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Darren Waters

How to survive CES

  • Darren Waters
  • 3 Jan 08, 11:29 GMT

The Consumer Electronics Show starts next week and BBC News will be bringing you the best of the show in video, audio and online journalism.

A week in Las Vegas may sound fun, but the reality of CES is somewhat different. With more than 2,000 exhibiting firms and 140,000 attendees it is more of a brawl than a leisurely trawl through technology.

I spoke to Gary Shapiro, head of the Consumer Electronics Association, for his tips on surviving CES:

For those of you newbies: Exercise, get a lot of sleep and don’t drink a lot of alcohol. When you get to Las Vegas, ask your hotel to have a humidifier in your room. It is dry in Vegas. You should wear comfortable shoes, not a new pair. Plan out your schedule and learn the layout. Leave yourself time to explore and find out new things

Here are a few tips also from blogger extraordinaire Robert Scoble,
and veteran analyst Michael Gartenberg.

I'll be publishing our plans for CES very soon - which includes some big name interviews. Perhaps the biggest is Bill Gates.

We're putting your questions to him. So if you have a burning desire to ask Mr Gates a question, then here's how to do it.

Comments

  • 1.
  • At 02:06 PM on 03 Jan 2008,
  • Ajamu Mutumwa wrote:

I am aware that you don't have time to get your hands dirty with all that coding, but apart from MS-DOS, what programming language are you proficient in nowadays?

  • 2.
  • At 04:33 PM on 03 Jan 2008,
  • Matthew Hicks wrote:

I don't really understand how that bears any relevance Ajamu..

What coding are you 'proficient' in...? heh

  • 3.
  • At 08:25 PM on 03 Jan 2008,
  • jharek wrote:

i think Ajamu was asking a question of Mr.Gates

  • 4.
  • At 01:47 PM on 08 Jan 2008,
  • genevieve learmonth wrote:

Does Bill Gates realise that in order to STOP TB from spreading, we first have to make a diagnosis. The diagnostic tools for TB which are in use at present and recommended by WHO are over 150years old !( direct microscopy). In his efforts to STOP TB will Mr Gates pay attention to the development of digital interactive diagnostic methods
(e.g. Interscopic Analysis) to more accurately screen and record populations in Africa for TB, to prevent spread of this highly contagious killer epidemic.. Keep your digital eye on the TB bug !

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