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Andrew Bowden Andrew Bowden | 10:00 UK time, Tuesday, 25 May 2010

After nearly two years, this is going to be the last post on this blog.

But don't worry. Although Press Red is closing, we will still be blogging. Along with our colleagues over at Journalism Labs and the Web Developer blog we're going to be moving over to join the BBC Internet Blog.

For us, this move makes a lot of sense as there has been an overlap between Press Red and the Internet Blog for some time, especially in areas like BBC iPlayer. Posting over there will allow us to have a single home for our content and means you get to see more of the BBC Blogs that connects to the work we do.

It will also free us from some of the overheads associated with running a standalone blog, and allow us to concentrate on writing more posts and we'll be working closely with Paul Murphy, editor of the Internet Blog, to do that.

Once we're over there, you can find all our posts in the red button category. If you read Press Red by one of our XML feeds, you may wish to add the feeds for the Internet Blog into your news reader - they're available in RSS and Atom format. Our regular, fortnightly What's On posts will also continue and you can still follow us on Twitter.

The Press Red Blog itself will be closing for comments on Tuesday 1 June however the blog archive will remain online at the same location.

On behalf of all the contributors to Press Red and its predecessor, BBCi Labs, thank you for reading and commenting over the last two years and we hope to see you over on the BBC Internet Blog soon!

Comments

  • 1. At 11:10am on 25 May 2010, TV Licence fee payer against BBC censorship wrote:

    "For us, this move makes a lot of sense as there has been an overlap between Press Red and the Internet Blog for some time, especially in areas like BBC iPlayer."

    In response to this ill-thought out and stupid merger, I cite a previous comment of mine from a few days ago;

    "I've given up complaining, it is bl**dy obvious that the BBC don't care a flying fig about the anger felt by annoyed Freeview users - the BBC seem to care more about the non-core iPlayer..."

    'nough said, other than for those who do not have (ready) access to an IP device the Iplayer and red button services are chalk and cheese.

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  • 2. At 2:05pm on 25 May 2010, Brekkie wrote:

    Another sign of the decreasing importance the BBC view interactive TV with. Since the iPlayer and HD came along, this area has been sadly neglected - as HD will be once the BBC embrace 3DTV.


    It's been a frustrating few months and as Boilerplated says it feels like our views are being hushed under the carpet, but that said I've always appreciated the efforts of the bloggers here to communicate with us - and I've always suspected you're as frustrated as us about the Freeview situation, yet in a position where you can't tell us anything we don't know and can't really push the management to reinstate such services.

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  • 3. At 2:40pm on 25 May 2010, Andrew Bowden wrote:

    I've worked in red button land for coming up to seven years and I personally think the enthusiasm and interest in the work we do in the team has never been higher within the BBC. It's a great time to be working in this area.

    BBC iPlayer has had a bit of work from us recently. If there ever was a service made for the TV set, it is BBC iPlayer, and 28% of all BBC iPlayer usage comes from TV devices like Virgin Media, Wii and PS3.

    However it's only part of what we do. For example, on Freesat we have an exciting project which will be launching very soon. I can't say much about it yet however I really do believe it's going to be worth the wait. And we will be writing about it on the Internet Blog.

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  • 4. At 3:59pm on 25 May 2010, TV Licence fee payer against BBC censorship wrote:

    #3. At 2:40pm on 25 May 2010, Andrew Bowden wrote:

    "However it's only part of what we do. For example, on Freesat we have an exciting project which will be launching very soon. I can't say much about it yet however I really do believe it's going to be worth the wait. And we will be writing about it on the Internet Blog."

    Which suggests that it is likely to be IP related, otherwise surely a more logical home for this blog would be the TV Blog?

    If it is not IP related we can only hope that is the announcement that the full "Press Red" service, found at present only on the BSkyB platform, will be available on the Freesat platform - or indeed the generic, unbranded, DVB-S platform, but that really would be to much to expect.

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  • 5. At 2:10pm on 26 May 2010, Andrew Bowden wrote:

    We'll continue writing about internet based and none internet based services over on the Internet Blog, just as we have done in the past. My first ever BBC blog post was about Freesat in 2008 and it was on the Internet Blog.

    We felt the more natural home for our posts was the Internet Blog rather than the TV blog - that's because we usually write more technical posts and the TV blog is more programme related. However that doesn't preclude us writing about red button programmes over on the TV Blog in the future.

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  • 6. At 2:45pm on 26 May 2010, TV Licence fee payer against BBC censorship wrote:

    5. At 2:10pm on 26 May 2010, Andrew Bowden wrote:

    "We felt the more natural home for our posts was the Internet Blog rather than the TV blog - that's because we usually write more technical posts and the TV blog is more programme related. However that doesn't preclude us writing about red button programmes over on the TV Blog in the future."

    Many will see the above as illogical, after all the BBC (Internet) blog thought it more rational to move blogs about and from BBC HD over on the BBC TV blog and perhaps it was correct to do so, but on the other hand and in the main (a few IP capable TV's and TV-out capable computers aside) the "Red Button" is a DVB-T/S BBC television service whilst the content of the various and numerous "What's on the Red Button" blogs are about content primarily available via the BBC's DVB-T/S television services, as is HD TV, so how come one gets shunted off to the TV blogs and the other to the Internet blogs, unless the subject "Red Button" is morphing into 'BBC IP services' of course...

    I have no problem if the BBC feel the need to close the dedicated "Press Red" Blog, my annoyance is were the content is being moved to, there is still time to reconsider this illogical move, please do so.

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  • 7. At 6:30pm on 26 May 2010, Sue_Aitch wrote:

    Please would the BBC amend the Points of View Messageboards' right hand blue boxes regarding to draw attention to the changes, Andrew?

    Thank you kindly and see you over on the BBC Internet Blog.

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  • 8. At 10:36am on 27 May 2010, Andrew Bowden wrote:

    Thanks Sue - I've let the Points of View team know so they'll hopefully fix that.

    Boilerplated - we've had several discussions on this internally already. Rest assured we'll be keeping an eye on how things go.

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  • 9. At 11:38am on 27 May 2010, TV Licence fee payer against BBC censorship wrote:

    8. At 10:36am on 27 May 2010, Andrew Bowden wrote:

    "Boilerplated - we've had several discussions on this internally already. Rest assured we'll be keeping an eye on how things go."

    Andrew, one last comment, whilst I don't hold these views, some who objected to the move of the HD blog away from the 'BBC Internet blog' to the 'TV blog' saw it as a way to hide a 'difficult' blog and at the same time shift the content away from the more technical issues, the movement of this blog to the BBC Internet blog might be seen by those people as conformation of their opinions as this move is going against the logic used by the BBC when moving the HD blog. Whilst I'm sure that there has been much discussion and probably argument within the BBC has anyone actually asked the opinions of those who pay the bills...

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  • 10. At 12:13pm on 27 May 2010, Nick Reynolds wrote:

    Boilerplated - thanks for your comments.

    We didn't move some HD blog posts away from the BBC Internet blog to the TV blog to "hide" anything. These judgements are about where audiences are and where's the best place to have a discussion.

    The PQ discussion on the Internet blog is primarily a technical discussion. For example people who care passionately about it usually know what an encoder is and argue about bit rates. As BBC HD becomes more mainstream it made sense to move the editorial part of the discussion (i.e. Danielle's posts ) to the TV blog while keeping the technical part (i.e. Andy's posts) on the Internet blog.

    The subject matter of the Internet blog has changed over time and I've always tried to be relaxed and flexible about what is published on it. While you could argue that the red button service is a TV service, the TV blog usually talks about TV programmes not technical matters.

    In any case we have featured posts about red button on the Internet blog before as Andrew rightly points out. I'm hoping this move will give the work of the red button team a higher profile, not a lower one.

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  • 11. At 12:56pm on 27 May 2010, TV Licence fee payer against BBC censorship wrote:

    #10. At 12:13pm on 27 May 2010, Nick Reynolds wrote:

    "Boilerplated - thanks for your comments.

    We didn't move some HD blog posts away from the BBC Internet blog to the TV blog to "hide" anything. These judgements are about where audiences are and where's the best place to have a discussion."


    I didn't say they weren't, I said that was how some saw the move, how some of the public, some of the TVL fee payers perceived the move.

    "to the TV blog while keeping the technical part (i.e. Andy's posts) on the Internet blog."

    Hmm, but when was the last time Andy actually started a blog, rather than just reply and were is that blog now, dropped off the bottom of the "Topical list" (thus now 'hidden' from anyone who doesn't have it book-marked).

    "The subject matter of the Internet blog has changed over time and I've always tried to be relaxed and flexible about what is published on it. While you could argue that the red button service is a TV service, the TV blog usually talks about TV programmes not technical matters."

    But much of the "Press Red" blog subject matter is about the content that will be featured in the coming weeks, or is available via devices that use televisions as the viewing medium, such as the iPlayer being accessible via Wii games consoles or IP capable TV's/STB's/HTPC's.

    If I remember correctly I actually agreed that the move of the HD blog was the right decision, for the same logic as I believe the planned move of the Press Red move to be wrong, both blogs are now vastly more content orientated than technical.

    "In any case we have featured posts about red button on the Internet blog before as Andrew rightly points out. I'm hoping this move will give the work of the red button team a higher profile, not a lower one."

    But only to those who know or realise that "Internet Blog" doesn't actually mean Internet as in world-wide-web but 'anything that the BBC does', you might ask "What's in a name"... There is an argument for the flagging of certain blogs from one area in another, as you did here with the blog about the new BBC homepage and as such give the blog an higher profile.

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  • 12. At 1:34pm on 27 May 2010, Nick Reynolds wrote:

    Indeed there is Boilerplated. But Web Developer is also closing. Cross posting in this way sometimes works but is also a bit clunky.

    The remit of the Internet blog is:

    "Senior staff from the BBC's online and technology teams discuss issues raised by you about BBC Online, BBC iPlayer, the BBC's digital and mobile services, and the technology behind them."

    The Red Button service is a digital service run by a technology team.

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  • 13. At 2:41pm on 27 May 2010, Andrew Bowden wrote:

    Just to note that whilst the "This page hasn't been updated for a while" banner has gone up, comments can still be added until Tuesday morning.

    Thanks
    Andrew

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  • 14. At 8:16pm on 02 Jun 2010, Hyperstar wrote:

    Rest in peace. Press Red Blog

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