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BBC News app released for larger Android tablets

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Steve Herrmann Steve Herrmann | 17:03 UK time, Thursday, 26 January 2012

As the number of people accessing BBC News via mobile phones and tablet devices continues to grow, I'm pleased to report that we have just launched a new version of the BBC News app specifically aimed at large Android tablets. (There's already an app for iPad and smaller 7 inch Android devices.)

In an average week, the BBC News site and apps are currently visited by about 9.7m users worldwide, or about 26% of the total. There are more details here from our Product Manager for mobiles, Kate Milner.

Steve Herrmann is editor of the BBC News website.

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 2.

    I heard BBC made APP of the day! Congratulations seem in order. especially to Kate Milner, Mobile Product Manager for News & Future Media at the BBC.

    I remember the initial launch, but this version looks like Android version 3.0 or above and makes use of both wi-Fi and 3G. and compatible with ONLY Android tablets 7.2 inches or bigger. I'm sort of hanging around waiting for the BBC News Channel with live video feeds that (I think) is supposed to touchdown soon as well as an international BBC Worldwide app later this year.

    Free tablet-optimised app is out now on the Android Market. Alas it says "BBC News app for UK audiences." and I happen to be Canadian. You may want to read comments by other folk too, which also appear on page.
    Link here:
    https://market.android.com/details?id=bbc.mobile.news.uk

  • Comment number 3.

    Certain dishes, if simply spread more thinly across more plates, seldom improve in palatability when still served up using the same recipe.

    In fact, trusted favourites can end up unrecognisable when converted from a slow simmer to suit the time and space demands of a fast food mentality.

    Getting a little bored being told headlines are inaccurate or unrepresentative as 'they need to fit'.

  • Comment number 4.

    While congratulations seem in order, why do you need an app when a browser will do?

    Have a look at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-16746785
    "There is something compellingly simple about MailOnline. No fancy site navigation, picture carousels or slideshows - just a front page with stories and pictures. Thousands of them."

  • Comment number 5.

    And JunkMale is right about headlines 'reducto ad absurdum'

  • Comment number 6.

    I have your mobile Android app and will certainly get this when I get a Tablet. This is a different comment/request. Why can't the BBC site have a "Clippings" function like the FT and Guardian do? I find it useful to clip to site, as I remember where I read the article, rather than trawling through Evernote, Delicious or Diigo. Just add a "Clip" function along with print, mail, share at the bottom of texts. Clippings could then be accessed through Android/iPhone apps too. Many thanks keep up the good work.

  • Comment number 7.

    am i the only person in the country that has realised that the rbs boss has received shares at an all time low and will be free to make a massive profit of untold millions when the shares go up in the future. I have not heard anyone in the media or anywhere else comment about this posssible traversty

  • Comment number 8.

    7. At 07:44 28th Jan 2012, geoff corlett wrote:
    am i the only person in the country


    Actually, an awful lot around this issue does seem to have been chewed on, if rather tribally.

    More a question of which 'Questions won't be asked'. Labour apparently did not have a failure in leadership... well.. recently.. er, the last few hours, anyway. Which some 'interviewers' will see as nothing to challenge too deeply.

    Can't think why.

    So far the BBC's favoured son Chukka has been given free rein for his notion that highly paid folk should not be awarded bonusses for simply doing their jobs.

    And I'd tend to agree.

    But really, as with so many things, are certain politicians and their media glee clubs being a bit narrow in their scope...

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-2088567/Huge-bonuses-grotesque-expenses-spendthrift-bosses-austerity-BBC.html

    ..for some reason? Maybe the 'context' was/is different?

    Plus there's also a big void in what is not being asked about the not so distant past in who drafted these contracts.

    Speaking of what gets left out, a lot, I found this interesting..

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/blog/2012/jan/30/newsdesk-live?CMP=twt_gu

    Now, being the Graun and CiF being more 'CiFitsuits' with the potential for a few community moddings out 'for harmony', I might chip in and ask them to also 'explain how we choose what we DON'T report and why'.

    And wonder if the BBC may ever be so minded on this topic, too?

  • Comment number 9.

    All this moral indignation a smokescreen when other serious matters occurring.
    BBC concentrates on Bonus of banker, and does not report at all on the EU attack on freedom of speech and expression that has been cooked up since 2004. Control of the Internet and monitoring of Your use of websites.
    Riots in Poland, cos they were made aware of what their MPs were up to!!
    BBC?? Big fuss about celebs getting their phones hacked, but SILENCE on the biggest invasion of freedom since the USSR.
    Editors blog covers unimportant nonsense so that BBC can concentrate on matters to divert from REAL issues which SHOULD be headlines.
    EU TO SNOOP ON ALL CITIZENS PRIVACY AND DELETE WHAT DOES NOT CONFORM
    How about that for an editors blog???
    I expect this item will be moderated away as it highlights REAL concerns about democracy!!

  • Comment number 10.

    9. At 16:21 30th Jan 2012, firemensaction -
    All this moral indignation a smokescreen


    There's a lot of it about. Why?

    http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/finance/jeremywarner/100014469/hesters-bonus-is-a-sideshow-the-real-issue-is-whats-become-of-our-45bn/

    The question therefore being, who the heck are making all the fuss to promote the sideshow, and as a distraction from what.

    Especially which media are doing this, why and, in some cases, using whose money in distraction from the highly compromising culpability of those they are promoting in taking opportunistic advantage?

  • Comment number 11.

    Dear Mr Herrmann,do you think that your viewers would be interested in how much time our MPs actually ever spend in the House itself?Everyone will be aware of the different committees that sit,and that the Cabinets of all parties work incredibly long hours. But what about your average MP? If I was to say that the vast majority,from all parties,spend less than an hour a week in the commons,would they be puzzled?For instance,you had a new lib-dem MP on a couple of days ago,and yet to the best of my knowledge he has not been in the house for any debate at all this year,and he is far from being abnormal.Could you ask every MP that comes on if they would agree that every MP should spend at least an hour a week in the chamber.I would exclude voting and morning prayers,and obviously let them off for illness and holidays(i am feeling generous).I hope that you will think this subject worthy of attention and I am keeping my fingers crossed that you may even start a campaign to force all MPs to attend at least an hours worth of debate!Come on,you know it makes sense.
    Best Regards
    Steve

  • Comment number 12.

    Thank you very much, introducing tablet and Android now BBC news can be more handy for common as well as common people, i think media people is going to utilise the maximum functionality of this modern invention.
    [Unsuitable/Broken URL removed by Moderator]

  • Comment number 13.

    '12. At 10:56 1st Feb 2012, David Fletcher - BBC news can be more handy for common as well as common people, i think media people is going to utilise the maximum functionality of this modern invention.'

    Not too sure what the difference is between 'media' and 'common' people, but it seems some do, which may be one reason for the skewed priorities being offered.

    I'd just like facts delivered, accurately and impartially, to the limit of media resources that meeting that requirement allows.

  • Comment number 14.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 15.

    You know what my favourite ever method of digesting News used to be? Ceefax. The limitations of the medium meant you got just the facts, all you needed to know, without opinion and blather. I don't have time for the endless barrage of content now available. The problem with the web is that there's simply no way it can ever be "full". I can read a newspaper, or watch the TV news, and there's a cut-off point, where the content ends, and I can finish. But even just this BBC site, I can spend all day reading it, and still not read every word. I think we've now reached a point where the media needs to be a bit more selective in what they present to us, instead of giving us the entire world and everything in it. I really don't need to know what's happening in Papua New Guinea today, do I?

  • Comment number 16.

    It doesn't really interest me, a new way to view the same stuff. More importantly, you need to make it easier for US to contact YOU to tell you stuff. Your user-whatsitted content is limited to the bits you choose to ask about, which is ludicrously restrictive. Have any of your team noticed that Facebook has gone down on the day of the IPO announcement? Is that not newsworthy? Make it easier for us to tell you stuff.

  • Comment number 17.

    Believe it or not- there was a time when reading a news paper or waiting through tv and radio advertisements were the only hope of keeping up with global events: Imagine how things have changed, well no need -its real. From new Android Apps to Micro-Thin computers the news in "massive volume" is at everyones fingertips.

  • Comment number 18.

    The BBC News product development team will be working on further mobile and tablet improvements over the coming year.

  • Comment number 19.

    18. At 03:44 8th Feb 2012, ahmed -
    The BBC News product development team will be working on further mobile and tablet improvements over the coming year.


    With luck, in complement to trying to ensure the content carried on these myriad devices, especially when tuned to the constraints of these wonderful new media, is also worked on for accuracy and impartiality.

    Take, for example, this, possibly editted 'to fit' for twitter:

    @BBCPolitics David Cameron attack on Welsh NHS bbc.in/xWGWbK

    Clicking the link, I find out the actual story is this: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-politics-16947484 'Prime Minister David Cameron has launched an attack on.... Labour's handling... of the health service in Wales.'

    There's a difference, a fairly big one, between those you see.

  • Comment number 20.

    Meanwhile as the demands of apps appears more what is served than serving. As precedent has already been established...

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-16951807

    ...I wonder... when it gets to the 'it won't fit on twitter or the mobile app' edit, which two words below the line would be sacrificed, along with accuracy?

    Even without, the practice of ['blatant tribal punt... says...'] hardly counts as news really.

  • Comment number 21.

    See how one can squeeze this 'discussion' into a twitter para or mobile screen shot...

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01c9w6c/Dateline_London_11_02_2012/?t=22m20s

    I'm guessing:

    [Visible] - UK warmongers provoking tensions over Malvinas...
    [after cliking link] ...claim.. no make that 'say', no make that 'warn' sage collection of impartial folk we just happened to have handy on our iPhones.'

    To get a 4 (5 including the chair) to 0 critique of the UK's stance on the Falkands (ignoring the inhabitants completely too), on the BritishBC takes some doing, but seems to have been managed.

    At least twitter can be used to quickly offer intel on bomb fuse settings and garrison strengths in future, when required.

  • Comment number 22.

    @Bob Harvey - browsers are adequate if you're wandering around with a laptop or PC. I, for one, am most grateful for BBC's latest Android app... it makes both navigation and reading much easier on smaller devices, especially mobiles.

    Also, given the increasing importance of integrating social media as part of the overall news consumption experience, the BBC Android app makes that so much more user friendly. Even my dad, who is now over 70, is quite happy using his simple tablet device to access what he never imagined possible in terms of news coverage outside the traditional media suite.

    Kudos BBC - definitely taking leaps in the right direction!

  • Comment number 23.

    22. At 21:03 12th Feb 2012, Michelle Summers -
    Kudos BBC - definitely taking leaps in the right direction!


    Sadly, directionally I am with the angels by way of an alternative view.

  • Comment number 24.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 25.

    The app. for Ipad is great. If this could be replicated for Android then more people would benefit.

  • Comment number 26.

    @JunKKmale To get a 4 (5 including the chair) to 0 critique of the UK's stance on the Falkands on the BBC takes some doing, but seems to have been managed.
    At least twitter can be used to quickly offer intel on bomb fuse settings and garrison strengths in future, when required.

    When does the Bada Version get released Anyone Know?

  • Comment number 27.

    I am so happy with the new android version for my tablet. Thanks a lot!

  • Comment number 28.

    good to know @jenny. I was thinking about downloading the android version on my sisters device before she leaves on holiday. She needs her BBC on the Go!

 

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