time, Monday, 2 July 2007

The Times: A report on the role played by 'citizen journalists' in the coverage of the attack on Glasgow Airport. (link)

The Guardian: Comments of Jeremy Paxman's decision to speak at the Edinburgh TV festival this year. (link)

Sunday Telegraph: An extended profile of the BBC's economics editor Evan Davis. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 11:27 UK time, Friday, 29 June 2007

Wall Street Journal: Former BBC journalist Robin Aitken comments on the recent report into the corporation's impartiality. (subscription only link)

Press Gazette: Reports that a weekly BBC news magazine, which will be run in close co-operation with BBC News, is to be launched this autumn. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:32 UK time, Thursday, 28 June 2007

The Times: Reports that the BBC's iPlayer will be available to dowload programmes on demand from 27 July. (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC's decision to sell off its technology arm to Siemens came in for stinging criticism from MPs today." (link)

The Guardian: Reports that the BBC has apologised for cutting off the end of Tony Blair's final speech in the House of Commons. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:48 UK time, Wednesday, 27 June 2007

The Times: Reports that the kidnappers of BBC correspondent Alan Johnston have reiterated their threat to kill him if their demands for prisoners to be released are not met. (link)

The Guardian: “As the BBC World Service puts the finishing touches to its plans for a Farsi satellite TV channel, it has emerged that Iran's state broadcaster will start an English news service next week.” (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:07 UK time, Tuesday, 26 June 2007

The Guardian: "All the top BBC executives, including Mark Thompson, the director general, are to waive their bonuses this year." (link)

Daily Mirror: Reports that Alan Johnston's family have made a fresh plea for his release following the latest video showing him wearing what appears to be an explosives belt. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 08:40 UK time, Monday, 25 June 2007

The Times: Reports on a video of BBC correspondent Alan Johnston wearing what appears to be an explosives belt, which was released by his kidnappers. (link)

The Times: “The true cost of BBC One is £1.4 billion, the corporation will reveal next week, nearly £600 million more than it was prepared to admit last year.” (link)

Daily Telegraph: Reports on the number of passes allocated to the BBC at Glastonbury. (link)

The Guardian: “A strict programme of savings and cutbacks has given the BBC a £60m surplus as it moves towards an uncertain future under its licence fee settlement.” (link)

The Guardian: Business editor Deborah Hargreaves on the BBC’s business coverage, criticising it for concentrating efforts on reality-style programmes such as The Apprentice. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 08:56 UK time, Friday, 22 June 2007

The Independent: Law Editor Robert Verkaik on how Martin Bashir's Panorama interview with Diana, Princess of Wales, changed the BBC's relationship with the monarchy. (link)

The Times: Article in which the BBC's deputy director general Mark Byford's responds to allegations of "an innate liberal bias" at the corporation. (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC is reviewing the generous relocation package it promised to staff moving to its new base in Salford." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:51 UK time, Thursday, 21 June 2007

The Times: Reports that video-sharing site YouTube is enjoying huge growth, challenging the BBC's position as the most popular online media destination in Britain. (link)

The Telegraph: "Colleagues and friends of kidnapped BBC reporter Alan Johnston have held a series of vigils across the world to mark his 100th day in captivity." (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:29 UK time, Wednesday, 20 June 2007

Daily Telegraph: "The BBC was accused last night of risking the safety of British forces in Iraq after trawling for information on troop movements in the war-torn country." (link)

The Guardian: John Lloyd writes that, in order for the BBC to lose its reputation for bias, it needs to accept more than two sides to every argument. (link)

Metro: "A worldwide vigil is to be held for kidnapped Gaza correspondent Alan Johnston on the 100th day of his captivity." (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that presenter Nick Ross is to leave Crimewatch, criticising the corporation of having an obsession with younger presenters. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:55 UK time, Tuesday, 19 June 2007

The Times: Columnist Libby Purves suggests that the BBC tries too hard to appeal to "any hip minority rather than horrid old 'Middle England'", following the publication of the BBC's impartiality report. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Damian Thompson on the BBC's realisation that it must address accusations of bias as its critics have increasingly more alternatives to choose from. (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that Hamas has issued an ultimatum to those who are holding the BBC correspondent Alan Johnston. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that the BBC’s director general Mark Thompson is considering plans to make fewer but “bigger” programmes in an attempt to cut costs. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:58 UK time, Monday, 18 June 2007

Daily Telegraph: “The BBC has failed to promote proper debate on major political issues because of the inherent liberal culture of its staff, a report commissioned by the corporation has concluded.” (link)

The Guardian: The director of the BBC’s college of journalism, Vin Ray, writes about an old e-mail that he recently re-discovered from Alan Johnston on the role of the reporter. (link)

Financial Times: Reports that the BBC is revamping its international output, replacing BBC Prime with new channels and increasing the amount of US-focused news on BBC America, including an hour-long weekly news programme featuring Jeremy Paxman. (link)

The Independent: Former Panorama reporter, Tom Mangold, gives his verdict of the new series of the current affairs programme after its first six months. (link)

The Times, Guardian, Daily Telegraph and others: Obituaries of the former Radio 4 controller and managing director of BBC Radio, Sir David Hatch. (link, link, link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:32 UK time, Friday, 15 June 2007

The Guardian: "The BBC has said it does not plan to launch a formal inquiry into its Panorama special in which it alleged that Pakistan cricket coach Bob Woolmer had been murdered." (link)

Press Gazette: Reports that the kidnapping of BBC correspondent Alan Johnston has forced news organisations to rethink how they report from Gaza. (link)

Manchester Evening News: Reports on BBC Director General Mark Thompson's suggestion that more of the BBC may move to Salford in the next couple of years. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:20 UK time, Thursday, 14 June 2007

The Guardian: TV columnist Mark Lawson on news stories that don't appear to be new, referring to a recent Ten O'Clock News bulletin which reported that Bob Woolmer had died of natural causes. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:17 UK time, Wednesday, 13 June 2007

Daily Telegraph: Reports that the BBC is going to review the salaries of its top on-screen earners. (link)

The Times: BBC's head of TV news Peter Horrocks, along with other media executives, commenting on Tony Blair's speech in which he likens the media to a "feral beast". (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:23 UK time, Tuesday, 12 June 2007

Financial Times: Reports that the BBC has hired former CBS executive producer Rome Hartman to develop a new one-hour evening news bulletin for US audiences. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:11 UK time, Monday, 11 June 2007

The Guardian: Emily Bell argues that the BBC is no longer impartial. (link)

The Independent: Raymond Snoddy writes that BBC News needs to engage with a young audience at a time when budgets are being cut and hundreds of jobs are likely to be lost at the corporation. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:52 UK time, Friday, 8 June 2007

The Scotsman: Reports that an SNP MSP has written to Mark Thompson, calling for a "Scottish Six" news bulletin. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Business editor Jeff Randall on the type of comments he received from audiences when he was the BBC's business editor. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 11:07 UK time, Thursday, 7 June 2007

Daily Express: Reports on teething problems at the BBC's new Scottish HQ in Glasgow (no link available).

The Times: "Despite the lack of a large-scale graduate scheme and stiff selection procedures, students aspire to work for the BBC" (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:37 UK time, Wednesday, 6 June 2007

Daily Mail: Columnist Richard Kay on the number of BBC News staff who have gone to cover the G8 summit. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that a BBC executive has warned that some parts of the UK will never get DAB radio because of the cost. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:09 UK time, Tuesday, 5 June 2007

The Guardian: Reports that the expected cuts, including jobs, at the BBC are inflated because of long-term contracts that the corporation has already committed to. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:45 UK time, Monday, 4 June 2007

Daily Telegraph: Reports that BBC News will have to cut hundreds of jobs in order to save money. (link)

The Guardian: Article on the revamped BBC4 and BBC World programme World News Today. (link)

Independent: Interview with Jeremy Vineon his life in the media. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:20 UK time, Friday, 1 June 2007

The Guardian: Reports that an internet video of the BBC journalist Alan Johnston, who was abducted in Gaza almost 12 weeks ago, has been released. (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that the BBC has been given the go-ahead for its relocation, which will include BBC Children's and BBC Sport, to Salford. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:56 UK time, Thursday, 31 May 2007

Daily Telegraph: Columnist Alice Thompson on Newsnight's debate featuring the six Labour deputy leadership candidates. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:37 UK time, Wednesday, 30 May 2007

Daily Mail: Reports on the BBC inquiry into premium rate phone lines, which criticised Blue Peter for a "serious error of judgement". (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 12:52 UK time, Tuesday, 29 May 2007

In this week's Newswatch, the programme about viewers' thoughts on BBC TV News, Panorama reporter Paul Kenyon responds to criticism of an investigation into the radiation risks of wi-fi.

Also, Vicky Taylor, editor of Have Your Say, discusses a recent live programme featuring Colonel Gaddafi after the Libyan leader walked out halfway through the interview. You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:51 UK time, Tuesday, 29 May 2007

The Times: Columnist David Aaronovitch on the increasingly tabloid nature of television, referring to the BBC and the Ipswich murders, Virgina Tech and Panorama's Scientology programme. (link)

The Guardian: "BBC Worldwide is creating a digital team to develop and launch of a number of community-based, video-rich websites." (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:28 UK time, Friday, 25 May 2007

The Guardian: Reports on the Pakistani army's denial of allegations made by a BBC investigation into the conduct of its peacekeeping troops in Congo. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:33 UK time, Thursday, 24 May 2007

The Guardian: Reports that the chairman of ITV, Michael Grade, signed a confidentiality agreement when he resigned as BBC chairman in November 2006. (link)

Financial Times: Reports that Rupert Murdoch denies being influenced by the Chinese government over the decision to stop broadcasting BBC News on his satellite channel, Star TV, in China. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:24 UK time, Wednesday, 23 May 2007

Columbia Journalism Review: Article on the British media’s invasion of the US market. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that broadcasting unions have rejected the latest BBC pay offer. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:56 UK time, Tuesday, 22 May 2007

Press Gazette: "More than 100,000 people from around the world have added their names to the petition calling for the release of kidnapped BBC Gaza correspondent, Alan Johnston." (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 14:54 UK time, Monday, 21 May 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' thoughts about BBC News, Kevin Bakhurst, controller of News 24, talks about the Madeleine McCann coverage, and whether the lack of hard evidence from police led to reporters speculating rather than reporting the facts. Vin Ray, director of the BBC’s College of Journalism, responded to criticism of camerawork used in Panorama and other news programmes.

You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:44 UK time, Monday, 21 May 2007

Financial Times: Reports that the BBC’s international audience grew by an estimated 11% last year. (link)

The Independent: Interview with Five Live Breakfast presenter Nicky Campbell on his life in media. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that scientists have rejected Panorama’s claims on the radiation risks of wi-fi. (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC director general, Mark Thompson, will present an interim report to the BBC Trust next month proposing annual savings of around 5% a year up to 2013.” (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:28 UK time, Friday, 18 May 2007

The Times: Article on the "crusader journalist", following John Sweeney's investigation into Scientology. (link)

The Guardian: Columnist Simon Jenkins on the BBC's coverage of the Madeleine McCann story. (link)

Birthday greetings

Host Host | 10:25 UK time, Thursday, 17 May 2007

Today's is Alan Johnston's 45th birthday, and his 66th day in captivity. Here some of his colleagues, friends and editors from across BBC News extend their birthday greetings - and invite you to add yours via the Comments box.

alanposters.jpgDear Alan, I'm about to write a quick note to your parents to tell them what we're preparing for your birthday. it should be a surprise I know, but I don't want them to miss World Have Your Say. Mark and his team have asked writers to send you their best wishes and they've all obliged: Brian Keenan, Ian Rankin, Paulo Coelho, AS Byatt and many many others have sent some incredibly moving words which I know you will get, now or later when you're released. Happy 45th birthday, we're all thinking of you.
Liliane Landor, World Service

Now more than ever, we miss your humanity, objectivity and integrity in reporting the story of Gaza. From all your friends in the Middle East and around the world - happy birthday Alan.
Jon Williams, Newsgathering
(More from Jon in this From Our Own Correspondent)

Hi Alan, all the best on your birthday, I have been thinking back to the many night shifts we did together at World Service and how you always seemed the calmest most sensible presence in the office,m always a huge pleasure to have around. I hope you'll be around again as soon as possible.
Alistair Burnett, World Tonight

Many happy returns to you Alan your 45th birthday. We all have you in our thoughts and are working hard for your release which we dearly hope will happen soon.
Fran Unsworth, Newsgathering

Happy Birthday from everybody on Today. We can only wish that your day is as good as it can possibly be. If there's a window, we hope you can see out of it. If there's a radio, we hope you can hear it so that you'll know how much we, our listeners, and people around the world are thinking of you, and looking forward to the day when we'll be able to say to you in person: "We're sorry we couldn't see you on your birthday."
Ceri Thomas,Today

Alan, I am editor of the One and Six O'Clock News. We haven't met, but now - for all the wrong reasons - I feel I know you. Like so many journalists you wanted to tell the truth about the country you were working in. Your kidnap is wrong. You should be released now. Here in the newsroom we think of you every day... and of course we extend our best wishes on your birthday. The greatest gift you and your family could have is your freedom.
Mark Popescu, Daytime

Alan, All of your friends and colleagues in the BBC World Service and Global News Division are thinking of you and wishing you well. We hope you receive these messages of support and that you'll soon be back with us. Stay strong.
Richard Sambrook, Global News

Many Happy Returns - and here's hoping for a happy return soon to your family and friends.
Jonathan Baker, Newsgathering

Best wishes on your birthday from all at the BBC News website. Our thoughts are with you.
Steve Herrmann, News website

Happy Birthday my friend. We miss you but we are with you, everyday. By the way I checked with the suits and you should be able to carry your leave over into next year.
Pete Rippon, PM

PS. If you run a blog or website, you can add the Alan Johnston button by following the instructions on this page. If you haven't already added your name to the petition calling for Alan's release, you can do so here. Thank you for your support.

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:21 UK time, Thursday, 17 May 2007

The Guardian: Reports on the resignation of the editor of Blue Peter. (link)

Metro: Reports on actor John Travolta's response to the BBC's recent documentary on Scientology. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:49 UK time, Wednesday, 16 May 2007

The Guardian: Reports that former Newcastle United assistant manager, Kevin Bond, is to sue the BBC for libel following a Panorama programme about football bungs. (link)

The Times: Reports that Top Gear presenter Richard Hammond has won a Royal Society science writing award for a children's physics book. (link)

The Guardian:
"The BBC is fighting back against the growing number of reports claiming TV is bad for children with an independent assessment of their scientific validity." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:49 UK time, Tuesday, 15 May 2007

The Independent: Reports that the BBC is to close its online education service, BBC Jam, with the loss of 200 jobs based there. (link)

Daily Mail: "The 14-year-old daughter of BBC news presenter Gavin Esler has revealed in a television interview how she battled cancer." (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:56 UK time, Monday, 14 May 2007

Daily Telegraph: Reports on video clip of Panorama reporter John Sweeney losing his temper during an investigation into Scientology. (link)

The Guardian: Jeremy Paxman is to deliver the keynote speech at this summer's MediaGuardian Edinburgh International TV Festival. (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that the BBC is to spend £100,000 on a documentary about Cherie Blair's years in Downing Street. (link)

The Guardian: Article on the delays and costs affecting the BBC's iPlayer project. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:04 UK time, Friday, 11 May 2007

The Guardian: "Alan Johnston, the BBC's kidnapped Gaza correspondent, was today named broadcasting journalist of the year at the annual London Press Club awards." (link)

The Guardian: The BBC's Andrew Marr reports on a month spent with an 'eBook'. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 11:47 UK time, Thursday, 10 May 2007

Independent: Reports that Moira Stuart may move to ITV. (Link)
Independent: Janet Street-Porter says TV is still run by men, despite what Sir Patrick Moore says. (Link)
Daily Mail: Report on Today programme's investigation into child carers. (Link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:46 UK time, Wednesday, 9 May 2007

Daily Mail: "The BBC was accused of dumbing down yesterday after it revealed plans to broadcast a 60-second news summary on its main channel at 8pm." (link)

The Guardian: "Former BBC director general Greg Dyke has warned today the corporation will be "hamstrung" by its new governance body, the BBC Trust." (link)

Television Centre statement

Host Host | 12:47 UK time, Tuesday, 8 May 2007

Alan Johnston banner on Television Centre


Newswatch

Host Host | 10:55 UK time, Tuesday, 8 May 2007

In this week's Newswatch, the programme about viewers' thoughts on BBC TV News, Newsround’s editor, Tim Levell, discusses whether it is appropriate for a news programme to poke fun at President Bush and News 24’s Stephen Mawhinney defends the amount of coverage given to Topshop’s unveiling of the Kate Moss collection. You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:22 UK time, Tuesday, 8 May 2007

The Guardian: Leader article praises BBC Parliament. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Interview with the BBC's director of future media and technology, Ashley Highfield. (link)

Daily Mail: Reports on Sir Patrick Moore's comments that the BBC has been ruined by women. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that BBC staff numbers have fallen by 9% since Mark Thompson became director general in 2004. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:57 UK time, Friday, 4 May 2007

The Times: Report on future of TV viewing via the internet (Link)
The Times: Columnist Oliver Kamm on Lord Tebbit declining to take part in Radio 4's The Reunion (Link)
The Mirror: Report on the success of Boots face cream after Horizon programme (Link)
Press Gazette: Parliament to act after Ten O'Clock News investigation into human trafficking. (Link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:52 UK time, Thursday, 3 May 2007

The Guardian: Reports on claims made by the Palestinian prime minister, Ismail Haniyeh, that there’s been progress in efforts to free the BBC correspondent Alan Johnston in Gaza.(link)

Daily Telegraph: “Lord Tebbit has accused the BBC of 'debased standards' after it invited him to take part in a programme with the man who planted a bomb at the Grand Hotel in Brighton 23 years ago, which resulted in his wife being left paralysed.” (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:33 UK time, Wednesday, 2 May 2007

The Guardian: Reports that the BBC has re-signed John Humphrys and Terry Wogan for another two years. (link)

Financial Times: Reports on the different "catch up" services to be offered by the BBC, ITV and Channel 4, allowing viewers to watch programmes they might otherwise have missed. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:52 UK time, Tuesday, 1 May 2007

Daily Telegraph: "Viewers will be able to watch BBC programmes on the internet under the terms of a new service agreed yesterday." (Link)

The Independent: Reports on the BBC’s success at the Sony Radio Academy Awards. Winners included John Humphrys for news journalist of the year and Five Live Breakfast for news and current affairs programme. (Link)

Financial Times: Reports that the BBC has topped a poll of employers as voted by graduates. (Link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 13:22 UK time, Monday, 30 April 2007

In this week's Newswatch, the programme about viewers' thoughts on BBC TV News, News 24's Simon Waldman discusses the showing of the Virginia Tech shooting videos, and Breakfast's David Kermode answers claims that St George's Day is not given fair coverage. You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:35 UK time, Monday, 30 April 2007

Daily Express and others: Reports of Panorama's investigation into the death of Bob Woolmer (Link)
Daily Mail: Complaints over scheduling of CBeebies show In the Night Garden. (No link)
Independent: Interview with BBC business editor Robert Peston, including comments about BBC business coverage. (Link)
Guardian: Former BBC announcer Patrick Muirhead on the supposed 'death of the newsreader' (Link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:11 UK time, Friday, 27 April 2007

Press Gazette: Reports on Mark Thompson’s comments that BBC plans to develop a network of local television stations are now uncertain following the licence fee settlement. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 11:11 UK time, Thursday, 26 April 2007

The Independent: "The BBC has been urged to make religion part of the Radio 1 remit in a submission by Catholic and Anglican church leaders." (link)

The Guardian: "The general secretary of the National Union of Journalists yesterday called for efforts to secure the release of Alan Johnston to be stepped up." (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:39 UK time, Wednesday, 25 April 2007

The Times: Reports on Mark Thompson’s comments that the traditional role of the newsreader "has virtually died out”. (link)

The Independent: Columnist Deborah Orr writes that the Hutton report has left a “culture of caution” at the BBC, citing various issues such as the Balen report and BBC Jam as examples of this. (link)

The Scotsman: Reports on comments made by the Palestinian deputy prime minister that the BBC Gaza correspondent Alan Johnston, who was abducted on 12 March, is “in good health”. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:06 UK time, Tuesday, 24 April 2007

The Guardian: Article on a BBC News website story about a Sudanese man marrying his goat, written in February 2006, which has repeatedly topped the website’s list of most popular stories ever since. (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that BBC newsreader Huw Edwards is to be part of the commentary for the opening ceremony at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 10:33 UK time, Monday, 23 April 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC TV News, Alison Ford, UK news editor, responds to criticisms that the BBC’s coverage of Prince William and Kate Middleton’s relationship was no better than that of the paparazzi.

You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:25 UK time, Monday, 23 April 2007

The Independent: Interview with BBC News presenter Kate Silverton on her life in the media. (link)

The Guardian: Article on how video on demand has reached the mainstream, with so many services now available, including the forthcoming BBC iPlayer. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:37 UK time, Friday, 20 April 2007

The Independent: "The Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas said yesterday he had been given confirmation that the kidnapped BBC correspondent Alan Johnston was alive." (link)

The Guardian: Reports that planning approval has been given for a major part of the BBC's relocation to Salford Quays. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:11 UK time, Thursday, 19 April 2007

Daily Telegraph: Reports that the BBC is to trial a plan making its archive available to the public via Freeview. (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC is working with Apple to ensure its iPlayer video download service is compatible with Macs." (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:28 UK time, Wednesday, 18 April 2007

The Times: Reports that the Archbishop of York has begun his prayer vigil for the BBC Gaza correspondent Alan Johnston who was abducted five weeks ago. (link)

The Scotsman: "Labour leaders have held a secret meeting with the BBC to warn the corporation against unfairly favouring the Scottish National Party before the Holyrood election." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:46 UK time, Tuesday, 17 April 2007

Daily Mail: Reports that Moira Stuart may resume her role presenting the news on Sunday AM, following claims that she had been dropped for being too old. (link)

The Guardian: The BBC’s security correspondent Frank Gardner, who became paralysed after being shot in Saudi Arabia three years ago, writes about his recovery. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 12:23 UK time, Monday, 16 April 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC News, Peter Horrocks, head of TV News, defends the decision to report the release of navy personnel by Iran so prominently, at a time when four British soldiers had been killed in Iraq.

You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:37 UK time, Monday, 16 April 2007

The Independent: Interview with former Newsnight political editor Martha Kearney as she starts her new job as presenter of The World at One. (link)

Daily Telegraph: “Up to a million hours of broadcasting history could be made available on the internet as part of a plan to open the BBC's archive to licence fee payers”. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:01 UK time, Friday, 13 April 2007

Independent: Dominic Lawson takes issue with Professor Jeffrey Sachs' Reith Lecture (Link)
Daily Mail: Broadcasters were not allowed to film coffins arriving at RAF Lyneham but instead were supplied footage filmed by the MoD. (Link)
Guardian: Polly Toynbee says the BBC's reporting of the sale of sailors' stories "follows the tabloid frenzy without investigating tabloid behaviour". (Link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:32 UK time, Thursday, 12 April 2007

Metro: "The parents of BBC correspondent Alan Johnston, who was abducted in the Middle East a month ago, will step up calls for his release today." (link)

The Guardian: Columnist Jonathan Freedland discusses the practice of 'empty chairing' (drawing attention to politicians' refusal to show up) by broadcasters. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:38 UK time, Wednesday, 11 April 2007

Daily Mirror: Have I Got News For You podcasts launched. (No link)
The Times:
BBC rejects complaints about Waking the Dead. (Link)
The Daily Telegraph: Columnist Jan Moir on Moira Stuart. (Link)
The Times:
Controller for BBC Three named. (Link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:29 UK time, Tuesday, 10 April 2007

The Telegraph: "A complaint by Opus Dei that its members were unfairly portrayed in a TV drama has been rejected by the BBC." (link)

The Times: Columnist David Aaronovitch criticises the BBC's coverage of the controversy over the decision to allow the 15 Royal Navy personnel held in Iran to sell their stories to the media. (link)

Newsweek: "How a budget crunch and the Internet are forcing big changes at the BBC." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:47 UK time, Thursday, 5 April 2007

Daily Telegraph: Criticism of Radio 4's Lent talk in which the Dean of St Albans questioned the traditional view of the Crucifixion. (Link)

Daily Star: Prince Harry will be branded "an embarrassment" in a Hard Talk interview with photographer Arthur Edwards (Link)

Daily Express, Times: BBC pays damages to Lady Falkender over the programme The Lavender List. (Link)

Times: Romanian embassy accuses Newsnight of "stage-managing" a report into immigrants sleeping rough in Hyde Park. (Link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:01 UK time, Wednesday, 4 April 2007

Financial Times: Reports that National Grid Wireless, which operates the BBC's transmitter network, has been bought by an Australian group, Macquarie. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Article on the changes that the BBC needs to make as a result of the licence fee settlement, which takes effect from this week. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that a Five Live interview with Trinity Mirror's chief executive, Sly Bailey, failed to happen when she refused to appear with the Sun's business editor, Ian King. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:18 UK time, Tuesday, 3 April 2007

The Mirror: "Journalists in war-torn Gaza began a three-day strike yesterday in a bid to free kidnapped BBC man Alan Johnston." (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that broadcasters and viewers are angered by the suggestion that Moira Stuart has been dropped from reading the news because of her age. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 11:47 UK time, Monday, 2 April 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC TV News, Guy Pelham, live editor of BBC Newsgathering, defends outside broadcasts, in response to criticisms that they often don’t add anything to a report.

You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:38 UK time, Monday, 2 April 2007

The Guardian: Interview with Newsnight's newly appointed political editor, Michael Crick. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Reports that the BBC is to publish a petition signed by 300 leading media figures calling for the release of missing journalist Alan Johnston in Gaza. (link)

The Independent: Columnist Matthew Norman speculates that the next BBC chairman is likely to be either Sir Michael Lyons or Chris Powell. (link)

The Times: Reports that record companies have agreed a deal with UK commercial radio stations, but not the BBC, to allow music clips in podcasts. (link)

BBC in the news, Sunday

Host Host | 10:32 UK time, Monday, 2 April 2007

Sunday Telegraph: "Senior BBC bosses think that their current affairs programmes, including the award-winning Panorama, are too dull and serious." (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:53 UK time, Friday, 30 March 2007

Daily Telegraph: "Sir Michael Lyons emerged last night as the favourite to be the new BBC chairman." (link)

The Independent: Reports that the whereabouts of BBC journalist Alan Johnston, who has been missing in Gaza for 18 days, are still unknown. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:43 UK time, Thursday, 29 March 2007

The Times: Reports on Channel 4‘s bid to run ten new digital radio stations to provide "public service competition” to the BBC. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that it looks likely that the BBC has won its High Court action concerning Freedom of Information requests to publish a review into the corporation’s coverage of the Middle East. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 11:39 UK time, Wednesday, 28 March 2007

The Independent: Reports that nominations for the Sony radio awards have been announced, including a "broadcasters' broadcaster" category to mark 25 years of the awards. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that a High Court hearing relating to the Freedom of Information requests to publish a review into the BBC's Middle East coverage is under way. (link)

Report hearing

Host Host | 11:22 UK time, Tuesday, 27 March 2007

Martin Rosenbaum, who writes the Open Secrets blog, here writes about the hearing at the High Court starting on Tuesday concerning Freedom of Information applications to publish a BBC internal review of the corporation's Middle East coverage.

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:44 UK time, Tuesday, 27 March 2007

Daily Telegraph: Gillian Reynolds comments on the anger evoked by the subject of slavery on various BBC radio programmes to mark the 200th anniversary of the trade's abolition. (link)

The Independent: Reports on BBC Director General Mark Thompson's appeal for the release of missing Gaza journalist Alan Johnston. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 14:49 UK time, Monday, 26 March 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC TV News, Amanda Bruckshaw, duty weekend editor, responds to accusations that the BBC weekend news bulletins ignored a protest staged by 12,000 doctors.

Controller of News 24, Kevin Bakhurst, defends the channel’s use of the term "Breaking News". You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 11:14 UK time, Monday, 26 March 2007

The Guardian: Article on the missing journalist Alan Johnston, and his understanding of the risks involved in reporting from Gaza. (link)

Daily Mail: Columnist Richard Kay comments on claims that newsreader Moira Stuart has been dropped from presenting news bulletins on Sunday AM because she is too old (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:56 UK time, Friday, 23 March 2007

The Guardian: "Less than half of regular BBC1 and BBC2 viewers think they show enough new programmes made in the UK" was one of the findings of Ofcom's first annual report. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Reports that the BBC is to televise Alistair Campbell's diaries. (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that the BBC is going to the High Court to block a freedom of information request about the Balen report which reviewed the corporation's reporting in the Middle East. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:57 UK time, Thursday, 22 March 2007

Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph: Michael Crick appointed new political editor for Newsnight. (Link)

Daily Mail: Controller of BBC Children's, Richard Deverell, on the Blue Peter phone-in story. (No link)

Guardian: Feature on file-sharing and implications for the BBC's iPlayer project. (Link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:35 UK time, Wednesday, 21 March 2007

The Times: Columnist Michael Gove on the BBC’s coverage in the Middle East and the Syrian ambassador’s appearance on Newsnight. (link)

The Independent: Reports on Margaret Beckett’s comments in Parliament about the missing BBC journalist, Alan Johnston. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:54 UK time, Tuesday, 20 March 2007

Daily Telegraph: Reports that the father of BBC journalist Alan Johnston, who went missing in Gaza a week ago, has appealed for his son’s release. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that the suspension of the BBC’s online education service, BBC Jam, has been condemned by teachers. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 12:46 UK time, Monday, 19 March 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC TV News, Peter Barron, editor of Newsnight, discusses the reporting of CCTV footage showing a policeman punching a woman and whether race was part of the story.

David Shukman, the BBC’s environment and science correspondnet responds to various criticisms of the BBC’s coverage of climate change. You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:46 UK time, Monday, 19 March 2007

The Independent: Article on whether short video clips will replace longer programmes, including news bulletins and current affairs shows. (link)

Daily Mirror: Reports on Director General Mark Thompson's comments that the BBC needs to restore viewers' trust after the recent TV phone-in scandal. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:52 UK time, Friday, 16 March 2007

The Times: Columnist Gerard Baker accuses the BBC of having an "anti-Western bias", referring to an article in the New York Times. (link)

The Scotsman: Reports that a serial rapist who was obsessed with female BBC newsreaders was given four life sentences. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:02 UK time, Thursday, 15 March 2007

The Guardian: Reports that the BBC Trust has decided to suspend the online learning service, BBC Jam. (link)

Daily Telegraph: “Executives from ITV, the BBC, Channel 4 and Five met DTI Minister Margaret Hodge in an eleventh-hour plea for guaranteed spectrum to supply free high-definition (HD) television.” (link)

The Times: Comments on Richard Hooper, former deputy chairman of Ofcom, being on the shortlist for the job of BBC chairman. (link)

The Independent: Reports that Blue Peter has apologised for fixing a phone-in competition. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:14 UK time, Wednesday, 14 March 2007

Daily Telegraph: Andrew Marr recounts a story that during the Suez crisis, the British government had troops ready to take over Bush House, the headquarters of the BBC’s "external service” (now the World Service) in central London. (link)

The Times: Legal report on the lifting of the injunction against the BBC over the cash-for-honours story. (link)

Daily Mail: “Falkands veterans reacted with anger to claims that the BBC is scaling down its coverage of events to mark the 25th anniversary of the conflict.” (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:27 UK time, Tuesday, 13 March 2007

All papers: Report that the BBC has been unable to contact reporter Alan Johnston in Gaza. (link, link, link, link, link)

The Independent: Reports that the BBC is allowed to broadcast details of the cash-for-honours story as the final injunction was lifted by the Court of Appeal. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 11:37 UK time, Monday, 12 March 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC TV News, Peter Horrocks, the BBC's head of Television News, defends the coverage of the cash for honours story. There is also a discussion with David Liddiment from the BBC Trust on how the public can have a say on the future of the BBC. You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 11:22 UK time, Monday, 12 March 2007

The Guardian: Interview with Channel 4 Head of News and Current Affairs, Dorothy Byrne, who accuses the BBC of being out of date and not making the most of its resources.(link)

The Times: Reports that there will be a new series of Top Gear, despite comments made by presenter Jeremy Clarkson that there would not be. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Interview with BBC Security Correspondent Frank Gardner, who is wheelchair-bound after being shot in Saudi Arabia in 2004, on taking up extreme sports. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:54 UK time, Friday, 9 March 2007

Daily Telegraph: “The broadcaster is set to press ahead with the sale and possible break up of BBC Resources”, [which owns studios, broadcast trucks, costumes, wigs and post-productions suites]. (link)

Daily Record: Reports that the licence fee is set to increase to £135.50 as of next month. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:34 UK time, Thursday, 8 March 2007

Daily Telegraph: “Local newspaper group Johnston Press, which is suffering from an advertising downturn, has criticised BBC proposals for more localised television programmes and websites as ‘an incorrect use’ of the licence fee.” (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:14 UK time, Wednesday, 7 March 2007

Daily Mail: Leader column says that "more and more restrictions are being placed on the freedom of the press", with reference to the recent developments in the cash-for-honours inquiry. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:47 UK time, Tuesday, 6 March 2007

Financial Times: Reports on BBC Worldwide’s plans to increase revenue by inviting other UK broadcasters to use its new iPlayer as an alternative to Apple's iTunes for downloading audio and video. (link)

The Guardian: “BBC Worldwide's annual sales show for buyers from around the world reflects the broadcaster's need to make a profit from exporting its programmes to close the gap in funding after the recent licence fee settlement.” (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 15:41 UK time, Monday, 5 March 2007

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC TV News, Roger Harrabin, the BBC’s environmental analyst, discusses how the subject of climate change is reported and Breakfast editor David Kermode defends this year’s Oscar coverage. You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 11:22 UK time, Monday, 5 March 2007

The Times: Reports that police are seeking to gag the media until the cash-for-honours inquiry is over after the attorney general took out an injunction against the BBC to stop it broadcasting a report about the investigation. (link)

Daily Telegraph: “There was widespread support last night for Jonathan Ross's claim that the BBC employs most black people only in low paid jobs.” (link)

The Independent: News presenter Nicholas Owen who joins News 24 later this month on “My Life in the Media”. (link)

The Guardian: Interview with Newsnight’s Ethical Man, aka reporter Justin Rowlatt who’s spent the last year leading an ethical lifestyle. (link)

The Guardian: “The BBC has struck a partnership deal with IBM to develop "web 3.0" technology.” (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 11:40 UK time, Friday, 2 March 2007

The Herald: Reports that Jack McConnell has criticised a BBC documentary which claimed that money sent to Malawi by the Scottish Executive to tackle poverty was being mis-spent. (link)

The Guardian: “The BBC has confirmed a deal with YouTube to make programming available via a number of branded channels, including supplying an ad-funded BBC News clips service.” (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:51 UK time, Thursday, 1 March 2007

Daily Mail: Columnist Steven Glover accuses the BBC of hypocrisy regarding its environmental record as it is revealed that the corporation’s employees flew 125 million air miles in one year. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Letter criticising BBC bulletin newsreaders for using the phrase “top stories”. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:12 UK time, Wednesday, 28 February 2007

Daily Telegraph: Reports that the BBC has been given the provisional go-ahead for its free digital satellite service. (link)

Manchester Evening News: “The future for Salford and the BBC is revealed in this exclusive first detailed view of the new Media City.” (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 08:36 UK time, Tuesday, 27 February 2007

The Sun, Daily Mail and others: Reports on Tuesday night's Watchdog report into security at airport car park valet services. (Link)

Daily Star: Mediawatch UK criticises level of violence in films shown on British TV. (No link available)

Daily Mirror: Report on BBC activities for World Book Day. (No link available)

Guardian: Report says TV soaps should include more politics. (Link)

Washington Post: Review of BBC World by Howard Kurtz.(Link)

Independent: Review of Richard D North's book Scrap the BBC! (Link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:08 UK time, Monday, 26 February 2007

The Guardian: “Frustrated by government jamming and dwindling audience figures, staff at the BBC's China service are worried about an increasingly uncertain future.” (link)

The Scotsman: Reports on comments by former BBC News presenter Michael Buerk looking at what kind of society it would be if the rise of the internet saw the end of national newspapers and serious television journalism. (link)

Daily Mail: Reports on BBC News 24 presenter Kate Silverton's appearance at the Oscars and asks whether news is dumbing down using glamorous reporters. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:24 UK time, Friday, 23 February 2007

Daily Telegraph: “Martha Kearney will succeed the late Nick Clarke as presenter of Radio 4's The World At One.” (link)

Financial Times: Reports that the BBC Trust has delayed its decision on whether the international website will carry adverts. (link)

The Guardian: “The BBC has been named as the UK's strongest business brand ahead of Google, Apple and British Airways, according to Superbrands' top 500 report.” (link)

The Guardian:Reports on leaked BBC internal e-mails following the RTS awards, with allegations of juries being biased and unfair results. (link)

The Times: Dan Sabbagh comments on why the job ahead for the BBC Trust and chairman should not be that of a regulator but to listen to the audience. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:46 UK time, Thursday, 22 February 2007

The Guardian: "The BBC Trust is set to indicate whether its international website will be allowed to run adverts." (link)

Marketing Week: "SNP politicians are lobbying for an independent Scottish Broadcasting Corporation to replace the BBC, if the nation wins independence." (no link available)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:16 UK time, Wednesday, 21 February 2007

The Herald: “The BBC came in for a cyclone of criticism yesterday after a weatherman described the Western Isles as ‘nowheresville’.” (link)

The Guardian: “BBC staff campaigning against the proposals for adverts on BBC.com have made a final call for the director general, Mark Thompson, to abandon the scheme.” (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that BBC security correspondent Frank Gardner, who has been wheelchair-bound since being shot by al-Qaeda in 2004, presented a report standing up. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:52 UK time, Tuesday, 20 February 2007

Daily Telegraph: Reports that the ANC has criticised the BBC for being racist, after a news report by John Simpson on violent crime in South Africa. (link)

The Guardian: “Top Gear presenter Jeremy Clarkson has attacked BBC executives over a plan to make all company car users go on a "safe drivers" course.” (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:32 UK time, Monday, 19 February 2007

The Independent: Columnist Raymond Snoddy on what the BBC must do for its employees. (link)

The Guardian: Steve Hewlett questions whether the BBC iPlayer is already out of date. (link)

BBC in the news, Sunday

Host Host | 10:16 UK time, Monday, 19 February 2007

The Independent on Sunday: Former Five Live assistant editor Tim Luckhurst asks whether the station is “becoming just a populist, lavishly funded competitor to commercial chat radio”. (link)

Sunday Mirror: “The BBC's Shipping Forecast is being released - as a dance track.” (link)

Mail on Sunday: Excerpts from former BBC journalist Robin Aitken's book on being a Tory working at the corporation. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 08:15 UK time, Friday, 16 February 2007

Daily Mail: Richard Littlejohn responds to Kevin Marsh’s recent comments here about his column. (link)

The Guardian: “Ashley Highfield, the BBC's director of future media and technology, has outlined plans that could see the iPlayer available via TV, and indicate how the corporation hopes to secure the future of Freeview.” (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:19 UK time, Thursday, 15 February 2007

The Independent: Interview with Newsnight’s political editor, Martha Kearney. (link)

Daily Mail: Columnist Richard Kay on the dilemma for Kate Silverton who’s going to be reporting at the Oscars which coincides with a 24-hour BBC strike. (link)

The Guardian: John Tusa on the job facing the new BBC chairman, whoever they may be. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:10 UK time, Wednesday, 14 February 2007

Daily Telegraph: “The BBC has spent another £700,000 of licence payers' money replacing its on-screen links between programmes.” (link)

The Guardian: Simon Jenkins comments on BBC coverage of the bird flu outbreak in Suffolk. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:22 UK time, Tuesday, 13 February 2007

The Herald: Feature asking whether Top Gear stunts cross the boundary of bad taste. (link)

Belfast Telegraph: Reports that Radio Five Live presenter Steve Nolan said live on air that he’d smoked cannabis. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:25 UK time, Monday, 12 February 2007

The Guardian: “Leading candidates are dropping out of the race to succeed Michael Grade as BBC chairman.” (link)

The Independent: Former head of Sky News Nick Pollard argues that ethnic diversity in the newsroom is easier said than done. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:00 UK time, Friday, 9 February 2007

The Guardian: "The new BBC Trust's register of interests reveals the corporation is now run by the most media-savvy group of people in recent times." (link)

Press Gazette: "Panorama's new format and peak time position has brought in a million extra viewers and an audience "ten years younger", according to the BBC." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 08:50 UK time, Thursday, 8 February 2007

Daily Mail: Columnist Stephen Glover comments on Jeremy Paxman, saying the presenter, "has recently developed his sneering and bullying tendencies to the point where they are interfering with the job." (no link available)

The Guardian: Columnist Mark Lawson criticises the use of 'dramatic devices' in TV News reports. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that 'well-known faces' in BBC News are facing a clampdown on expenses claims. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:49 UK time, Wednesday, 7 February 2007

Financial Times: “Business Post, the express delivery service, has won a contract with BBC TV Licensing worth up to £8.1m in revenue annually for up to three years.” (link)

The Guardian: Marcel Berlins comments on the inclusion of the Ryan O’Neal shooting story in Radio 4’s main news bulletin. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:34 UK time, Tuesday, 6 February 2007

The Times: Columnist David Aaronovitch writes about his run-in with a Daily Mail journalist on the BBC’s Daily Politics programme and comments on the Mail’s influence on the news agenda. (link)

The Herald: “The BBC has reduced its taxi bill in Scotland by more than £100,000 in a single year.” (link)

Daily Mail: Reports on female Newsnight’s presenters’ interview and photo shoot in Harpers Bazaar. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:47 UK time, Monday, 5 February 2007

The Independent: Columnist Matthew Norman on Tony Blair’s Today interview. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that David Dimbleby has ruled himself out of the race to be BBC chairman. (link)

The Guardian: Offers a verdict on the iPlayer test. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:21 UK time, Friday, 2 February 2007

The Guardian: "A strong performance by Radio 2 veterans Terry Wogan and Steve Wright helped the BBC extend its advantage over commercial radio with a market share lead of 11.2 percentage points." (link)

Financial Times: Reports on Gavin Esler’s response to Newsnight colleague Jeremy Paxman’s critique of the BBC’s green credentials. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:47 UK time, Thursday, 1 February 2007

Daily Telegraph: Reports that the iPlayer proposals have been approved by the BBC Trust for later this year. (link)

The Guardian: Reports on Spectator article by Lord Puttnam, who says he will not be applying for BBC chairmanship. (link)

The Sun: Leader article criticises BBC bulletin’s coverage of Birmingham terror raids. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:25 UK time, Wednesday, 31 January 2007

The Guardian:"BBC News could face further strike action within days"€. (link)

Daily Mail: Comments on Jeremy Paxman'€™s criticism of BBC environmental standards. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:15 UK time, Tuesday, 30 January 2007

The Times: Tim Montgomerie comments on the BBC's influence in setting the political agenda. (link)

The Independent: Reports on Lord Puttnam statement on being chair of BBC Trust, ahead of the application deadline tomorrow (as mentioned here and here). (link)

Daily Mail: Article on Panorama's investigation into the drug Seroxat. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:27 UK time, Monday, 29 January 2007

Daily Mail: "œLord Puttnam has revealed he is considering a formal approach from the BBC to be its chairman." (link)

The Independent: Executive producer of BBC Current Affairs, Dominic Crossley-Holland, asks whether a programme's success should be judged by the number of complaints it receives. (link)

The Guardian: Interview with BBC Sports News Editor Mihir Bose. (link)

The Guardian: Letter from BBC Director of Vision Jana Bennett on current affairs programming. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:49 UK time, Friday, 26 January 2007

The Guardian: An opinion piece criticises a recent attack on the BBC (as discussed here, here and here). (link)

The Guardian: A columnist debates the merits of news on Radio 4, as opposed to Radio Five Live. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:42 UK time, Thursday, 25 January 2007

Daily Mail: A report on criticisms made of the BBC's coverage of the execution of Saddam Hussein. (no link available)

The Guardian: A columnist's view of a speech given by the editor of the Daily Mail, where he attacked the BBC. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:08 UK time, Wednesday, 24 January 2007

The Guardian: Marxist Andrew Murray considers Paul Dacre's claim that the BBC is Marxist. (link)

The Times: Reports that Ofcom has warned that the BBC's iPlayer risks having an adverse effect on commercial rivals. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:55 UK time, Tuesday, 23 January 2007

The Guardian: Reports on a speech made by Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre criticising the BBC. (link)

Daily Mail: Columnist Richard Kay comments on the BBC chairman vacancy. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:37 UK time, Monday, 22 January 2007

Daily Telegraph: BBC local radio criticised over alleged ageism. (link)

The Independent: Interview with BBC4 controller Janice Hadlow. (link)

The Guardian:
"The BBC is in advanced negotiations with Google to make programming available via a branded channel on the search giant's video-sharing site." (link)

The Guardian: Top media industry figures are asked "how can the BBC overcome the reported £2bn deficit it faces after the licence fee settlement?" (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 11:21 UK time, Friday, 19 January 2007

The Independent: Former secretary of state for culture, media and sport, Chris Smith on the BBC licence fee settlement. (link)

The Guardian: Comments that the licence fee announcement was eclipsed by Big Brother controversy. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:59 UK time, Thursday, 18 January 2007

The Independent: Reports on the licence fee settlement to be announced today. (link)

The Guardian: TV critic Mark Lawson comments on a reconstruction used by the Ten O'Clock News. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:40 UK time, Wednesday, 17 January 2007

The Times: Columnist Daniel Finkelstein comments on bias in the BBC. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Andrew Marr writes about the BBC estate and the potential sale of TV Centre. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:29 UK time, Tuesday, 16 January 2007

The Times: Reports the launch of BBC's College of Journalism website. (link)

Daily Telegraph: Radio critic Gillian Reynolds asks whether the BBC should "pay commercial going rates every time it advertises itself on its own networks". (link)

The Guardian: Reviews the first edition of new Panorama series. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 11:32 UK time, Monday, 15 January 2007

The Independent: Stephen Glover on the media's handling of Kate Middleton's birthday. (link)

The Independent: Columnist Matthew Norman on Kelvin MacKenzie's Question Time appearance. (link)

Mail on Sunday: "Pop star Pete Doherty has been banned by the BBC from appearing on their children's television programmes." (link)

The Guardian: Report on Panorama's new primetime slot on Monday nights. (link)

The Guardian: "Three years ago the BBC issued an unprecedented apology to the government over the Kelly affair. But who authorised the announcement and why is there no record that it was discussed by the governors?" (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:18 UK time, Friday, 12 January 2007

Daily Telegraph: Reports that Greg Dyke asked for his job back a week after resigning as BBC director-general. (link)

The Times: "Last-minute lobbying by the BBC has failed to convince the government of the case for a more generous licence fee settlement." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:27 UK time, Thursday, 11 January 2007

The Guardian: Reports that "the BBC has set up a £350m war chest for expansion into social networking on the internet and international acquisitions." (link)

The Guardian: Report claims that BBC Television Centre is facing closure as part of plans to sell off the 13-acre complex. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:50 UK time, Wednesday, 10 January 2007

The Guardian: "The BBC was yesterday ordered to publish secret documents that will reveal why Greg Dyke was forced out as director general after the publication of the Hutton report." (link)

The Guardian: "A government minister last night insisted that deliberations are still under way to set a "tough but fair" licence fee settlement." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:57 UK time, Tuesday, 9 January 2007

The Guardian: "Manchester [city council] has approached the BBC and ITV Granada to join them in creating an academy which would specialise in creative and media industries." (link)

Daily Mail: Columnist Richard Kay on Panorama's return to prime time on Monday nights. (link)

The Times: Extract from an Economist article on whether the BBC should be publicly financed by a licence fee. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:43 UK time, Monday, 8 January 2007

The Guardian: Report that BBC efforts to persuade the government to reconsider its decision on the licence fee are "too little, too late". (link)

Daily Telegraph:
Jim White on Five Live's audience response to 14-year-old Michael Perham's voyage across the Atlantic. (link)

The Times: "Magnus Magnusson, one of the country's most cherished quizmasters, died last night at the age of 77." (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:14 UK time, Friday, 5 January 2007

The Times: Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell writes about the new BBC Trust. (link)

The Guardian: "Government officials will this weekend launch their hunt for a new BBC chairman." (link)

Daily Mail: "TV watchdogs are to investigate the controversial broadcasting of Saddam Hussein being taunted on the gallows."


BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:41 UK time, Thursday, 4 January 2007

The Independent: Report on Sir Menzies Campbell's interview on the Today programme (link)

Daily Mail: "The BBC has outraged child protection experts by producing a reality TV show where infants are handed over to live with teenage 'parents.'" (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:24 UK time, Wednesday, 3 January 2007

The Guardian: A columnist reflects on yesterday's Today programme interview with the deputy prime minister (which you can hear by clicking here). (link)

The Telegraph: New BBC News sports editor Mihir Bose reflects on his career in journalism. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 11:09 UK time, Tuesday, 2 January 2007

The Times: William Rees Mogg pays tribute to former BBC chairman Marmaduke Hussey, who died last week. (link)

The Telegraph: Reports on disputes over the result of the Today programme's end of year poll. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:41 UK time, Thursday, 28 December 2006

The Independent: "Former BBC chairman Marmaduke Hussey, the man said to have been brought in by Margaret Thatcher to "sort out" the corporation, has died aged 83." (link)

The Guardian:
Columnist Mark Lawson on news at Christmas - "Holiday news shows convey an attitude that is otherwise considered anti-journalistic: a hope that nothing bad happens." (link)

The Daily Record:
"The SNP want BBC Scotland's Hogmanay Live TV show broadcast to the rest of the world - claiming it is a 'huge cultural asset'." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 08:54 UK time, Thursday, 21 December 2006

Daily Mirror: Tony Blair's appearance on Chris Evans' radio show "was scripted in a memo... detailing plans for a farewell tour". (Link)
Guardian: Catherine Bennett on Bishop of Southwark return to Thought for the Day. (Link)
Financial Times and others: Reports on Lord Stevens report into football transfers, and ongoing fallout of Panorama investigation. (Link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:17 UK time, Wednesday, 20 December 2006

Daily Telegraph and others: Report on Margaret Beckett's interview on Today programme (Link)
Daily Mail: Claims BBC didn't report background of two men convicted of killing PC Sharon Beshinivsky. (No link available)
Times: Magnus Linklater on Contempt of Court rules (Link)
Guardian (and others): Cartoons on the Bishop of Southwark's return to Thought for the Day. (Link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:21 UK time, Tuesday, 19 December 2006

Daily Star, Telegraph and others: References to BBC interview with Tom Stephens. (Link)
Daily Mail: Newsround poll on children's views of Christmas. (Link)
Independent: Steve Richards says the BBC is "anti-politics". (Link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 11:41 UK time, Monday, 18 December 2006

On this week's Newswatch, the programme for viewers' complaints about BBC TV News, Kevin Bakhurst, controller of BBC News 24, discussed the issue of labelling the Suffolk murder victims as 'prostitutes'. You can watch it by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:22 UK time, Monday, 18 December 2006

Daily Telegraph: Jeremy Clarkson 'ticked off' by BBC for saying car was 'a bit gay'. (Link)
Guardian:
Interview with Newsnight editor Peter Barron. (Link)
Guardian: Columnist Jeff Jarvis on making corrections to internet articles. (Link)
Daily Telegraph: Philip Johnston on Today programme's 'Christmas Repeal' (Link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:18 UK time, Friday, 15 December 2006

Daily Mail and others: Lib Dem culture spokesman criticises Christmas TV schedules. (Link)
Daily Telegraph: Report that the Today programme newspaper review will no longer be read by newsreaders and will instead be read by the main presenters. (Link)
Daily Mail: Richard Littlejohn on the debate about the use of the word "prostitute". "Will we have to call their pimps 'leisure services procurement advisers?" (Link)
Daily Telegraph: Andrew Roberts criticises BBC News website animated reconstruction of Diana, Princess of Wales's car crash. (Link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:15 UK time, Thursday, 14 December 2006

The Independent: "Sir David Attenborough has called for a "moral" crusade against wasting energy." (link)

The Guardian: Reports on preparations for the BBC's new sports news programme, which is scheduled to launch next summer. (link)

The Guardian: Columnist Mark Lawson takes a look at TV coverage of Parliament. (link)

Audience response

Host Host | 17:20 UK time, Wednesday, 13 December 2006

Five Live's Matt Morris wrote on Monday about the use of the word "prostitute" in the Ipswich murder inquiry. BBC viewers, listeners and users have been offering feedback on how the story has been reported - here are some more of their thoughts.

Lee Taylor was among those who still felt strongly about the labelling of the women as prostitutes. "I was a bit offended by your headline today 'Third prostitute was asphyxiated'. It makes the victims seem less than human to call them prostitutes rather than girl/s or woman/women which is what they are."

Many callers took issue with the use of the term "girls" since the victims are all adults.

Matt Wells wrote that he heard "a (female) correspondent on the midnight Radio 4 news use the phrase 'local women AND prostitutes admit they're terrified'. What a dehumanising form of words. Are prostitutes not women too? Surely it should have been something like: 'Local women, and prostitutes in particular, admit they're terrified.'"

Some users felt it was necessary for the word prostitute to be included. Dave Browne wrote: "What's the alternative? 'Someone was killed somewhere, somehow'? You might as well not bother! Any news story will be made more tangible and gain news value if it includes plenty of facts. Yes, it may be insensitive to broadcast details that innocent victims or their families would rather were kept private. But with every fact left out of a story such as this, its power to inform seeps away."

Simon Hatton wrote: "The term prostitute is correct: because as prostitutes these women are making themselves more vulnerable to attack, and therefore, it is necessary for the police to make this distinction in order to curb the panic surrounding these murders. It is not a matter of degradation in the slightest."

Gina Hickley picked up on Matt's question of whether the women's jobs would have been included if they had been plumbers. She thought it would. "If three plumbers had been murdered and two were missing, surely you would report their trade as it would be pretty freaky? The serious point here is that if I were a sex worker/prostitute in the Suffolk area I would be grateful for the information and would either wait until the serial killer is caught before I go out to work again, or switch catchment areas."

Jack Matthew Leahy pointed out the assumption that the killer of the women was a man. "What makes this a 'he'?" he asked. And Joanne said: "I'm far more concerned about giving the murder a name - 'The Ipswich Ripper'. It gives him/her something to 'live' up to."

Many callers thought various interviews with Brian Clennell , the father of one of the missing women, had been inappropriate.

Your further comments are welcome.

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:51 UK time, Wednesday, 13 December 2006

Metro: Newsreader Fiona Bruce discusses the recent controversy over her wearing a cross. (link)

Manchester Evening News: "Business leaders have met BBC chiefs to seek assurances that the corporation is still planning to move to Salford." (link)

The Scotsman: An extended interview with Today programme presenter John Humphrys. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:05 UK time, Tuesday, 12 December 2006

Daily Mail: Reports that Panorama's investigative reporter John Ware has left the programme. (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC faces an uphill battle to persuade Gordon Brown to allow it an inflation-busting rise in the licence fee..." (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:24 UK time, Monday, 11 December 2006

The Guardian: "The BBC is to trial a new catch-up TV offering with its own personal video recorder." (link)

The Independent: An extended interview with the BBC's Middle East editor, Jeremy Bowen. (link)

Financial Times: Reports that "the BBC could be forced to double its proposed cost cuts". (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 11:03 UK time, Friday, 8 December 2006

Daily Mirror and others: George Bush and BBC's Nick Robinson clash at White House news conference. (Link)
Independent: BBC gender salary disparity revealed. (Link)
Daily Mail: Lord Puttnam expresses interest in succeeding Michael Grade (Link)
Daily Mail:
Roy Hattersley advises new BBC chairman 'not to underestimate the inclinations of the viewing public'.

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:33 UK time, Thursday, 7 December 2006

Mirror: Fake tickets for Strictly Come Dancing have been sold. (Link)
Sun: John Simpson criticises Michael Grade for leaving the BBC. (No link)
Daily Mail: BBC Breakfast responds to viewers calls for Christmas decorations, quoting David Kermode. (No link)
Daily Telegraph and others: General Sir Mike Jackson gives the Dimbleby lecture. (Link)
Guardian: Review of the Generation Next season. (Link)
Guardian: Timothy Garton Ash says a low licence fee settlement has dangers for the BBC. (Link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:55 UK time, Wednesday, 6 December 2006

Manchester Evening News: "The BBC could get the money it needs to move to Salford, even if the corporation ends up with a low licence fee settlement." (link)

Evening Standard: "The BBC will be left without a chairman until at least April, following Michael Grade's shock defection to ITV last week." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:51 UK time, Tuesday, 5 December 2006

The Guardian: Reports on possible job losses within BBC News. (link)

The Times: Speculation over who could replace recently-departed BBC Chairman Michael Grade. (link)

Newswatch/Feedback

Host Host | 13:11 UK time, Monday, 4 December 2006

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' comments on BBC TV News, home affairs correspondent Daniel Sandford answered criticisms that the coverage of an offensive e-mail circulated among police officers had become a story about racism rather than decency. You can watch the programme here.

On Feedback, Radio 4's programme for listener views, Jonathan Dimbleby, the chairman of Any Questions? was asked about claims that he was extending his role into that of interviewer. You can hear that programme here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:48 UK time, Monday, 4 December 2006

The Guardian: "The BBC may be forced to go through with its Salford move by the government, even if the corporation does not get the licence fee deal it has asked for." (link)

The Times: Columnist Helen Rumbelow comments on how an end to Radio 4's "monopoly" may soon be near. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:50 UK time, Friday, 1 December 2006

Daily Mail: Reports on a speech given recently by the BBC's head of TV News, which you can read in full on this blog. (link)

The Scotsman: "BSkyB chief exec James Murdoch launched a withering attack on the British broadcasting industry, and the BBC in particular." (link)

The Telegraph: "Jeremy Paxman, notorious for his merciless interviews on Newsnight, has turned his fire on the show itself." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:14 UK time, Thursday, 30 November 2006

The Mirror: Columnist Brian Reade asks, "why the fear over Michael Grade defecting to ITV?" (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC will have to lop at least £1.6bn off spending plans if - as looks likely - the government gives it a licence fee deal in line with inflation or below." (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 07:54 UK time, Wednesday, 29 November 2006

All papers: Further reports on the departure of BBC Chairman Michael Grade for ITV. (link and link)

The Sun: Reports that "cheeky hackers" have "sabotaged Jonathan Ross’s MySpace account". (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:35 UK time, Tuesday, 28 November 2006

All papers: Report the news of BBC Chairman Michael Grade's departure for ITV. (link, link, link and link)

The Independent, among others: Reports the death of former Radio 1 DJ Alan 'Fluff' Freeman. (link)

Newswatch/Feedback

Host Host | 10:56 UK time, Monday, 27 November 2006

Newswatch, the programme which features viewers' responses to BBC TV News, this week discussed the coverage of the return to the UK of Mirza Tahir Hussain after his release from prison in Pakistan. It also looked at the labelling of 4x4s as 'gas guzzlers', and how charities are treated in TV News. You can watch it here.

Radio 4's Feedback this week discussed why news programmes report the deaths of UK troops before the names have been released, and the worry this can cause for families who fear they might have been affected. You can listen to it here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:37 UK time, Monday, 27 November 2006

The Independent: The BBC's Bridget Kendall writes about her 'mentor', Sir John Tusa. (link)

The Times: "The BBC boasts that it is the only UK media corporation with a global brand. But it is hardly a global business..." (link)

The Guardian: A piece discusses the possibility of advertising on the international version of the BBC News website. (link)

Blogs on the BBC

Host Host | 09:55 UK time, Friday, 24 November 2006

A round-up of what's being said about the BBC in other blogs. Today, the death of Nick Clarke.

Trevor Dann's blog: "To those of us who didn't know how far Nick's health had deteriorated since his surgery it was a big shock." (link)

Clive Davis: "He was a fantastic broadcaster and the antithesis of the "look-at-me-I’m-famous" breed of interviewer." (link)

Iain Dale's Diary: "He treated his interviewees as people who should be listened to and given an opportunity to speak." (link)

Paul Linford: "I rated him alongside PM's Eddie Mair as the best BBC radio journalist of his generation and there is no doubt he will be sorely missed." (link)

Channel 4 News blog: "To his colleagues and friends he was loyal, supportive and a very, very good journalist." (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:32 UK time, Friday, 24 November 2006

The Telegraph, amongst others: Reports on the death of Radio 4's Nick Clarke. (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC's decision to screen a new drama based around the events of the 2004 Asian tsunami has provoked a mixed reaction from survivors and relatives of its victims." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 08:48 UK time, Thursday, 23 November 2006

The Guardian: "BBC global news director Richard Sambrook has said that ads on the international news website can't be avoided." (link)

The Guardian: Columnist Mark Lawson takes a look at the coverage provided by 24-hour news channels overnight. (link)

Press Gazette: Former editor of the Today programme Rod Liddle comments on the row over the BBC's handling of the 'cash for honours' story. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:08 UK time, Wednesday, 22 November 2006

FT, Sun, Telegraph, Guardian: Labour criticises the BBC for internal e-mail which offered journalists a £100 bonus for breaking stories on the "cash for peerages" investigation. [The BBC said the offer, which had been a one-off, had been inappropriate and had been withdrawn, and that staff would continue to cover the story impartially.] (Link (subscription), link, link, link.)

International Herald Tribune:
BBC Urdu service journalist who had been kidnapped in Pakistan released safely. (Link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:16 UK time, Tuesday, 21 November 2006

Evening Standard: "Veteran news presenter Nicholas Owen is to quit ITV after two decades to join the BBC." (link)

International Herald Tribune: "A BBC journalist (a reporter for the Urdu-language service) went missing on Monday after visiting the Pakistani capital, the broadcaster has said." (link)

Newswatch/Feedback

Host Host | 12:42 UK time, Monday, 20 November 2006

Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers complaints about BBC TV News, this week debated a docu-drama about bird flu, and also the media's coverage of mental health issues. You can watch the programme here.

Feedback, Radio 4's programme for audience response, asked Today programme editor Gavin Allen about the changes to its messageboards. You can hear the whole of Feedback here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 11:37 UK time, Monday, 20 November 2006

Sun: Children in Need likely to raise more than £33m.
Guardian: Column on the popularity of radio among young people. (Link)
Guardian: TV News is up for grabs, says Peter Preston (Link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:47 UK time, Friday, 17 November 2006

The Sun: BBC presenter Adrian Chiles writes about the time he was asked to become "a real-life James Bond". (link)

The Guardian: Reports that, "in a policy U-turn, the BBC has decided to pay viewers who send in pictures and videos" - the BBC has denied this story, and Vicky Taylor, editor of interactivity, will write on this subject on this blog later today. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:03 UK time, Thursday, 16 November 2006

The Sun: Reports that two MI6 officers "broke cover" yesterday to speak to BBC Radio 1. (link)

The Guardian: "Controversial proposals to put advertising on the BBC's international websites have been approved by the corporation's executive direction group, the most senior level of management before the BBC governors." (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:59 UK time, Wednesday, 15 November 2006

The Guardian: "BBC programmes scaled back their live reporting last night following the start of a 24-hour strike by technicians." (link)

The Telegraph: "The BBC was accused of ageism yesterday after a leaked memo revealed that phone-in presenters on a local radio station have been barred from allowing callers who sound old on air." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:04 UK time, Tuesday, 14 November 2006

The Guardian: "BBC management is preparing contingency plans to keep news bulletins and live coverage of the state opening of parliament on air, as technical staff begin a 24-hour strike at 10pm this evening." (link)

The Telegraph: Reports on the Archbishop of York's criticism of the BBC, which was first reported yesterday. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 14:03 UK time, Monday, 13 November 2006

This week's Newswatch - the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC News - comes from Istanbul, where news executives from around the world met recently to discuss current events at a major conference. You can watch the programme by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:42 UK time, Monday, 13 November 2006

The Independent: A columnist comments on the recent row over newsreaders wearing poppies. (link)

The Independent: Another columnist comments on the imminent launch of the English language version of the Al Jazeera TV channel, with reference to how it could impact upon the BBC. (link)

Daily Mail: An interview with the Archbishop of York, Dr John Sentamu, in which he says the BBC has "an anti-Christian bias". (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 11:19 UK time, Friday, 10 November 2006

Guardian: Jeremy Vine to present revamped Panorama (Link)

Daily Mail: Foreign secretary criticises broadcasters for interviewing extremist Muslims (No link)

Daily Telegraph: I won't bow to 'poppy fascists', says Channel 4's Jon Snow (Link)

Daily Telegraph: Head of MI5 says life is not as simple as Spooks (Link)

Independent: Obituary for BBC Radio Norfolk's John Taylor - "widely acknowledged to be the oldest presenter working in local radio". (Link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:49 UK time, Thursday, 9 November 2006

The Mirror: "Pete Doherty was yesterday fined £750 for assaulting a BBC reporter." (link)

The Guardian: Columnist Mark Lawson discusses TV coverage of the US mid-term elections. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:14 UK time, Wednesday, 8 November 2006

The Guardian: A columnist writes about the BBC's bid for a licence fee increase. "In terms of the quality of its output, it is hard to recall a time when the BBC has been creatively stronger." (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that Sir Paul McCartney is in negotiations to do an interview with the BBC. (link)

The Telegraph: "Why can't newsreaders just read the news... when they are not trying to become stars, they are always flirting with each other to demonstrate their mucilaginous on-screen chemistry." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:01 UK time, Tuesday, 7 November 2006

The Guardian: "The BBC's live coverage of the state opening of Parliament next Wednesday faces disruption from a 24-hour strike by TV news technicians." (link)

The Scotsman: "The BBC plans to buy news and content from local papers across Britain for its planned network of local TV stations, the corporation's director-general said yesterday." (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 11:47 UK time, Monday, 6 November 2006

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' complaints about BBC News, Newsnight editor Peter Barron debates David Loyn's interview with the Taleban, and there's a report about the use of old pieces of film on contemporary reports. You can watch it here.

Blogs on the BBC

Host Host | 10:34 UK time, Monday, 6 November 2006

An semi-regular feature where we round-up blog comments on matters relating to the BBC. Today - Newsnight's recent interview with Madonna (discussed on this blog here and here).

Stressqueen: "It felt positively surreal and utterly ridiculous to see Jeremy Paxman discussing Madonna's adoption of a Malawian orphan on Newsnight." (link)

Adventures in engineering: "Newsnight’s decision to have Kirsty Wark interview Madonna, for example, is coming perilously close to being entertainment." (link)

The set of the BBC's Madonna interviewBill's comment page: "What is the stage set all about? Is this whole thing not an enormous fire risk?" (link)

Potunkey: "I was under the clearly mistaken impression that responsible journalism didn’t involve getting the subjects of interviews to dance." (link)

Adrian Monck online: "The truth is there are good ways to put on audience, and then there's doing a Madonna interview." (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:18 UK time, Monday, 6 November 2006

The Independent: Extended interview with BBC News presenter Ben Brown. (link)

The Times: Reports that the historic former BBC studios at London's Alexandra Palace could soon be demolished. (link)

New Statesman: Peter Wilby comments on the recent row over BBC impartiality - "The proposal that the BBC should echo some notional consensus of demotic opinion is a fairly recent one". (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:48 UK time, Friday, 3 November 2006

Daily Mail: Richard Littlejohn on news coverage of the Stern Report: "The BBC is only too willing to give free rein to the wildest fantasies of the eco-nutters, especially if it can pin the blame on George W. Bush and the evil multee-nash-nuls." (link)

The Sun: "Telly anorak Keith Hamer yesterday unveiled his amazing collection of BBC test cards." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:49 UK time, Thursday, 2 November 2006

The Guardian: "The recent BBC debate over religious adornments gives a new context to the annual display of Remembrance poppies by BBC frontpeople." (link)

Daily Mail: Reports that presenter Huw Edwards was briefly without a poppy during a recent broadcast. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:07 UK time, Wednesday, 1 November 2006

Daily Mail: The BBC are facing accusations of anti-Christian bias after a BBC drama portrayed evangelical extremists murdering Muslims. (link)

The Guardian: Reports that Madonna has given the BBC her first UK interview since adopting a Malawian child. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:34 UK time, Tuesday, 31 October 2006

Daily Mail: "The BBC has been accused of wasting money after it was revealed that plans to give its most famous building a lavish face-lift are over-budget and behind schedule." (link)

The Guardian: "BBC news could be hit by a 12-hour strike next week after the broadcasting union Bectu said it expected its members to vote for industrial action." (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 11:02 UK time, Monday, 30 October 2006

On this week's Newswatch, the programme to discuss viewers' comments on BBC News, head of TV News Peter Horrocks answers complaints about coverage of the Kriss Donald murder trial, and director of sport Roger Mosey debates the appointment of Mihir Bose as sport editor. You can watch it here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:25 UK time, Monday, 30 October 2006

New York Times: "Critics inside the BBC’s Web site are condemning plans to advertise on the site, saying the ads could damage the BBC’s reputation." (link)

The Telegraph: "One of the BBC's most senior executives has defended the corporation against accusations that it is 'crammed full of soft liberals'." (link)

The Observer: A diary written by Today programme presenter John Humphrys during his recent period in Iraq. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 11:03 UK time, Friday, 27 October 2006

Daily Mail: BBC criticised for interviewing Taleban. (Link)

Daily Telegraph (and others): BBC radio feels the heat from commercial rivals (Link)

Daily Telegraph: Opinion column on BBC impartiality. (Link)

Daily Mail: John Humphrys writes about faith (No link available)

Independent: Pandora claims Zac Goldsmith will be guest editor of Today. [BBC did not confirm this.] (Link)

Spectator: Fergal Keane writes about his love for America. (Link [subscription required])

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:57 UK time, Thursday, 26 October 2006

The Sun: Reports that the BBC has been criticised for broadcasting an interview with members of the Taliban. (no link available)

The Guardian: The paper's leader column praises Today programme presenter John Humphrys. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:18 UK time, Wednesday, 25 October 2006

The Sun: "The Queen has allowed a BBC film crew an 'unprecedented insight' into the Royal Household." (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC is fighting the Bulgarian media regulator in court for the right to broadcast in the country after threats to revoke its licence last week." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:35 UK time, Tuesday, 24 October 2006

Financial Times: A columnist outlines why they believe the BBC is "too big, too diverse and too distant from its original purpose". (link, subscription required)

The Mirror: Richard Hammond's wife talks about the crash that nearly killed her husband. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 12:31 UK time, Monday, 23 October 2006

On this week's Newswatch, the programme which airs viewers' complaints about BBC News, News 24's Stephen Mawhinney addressed claims that Madonna's adoption of a Malawian child had been over-reported on the BBC. The programme also looked at whether the BBC interviewed too many newspaper journalists in news reports. (You can watch the show here.)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:07 UK time, Monday, 23 October 2006

The Telegraph: An extended interview with Today programme presenter John Humphrys. (link)

The Mirror: An interview with Richard Hammond, the BBC presenter who survived a high-speed car crash. (link)

Daily Mail: "BBC executives have been forced to admit what critics have known for years - that the corporation is biased." (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:04 UK time, Friday, 20 October 2006

The Guardian: The controller of BBC One comments on the future of some BBC current affairs programmes. (link)

Press Gazette: "BBC chiefs have been warned they will face an outcry from the North if they abandon their plans to move to Manchester." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:09 UK time, Thursday, 19 October 2006

The Times: Reports that the BBC has decided that religious symbols can be worn by newsreaders, but that they must not distract viewers (based on this blog entry). (link)

The Guardian: A report on the ethics of reporting on the Mills/McCartney divorce, featuring comments from the head of BBC TV News, Peter Horrocks. (link)

The Telegraph: "A secret guide that has helped generations of BBC newsreaders pronounce difficult words and odd-sounding names is to be made public for the first time." (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:43 UK time, Wednesday, 18 October 2006

The Guardian: "Authorities in Bulgaria have announced that they are revoking the BBC World Service's right to broadcast in the country." (link)

The Independent: "Yoko Ono has been invited to be a guest editor of BBC Radio 4's Today programme." (link)

The Guardian: Satirist Armando Iannucci on how comedians are filling the gap where serious political debate used to be. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 08:47 UK time, Tuesday, 17 October 2006

The Guardian: "The BBC is to increase its spending on Welsh-language programmes for S4C by £3m in the run-up to digital switchover in Wales in 2009." (link)

The Times: Reports that a BBC executive has mocked claims that website clips (such as those found on YouTube) will replace television. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 12:58 UK time, Monday, 16 October 2006

On Newswatch, the programme which discusses viewers' criticisms of BBC News, Peter Horrocks debates the issue of Fiona Bruce's cross, and Amanda Farnsworth addresses criticisms of presenters standing and using each other's names. You can watch Newswatch by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 11:29 UK time, Monday, 16 October 2006

Sunday Telegraph: 'BBC is to have independent review into its business news coverage.' (Link)

The People: Traffic to MI5 website doubles after each episode of BBC One's Spooks. (Link)

Sunday Telegraph: BBC to challenge Freedom of Information ruling about a Middle East report. (Link)

The Guardian: Letter saying Ofcom should restrict news programmes to events in preceeding 24 hours. (Link)

The Independent: Columnist says 'BBC could afford move to Salford if it wanted.' (Link)

The Financial Times: BBC 'ranked at or near the top of the list of ideal employers for every ethnic group surveyed this summer'. (Link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:28 UK time, Friday, 13 October 2006

Times, Guardian: Appointment of members of BBC Trust (Link, link)

Daily Telegraph:
Change in licence fee administration linked to decline of post offices. (Link)

Daily Mail:
Richard Littlejohn asks why the BBC should launch an Arabic and Farsi TV service? "Those of us who live in the London area might just as well be watching the Baghdad Broadcasting Corporation." (Link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:22 UK time, Thursday, 12 October 2006

Several papers: Director general Mark Thompson may halt the move of some BBC departments to Manchester if the licence fee is not increased. The switchover to digital might also be jeopardised if not properly funded, he warned.

Daily Telegraph: Panorama starts showing secret recordings to FA investigators. (Link)

Daily Telegraph: Sir Clement Freud discusses slang, after Today programme appearance. (Link)

Independent: Nick Robinson is to be interviewed by Michael Howard in a charity event. (Link)

Marketing Week: Freeview plans a PVR in every home.

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 08:51 UK time, Wednesday, 11 October 2006

The Guardian: "BBC director general Mark Thompson will today bow to pressure and revise downwards the corporation's above-inflation licence fee bid." (link)

The Times: Reports that BBC Radio Five Live has lost its exclusive rights to broadcast live Premiership matches. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:23 UK time, Tuesday, 10 October 2006

The Independent: The paper's diary column on Jeremy Paxman speaking at the Cheltenham Book Festival. (link)

The Guardian: More reaction to Graham Norton's comments on drug taking. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 11:50 UK time, Monday, 9 October 2006

In this week's Newswatch, the programme for viewers' complaints about BBC News, Jamie Donald answers criticisms of party political conference coverage, and Africa bureau editor Milton Nkosi addresses claims that the BBC had not sufficiently covered events in the Democratic Republic of Congo. You can watch the programme here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:34 UK time, Monday, 9 October 2006

Daily Mail, Times: Reports on survey of PC security conducted by the BBC News website. (Link)

Guardian: BBC wins first round of Saturday night TV viewing battle. (Link)

Daily Mail: BBC History Magazine stages battlefield tests of longbows. (No link)

Guardian: Thanks to BBC America, a host of British TV shows are hits in the States. (Link)

Guardian: Letter about BBC cross-promotion. (Link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:59 UK time, Friday, 6 October 2006

The Independent: "The BBC newscaster Darren Jordon, yesterday became the latest high profile presenter to join the soon-to-be-launched Al Jazeera International." (link)

The Mirror: Claims that the 300mph crash that nearly killed Top Gear presenter Richard Hammond will be shown on TV. (link)

The Guardian: "Journalists could be in line for the Nobel peace prize - but not if they work for the BBC." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:43 UK time, Thursday, 5 October 2006

Daily Mail: "Richard Hammond's 300mph crash in a jet-powered dragster will not spell the end for the BBC's controversial Top Gear, it has been reported today." (link)

The Guardian: "The Liberal Democrats have called on the chancellor to stop obstructing a 'fair BBC licence fee deal', after earlier reports of a cabinet split on the issue." (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 11:41 UK time, Wednesday, 4 October 2006

Among the audience response received by the BBC in the past 24 hours were many complaints that the Daily Politics had cut short Shadow Foreign Secretary William Hague's speech on Tuesday to go to a live interview with former leader Michael Howard. Some Newsnight viewers expressed scepticism at the programme's coverage of climate change. We also received this e-mail:


    I would like to complain about your coverage of the school shooting at the Amish school. While I found your coverage very informative, I strongly object to your photographing adult Amish. Perhaps you are not familiar with Amish religious beliefs but they do not want to be photographed as a religious belief. To take their picture is to steal their soul.

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:13 UK time, Wednesday, 4 October 2006

The Express: Claims that presenter Fiona Bruce is at the centre of a "barmy BBC row" over a crucifix worn on air. (no link available)

The Guardian: A columnist criticises the amount of coverage given by the BBC to Richard Hammond's accident. (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:28 UK time, Tuesday, 3 October 2006

The Telegraph: Reports on Tony Blair's appearence on today's Blue Peter. (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC has dismissed as "banter" an incident on Chris Moyles' Radio 1 show today in which footballer Rio Ferdinand called the DJ a 'faggot'." (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 11:51 UK time, Monday, 2 October 2006

On this week's Newswatch - the show which voices your criticisms of BBC News - David Kermode, editor of Breakfast, talks about coverage of celebrity news such as Richard Hammond's crash. Also Craig Oliver, editor of the Ten O'Clock News, addresses the issue of sport coverage on his bulletin. Click here to watch it.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:33 UK time, Monday, 2 October 2006

The Telegraph: "The head of the Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales is to make a formal complaint to the BBC over a controversial documentary". (link)

The Guardian: An analysis of BBC One's controversial new idents. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 11:22 UK time, Friday, 29 September 2006

The Herald: "The BBC has tightened up the rules on its star news and current affairs journalists writing lucrative newspaper and magazine columns or books, and making public speeches." (link)

The Telegraph: A diary feature on what happened when BBC reporter Jo Coburn interviewed former US president Bill Clinton. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:24 UK time, Thursday, 28 September 2006

Press Gazette: "Journalists at BBC News could go on strike within seven days if the corporation goes ahead with threatened compulsory redundancies, according to the NUJ." (link)

The Telegraph: "The head of one of Britain's biggest media agencies has blamed regulator Ofcom for allowing the BBC to behave like a 'spoilt child'." (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:36 UK time, Wednesday, 27 September 2006

Daily Mail: "The BBC has spent £1.2 million of licence payers' cash on 80 seconds of programming." (link)

The Telegraph: Reports that pigeons are disrupting the BBC's Labour conference coverage in Manchester. (link)

The Guardian: "BBC News is to axe 108 jobs by the end of March next year in a bid to save £11m." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:29 UK time, Tuesday, 26 September 2006

The Telegraph: "Bolton manager Sam Allardyce says he is planning to sue the BBC over allegations that he took illegal payments from player transfers." (link)

The Guardian: A columnist criticises the BBC's choice of interviewees in relation to climate change reports. (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 15:01 UK time, Monday, 25 September 2006

On this week's Newswatch - the show which voices your criticisms of BBC News - you can see a debate on whether or not the BBC broadcast views from all sides when the Pope came under fire for his recent controversial comments.

Click here to watch the show.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:39 UK time, Monday, 25 September 2006

All papers: continued discussion of Panorama investigation into football bungs.

Sunday Telegraph: BBC plans to launch iPlayer, which will make TV and radio programmes available online, criticised by commercial media sector. (Link)

Sunday Telegraph: Alleges Abu Izzadeen regards appearance on Today as a "propaganda coup". (Link)

Daily Mirror: Abu Izzadeen interview meant "other Muslims lost their chance to voice their concerns", writes columnist Tony Parsons. (Link)

Daily Telegraph: BBC criticised for having shut the Thai language section of the World Service before the coup. (Link)

Guardian: BBC Scotland output treats Scottish news as local rather than national, says commentator Iain MacWhirter. (Link)

Guardian: Downing St communications director David Hill replies to BBC Head of TV News Peter Horrocks, saying Number 10 does regularly complain to 24-hour news channels about specific aspects of coverage. (No link)

Independent: Interview with Five Live's Simon Mayo. (Link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 12:59 UK time, Friday, 22 September 2006

Among the audience responsereceived by the BBC in the past 24 hours was much discussion of the newsworthiness of Richard Hammond's crash. We received these three e-mails, among thousands of others:

  • Whilst saddened by news of Richard Hammond's accident, I must implore you; please please don't give in to the rantings of those people who would have us beleive it's immoral to drive cars, race cars, drink beer, fly aircraft, strive for new records. It is feats of derring do of this sort which define humanity, and sure, sometimes things go wrong. That is no reason to stop trying. I for one don't want some bleeding heart liberal to wrap me in cotton wool.

  • Richard Hammond, Richard Hammond, Richard Hammond.... I really do think there's more news than Richard Hammond, but listening to the BBC this morning three days after it has happened you wouldnt think so! Why so over the top about someone doing something willingly that went wrong? I didnt even know his name before three days ago and I imagine many other people didn't.
  • Please convey our heartfelt best wishes [from Australia] to Richard of TOP GEAR and our thoughts are with him and his family, we have already lost two of our Icons and cannot believe the news from the UK. THIS TRULY A BLACK SEPTEMBER.

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:14 UK time, Friday, 22 September 2006

The Times (amongst others): Reports on Wednesday's crash involving TV presenter Richard Hammond. (link)

The Guardian: BBC Chairman Michael Grade writes on how to achieve impartiality in the digital age. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:02 UK time, Thursday, 21 September 2006

Daily Mail (amongst others): Reports on the car crash that has left BBC presenter Richard Hammond fighting for his life. (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC has persuaded John Humphrys to venture abroad professionally for the first time in more than 25 years to host the Today programme from Iraq." (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:23 UK time, Wednesday, 20 September 2006

All papers: Sam Allardyce among those accused of being involved in taking bungs in a Panorama investigation.

Independent and Telegraph: Access to BBC and CNN restricted in Thailand after coup. (Link)

Independent: Charles Kennedy to appear on Question Time. (Link)

Daily Mail: Lembit Opik says he's complained after a Radio Five Live interview.

Financial Times: Letters challenging licence fee research. (Link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:24 UK time, Tuesday, 19 September 2006

Daily Mail: Columnist Richard Littlejohn attacks the BBC for inflaming the controversy over recent remarks made by the Pope. (no link available)

The Guardian: A report into a BBC investigation into football's "bung culture", which will be broadcast on tonight's Panorama. (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 10:15 UK time, Monday, 18 September 2006

Among the audience feedback received by the BBC in the past 24 hours include calls objecting to some BBC reports that the Pope had "said sorry" for his comments on Islam, saying that he had "expressed regret" rather than apologised.

We also received this e-mail:

    Why hasn't there been a mention of the England team's win in Portugal in fishing? Fishing is the number one sport in the UK, Team England is the best in the world, yet you don't give it a mention.

and this one:

    I wish the BBC would develop a radio news programme (possibly aimed more at women), which does not involve attacking interviewees, and continual and repeated references to Islam, terrorism, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, etc but which provides news, weather, and general items of interest. There is nothing between 6.30am and 9am to wake up to which is seriously newsworthy and which relies on finding items which are relevant. I don't want to hear men talking for two hours, making their opinions known, I want a varied and refreshing attitude to current affairs. The One Show on BBC One strikes the right note, but WRONG TIME, WRONG MEDIA!

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:08 UK time, Monday, 18 September 2006

The Independent: An interview with the BBC's political editor Nick Robinson. (link)

The Guardian: An interview with the head of BBC TV News Peter Horrocks. (link)

Sunday Mirror: Claims that pop star Pete Doherty has been selected to guest edit the Today programme. (The BBC has issued a statement denying this).

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:12 UK time, Friday, 15 September 2006

The Guardian: "The BBC is to reveal the prices of its programmes and research into the costs of running the corporation." (link)

The Scotsman: "The BBC was yesterday told by the government that it cannot expect a "blank cheque" from licence-fee payers to fund the corporation." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:20 UK time, Thursday, 14 September 2006

The Independent: "The award-winning comedy actor Chris Langham has been charged with eight counts of indecent assault and one other sexual offence." (link)

The Mirror: "Culture Secretary Tessa Jowell will today tell the BBC to forget plans for a £180 television licence fee." (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:59 UK time, Wednesday, 13 September 2006

The Guardian: A columnist talks about how language can affect broadcast interviews. (link - scroll to the bottom of the page)

The Independent: "Actor Chris Langham, who is facing a court case over child pornography charges, will not appear in a special Christmas edition of the hit political satire The Thick of It." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 08:28 UK time, Tuesday, 12 September 2006

The Sun: "BBC staff were quizzed by bosses yesterday after filming a spoof video of the Middle East crisis." (link)

The Mirror: "The son of BBC director Alan Yentob was stabbed by muggers outside the family's home, it was revealed yesterday." (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:13 UK time, Monday, 11 September 2006

The Guardian: A interview with the new host of Radio 4's Broadcasting House, Paddy O'Connell. (link)

The Independent: Newsnight presenter Gavin Esler pays tribute to veteran reporter Charles Wheeler. (link)

How to say: Machu Picchu

Host Host | 11:26 UK time, Friday, 8 September 2006

A guide to words and names in the news from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu in Peru, in the news because of controversial helicopter flights. The pronunciation is MATCH-oo PEEK-choo."
Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF)

• From Monday, this guide will become part of the Magazine Monitor, which can be found at www.bbc.co.uk/magazine.

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:13 UK time, Friday, 8 September 2006

The Guardian: An interview with BBC news presenter George Alagiah. (link)

The Daily Telegraph: Obituary for former controller of Radio 3 and director of the BBC Proms, Sir John Drummond. (Link)

How to say: Erythropoietin

Host Host | 17:02 UK time, Thursday, 7 September 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is the drug for which sprinter Marion Jones has now tested negative - erythropoietin. The pronunciation we recommend, based on various published sources, is err-ith-roh-POY-uh-tin."
Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:19 UK time, Thursday, 7 September 2006

Daily Telegraph: Charles Kennedy has been asked to present a BBC Scotland programme on the 300th anniversary of the Act of Union. (Link)

The Guardian: A mini-series made by US network ABC and due to be broadcast on BBC Two on Sunday, The Road to 9/11, has come under fire for blaming the Clinton administration for failing to capture Osama bin Laden. (Link)

Daily Mail: Michael Parkinson calls for more intelligent women to be given plum jobs on TV.(No link)

Daily Telegraph: Obituary for BBC presenter Anne Gregg. (Link)

How to say: Omagh

Host Host | 13:29 UK time, Wednesday, 6 September 2006

A guide to names and words in the news from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's news pronunciation is Omagh, pronounced OH-muh with the stress on the first syllable. The trial of a man charged with carrying out the car-bombing in that town in 1998 had been due to start today."

Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:11 UK time, Wednesday, 6 September 2006

The Guardian: "Former BBC foreign correspondent-turned-politician Martin Bell has attacked the corporation's Six O'Clock News." (link)

The Mirror: "The BBC should give police any evidence that clears Barry George of killing Jill Dando, his Irish family said yesterday." (no link available)

How to say: Nokhchiyn

Host Host | 14:19 UK time, Tuesday, 5 September 2006

A guide to names and words in the news from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is the proposed new name for Chechnya, which we researched by consulting the BBC World Service Central Asian and Caucasus Service. NOKHCHIYN or NOKHCHIIN is pronounced nokh-CHEEN (kh as in loch, ch as in church)."

Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:27 UK time, Tuesday, 5 September 2006

The Telegraph: "The BBC has defended its decision to use a former prisoner to make a documentary that questions the conviction of Jill Dando's killer". (link)

The Guardian: An obituary of BBC journalist Michael Vestey. (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 08:54 UK time, Monday, 4 September 2006

Financial Times: "The BBC is coming under increasing pressure from opposition parties and commercial rivals to publish a revised licence fee bid." (link)

Sunday Times: "A veteran war correspondent has turned his fire on BBC television and radio broadcasters for delivering their reports like robots." (link)

How to say: Fouad al-Siniora

Host Host | 13:49 UK time, Friday, 1 September 2006

A guide to names and words in the news from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is Lebanese Prime Minister Fouad al-Siniora (variously spelt). Our recommendation is based on the advice of the BBC Arabic Service: foo-AD uh-suhn-YOO-ruh (-oo as in boot; -uh as in the). The L in the article 'al' turns into an S before the first letter of the surname which is a so-called sun letter."

Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 11:26 UK time, Friday, 1 September 2006

Daily Mirror: CBBC programme Lazy Town credited with persuading children to eat healthily. (Link)
Daily Telegraph: BBC and Five might be priced out of showing Ashes highlights by Sky. (Link)
The Guardian: Another diary item on the 'Newsnight tray carrier'. (Link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 08:56 UK time, Thursday, 31 August 2006

Financial Times: "Ashley Highfield, head of the BBC’s new “future media and technology” division, answers questions from readers." (link)

The Times: "The 14-year-old brother of a Pakistani journalist working for the BBC was found murdered yesterday in a remote tribal area." (link)

How to say: Jarosław Kaczyński

Host Host | 13:08 UK time, Wednesday, 30 August 2006

A guide to names and words in the news from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is Polish Prime Minister Jarosław Kaczyński. Our recommendation is yarr-OSS-waff katch-IN-ski (-arr as in marry; -tch as in church).

"The barred L in Jarosław is pronounced like a W in English, while the Ń in Kaczyński represents a nasalised vowel in a native Polish pronunciation but this is rendered as a nasal consonant in our anglicised pronunciation. Lech Kaczyński, President of Poland and Jarosław Kaczyński's twin brother is pronounced LEKH (-kh as in Scottish 'loch')."

Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:18 UK time, Wednesday, 30 August 2006

The Daily Telegraph: Interview with Ashley Highfield, head of New Media and Technology at the BBC, on how a broadcaster's archives will become more important. (Link)
The Guardian: Diary item asking if people carrying trays on their heads had walked on the set during a Newsnight interview. (Link)
The Daily Mirror: Columnist Kevin Maguire says a BNP caller rang the BBC to complain that Maguire had been on Radio Four on Sunday. (Link)
The Daily Telegraph: Obituary for former BBC presenter, and Spectator radio critic, Michael Vestey, who became a harsh critic of the BBC under Lord Birt. (Link)

How to say: Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

Host Host | 13:01 UK time, Tuesday, 29 August 2006

A guide to words and names in the news from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is Iranian President Mahmoud AHMADINEJAD (sometimes also spelt AHMADINEZHAD). Our recommendation is mah-MOOD ah-mad-in-uh-ZHAAD (-h is pronounced in 'Mahmoud' and in 'Ahmadinejad') based on the advice of the BBC Persian Monitoring team."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 10:43 UK time, Tuesday, 29 August 2006

The Herald: Discussion in letters page about Newsnight Scotland. (Link)

The Telegraph and others:
BBC History Magazine poll names Thatcher and Attlee as best prime ministers of 20th century. (Link)

The Sun: Diary item on Today programme's discussion of how best to prepare scones with jam and cream. (No link available)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:31 UK time, Friday, 25 August 2006

Independent: Asian students deny on Newsnight that an airline mutiny was a student prank. (link)

Daily Mail: Leader on multiculturalism, including Ruth Kelly's statement about integration and George Alagiah's book. (no link available)

How to say: Erkki Tuomioja

Host Host | 16:32 UK time, Thursday, 24 August 2006

A daily guide to pronunciation of names and words in the news from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is Finnish Foreign Minister Erkki Tuomioja. Our recommendation is AIR-ki TOO-uh-mi-oy-uh. As with all our advice, this is an anglicised pronunciation and is not intended to represent a native pronunciation. This is so that the pronunciation flows as naturally as possible in an English-language broadcast."

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 11:32 UK time, Thursday, 24 August 2006

Press Gazette: Channel Four News reporter Alex Thomson supports the BBC's Orla Guerin in her reporting of Bint Jbail. "What Orla said about the town centre is absolutely 100 per cent true. Orla is an extremely experienced and professional correspondent," he says. (link)

Guardian: Obituary of BBC producer Iris Furlong. (link).

Daily Mail:
Letters on George Alagiah's comments on multiculturalism. (no link available)

How to say: Donetsk

Host Host | 13:25 UK time, Wednesday, 23 August 2006

A daily guide to names and words in the news from Lena Olausson of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's name is the site of the plane crash in Ukraine - Donetsk. The correct Ukrainian pronunciation is don-ETSK, but a russified dun-YETSK is sometimes also heard."

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:49 UK time, Wednesday, 23 August 2006

The Sun: Reports that BBC News 24's accidental hero Guy Goma has struck a six-figure deal with a Hollywood producer to make a film about the gaffe that propelled him to fame. (link)

The Guardian: A report on yesterday's changes to the BBC News website. (link)

How to say: Halkidiki

Host Host | 12:30 UK time, Tuesday, 22 August 2006

A daily guide to words and names in the news from Lena Olausson of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's name is the Halkidiki peninsula in northern Greece, where forest fires forced tourists to spend last night on the beach. The pronunciation is hal-kee-dhi-KEE (-dh as in "this")."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 08:58 UK time, Tuesday, 22 August 2006

The Herald: A series of letters from readers objecting to the extended coverage given by the BBC to the cricket row. (link)

How to say: Avastin and Erbitux

Host Host | 12:57 UK time, Monday, 21 August 2006

A guide to words and names in the news from Lena Olausson of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.
Lena Olausson"Two pronunciations for today. The cancer drugs that will not be made available on the NHS, Avastin and Erbitux, are pronounced uh-VAST-in (sometimes also ay-VAST-in) and UR-bi-tuks."

(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:42 UK time, Monday, 21 August 2006

The Guardian: "Panorama's best-known reporter, John Ware, has warned against the programme becoming over-dependent on stunts." (link, and more here).

Daily Mail: BBC newsreader George Alagiah comments on multiculturalism in the UK. (link)

How to say: Escondida

Host Host | 14:34 UK time, Friday, 18 August 2006

Catherine SangsterA guide to words and names in the news, from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is for Escondida, the world's largest privately-owned copper mine in Chile, where the workers are currently striking."

"We recommend the pronunciation esk-on-DEE-dhuh (dh represents the voiced th sound in the word "this")."

(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 10:05 UK time, Thursday, 17 August 2006

The Independent: "The editor-in-chief of the Sport newspapers is to concentrate on a new career in television and radio with the BBC." (link)

The Sun: An article attacking the amount of money spent on taxis and car hire by the BBC. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:44 UK time, Wednesday, 16 August 2006

The Scotsman: "The BBC's £19-million-a-year Arabic TV service will launch next autumn with a mission to challenge the dominance of al-Jazeera." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 11:41 UK time, Tuesday, 15 August 2006

The Guardian: "BBC News 24, ITN and Sky News will be competing for prestigious International Emmys, after being nominated for the 2006 news awards." (link)

The Guardian: A review of BBC One's new magazine programme, 'The One Show'. (link)

How to say: Clydach

Host Host | 12:28 UK time, Monday, 14 August 2006

Catherine SangsterA guide to words and names in the news, from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is the Welsh town Clydach, for which we recommend the pronunciation KLID-uhkh (kh as in Scottish "loch").

"This recommendation, for use in English-language broadcasts, is based on the local Welsh pronunciation and was researched with a number of local sources."

(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:52 UK time, Monday, 14 August 2006

The Telegraph: "The BBC was yesterday plunged into a row after its new 'diversity czar' said there were too many white journalists reporting from non-white nations." (link)

The Independent: A profile of the head of the BBC's web operation, Ashley Highfield. (link)

The Independent: A report on the return of Nick Clarke to Radio 4's 'World at One' after his cancer battle. (link, and more here)

How to say: O. Obasanjo

Host Host | 11:30 UK time, Friday, 11 August 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo.

"Our recommendation is ol-OO-sheg-uu(ng) ob-ASS-an-joh (-ol as in 'olive', -g as in 'get', -j as in 'Jack'), following consultation with the BBC Hausa Section."

(Click here for a guide to phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:22 UK time, Friday, 11 August 2006

The Times: "The BBC has admitted paying out a total of £17 million in bonuses to more than 10,000 employees." (link)

The Guardian: A report on how the UK's TV news services covered the terror plot story on Thursday. (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 10:50 UK time, Thursday, 10 August 2006

Among the audience comments to the BBC in the past 24 hours were many on coverage of the Middle East crisis, with one person complaining that the BBC is not devoting enough airtime to the story.

Also, some people remarked on coverage of the verdict in the Damilola Taylor case - with at least one person saying that the story should not have led any of the news bulletins.

We also received the following comment in an email:

I no longer see the need for news. Up until now I believed that news reporting had some effect on the perpetrators of violence - I'm afraid those days are gone.

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:34 UK time, Thursday, 10 August 2006

The Telegraph: Commentary on Newsnight's recent investigation into Arsenal football club. (link)

Press Gazette: Senior BBC journalists talk briefly about the current state of political reporting. (link)

How to say: J. Kellenberger

Host Host | 11:11 UK time, Wednesday, 9 August 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is for the Head of the International Committee of the Red Cross, Jakob Kellenberger - a Swiss national with a German name.

"It is pronounced YAA-kop KELL-uhn-bair-guhr (-air as in 'hair'; -g as in 'get'). This pronunciation was given to us by the Swiss Embassy."

(Click here for a guide to phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

How to say: Vitaly Churkin

Host Host | 08:59 UK time, Tuesday, 8 August 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is Russian UN Envoy Vitaly Churkin, pronounced vi-TAA-lee CHOOR-kin.

"The surname might at first look as though it ought to be pronounced as CHUR-kin (-ch as in 'church' and -ur as in 'fur') but the vowel sound is closer to -oo' (as in 'boot')."

(Click here for a guide to phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 07:58 UK time, Tuesday, 8 August 2006

Financial Times: "The war in Lebanon is being fought not just on the ground but in the media... oddly enough, both sides are right." (link)

Daily Mail: BBC staff deluged with emails from girl desperate to trace 'gorgeous Gavin'. (link)

How to say: Tarique Ghaffur

Host Host | 13:50 UK time, Monday, 7 August 2006

MarthaA guide to words and names in the news, from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Our recommendation for Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner Tarique Ghaffur is tuh-REEK gaff-OOR. That's based on the advice of the Metropolitan Police Press Office.

(Click here for a guide to phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:02 UK time, Monday, 7 August 2006

The Independent: Columnist Stefano Hatfield criticises the BBC's coverage of the battle over the future of ITV. (link)

The Guardian: Columnist Martin Kelner on last week's Panorama looking at the World Cup: "Not for one moment did we swallow the line that this was a festival of sweetness and light." (link)

How to say: Amir Peretz

Host Host | 12:53 UK time, Friday, 4 August 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Lena Olausson of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's name is the Israeli Defence Minister Amir Peretz, pronounced am-EER PERR-ets. Hebrew stress often falls on the last syllable, and sometimes there is a tendency to treat all Israeli names like that. Peretz (and other well-known names such as Peres and Ha'aretz), however, have stress on the second to last syllable."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:08 UK time, Friday, 4 August 2006

Daily Mail: Richard Littlejohn on Middle East coverage - "I use a rough rule of thumb whenever I watch TV coverage of the Middle East. Anyone who pronounces Hezbollah as 'Hiz-bull-arrrgh' and Israeli as 'Izza-ra-ay-lee' is almost certainly telling lies." (link)

The Sun: Columnist Fergus Shanahan attacks the BBC's Middle East coverage for "turning war into showbiz". (no link available)

How to say: William Patey

Host Host | 11:09 UK time, Thursday, 3 August 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Lena Olausson of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's name is Britain's outgoing ambassador to Iraq, William Patey. The pronunciation is PAY-ti."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:08 UK time, Thursday, 3 August 2006

Daily Mail: "The BBC has been urged to pull a 'sick' new comedy show which features spoof news reports." (link)

Press Gazette: "Leading journalists have dismissed claims that the trend among war reporters not to wear ties is disrespectful." (link)

The Herald: Readers respond to Tuesday's attack in the paper on the BBC's reporting from Lebanon. (link, and more here)

How to say: Baalbek

Host Host | 12:05 UK time, Wednesday, 2 August 2006

Lena OlaussonA guide to words and names in the news, from Lena Olausson of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's name is the Lebanese town Baalbek (sometimes spelt Ba'albek).

"The pronunciation, BAAL-bek, is listed in English gazetteers and dictionaries and is an established anglicisation. The Arabic pronunciation has a pharyngeal consonant before the second A."

(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:45 UK time, Wednesday, 2 August 2006

The Times: "The BBC governors have sought assurances that Radio 1 will not play music that encourages crime, in response to concerns raised by the Tory Party leader." (link)

The Scotsman: "The BBC yesterday stepped in to defend its star motoring pundit Jeremy Clarkson." (link)

How to say: Helmand

Host Host | 11:19 UK time, Tuesday, 1 August 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Lena Olausson of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is the Afghan province Helmand, where two British soldiers have been killed. This name is sometimes mispronounced as HEL-mand, when it should be hel-MAND - with stress on the last syllable."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:08 UK time, Tuesday, 1 August 2006

The Herald: A columnist writes, "The BBC has succumbed to the pressures to emotionalise events in Lebanon: dumbing down almost, it seems to me, to the level of EastEnders." (link)

Manchester Evening News: "The Bishop of Manchester has said that squabbling between Manchester and Salford councils could scupper the BBC's move to the north." (link)

How to say: Qana

Host Host | 11:46 UK time, Monday, 31 July 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Lena Olausson of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

Lena Olausson"Today's name is the Lebanese village Qana, pronounced KAA-nuh. The letter Q is a uvular consonant, a sound which does not exist in English. We always anglicise the Q in names like al-Qaeda, al-Aqsa, Umm Qasr etc. to a K sound."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 11:07 UK time, Monday, 31 July 2006

Among the audience research to the BBC in the past 24 hours were many calls about Sunday night's Panorama, about the charity Interpal (for more details and to watch the programme online, click here). Some callers thought it was inappropriate to be broadcast amid the current situation in the Middle East, others thought it was particularly timely. Some claimed it was unbalanced; others said it was well researched. Several objected to the style of the camerawork.

We also received these e-mails:

The Panorama programme tonight was courageous and much needed in the present climate.

I've just turned off tonight's Panorama in disgust because it was fundamentally anti-religious. All religions have a political sub-strata - vide Desmond Tutu's "Anyone who says the Bible isn't a political document isn't reading the same Bible I'm reading" - and to attack one religion because you don't happen to find the political sub-strata supportive to your own prejudices is to sanction an attack on any religion by anyone who doesn't like the implications of what that religion is saying. This morning a church I know sang "Soldiers of Christ, arise!" with great gusto. OK, it isn't as detailed as the songs the Palestinian kiddies were singing - but the basic call to believers is the same.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 08:53 UK time, Monday, 31 July 2006

The Guardian: "A war is raging over perceived bias in the media's coverage of the crisis in the Middle East." (link)

The Independent: "Any self-respecting TV journalist evidently wants to head to the Middle East... BBC stars have been jostling one another as they vie for attention." (link)

How to say: Pardubice

Host Host | 11:14 UK time, Friday, 28 July 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is Pardubice, the Czech town where a British woman has died during a chess tournament. Czech is invariably stressed on the first syllable, and the pronunciation is PAR-doo-bits-uh."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:43 UK time, Friday, 28 July 2006

The Guardian: Detectives investigate more than 60 phone calls to police hotline following BBC documentary about Stephen Lawrence. (Link)

The Daily Mail: Why do the BBC's war reporters refuse to wear ties? Michael Cole writes. (Link)

The Daily Telegraph: Obituary for former BBC reporter Bob Simpson. (Link)

How to say: Ehud Olmert

Host Host | 14:31 UK time, Thursday, 27 July 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is the Israeli prime minister Ehud Olmert, pronounced ay-HOOD OL-mairt.

"We generally research names using written sources and native speakers within the BBC, but we also consult outside agencies. In this case, the pronunciation came from a Hebrew speaker in the press office of the Israeli embassy."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 13:24 UK time, Thursday, 27 July 2006

The Daily Mail: Stephen Lawrence documentary "a laudable piece of journalism".(link)
The Independent: Documentary has "concentrated our minds wonderfully". (Link (£))
The Guardian: In praise of Election Night (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 10:51 UK time, Thursday, 27 July 2006

Among the audience response received by the BBC in the past 24 hours were many calls praising the documentary The Boys Who Killed Stephen Lawrence, though some callers thought too long had passed since the original events. There continue to be calls about Middle East coverage, alleging bias on our part in both directions, and also some calls complaining about the amount of reporting on the subject.

How to say: Kofi Annan

Host Host | 12:29 UK time, Wednesday, 26 July 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's news-related pronunciation is an apparently simple name, often mispronounced: UN secretary-general Kofi Annan.

The pronunciation is KOH-fi AN-an, with the stress on the first syllable of the surname. We have the best possible source for this pronunciation; it is how he said his name himself during his swearing-in ceremony in 1996."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:40 UK time, Wednesday, 26 July 2006

The Times: The editor of the BBC's Sunday AM reponds to criticism of his programme in the paper. (link)

The Telegraph: "The drama of general election night could soon come to an end because of new voting laws, a Government minister has said." (link)

How to say: Nouri al-Maliki

Host Host | 13:01 UK time, Tuesday, 25 July 2006

Catherine SangsterA guide to words and names in the news, from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Today's pronunciation is for the name of Iraq's prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, who held a joint news conference with Tony Blair in London on Monday.

Prime Minister Tony Blair greets his Iraqi counterpart"The Pronunciation Unit recommends the pronunciation...

NOO-ri uhl-MAL-ick-i."

(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 11:34 UK time, Tuesday, 25 July 2006

Among the audience reaction received by the BBC in the past 24 hours were a number of messages praising Panorama's report on Sunday into the provision of health care for the elderly, as well as numerous objections to the coverage of the Middle East conflict.

We also received this email.

I would like weather reporting to take account of the fact that a fine sunny day is not always what we all want. There is a drought in the south east of the UK and rain is very welcome. You would think that weather reporters had not heard about it.

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:42 UK time, Tuesday, 25 July 2006

The Times: "The BBC is working on a musical to be based on the rise and fall of Gerald Ratner." (link)

The Independent: "For some reason it is now the habit of every commentator - especially on the BBC - to add four meaningless syllables to the truth." (link)

How to say: Chester-le-Street

Host Host | 11:32 UK time, Monday, 24 July 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Catherine Sangster of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.
Catherine Sangster
"Today's pronunciation is for the English town Chester-le-Street.

"Our recommendation, based on the advice of people who live there as well as published sources, is CHEST-uhr-li-street - the first part rhymes with 'westerly'. Most English placenames with 'le' in them are pronounced in this way, rhyming with 'me' rather than the French-sounding 'luh'."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 10:21 UK time, Monday, 24 July 2006

Among the audience reaction received by the BBC in the past 24 hours were comments that "there are not enough interviews from the Lebanese" and "Israel is not getting equal coverage". We also received these e-mails:

I wish the BBC would stop banging on about blogs. I want quality journalism from intelligent people. Blogs are 99.999999% self-indulgent ramblings from people whose opinion I have no interest in.
Can the BBC news teams, when quoting statistics in news broadcasts, not make a mockery of our language? It is ludicrous to state, for example, that "In the UK, 30,000 people die of lung disease every year". No, they don't! Once they've died, those people can't die again the following year ! Do you not see that the better way to quote that (fictional)statistic would be: "Every year, lung disease is responsible for 30,000 deaths in the UK"? If BBC London were to tell me that "Somebody is mugged on the tube every 38 minutes", my immediate reaction would be "and he's getting really fed up with it now".

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:26 UK time, Monday, 24 July 2006

The Independent: Reporter Ian Burrell spends a day in the BBC News 24 newsroom. (link)

The Times: Columnist Stephen Pollard attacks the BBC's coverage of the Middle East crisis. (link)

The Guardian: "Panorama's return to a primetime weeknight slot could make or break the current affairs programme." (link)

How to say: HMS Bulwark

Host Host | 12:19 UK time, Friday, 21 July 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"The Pronunciation Unit recommends the pronunciation BUUL-wuhrk.

"Pronunciation dictionaries give the above pronunciation as the preferred British English pronunciation of 'bulwark' (the word), although other acceptable pronunciations of this word include BUL- (as in 'cup') initially or -WURK (as in 'her') finally. For the name of the ship, we checked the pronunciation with the Royal Navy Press Office."
(Click for a guide to our phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 10:48 UK time, Friday, 21 July 2006

Among the audience response given to the BBC in the past 24 hours were, again, many calls about our coverage of the Middle East. Other points raised were objections that Condoleezza Rice was referred to as 'Condy' on Newsnight, and that an item on the Today programme might encourage children to use water pistols during a water shortage. We also received this e-mail, our favourite of the week:

I am sorry to be a nitpicking pedant however I have had frequent arguements with friends on this topic and I am very surprised that the BBC of all people would get this fact wrong... Bananaman did not live at 29 Acacia Avenue as you mentioned in your article, he lived at 29 Acacia ROAD.
(Story is now corrected.)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:56 UK time, Friday, 21 July 2006

The Times: A columnist on the BBC's coverage of the Middle East crisis: "Both the BBC and ITV have staged feelgood family reunions by satellite during news bulletins." (link)

The Independent: "Lebanon's PM has enough problems but, even so, he might have been distracted by one trivial, nagging question when he met the BBC's Middle East editor this week..." (link)

Blogs on the BBC

Host Host | 15:23 UK time, Thursday, 20 July 2006

A round-up of what's being said about the BBC in other blogs. Today, the announcement of a major restructuring of the BBC.

Buzzmachine:
"This is a big cultural change for the BBC... different tribes are being thrown in together and told they’d better get along." (link)

I'm Simon Dickson:
"It's further evidence that online production really isn’t that specialised any more... everything is ‘just content’." (link)

Plasticbag.org:
"Are you impressed by the BBC's progress? I'm not." (link)

Ninthspace:
"The BBC has given new media an expanded role... Great. Now go sort out your interactive TV service!" (link)

How to say: Jan Egeland

Host Host | 12:17 UK time, Thursday, 20 July 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

Jan Egeland, UN emergency relief co-ordinatorToday, Jan Egeland, UN emergency relief co-ordinator.

"The Pronunciation Unit recommends the pronunciation YAAN AY-guh-lan.

"This is a Norwegian name, so the final 'd' in Egeland is silent in this position."

(Click here for a guide to phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:49 UK time, Thursday, 20 July 2006

The Guardian: "The BBC's director general yesterday unveiled a restructuring package... designed to make the BBC 'the most creative organisation in the world'." (link)

The Mirror: "Computer giant Microsoft has beaten the BBC to be crowned the UK's top consumer brand." (link)

How to say: Javier Solana

Host Host | 12:00 UK time, Wednesday, 19 July 2006

A guide to words and names in the news, from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

Today, Javier Solana, European Union foreign policy chief.

"The Pronunciation Unit recommends the pronunciation khav-YAIR sol-AA-nuh (-kh as in Scottish loch)

"People sometimes confuse the pronunciation of Spanish 'Javier' with the pronunciation of French words or names ending in -ier (such as Xavier, Olivier). The resulting pronunciation is a cross between the Spanish khav-YAIR and the French gzav-YAY. Since this individual is Spanish, the initial sound in 'Javier' is like the sound in Scottish 'loch' (not English 'lock') and the final syllable rhymes with 'hair' in an anglicised pronunciation."

(Click here for a guide to phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

Reporting from Norwich

Host Host | 10:40 UK time, Wednesday, 19 July 2006

Blogger John Gibbard has written a report from the BBC governors' meeting in Norwich (which took place last Thursday - BBC News report here).

He's pretty sure he was the only blogger there... but if you know otherwise, leave a link in the comments.

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:19 UK time, Wednesday, 19 July 2006

The Guardian: "BBC director general Mark Thompson will today unveil major changes to the structure of the corporation." (link)

The Telegraph: "The BBC is rescuing Panorama from its "graveyard" Sunday night slot." (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 09:56 UK time, Wednesday, 19 July 2006

Among the audience reaction given to the BBC in the past 24 hours were several people who objected to the evacuation of Lebanon being compared to Dunkirk. And as on previous days, some people alleged bias in favour of Israel, others alleged bias against. We also received this e-mail:

I can't believe the UK comes to a stand still and we're told what we can and can't do due to the weather/heat. I'm in the British Army out in Iraq for the third time in three years working in 45+ degrees daily wearing combat body armour. The Army is forgotten about by the British public until something bad happens.

How to say: Hezbollah

Host Host | 14:16 UK time, Tuesday, 18 July 2006

MarthaA guide to words and names in the news, from Martha Figueroa-Clark of the BBC Pronunciation Unit.

"Our recommendation for Hezbollah is hez-buul-AA (stress on final syllable). We've arrived at this recommendation by considering the original Farsi pronunciation, the Arabic pronunciation and anglicised pronunciations in published sources.

In yesterday's post, some of you asked how to pronounce the word orthoepist (a professional pronouncer).

It's not a word we use in everyday conversations but we find it ironic that a word that refers to correct pronunciations can be said in so many ways! These possibilities include: OR-thoh-ep-ist, or-thoh-EE-pist and or-THOH-uh-pist. All these are acceptable but our personal preference is perhaps the last one."

(Click here for a guide to phonetic pronunciations (PDF).)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 10:57 UK time, Tuesday, 18 July 2006

As with previous days, much of the audience response received by BBC News in the past 24 hours relates to coverage of the crisis in the Middle East. Amongst other issues, some people objected to the comparison of the evacuation of Britons from Lebanon to the evacuation from Dunkirk during World War II.

Some people also objected to the broadcast of a recording of a private conversation between President Bush and Prime Minister Tony Blair.

We also received this e-mail:

What had set BBC apart from other news organizations was its traditional and professional objective reporting and presentation. Hope BBC gets back to tradition soon.

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:46 UK time, Tuesday, 18 July 2006

The Guardian: More on the BBC's response to complaints over a spoof report of an incident at the Queen's party at the palace. (link)

The Telegraph: Comments on Foreign Office minister Kim Howells advising Britons in Lebanon to listen to the BBC. (link)

You say tomato

Host Host | 13:46 UK time, Monday, 17 July 2006

Introducing a new feature to this blog.

Pronunciation Unit staffOne of the beauties of an organisation such as the BBC is having a resource like the Pronunciation Research Unit. It is staffed by three full-time pronunciation linguists (from left, Martha Figueroa-Clark, Catherine Sangster and Lena Olausson), whose job is to provide advice on the pronunciation of any words in any language required by anybody in the BBC. They research and maintain a database of pronunciations which have been researched and indexed over the course of the past 80 years. It now consists of around 200,000 entries.

In his book on language, Mother Tongue (1990), Bill Bryson says: "The problem [of pronouncing names correctly] is so extensive, and the possibility of gaffes so omnipresent, that the BBC employs an entire pronunciation unit, a small group of dedicated orthoepists (professional pronouncers) who spend their working lives getting to grips with these illogical pronunciations so that broadcasters don't have to do it on the air."

In fact the BBC has had a pronunciation advice service since its earliest days. Lord Reith set up an Advisory Committee on Spoken English in 1926, chaired by Robert Bridges, poet laureate of the day. Other board members included playwright George Bernard Shaw and phonetics professor Daniel Jones. The committee's original task was to advise announcers on words of doubtful pronunciation. The modern Pronunciation Research Unit provides an advisory service to the entire BBC. One of its services for BBC News is to prepare a daily list of pronunciations of names, places and phrases which relate to the day's news.

The Unit's advice is based on the following policies:

• For placenames in English-speaking countries, a standardised version of the local pronunciation is recommended. The same is true for placenames in non-English-speaking countries, but if there is an established English form of a placename (e.g. Florence, Munich), then this is recommended rather than the local form (Firenze, Muenchen). For placenames which have sounds which would cause difficulties of production (for the speaker) or comprehension (for the listener), an anglicised form as close as possible to the native pronunciation is devised.

• For people's names, the pronunciation that the individual prefers is recommended. Family members, colleagues and agents are consulted.

• For words and phrases, recommendations are made based on the Unit staff's own language fluencies, a wide range of reference works, and consultation with native speakers. In the case of English words which can be pronounced in more than one way, the Unit can advise on which pronunciation is more traditional or usual.

From tomorrow, The Editors will be featuring a news-related pronunciation of the day, taken from the unit's daily list. Your queries and thoughts are, as ever, welcome.

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 10:01 UK time, Monday, 17 July 2006

Among the audience response to the BBC in the past 24 hours were many people debating our reporting of the Middle East crisis (one person objected to the increased use of the headline-friendly phrase "Mid East"). Some people claimed we gave too much emphasis to the situation in Lebanon - there was an objection to an interview with a 12-year-old British schoolboy in Lebanon because his views "weren't valid". Others claimed we gave Israeli interviewees too easy a ride. We also received this e-mail:

"Hi! Well, I've been reading your Country Profiles and I think you give a very prejudice perception of ALL of them..."

Last word to this e-mailer:

Please can we have some cheerful news, the world can’t be all gloom. I read the BBC internet News most days, however I am getting to the stage of not bothering as all it does is make me unhappy. Surely you have a reporter somewhere in the world who can find something other than war, death and despondency.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:11 UK time, Monday, 17 July 2006

The Independent: A columnist writes, "there was something discomforting to me - and, I suspect, to other journalists of my generation - about John Humphrys's persistent questioning of John Prescott". (link)

The Guardian: BBC staff - including the director general and head of news - appear in the paper's annual list of the 100 most powerful people in UK media. (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:48 UK time, Friday, 14 July 2006

The Times: People column reports that the BBC's Politics Show has secured an interview with Tony Blair this week. (link)

The Times: "The BBC Proms season that opens tonight features not a single piece of music composed or conducted by a woman." (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 12:14 UK time, Thursday, 13 July 2006

The Telegraph: Two BBC executives resign saying they are disillusioned with having to fire staff. (link)
The Telegraph: Columnist Tom Leonard on prospects of a strike at the BBC (link)
The Independent: Letter claiming media salary increases fuel inflation (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:27 UK time, Wednesday, 12 July 2006

The Telegraph: "The BBC's top brass yesterday defended the decision to hand its executives record pay rises." (link)

The Guardian: "Des Browne, the defence secretary, yesterday accused the BBC of endangering the lives of British troops." (link)

The Telegraph: "A Labour MP turned the air blue in the Commons as he berated the BBC for helping to create Britain's increasingly vulgar culture." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:25 UK time, Tuesday, 11 July 2006

The Times: A columnist writes of last week's John Prescott Today programme interview, "I was at the BBC throughout the David Mellor affair. It is inconceivable that such a question would have been asked ten years ago." (link)

The Scotsman: "The BBC is facing a series of strikes next month by broadcasting workers and journalists in a bitter pay and pensions dispute." (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:32 UK time, Monday, 10 July 2006

The Guardian: "Friday's launch of the BBC governors' final annual report was a sombre affair." (link)

The Observer: An article on how political blogs infiltrated the mainstream media, including the BBC, last week. (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 09:29 UK time, Friday, 7 July 2006

The audience response given to the BBC in the past 24 hours included people thinking it was wrong to give emphasis to the video of 7 July bomber Shehzad Tanweer, which was revealed on al-Jazeera. Opinion divided between those who applauded the Today programme interview with John Prescott and those who thought it was too much.

We also received this e-mail: "While I fully realise the importance of the anniversary of the London Bombings, I feel you are just wallowing in it. This is an increasing trend. Anniversaries need to be recognised, but not made into media show-pieces."

Freedom of Information

Post categories:

Host Host | 13:09 UK time, Thursday, 6 July 2006

Some bloggers have queried how Newsnight had key documents on John Prescott (watch here), obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, at such an opportune time. The BBC's Open Secrets blog has an intriguing explanation...

Finding this blog

Host Host | 12:49 UK time, Thursday, 6 July 2006

link.jpgAs you may (or may not) have noticed, this blog is now linked on the left hand side of the BBC News website. So that should make it a bit easier for you to find us.

Or you could always subscribe to our RSS feed (instructions here).

You can get to the Newswatch site from the link on the right hand side of this blog, or at http://www.bbc.co.uk/newswatch.

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:13 UK time, Thursday, 6 July 2006

Telegraph: "A student who works as a scuba diving instructor in his spare time and supports the Tories is due to appear as a panellist on Question Time on BBC One tonight." (link)

The Guardian: A feature on proposed new European rules for TV transmitted over the internet, and how they could affect broadcasters including the BBC. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:35 UK time, Wednesday, 5 July 2006

Daily Mail: "But despite the furore over John Prescott, the BBC appeared to be playing down the controversy." (link)

The Guardian: "A fantasy BBC radio station personalised for each listener is to become a reality, according to director general Mark Thompson." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:11 UK time, Tuesday, 4 July 2006

The Independent: "What are we to make of the BBC's coverage of the latest scandal to engulf John Prescott?" (link)

Financial Times: A media commentator describes how new technology will change the relationship between the public and the BBC (and other broadcasters) (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 09:11 UK time, Monday, 3 July 2006

Among the audience reponse received by the BBC in the past 24 hours include this e-mail from Father Paul Nicholas:

Two soldiers are killed in Afghanistan and the top news on BBC One is Beckham's resignation?? The BBC seems to becoming more like a tabloid newspaper rather than a serious news giver.

The level of sport coverage, both on the TV schedules and in news programmes, is often a cause for some complaint. Though some viewers yesterday said Andy Murray's victory over Andy Roddick had not been given enough coverage.

A radio listener complained that warnings about the dangers of the hot weather for old people were given only in Celsius, when most of them would relate more to temperatures in Fahrenheit. Others contacted us to welcome Nick Clarke back to the radio, after he presented Radio 4's Any Questions.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:09 UK time, Monday, 3 July 2006

The Guardian: A reviewer defends a new BBC Two drama series attacked for its negative stereotyping of black people. (link)

Sunday Telegraph: "Revealed: how the BBC used MI5 to vet thousands of staff." (link)

The Guardian: The paper's readers' editor on communication between a news organisation and its readers. (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:19 UK time, Thursday, 29 June 2006

The Guardian: "The BBC's commercial arm expects to launch an advertising-supported website by next March, the chief executive of BBC Worldwide, said yesterday." (link)

The Independent: Television presenter Jonathan Ross defends the controversial questions he put to Conservative leader David Cameron. (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:26 UK time, Wednesday, 28 June 2006

The Independent: "Kirsty Young, anchor of Five News, has been confirmed as the next presenter of Desert Island Discs." (link)

The Guardian: "The government will unveil plans to involve the public in the search for members of the new BBC Trust." (link)

The Guardian: "A quarter of the journalists in the BBC's flagship television current affairs department are to be forced to take compulsory redundancy." (link)

Blogs on the BBC

Host Host | 11:18 UK time, Tuesday, 27 June 2006

A round-up of what's being said about the BBC in other blogs. Today, the launch of this site.

CBS Public Eye: "It appears BBC News is hopping on the transparency bandwagon." (link)

BuzzMachine: "The BBC's new editors' blog is another move toward transparency by another big news organization and I’m glad to see it." (link)

jamesAntenne: "We’ll have to see what sort of comments make it on to the blog." (link)

Quite Random: "Comments on The Editors are peppered with spelling mistakes... everywhere you look, glaringly poor English." (link)

The Gorse Fox: "I wonder if the blog will include dilemmas and issues regarding truth and bias." (link)

I'm Simon Dickson: "There’s a risk of the editors blog becoming a bit too Points Of View, but another positive step." (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:13 UK time, Tuesday, 27 June 2006

The Telegraph: "The BBC apologised yesterday for a hoax that provoked 70 complaints during the Queen's party for children at Buckingham Palace.." (link, and more here)

The Guardian: Mark Lawson considers why David Beckham vomiting during a World Cup match was considered taboo by some TV executives. (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 09:46 UK time, Monday, 26 June 2006

Among the audience reponse received by the BBC in the past 24 hours were numerous complaints about a spoof news bulletin starting the coverage of the Queen's birthday party: some viewers said they had been scared because they thought it was genuine. There were also complaints claiming that reports of arrests of English football fans in Stuttgart labelled them British, which, some viewers said, was unfair on Scottish, Welsh or Northern Irish fans.

We also received this e-mail:


I was concerned that your coverage, along with the rest of the UK media, chose to run the foster care abuse story initially with the word 'gay' at the front of the headline. I was wondering if in future cases of child abuse you will ensure the words 'heterosexual', 'white', 'black', 'Asian', 'Christian', 'Muslim', 'secular' and so on will also be applied? I feel once again the media is putting gay men into the usual boxes of sex-obsessed, tragic, funny, victims or criminals.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 08:40 UK time, Monday, 26 June 2006

The Sun: "Viewers flooded the BBC with complaints over a spoof Newsflash claiming there was a major incident at the Palace." (link)

The Guardian: "Jonathan Ross is a chancer and politicians who accept an invitation to sit on his Friday night sofa know they are taking a chance too." (link)

The Telegraph: In an interview, chairman of the BBC Michael Grade says criticism of the corporation's development of digital media is unjustified. (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 11:04 UK time, Friday, 23 June 2006

Among the audience response received by the BBC were some complaints that a rogue voice could be heard swearing over the end of Question Time, and a complaint that the World at One used the word "Schadenfreude" when it was not obvious what it meant.

This e-mail was also received:

Please pass on my thanks and admiration to Nick Clarke and his wife, Barbara Want, for their diary, Fighting to be Normal, which I listened to today. Brilliant radio. It had me in tears at points for its truthful and honest look at how real people in normal life meet and deal with the extreme. Thank you both so much. You cannot beat radio as a medium and you cannot beat honesty and humour as ways of tackling cancer. The twins are wonderful!

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:18 UK time, Friday, 23 June 2006

The Sun: "Telly weathergirl Helen Willetts got soaked when someone switched on sprinklers behind her during a live broadcast for BBC Breakfast" (link)

Media Guardian: "Television news tended to "toe the government line" during the Iraq war, a new international study claims" (link)

Media Guardian: "BBC director general, Mark Thompson, is planning more major changes to the structure of the corporation" (link) [Update: Mark Thompson has denied this.]

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 14:43 UK time, Thursday, 22 June 2006

Among the audience response to the BBC in the past 24 hours were calls complaining that BBC Two's Daily Politics was biased against the Conservative party, and others claiming it was biased against the Labour party. Some callers thought generally BBC News had given Michael Owen's injury too high a priority. Several complained at the degree of football coverage on radio and TV. One complaint said it was wrong to refer to 21 June as "the longest day", since all days are 24 hours long.

We also received this e-mail, which proves the value of giving as much information as possible:

I did not see anywhere anything that told us what wine the Queen had with the meal that was cooked for her 80th celebration Lots about the food but could you let me know what wine they had with each course?

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 08:15 UK time, Wednesday, 21 June 2006

Daily Mail: BBC radio presenter Jeremy Vine apologised on air on Tuesday after his show ran a spoof news item saying that Soham murderer Ian Huntley had been murdered in his prison cell (link)

The Guardian: "A request from the England camp for news of how their World Cup performances are going down back home has prompted BBC News 24 to adjust its schedules" (link)

Financial Times: The BBC's director-general writes, "all BBC journalism must be rooted in our values and in an agenda, not just of what is interesting, but what is important" (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 09:20 UK time, Tuesday, 20 June 2006

Among the audience reaction received by the BBC in the past 24 hours were claims that Newsnight inferred that people who opposed whaling did so only on sentimental grounds, though another caller was pleased at the emphasis given to the subject on programmes. There was also a claim that it was said people who opposed screening of embryos did so only on religious grounds when some people have other reasons. There was concern about the safety of children shown on Newsround firing party poppers over birthday candles.

This e-mail was also received:

The panels used to project the graphics and pictures on the back wall of your news bulletins show the lines where they join. Has no one else seen this poor quality of display.The weather map shows the flaws as it scans the country and the background is uneven when panned back. It looks as if some dodgy decorator did a quick job and will be back to finish some-time.

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 12:00 UK time, Monday, 19 June 2006

Among the calls to the BBC in the past 24 hours were a complaint claiming incorrect usage of the word "schizophrenic" on Panorama, and a claim that unemployed people are not represented on the news. These are two of the e-mails received:

Something I have noticed about BBC News, which I previously thought only happened on the other channels is the clear misuse of the word "paedophile", to describe any convicted child molester - even the term 'convicted paedophile' - which is obviously ignorant of legal definitions. The term simply means 'one who shows sexual *desire* - directed towards children' (Oxford, 1991), and is therefore simply a description of sexual orientation, alongside, say zoophilia or heterosexuality...The objective word for someone who practices sex with prepubescent children is "pederast", and in most countries, the legal definition is "child molestor".
Why do news readers talk to their correspondents as if they themselves are having a conversation instead of talking to us, the viewers? It irritates me beyond belief! I love the BBC news, but these two way conversations exclude the viewer; no-one seems to talk to us except when welcoming us to the programme, then these two way conversations occur, obliterating the welcome to the programme.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:52 UK time, Monday, 19 June 2006

Financial Times: "Tessa Jowell, the culture secretary, has given the strongest signal yet that the government plans to scale back the BBC's licence-fee bid" (link)

Telegraph: "It is impossible to listen to BBC news without hearing a procession of spokesmen for what was referred to as "the community" condemning the police action in east London..." (link)

Independent on Sunday: Director of BBC Sport Roger Mosey talks about what he hopes the BBC's new sports editor will achieve (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:40 UK time, Friday, 16 June 2006

The Independent: "The city of Salford has beaten Manchester, its neighbour and old foe, to pole position in the race to house parts of the BBC when they are relocated north" (link)

Press Gazette: "Scotland's First Minister Jack McConnell has attacked the BBC and ITV for being too biased in favour of England in their World Cup coverage" (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 13:28 UK time, Thursday, 15 June 2006

Among the audience response to the BBC in the past 24 hours, several callers objected to Mark Oaten's appearance on Question Time, saying it was inappropriate. Others thought that government minister Hazel Blears had been given a tough time on Newsnight, while one thought fellow minister Yvette Cooper had been given too easy a ride "because she is an attractive lady".

One viewer e-mailed to say:

The news/sport presenters seem to have learned a new word. Actually its a very common word, but recently its been used to give special emphasis to just about anything. The word is "that". For example, with regards to Wayne Rooney's foot, we hear "that foot". Today is "that match", referring to a World Cup match. There are so many examples (I can't list them all here), and it's not only related to sport/football.

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:31 UK time, Thursday, 15 June 2006

The Guardian: "The biggest threat to the BBC's future may not be commercial pressure, but its commercial success" (link)

The Independent: "There is no sharper sword in the BBC's armoury than Jeremy Paxman, so it is intriguing to hear they are offering politicians advice on how to deal with him" (link)

Phones, letters, e-mails

Host Host | 09:53 UK time, Wednesday, 14 June 2006

Some of the issues raised by callers to the BBC in the past 24 hours include continued complaints about the amount of World Cup coverage in news programmes, and claims that coverage was too sympathetic to the two men arrested in the Forest Gate raid. One said there was too much emphasis on building bridges with Muslims. One viewer e-mailed to say:

"I work at home and listen and watch news a great deal. This is the first time I have ever written to complain about what I usually consider to be a good unbiased service. However last night I was concerned that on News 24 (6 ish) the item on Tony Blair attending the Bevis Marks Synagogue to mark the anniversary of Cromwell's readmittance of the Jews was immediately followed by coverage of an incident in Israel, where criticism was levelled at Israel. I am Jewish but not a Zionist and I am concerned that in most viewers minds these two items are inextricably linked. They are not! I would like to know how the running order is decided and whether sensitivity plays any part."

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:07 UK time, Wednesday, 14 June 2006

The Guardian: "The BBC is planning to launch a weekly news magazine linked to its flagship news programmes Newsnight and Panorama" (link)

The Times: "Critics of the BBC often accuse it of political bias. Rageh Omaar exemplifies the untruth of the charge" (link)

The Guardian: "The BBC's new media chief says that by 2013 the corporation's online operation will cost licence fee payers the equivalent of just "one music download" a month" (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:12 UK time, Tuesday, 13 June 2006

The Independent: Reports that Kate Silverton is to be given the prestigious job of fashion reporter at this year's Ascot (link)

The Guardian: "Sepp Blatter had his breakfast ruined yesterday by a private screening of Sunday evening's BBC Panorama programme alleging corruption at Fifa" (link)

Daily Mail: "Television shows such as Top Gear have been accused of encouraging bad driving" (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 08:35 UK time, Monday, 12 June 2006

The Guardian: "The BBC is looking to rebrand all its domestic news outlets, including its News 24 channel, under the BBC News name" (link)

Daily Mail: "An influential committee of peers has demanded Parliament has a greater role in determining the TV licence fee" (link)

The Times: "The BBC may stop its broadcasts of England’s World Cup matches on giant city-centre screens after violence broke out in London and Liverpool" (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 10:01 UK time, Friday, 9 June 2006

Financial Times: "As the main 'face' of the BBC's effort to build a US audience, George Alagiah plans to put a stronger personal stamp on BBC World's daily news programme" (link)

Daily Mail: "Lyrics that celebrate gun culture have no place anywhere, let alone on the airwaves of a public sector broadcaster" (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 11:08 UK time, Thursday, 8 June 2006

The Sun: "David Cameron has accused Radio 1 rap DJ Tim Westwood of stoking Britain’s knife culture" (link)

The Times: A columnist writes about the experience of appearing on Question Time with Michael Winner (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:48 UK time, Wednesday, 7 June 2006

The Guardian: "The BBC may argue that Chris Moyles is supposed to be down with the teenagers - but that doesn't necessarily mean that he should behave like one" (link)

The Telegraph: "The BBC is hiring a 'diversity tsar' to ensure programmes are 'culturally authentic and accurate'" (link)

The Telegraph: Andrew Marr's notebook - "I am beginning to wonder whether the much-discussed decline of journalism is 100 per cent explained by the commercial threat of the web" (link)

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:15 UK time, Tuesday, 6 June 2006

The Times: The word "gay" now means "rubbish" in modern playground-speak and need not be offensive to homosexuals, the BBC Board of Governors has ruled. (link)

The Independent: "Channel 4 has launched a bid to become a national radio broadcaster to rival the BBC." (link)

The Telegraph: Interview with former BBC News chief Tony Hall: "The Royal Opera House is very like the BBC in being "creative, passionate, chaotic,'' he says. And full of prima donnas? He nods." (link)

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 09:20 UK time, Monday, 5 June 2006

The Independent: Armando Iannucci, creator of 'The Thick of It', said it was "depressing" to hear that Downing Street had requested a set of recordings of the series (link)

The Independent: Five Live's controller, Bob Shennan, says, "the World Cup will be our station's lead news story for much of the tournament" (link)

The Observer: "Broadcasters including ITV and the BBC have formed an unprecedented alliance to develop a TV service that will broadcast live to mobile phones" (link)

SOS 606

Host Host | 10:41 UK time, Friday, 2 June 2006

There's been an interesting debate over on the Sport Editors' Blog about changes that have been made to the 606 messageboards. You can keep track of it by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:51 UK time, Friday, 2 June 2006

Daily Mail: "BBC Breakfast presenter Kate Silverton had to apologise for wearing an outfit which put viewers off their cornflakes" (link)

The Independent: "BBC World has just launched in the New York area... and billboards across Manhattan are highlighting the BBC's reputation for objective reporting" (link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:23 UK time, Thursday, 1 June 2006

Telegraph: "Even though Rageh Omaar believes reporters are virtually imprisoned in Baghdad, he doesn't think the BBC bureau should be closed" (link)

Press Gazette: "BBC director general Mark Thompson has denied that plans to move much of the corporation to Manchester have been put on ice" (link)

The Guardian: Nicky Campbell says, "when BBC News 24 interviewed the wrong guest the other week, the whole world was laughing at them - not me" (link)

The Guardian: "The Commission for Racial Equality is to call on the culture secretary to enforce strict new rules on the BBC's employment of black and ethnic minorities" (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:29 UK time, Wednesday, 31 May 2006

Financial Times: "BBC director-general Mark Thompson has claimed that the corporation is the only European media group capable of taking on internet and media giants" (link, and full interview)

Daily Mail: "Tessa Jowell is to hand the BBC chairman Michael Grade a massive £60,000 pay rise for working a four-day week" (link)

Daily Mail: "Bruce Forsyth caused some students to walk out of an Oxford Union debate when he told an ill-received joke about Indian take-aways" (link)

Reporting from Baghdad

Host Host | 15:33 UK time, Tuesday, 30 May 2006

John Simpson, the BBC's world affairs editor, looked into the state of journalism in Iraq on Tuesday's Today programme.

"The deaths of a CBS camera crew in Baghdad were a terrible reminder of how dangerous reporting here can be... but it still isn't too dangerous to operate here, if you're sensible, careful and lucky... It's still perfectly possible to get out into the streets and film most days. And please don't take any notice of that ignorant stuff about western journalists huddling in the safety of the Green Zone"

Listen to the piece in full here.

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 08:58 UK time, Tuesday, 30 May 2006

The Guardian: John Simpson defends the reporting in Iraq: "We do not cower in the Green Zone" (link)

The Independent: "I wonder how worthwhile Newsnight's 'memorable front page' competition was" (link)

The Observer: "The BBC's chairman has put the brakes on a plan to move flagship divisions of the corporation to Manchester" (link)

Manchester Evening News: "A BBC spokesman denied there was any truth in a report that the chairman of the BBC has put the brakes on the move" (link)

The Scotsman: "The BBC director-general has definitively ruled out any prospect of a "Scottish Six" news bulletin" (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:39 UK time, Friday, 26 May 2006

Daily Mirror: Tony Blair, interviewed on Radio 1, refused to discuss whether he had ever had a one-night stand (link)

Independent: The Bureau, France's answer to The Office, loses something in translation. (link)

The Guardian: BBC reporter didn't know who Kevin Pietersen was (link)

Daily Mail: Ephraim Hardcastle alleges News 24 said Hutton report signed by Cherie Blair was sold for charity (it was for Labour funds) (no link)

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:59 UK time, Thursday, 25 May 2006

The Independent: "Millions heard Robin Lane-Fox, a fellow of New College, label garden designers as 'fairies' during a debate about the Chelsea Flower Show on Radio 4, prompting a stifled snigger from others in the studio" (link, and Today's response here)

The Times: "The BBC has persuaded the creator of the 1970s television series M*A*S*H to turn his fire on the Bush Administration" (link)

The Australian: "If the BBC can run commercial and public streams without conflict, why not the ABC" (link)

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 10:25 UK time, Wednesday, 24 May 2006

The Telegraph: "The BBC has used "back-of-a-fag-packet figures" to overstate the need for a licence fee increase, ITV has said" (link).

The Independent: David Attenborough says, "I'm no longer sceptical... I think climate change is the major challenge facing the world" (link).

The Sun: "Blue Peter will change its name tonight for the first time in its 47-year history" (link).

Blogs on the BBC, Tuesday

Host Host | 15:45 UK time, Tuesday, 23 May 2006

A selection of comments being made about the BBC on blogs around the world...

Adam Smith Institute: "Some BBC staff are reportedly annoyed that something which would in the past have been fixed by a couple of workmen in a cradle has degenerated into an expensive and long-running farce" (link).

Idents.tv :"I really like the BBC News sets" (link).

Chris Doidge: "The BBC is supposed to be 'ours', yet at the moment is greatly detached from society in many respects" (link).

Standing in other people’s shoes: "I love this audience analysis from Newsnight editor Peter Barron - I suspect I might actually be a dedicated loyalist" (link).

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 09:19 UK time, Tuesday, 23 May 2006

Telegraph: "The BBC needs to be put back in its public service box, says the chief executive of the radio group Chrysalis" (link).

The Times: "A leading teacher has said that some rap music is undermining classroom discipline and has urged the BBC not to broadcast it" (link).

The Herald: "BBC Scotland's head of radio is to relocate to Inverness as part of the corporation's plan to position key editorial roles in regional offices" (link)

Newswatch

Host Host | 13:59 UK time, Monday, 22 May 2006

It's worth taking a look at this week's Newswatch. Among other things, host Ray Snoddy interviews the BBC's Mark Urban on the issue of conspiracy theories (which we looked at last week).

Ray: "In future, will journalists like you have to pay more attention to the unofficial view of the world, through blogs and the internet?"
Mark: "I think we already do - I think it is a very good way of getting some sense of what people are saying and thinking out there."

Watch the programme in full here.

Audience e-mail

Host Host | 13:38 UK time, Monday, 22 May 2006

An e-mail from Mrs J Daniel, Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire:

Why "Silver" surfer? This reference and labelling is, in my view, as derogatory as the term 'blonde bimbo'. My husband bought a computer in the mid-1980s. I am sorry to disillusion them, but this present day generation of IT whizz-kids did not invent computer technology. Enhance, certainly, but before they completely shove the proverbial boot into our faces, I would like to see some credit, where due, and less labelling of those who are considered to be no longer in the mainstream due to either date of birth or colour of hair. I don't consider myself, nor my friends, to be silver' surfers. We are adults and IT literate. Thank you for your time.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 10:25 UK time, Monday, 22 May 2006

Mail on Sunday: "BBC bluffer Guy Goma is facing deportation because he does not have a work permit" (link).

The Times: "Just how many people does it take to change a light bulb at the BBC?" (link)

The Guardian: BBC director general Mark Thompson says his competitors are trying to reopen a lost argument in their last-minute fight to limit the licence fee increase (link)

The Guardian: Jeff Jarvis writes: "Don't just build BBC 2.0 - build the open-source BBC, please" (link)

The Independent: Krishnan Guru-Murthy writes: "While I secretly admire Jeremy Paxman's disdain for doing anything but presenting his television programme, and his refusal to write the Newsnight e-mail to viewers, my generation cannot afford to be so choosy." (link)

Financial Times: An opinion piece comments on the role the BBC World Service Trust has to play in the fight against HIV (link)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 09:20 UK time, Friday, 19 May 2006

The Guardian: Interview with Newsnight's Martha Kearney - "Jeremy Paxman winds her up about doing Woman's Hour endlessly - she will walk into the Newsnight studio and, in front of guests, he'll tweet: 'Any jam recipes, Martha?'" (link).

The Telegraph: "Jack Straw, the Leader of the Commons, said he believed newscasters were overpaid and mocked those who "prance" around studios" (link).

The Guardian: "Breakfast DJ Chris Moyles yesterday clashed with Oscar-winning actor Halle Berry after she accused him of having "a racist moment" live on air" (link).

Blogs on the BBC, Thursday

Host Host | 15:44 UK time, Thursday, 18 May 2006

A selection of comments being made about the BBC on blogs around the world...


Richard H's blog: "When I checked my email just now I found an e-mail titled "Interview request from BBC, Today..." (link).

Tom Morris: "What the BBC don't seem to understand is that user-generated content is happening all around them" (link).

L'Ombre de l'Olivier: "The BBC's "From Our Own Correspondent" used to be a flagship program but right now it seems to be more a flagship example of BBC bias" (link)

The Medium is Not Enough: "The BBC planned to turn itself into Italian TV for charity" (link).

John Pilger on Comment is Free: "The BBC Ten O'Clock News last night wasn't news: it was a series of pronouncements by the spokespeople of the spokespeople" (link).

Problems with comments

Host Host | 12:51 UK time, Thursday, 18 May 2006

At the minute, we've got a bit of a problem with comments not appearing promptly.

The number of comments you see after each post (and on the right hand side of the main blog page) is the number of comments that should be on each post. But we have some technical problems which slows this process...

Here's why it happens.. (you may have seen this explanation before, on Nick Robinson's blog..)

"The difference is due to the way that the content of the blogs is published. Without going into too much heavy detail, when a blog is updated, certain bits of it are rebuilt and certain bits are automatically changed. These rebuilt sections are then transferred across multiple servers. Sometimes due to the heavy load on bbc.co.uk some of the bits find themselves stuck in a queue waiting to be published. The rebuilt bits can take longer to arrive than the others... and so there is sometimes a disparity between number of comments 'totals' and actual published numbers."

We are looking into a solution.

Conspiracy theories

Host Host | 12:06 UK time, Thursday, 18 May 2006

Paul Reynolds, the BBC News website's world affairs correspondent, wrote on Wednesday about 9/11 conspiracy theories. He has been deluged with e-mails since then. He writes:

"I knew when I wrote this piece that it would draw out the conspiracy theorists and I have not been disappointed. As it happens I was already in e-mail exchange with one of them before the latest Pentagon video frames were released and she had startled me by suggesting that the missing passengers (after all, if no plane hit the Pentagon, what did happen to them and where is Barbar Olson who called her husband from the plane?) might have been taken away to be "gassed". The e-mails are along simlar lines. I attach one below. Each and everyone of the theories has been exposed and I only wish I had the time and space to have gone into each.

Read the rest of this entry

BBC in the news, Thursday

Host Host | 09:10 UK time, Thursday, 18 May 2006

Financial Times: "Senior newspaper executives have attacked the BBC over plans to move into digital media" (link, subscription req).

Independent: The BBC's David Loyn writes on Afghanistan - "The international system is sucking the country dry" (link).

The Sun: "BBC chiefs yesterday pole-axed plans for a sexy spoof of Strictly Come Dancing - stars Zoe Ball and Natasha Kaplinsky were lined up for Strictly Come Pole Dancing as part of Sport Relief" (link).

Bias and brainwashing?

Host Host | 15:41 UK time, Wednesday, 17 May 2006

The BBC has been accused of biased reporting by both opposing sides in Sri Lanka. Bernard Gabony, the South Asia editor of the BBC News website, writes a response here.

BBC in the news, Wednesday

Host Host | 09:59 UK time, Wednesday, 17 May 2006

Daily Mail: "The man who accidentally found himself on live television commentating on computers for the BBC agreed to return and discuss his bizarre experience" (link).

The Scotsman: "The BBC mole who leaked the huge salaries of its star presenters was yesterday unmasked as a temporary office worker" (link)

Daily Express: Ann Widdecombe praises BBC One's Real Story on social services (no link, but more on that here)

Daily Mail: Edwina Currie says BBC Two drama The Line of Beauty is "a portrait of Thatcher's Britain as seen through the prism of a BBC which still seems to hate her 16 years after she left office" (no link)

You can read previous 'BBC in the news' posts by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Tuesday

Host Host | 08:54 UK time, Tuesday, 16 May 2006

The Sun: "This is the mystery TV pundit Guy Goma mistakenly grilled by BBC reporters" (link, or read our exclusive from yesterday here).

The Telegraph: Craig Brown - "Virtually everyone interviewed on the radio and television news is either pretending to know something he doesn't, or pretending not to know something he does" (link).

The Guardian: Tim Dowling - "I should have asked for a driver. At least then there might have been a chance of them interviewing him instead of me" (link).

Daily Express: Patrick O'Flynn - "A rival form of extremism is tightening its grip over our politics - its influence is far-reaching within the judiciary, government and the BBC".

You can read previous 'BBC in the news' posts by clicking here.

BBC in the news, Monday

Host Host | 08:34 UK time, Monday, 15 May 2006

Guardian: Audiences for the BBC World Service have reached record levels (link)

The Sun: "TV bosses were last night desperate to sign up a cabbie grilled on live telly by blundering BBC reporters" (link, and more details)

Independent: Former BBC correspondent Tom Mangold says "if Panorama makes one more film about the NHS, I shall personally sit on the steps of White City, pour unleaded petrol over myself and ignite in protest." (link)

BBC in the news, Saturday

Host Host | 16:32 UK time, Saturday, 13 May 2006

The Times reports that on Monday, News 24 mistakenly interviewed a taxi driver thinking he was Guy Kewney, an expert on the Apple Corps v Apple Computer court case. (Link, and the real Guy Kewney's blog)

BBC in the news, Friday

Host Host | 12:09 UK time, Friday, 12 May 2006

Guardian: Not for the first time, Radio 4 listeners are up in arms. The cause is a 'sexist', 'racist', 'rubbish' phone-in show called Down the Line. But we've been had. (Link)

Guardian: BBC radio widens gaps over rivals (Link)

Telegraph on July 7 report: During its years in office, the Government has gone to the most tortuous lengths to evade responsibility for all sorts of faults. The appointment of a tame judge ensured the inquiry into the death of Dr David Kelly shifted the blame for that tragedy on to the BBC rather than on to Labour's bullying spin machine, where it properly belonged. (Link)

Independent: BBC asks staff to step in after 'Top of the Pops' audience crisis (Link)

Welcome to The Editors

Host Host | 10:32 UK time, Friday, 12 May 2006

This blog aims to explain the editorial decisions and dilemmas faced by the teams running the BBC's news service - radio, TV, and interactive. It will feature contributions from BBC editors, along with your comments and questions.

The BBC wants to be open and accountable, and so this site is a public space where you can engage with us as much as the medium allows. We're happy for you to criticise the BBC in your e-mails and comments, and to ask serious, probing questions of us - we'll do our best to respond to them.

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