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Pressure cooker clash a challenge for hothead Diouf

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Piers Edwards | 09:36 UK time, Friday, 4 February 2011

El Hadji Diouf is not known for his self-control, which makes you wonder - or worry - about how Rangers' new signing is going to react to his first Old Firm clash on Sunday.

With next-to-no-time to settle in following his last-minute loan deal, a man often dubbed the 'most hated man in British football' is about to be catapulted into the most acrimonious fixture on these isles.

And what a reception it promises to be, for Diouf was already persona non grata with Celtic fans after spitting at one of their number when representing Liverpool in a 2003 Uefa Cup clash.

But this constant bedfellow of controversy - his latest incident, Jamie Mackie-gate, seemingly sparking his Blackburn exit (coach Steve Kean never selected him again) - claims to thrive on adversity and, one way or another, he's unlikely to go missing.

"I know people will boo me but I love that. The more you boo me the more power I get," says the Senegalese, who should be flying by the 90th minute in Ibrox given the vitriol that has already started. "I don't want people to love me - I just want them to respect me."

Yes, he did really say that - but respect is not the quality most have for the two-time African Footballer of the Year. After the incident with Mackie (which Diouf denies), QPR boss Neil Warnock described him as 'lower than a sewer rat'.

El Hadji DioufDiouf was on the end of some rash challenges against Hearts on his Rangers debut: Photo: Reuters

Many would agree and few fans in England will bemoan his departure.

That's because his list of unsavoury misdemeanours is implausibly long and varied, so much so you probably couldn't name them all off the top of your head, but they range from repeated spitting through car crashes and drink-driving to endless verbal spats.

So why the character?

"People don't like me because I'm a bad loser," 'Dioufy', 29, has said before in an attempt at explanation.

In Senegal, greater insight comes from those who credit his behaviour from his childhood in impoverished Saint Louis, a coastal city whose crumbling facades reflect its faded colonial grandeur and harsh existence.

Diouf, they say, was used to having to defend himself on the streets and the mentality is so deeply ingrained that no amount of money nor privilege can exorcise it.

Nor popularity. Despite his infamy, his face still adorns posters representing some of Senegal's biggest businesses and he's more popular than the national president - his decisive and thrilling role in taking Senegal to the 2002 World Cup quarter-finals never to be forgotten.

In fact, when he quit international football in 2007, superstar singer Youssou N'Dour was among those beseeching 'le badboy' to reconsider - which he did (only to retire again after the failure to reach South Africa 2010, although he has since made himself available).

His ability aside, the main reason most Senegalese tolerate Diouf is because he gives a great deal back to society, mainly through charitable donations.

Three years ago, he set up the KONFIDENCE foundation with another Senegalese star - the rapper Akon - with a brief to help hospitals, education, sick children and improve sports facilities so others can profit like he did.

And another charity aimed at boosting the fortunes of Senegalese children through further improvements in education and health is in the pipeline.

"Everybody in Senegal knows he helps a lot of people, which is why he's still so popular," says Dakar-based sports journalist Aliou Goloko. "Diouf has two faces. On the pitch, he has to win and will address any provocation, which some knowing opponents abuse. But off it, he's a very lovely person - and people find that surprising."

Speaking from my own experiences while based in Senegal, it would be remiss to state that Diouf was anything but charming and friendly on the occasions we met.

Few will defend the former Liverpool, Bolton and Blackburn forward but one man who regularly stands by him is Sam Allardyce, whose advice Walter Smith sought before deciding upon a move which has, in the eyes of some, already stained the Rangers boss' character.

Smith's challenge is how to maximise Diouf's undoubted ability and if he listens to Allardyce and other coaches who've got the best out of him - such as Joel Muller (Lens 2001-02) and Bruno Metsu (Senegal) - he'll know that giving him a degree of respect and freedom should reap dividends.

In return, an appreciative Diouf will work hard to repay that faith but Smith must ensure the Senegalese learns to keep his mouth shut, since his lip is often the catalyst for any downfall.

Smith has successfully handled other wayward characters before, e.g. Paul Gascoigne, but he may find Diouf needs only a steer here and there to produce his best.

For the passion to succeed should come from within as with time ticking on his career, the Senegalese only has one club honour to show from a 14-year European odyssey: the 2003 League Cup medal he won with Liverpool.

Although his pace has long gone, the versatile Diouf is still a highly-skilled player who can beat defenders and deliver dangerous crosses - hence, Smith's gamble as he tries to catch league leaders Celtic (Rangers trail by five points with two games in hand).

"I want him to be remembered for his football," says the Rangers coach, who has backed Diouf to handle the flak.

Meanwhile, the Senegalese says he wants to become a Rangers legend and despite his advancing years he certainly can deliver in Scotland.

But will controversy undermine him again - or can one of football's ultimate hotheads handle the pressure-cooker situation of an Old Firm derby?

His flashy feet will surely flourish - his legacy will come from his head.

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    I`m not sure walter will give him a start on sunday. May`be bring him on as a sub later on in the game. The sight of diouf from the celtic fans will no doubt electrify the atmosphere. (not that an old firm game needs any more)

  • Comment number 2.

    And into this heady mixture of alcohol and sectarian bile..we add Diouf!

    To be fair he has already apologised for his behaviour last time round at Celtic Park and disgraceful as it was at the time - using racism as a made up excuse for spitting - people should try and move on from that. He is a clever player on his game and people should just concentrate on the football..

    ..if only more would actually concentrate on the football and not the culture in the OF games!!

  • Comment number 3.

    How ironic Neil Warnock calling anybody lower than a sewer rat. This is the a man who could make Diouf look like a choirboy. I wonder if Warnock remembers screaming instructions to players to break other players legs? A truly malignant little runt.

    With regards to Diouf playing, It will make no difference! The atmosphere is always on that thin line between incredible and downright dangerous. Lets hope that all the talking afterwards is about what happened on the pitch!

  • Comment number 4.

    As a Rangers fan, I accept that we needed reinforcements upfront, but I am disappointed we have gone for a nasty piece of work like Diouf. Why not go the whole hog and bring in Joey Barton and Marlon King too?!?!?
    Even if he does have talent, Diouf thinks he is better than he is, and I can see him losing interest in SPL football fairly quickly.
    I see Jimmy Bullard went on loan to Ispwich -he would have been the kind of character we need.

  • Comment number 5.

    The truth is that those who are most fervent in their opposition to Diouf signing are Celtic fans, ex-Celtic players like Craig Burley, and Celtic fans in the media. It's football concerns masquerading as self-righteousness.

    Simply put, some fans are worried he will be a decent player for Rangers.

    If Diouf is hopeless it will all be forgotten. If he plays well expect it to be more of the same.

  • Comment number 6.

    'In Senegal, greater insight comes from those who credit his behaviour from his childhood in impoverished Saint Louis, a coastal city whose crumbling facades reflect its faded colonial grandeur and harsh existence.

    Diouf, they say, was used to having to defend himself on the streets and the mentality is so deeply ingrained that no amount of money nor privilege can exorcise it.'

    Mr Edwards - could you pick a more stereotypical reason for Diouf's character? Lots of people with the same upbringing don't carry it through their lives - how would you explain that?

    Outside Senegal, Diouf, unfortunately, will never be remembered for being a good football player.. that is the tragedy of the man

  • Comment number 7.

    Qpr fan here...

    Im glad he's left England, no doubt he is and has been a tallented player, but the things he has done and said.... He has absolutely NO REMORSE for. Abusing a player when he lay on the ground with a broken leg, horrible.

    Diouf denies this of course, but never played for Blackburn again. Strange that.

    Good luck to Celtic at the weekend.

  • Comment number 8.

    John 1899, utter nonsense. If you look at the guy's list of misdemeanours, you will see he is a very unsavoury character, what is the problem with disliking him on that basis? We are not talking about one-off incidents here. Why on earth are you trying to turn this around on Celtic? Says more about you than anything else. Bizarre in the extreme, and simply untrue.

    If you listened to the phone-in on Talk Sport the day he signed, for example, you would understand the depth of hatred for Diouf from the majority of football fans, regardless of their team. Most of us who have watched him over the years can easily understand why!

    On the other hand, this is a very shrewd move by Smith - a bit desperate yes but could nevertheless turn out to be an excellent signing. The guy is a good player at the end of the day.

  • Comment number 9.

    Qpr fan here...

    Im glad he's left England, no doubt he is and has been a tallented player, but the things he has done and said.... He has absolutely NO REMORSE for. Abusing a player when he lay on the ground with a broken leg, horrible.

    Diouf denies this of course, but never played for Blackburn again. Strange that.
    -------------------

    I'm a gooner, but I second that - Diouf is the type of player that makes neutrals want to support Celtic.

    Simply a horrible guy and not a particularly good player.

  • Comment number 10.

    I've always had a soft spot for Diouf, although I don't really know why. I guess I like that he has character which 99% of professional footballers are missing.

  • Comment number 11.

    Did Mackie not break his leg by attempting a very bad tackle on a Blackburn player? fair enough Diouf should have apologised once he realised that Mackie had injured himself.

    I think he's a good player and a character. I look forward to seeing him on Sunday winding up everyone....commentators included!

  • Comment number 12.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 13.

    These people are so one-eyed it makes you want to laugh...or cry!. So Diouf is a bad person?

    How about Wayne Rooney? "Are his list of unsavoury misdemeanours not also implausibly long and varied, so much so you probably couldn't name them all off the top of your head,"?

    Now let's move to Andy Carroll. What has Diouf possibly done that is worse than Andy Carroll's beating up his girlfriend amidst a list of other physical abuses and night out violence

    Steven Gerrard - pub CCTV footage showed him delivering 5, 6 blows to a man who did cowered in fear. Yet all of dear Stevie G's friends were prosecuted by the law while the perpetrator himself walked free

    John Terry - recklessly shagging the mother of his mate's children amongst other misdeamenours

    Yeah all of these are waved aside as 'naughtiness' and 'typical footballer behaviour' until they are done by a foreign player. If a foreign player as much as kneel's on the football pitch arms outstretched after scoring a goal he is vermin (re- Adebayor), or if he has enough confidence in his abilities to say if (re-Balotelli)- he is despicable. He must learn to keep quiet and be eternally gratefully because ordinarily he should be in some slum dying from polluted water?

    Please can you just stop all these nonsense? Surely you must realise these articles are read from all over the world and learn to be a lot more objective or the rest of the world will continue to view you in the current unfavorable light.

  • Comment number 14.

    Piers, I usually find you a fair man, but this time I think you might have tried to please all sides too much. I'd like to point out a few gaps here.

    1. Steve Kean loaned Diouf to Rangers but said he had not ruled out his return - what I see - and I might be wrong - is a coach forced to do what he knew was wrong (Kean has never uttered a word against Diouf in the Mackie affair. So saying (coach Steve Kean never selected him again) is misrepresenting the facts, I think.

    2. Past indiscretions aside, Diouf was only standing up for a team-mate - Givet who was dangerously tackle by Mackie - but who unfortunately came off worse. We all do that sometime and you would know that if you have ever played sports, how was Diouf supposed to know Mackie had broken his leg? Kean said Diouf didn't know about the broken leg - Note, hard as the English press have pushed the club, Blackburn have never said a word against the player. Actually Kean said, and I quote: "He's never been a problem. Never a problem at training grounds or at games.

    3. Walter Smith is a respected man. He could not have signed 'Dioufy' blindly, could he? He would have asked questions and Blackburn could not have lied, could they? - Hear Smith then (after THREE Hearts players all got booked because of attacks on Diouf - including two in his first 20 minutes in Scottish football): "I thought El-Hadji Diouf handled it all very well and he will have to do that for us during his time here," said Smith. "He did that aspect very well. Overall I was pleased with the way he played considering that serial killers get better publicity than he did over the past few days.

    PLEASE note the part about serial killers getting better publicity in Britain than 'Dioufy'.

    4. I thought Neil Warnock calling Diouf something 'worse than a sewer rat' was uncalled for. He didn't show leadership and certain would not have passed my test for a role model for kids himself.

    ALL SAID, while Diouf has been at times his own worst enemy, the English FA and press have acres of space to improve. Africans follow the English game as you would know, and I think our players deserve a teeny weeny bit more.

    Have a good weekend further.

  • Comment number 15.

    @john1899, its the other way around. self-righteousness masquerading as football concerns

  • Comment number 16.

    I was surprised at how deep diouf played the other night against hearts.I thought he was a striker but he's a right sided midfielder

    He might play on Sunday if Lee McCulloch dosen't make it but i think he will be on the bench

    He done enough the other night to suggest he will be a decent player and we will need him for the Europa league with Jelavic cup tied

  • Comment number 17.

    The guy is an entertainer I love him, lots of people still hurting since we signed Mo Jo and they hurt over all our signings

  • Comment number 18.

    Hard to know what to make of Diouf. Easy to stand on the touchline in Western society and pass judgement but how many of us have grown up on the streets of Senegal?

    I'm certainly not excusing his past mistakes which, to be fair, neither is he. However, many other so-called role-models have left a lot to be desired, Rooney, Terry et al. Are we so quick to judge ‘our own’ and so slow to forget?

    As for the hypocritical Arsenal supporter out there (9) – I seem to recall a certain Martin Keown and others behaving like caged animals when a young Ruud van Nistelrooy missed a penalty at Old Trafford. Something, dare I say, even Diouf would have been impressed with?

    C’mon the Gers at the weekend.

  • Comment number 19.

    stevie_bhoy,

    Thou protesteth too much.

    There are plenty of footballers who are despised, however why an African Muslim is told to leave "our little island" and called a "rat", "repugnant creature", "depraved" and "Satanised" in recent days by Scottish Journalists alone is very worrying.

    I hope Diouf is given the same protection and respect as every other person in Scotland.

  • Comment number 20.

    spurs fan here - i personally think diouf is a quality player, though on the pitch sometimes takes things a bit too far, but to win things, you've got to win ugly.

  • Comment number 21.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 22.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 23.

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  • Comment number 24.

    Strange_UBoat

    I wouldn't get into a childish tit for tat on Old Firm fans and racism. Celtic fans throwing hundreds of bananas at Mark Walters simply because he was black is hardly something to be conveniently forgotten.

    I just hope Diouf gets jeered for football concerns and nothing else.

    http://news.scotsman.com/tacklingracisminscotland/A-black-day-for-Scots.3628273.jp

    As rob_LFC_fairbairn correctly corrected me on - it's self-righteousness masquerading as football concerns.

  • Comment number 25.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 26.

    How irnoic John, as it's actually you doing the protesting, if you want to read back your first comment. I'm simply responding to your ill-founded opinion. A guy who spits on fans being called a rat is worrying? Not to me, or to most sane people. Each to their own though eh? Why you are drawing upon the fact that he is an African Muslim, as if it has any relevance whatsover, is a tad strange.

    I think a lot of you are missing the point completely. Just because a number of Premiership players are guilty of atrocious (mainly off-field) behaviour, you seem to think that makes it wrong to criticise what Diouf has done over the years.

    This article has been written about Diouf because of his recent move and - here's the crucial bit - the fact he is about to play in an Old Firm game.

    The thrust of it is that because of his explicitly shocking actions *at football games* (not off the field antics, Dazz), how will he cope in what is generally acknowledged as the most highly-charged football game in Britain. There is nothing inconsistent or somehow wrong with that, indeed it is a topical, well-written and balanced article!

    Rob - the Diouf - Keown comparison is a bit lazy. There's bending the rules and playing hard, then there's spitting on fans repeatedly. I wouldn't be drawing too many parallels personally.

  • Comment number 27.

    I don't seem to remember Roy Keane getting the same level of abuse and scrutiny when he arrived at Celtic. You know a man that admitted ending a fellow professionals career. Diouf has done some despicable things in his career. But for the life of me I cant remember him giving a fellow pro a serious injury. If he did feel free to tell us. He has spat at a few people. Disgusting immature behaviour. But hardly the crime of the century. I know if I had the option of being spat on. Or my leg broke or a career threatening injury. I would be taking the spit every time. I'm sure Paul Elliot, Alfe Inge Haaland, Ian Durrant and John Kennedy to name just a few would agree.

  • Comment number 28.

    Celtc and their fans have selective memories. Over the last ten years Chris Sutton, Mark Viduka and Bobby Petta were all involved in spitting incidents.

    Actually Petta was involved in a two way spitting match with Celtc fans. Imagine that, celtc fans spitting on their own player.

    And now they're all excited about Diouff playing for Rangers. They will be, when we lift three in a row.

    Good luck to the Glasgow Rangers, and EHD.

  • Comment number 29.

    stevie_bhoy

    You allow slurs by Diouf as a "rat" yet I'm sure you loved Chris Sutton. It's all silly. People love their own players and dislike the opposition. Simple as that.

  • Comment number 30.

    The guy spat on young fans in two seperate incidents and racially abused a ballboy - he deserves all the criticism he has received and in this case it his nothing to do with race or religion.

    As for Sunday, most likely to be on the bench though Rangers seem to be struggling for goals so he will probably get his chance.

    http://footballfutbolfitba.wordpress.com/

  • Comment number 31.

    24

    Tit for tat on racism, you jest surely!

    Hardly childish when you can still hear those songs among Rangers fans today.

    You've picked out one incident many years ago.

    But I do applaud your individual stance on racism I really do.

  • Comment number 32.

    footballfutbolfitba

    Strange that your blog did a post on Maradona and you never abused him for off-the field activities in any way.

    You are a Celtic fan. Diouf plays for Rangers. Join the dots.

  • Comment number 33.

    @26 Unless I am massively out-of-touch, if I remember correctly Andy Carroll recently made a move as well. So far I have not seen any article mainly made up of his girlfriend beating or other violence on nights out!

  • Comment number 34.

    Strange_UBoat

    Again, I wouldn't think it appropriate for any Old Firm fan to start moralising about the songs of the other. It would be like two bald men fighting over a comb.

  • Comment number 35.

    @32 wake up to the world we live in!

    Maradona is an Angel but Thierry Henry is the devil incarnate

  • Comment number 36.

    27. At 4:03pm on 04 Feb 2011, EKblue wrote:
    I don't seem to remember Roy Keane getting the same level of abuse and scrutiny when he arrived at Celtic. You know a man that admitted ending a fellow professionals career. Diouf has done some despicable things in his career. But for the life of me I cant remember him giving a fellow pro a serious injury. If he did feel free to tell us. He has spat at a few people. Disgusting immature behaviour. But hardly the crime of the century. I know if I had the option of being spat on. Or my leg broke or a career threatening injury. I would be taking the spit every time. I'm sure Paul Elliot, Alfe Inge Haaland, Ian Durrant and John Kennedy to name just a few would agree.
    -------------------------
    Excellent point.

  • Comment number 37.

    Dazz @33

    Probably the best post here. Would white Englishman Andy Carroll be treated in the same way as a Black African Muslim by Scottish journalists?

    Would he be called a "rat", "repugnant creature", "depraved" and "Satanised" by those same journalists? We all know the answer.

  • Comment number 38.

    Dazz, great comment (#13)! The quality of the feedback is pretty good... Guys, lay off Diouf's back, he is not that bad a guy.

  • Comment number 39.

    I can't believe some of the drivel I'm reading on here. Curiously enough, to my knowledge, despite what went on between them preceeding the incident, no one of a green persuasion has ever castigated Roy Keane for self admittedly ending Alfe Inge Haaland's career! Undoubtedly, had Keane been playing for any other club in England other than Man Utd, he would have received equal vilification to Diouf from the media.

    For those who have mentioned Duncan Ferguson, well he was no angel but he reduced the burglary rate in Liverpool, and let's not forget, despite his actions not being very clever, Jock McStay went down in installments and in doing so, perhaps unwittingly condemned a man, albeit one who was on his last warning, to prison!

    Further more, most of us have played the game at some level. If an opposition player flew in with a leg breaker of a tackle, on one of your team mates, but in doing so broke his own leg, how would you honestly react to him? Really, think about it very carefully? Diouf did over react to Jamie Mackie, but let's not forget, it was his dangerous tackle that resulted in his own injury. Of course the self righteous will take the easy option and say they'd do this or that, but do we really know? How would we react to someone who drove their car into the side of ours and injured our wife and kids? After seeing to them, would we just run over and offer First Aid for their broken bones or would we hurl abuse at them and offer to put them out of their misery?! No prizes for guessing what I and many others would do. The point is, in the heat of the moment, human beings over react. Perhaps this isn't the best example, but like it or not, it is similar to the Mackie one.

    The incident itself is a bit like the Gascoigne one, no less, versus Notts Forest. The difference being that no Forest player would have dared react to Gascoigne like Diouf did to Mackie because, at that time in any case, his reputation was as a lovable rogue to players, to fans and, most importantly of all, to the media!

    I will be judging Diouf only on his football peformances. If he is involved in any unsavoury incidents of his own doing then I won't condone it. Let's cross that bridge if we ever come to it.

    I can't say that I'm over confident about the game on Sunday, I never am about OF games, but by jove if Rangers win and Diouf plays a blinder, I can't wait to see the reaction of the pundits, media and fans et al. Love him or loathe him, his arrival in Scotland has certainly put our game under the microscope. Don't forget, there is a chain of thought that there is no such thing as "bad" publicity.

  • Comment number 40.

    Piers has done a good job of trying to win some sympathy for Diouf. He is just human after all. I find myself wishing him well, and hope he does too. Because it seems to me like this would be the last real chance he would ever have in football at that level.

  • Comment number 41.

    @ 13 ...Well said!

    This is the typical British press & fans at work..
    "Anything done by a foreign player(especially African players) is chastised vehemently, backed up with horrific r....... abuses, masquerading as opinions, yet worse attrosities are committed daily by English & British players and is swept under the rug".

    The latest victim of this disgraceful display of hypocrisy is Cesc Fabregas, one of the most gifted players of his generation.

  • Comment number 42.

    I'm a Blackburn fan and I have mixed feelings about Diouf. I won't dwell on his nasty side, as we are all aware of those, but from a purely footballing point of view it seems to me that he swings between electrifying talent in one game to pure laziness the next, with no in between. It's hard to fathom why, but he seems to be very much a mood player. Fair enough that Kean has lost all respect for him, but Rovers appear to be a little short of out-and-out wingers after his departure (that he is both footed is certainly his strongest point), and wingplay is one of the strengths of our game. Maybe Smith can tame him, who knows, but no other manager has appeared able to do so thus far. So good luck to Diouf I suppose.

  • Comment number 43.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 44.

    Eh the reason Keane wasn't vilified for his indiscretions when he joined Celtic was because they did not directly affect anyone in the Scottish game. This article was written because it was Celtic fans Diouf spat on. Nothing to do with him being an african Muslim or just being a Rangers signing - it is because he has previous with the opposing fans in what is always a highly charged fixture regardless.

    Would have thought this was obvious...

  • Comment number 45.

    He'l fit right in at Rangers. Like for like

  • Comment number 46.

    For all thos writing about Keane ending a player's career, they should really read the facts and not what the red top rags write. I remember Alf-Inge Haaland took Keane to court wanting to get compensation and lost since it was his other knee that ended his career not the injury that Keane did.

    Keane did not end the player's career but he did injure Halaand on purpose. It doesn't make what he did right but please get the facts straight.

  • Comment number 47.

    This signing is a last desperate throw of the dice by Walter. The guy Diouf can play a bit, if he can be bothered, but has openly admitted that diving is all part of his game. That being so, he will fit right in at Ibrox. It won't matter a jot though because the squad that Lennon has assembled is too strong for an ageing Rangers squad that is running out of steam as the fixture backlog starts to take its toll.
    And for those of a green persuasion enjoying this protracted collapse, just wait till next season when Swally gets handed the reins and tries to mount a challenge without Davis, Bougherra, and McGregor. Comedy Gold coming to a League near you soon!!!!! :-)))

  • Comment number 48.

    13. At 2:23pm on 04 Feb 2011, Dazz wrote:

    You hit the nail on the head there. The media is sharp at focusing on discipline issues pertaining to footballers who aren't English but hazy with it comes to English footballers. Diouf has a terrible attitude and I'm glad to see him gone but there needs to be consistency in reporting.

  • Comment number 49.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 50.

    It great to see Piers pulling up this article and it is also wonderful to see how people, sorry, football fans can see things differently as some blatantly refuse to accept Diouf characters, some trying to balance his character with football while others tends to reasoned with his act on the pitch, but what I want to ask everyone is, how has race influence our judgement on this Diouf of a thing? Are we all making a football decision or race decision? Remember, we are all talking about football here. Thanks.

  • Comment number 51.

    Jammie Dodgers

  • Comment number 52.

    I see ıts probably all 1st class angels who complain about his so called NASTY side

    The internet is full of faceless hypocrites

  • Comment number 53.

    I understand what everybody supporting Diouf is saying. Warnock has no moral right to critise anybody. He is worse than Diouf. Yesterday it was Cesc, The press are now calling him names though none have been proved. Today it is Diouf. They have started giving Torres a bad name but Bent and Caroll did the same thing and the press gave them the benefit of doubt. Why is the Press one sided. You start a campaign of diving against Eduardo for one dive in his long career, when Rooney and Gerrard has been doing it constantly before him. You call Wenger names such as Whinging when every other coach complains and goes free even Sir Alex. The English press are myopic. You should remove the log log in your eye before trying to remove the spec in another's. He is a decent guy. His charity says so. You can judge a guy by what happens in the field of play. Everything stays there.

  • Comment number 54.

    53, You can't judge a guy by what happens on the pitch. Everything should stay on the pitch

  • Comment number 55.

    some people never change.obviously Diouf has changed a lot and he is only showing what he can do on the pitch.but some people are still stuck with the Diouf of the past.no doubt he is a brilliant footballer and concentrate on that.

  • Comment number 56.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 57.

    "Please can you just stop all these nonsense? Surely you must realise these articles are read from all over the world and learn to be a lot more objective or the rest of the world will continue to view you in the current unfavorable light. "

    Are you Diouf's mum? You defo sound like it. Lets turn the tables round on your comment shall we? How do you think the rest of the world feels about a man who spits in other people's faces. I ask this question because you seem to be put out by a harmless article that has'nt really attacked anybody physically, yet you dont seem to have a problem with a man who does. How do you think the world percieves him, and more to the point, do you think he worries about it? Would you like him to?

    If the answers to the above questions are no, then you sir, are a hypocrit.

  • Comment number 58.

    As a Rangers fan i couldn't care less what celtic fans or any other fans for that matter think of Diouf.

    If the guy performs on the pitch to the standard required then the past is forgotten and this is a new chapter in his career.

    Celtic fans are too quick to jump on the high horse when a certain roy keane played for them and this was a man who ended another professional's career with a challenge what can only be described as shocking.

  • Comment number 59.

    53. At 08:19am on 05 Feb 2011, barca4ever wrote:
    I understand what everybody supporting Diouf is saying. Warnock has no moral right to critise anybody. He is worse than Diouf. Yesterday it was Cesc, The press are now calling him names though none have been proved. Today it is Diouf. They have started giving Torres a bad name but Bent and Caroll did the same thing and the press gave them the benefit of doubt. Why is the Press one sided. You start a campaign of diving against Eduardo for one dive in his long career, when Rooney and Gerrard has been doing it constantly before him. You call Wenger names such as Whinging when every other coach complains and goes free even Sir Alex. The English press are myopic. You should remove the log log in your eye before trying to remove the spec in another's. He is a decent guy. His charity says so. You can judge a guy by what happens in the field of play. Everything stays there.

    ..............................

    So very, very true.

  • Comment number 60.

    #57 Riggadon - bravo, at last a comment that actually makes sense.

    Lets attack a fair and balanced article and instead defend a guy who thinks its ok to repeatedly spit on fans eh? Because, you know, some other people out there are also unsavoury. Seems to be the bizarre argument for some posters here - which I find very strange indeed. Black and white arguments, tit for tat nonsense - childish in the extreme.

    Aye John it's as simple as that. Celtic fans loved Chris Sutton so we can't criticise Diouf? Why on earth not? The fact you feel the two are in any way comparable simply reinforces that you're missing the point. It's not "silly" - I'm sure you wouldn't mind if he had spat on your face.

    barca4ever you say "You can't judge a guy by what happens on the pitch. Everything should stay on the pitch" - you are also missing the point. That type of attitude says play tough while the game is on, bend the rules, have a go at each other - fine. The whole point is that this guy's behaviour transcends that - spitting on fans is not "on the pitch" activity and I find it odd that you think this is acceptable.

    That the racism card is being played by some is truly hilarious, what don't you understand about this guy's list of misdemeanours?

    simplybetterthantherest - you don't ever stand over a player in pain and give him pelters unless you're a certain type of person, regardless of whether he made a poor tackle. Hint: I think your team-mate is prety safe when he's lying there in agony. I played football for a long time at a decent level and can't remember it happening once. That's why "I know", as you would ask.

  • Comment number 61.

    let us not forget that The_Diouf_Celtic incident happened in 2003.we all have come very far in our own lives.what is surprising is he is continuously booed by people at every ground.even those who don't know what he did in the past boo him simply because others do so.
    let us not forget that there are other players in the premier league who are 10 fold mischievious and who always swear at Refs and are let go as if they have the liscence to do so.Diouf is what he is_a fighter.he plays good football.stop chewing at his old stories.give him a break.

  • Comment number 62.

    So Stevie, from your moral high perch answer me this?

    How would we react to someone who drove their car into the side of ours and injured our wife and kids? After seeing to them, would we just run over and offer First Aid for their broken bones or would we hurl abuse at them and offer to put them out of their misery?! No prizes for guessing what I and many others would do. The point is, in the heat of the moment, human beings over react. Perhaps this isn't the best example, but like it or not, it is similar to the Mackie one.

    What an amazing calm temperament you must have if you'd keep your cool in that situation?!

    You may well have played the game and not recall a similar incident. But did a similar incident ever happen before your eyes? I'd be surprised to hear if the odd amateur game never, ever got heated. Besides, the crux of the matter is, usually it's the victim of the tackle who ends up in casualty, even at amateur level, not the perpetrator. It would be an amazing coincidence if you had witnessed such a scene and "you knew" the answer to it.

    As this article is written by an English journalist, it only adds insult to injury given what EPL players have been proven to get up to over the last few years. WAG beating, sp1t roasting et al, I don't recall such an outcry to Carroll, Gerrard and Lampard etc. Why could that possibly be?

  • Comment number 63.

    stevie_bhoy

    The fact you can say you loved Chris Sutton, yet criticise Diouf, shows that the act of spitting does not concern many people if they wear the right colours.

    Again, why did a White Englishman get no bad publicity for spitting, yet a Black African Muslim gets called a "rat", "Creature" and "Satanised" for the same thing?

    I only hope on Sunday that the away support jeer Diouf for football reasons only.

  • Comment number 64.

    Paul @ 45.

    You say Diouf "will fit in at Rangers." You are 100% correct. Like Mark Walters, Boli, and Edu the Rangers fans will treat him like a King.

  • Comment number 65.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 66.

    Why is it that not one person has mentioned the despicable behaviour of Neil Lennon when he spat on a fans rangers scarf ?

  • Comment number 67.

    If you are going to attack players on morality issues we will find very few are exempt.

    I like the bits where Rangers fans get indignant at racism and I can only hope they are the ones who also get angry at their fellow fans, the ones who still seem to take exception to Scottish players from Irish Catholic backgrounds.

    Its being going on for far too long guys and most people in Scotland would like it to end.

    And #66 you'll find that Mr Lennon is also the target of that same set of sectarian racist abuse.

  • Comment number 68.

    the suddenly moralistic celtic support really make me laugh. this is the same support that refuse to respect our own soldiers in times of war but are getting all het up about some halfwit spitting!
    get a sense of perspective in your lives!

  • Comment number 69.

    This guy is the most nastiest thing ever to grace the field of football. He is also the most ungrateful, unintelligent and childish player ever.

    I can remember when Rafa Benitez was to take over at Liverpool. The first thing he did was order the departure of Diouf before he even walked in to Anfield.
    Even Gerard Houllier said he was the biggest dissappointment from his time at Liverpool.
    This was before his spitting incidents.
    How can you spit in a player's mouth, referring to Arjan De Zeeuw. I had so much respect for De Zeeuw after that because he kept his calm, and you could tell he thought about lashing out at him.
    Diouf should have been banned for life from playing football.

    Now, you can take the advice of Sam Alladyce who reminds me of a dodgy used car sales man, or a dodgy builder, or a dodgy anything. Or you can take the example of the finest european managers of the highest pedigree.
    We know what line Walter has followed, very disappointed in him.

  • Comment number 70.

    64

    "Like Mark Walters, Boli, and Edu the Rangers fans will treat him like a King"

    You mean most of them will. The exception being those who racially abused Edu in the Ibrox car park.

  • Comment number 71.

    Racism is a problem in society, not just in football. At least in football it comes out in the open because the nature of the game means you will see mans' true colours. This can then be eradicated.
    However, I feel spitting is an even bigger insult than racism. Its see as the biggest insult you can make to someone in quite a few cultures as it degrades them worthless or inhuman.

  • Comment number 72.

    He played some great football at Bolton, especially with Anelka and the Bolton fans loved him. I also met him in a local restaurant and he was a friendly pleasant guy.I question his work rate but when he has the ball, he sometimes ghosts past defenders like Gazza!

  • Comment number 73.

    one thing is certain.british people are the most hypocritical ever. i am no fan of diouf but he is no worse than rooney beckham and so many others. bad discipline in international games got rooney sent off but everyone here blamed RONALDO. Diouf never broke anyone's legs and there are a few who have.deliberately!!.in my book a lot worse than spitting some guy tried to do him and got hurt instead.tough. it turned out his leg was broken. diouf owed him no duty of love. not everyone is capable of feigning sympathy. the fact that brits find spitting so offensive does not make it a war crime. personally i find it funny. brits find it funny for a grown man to run naked unto a pitch others less so. there is no universally acceptable scale of offensiveness. so if you dislike the guy that is fine.nothing wrong in visceral hate.dont try and dress it up with some self-serving logic. we had enough of that when england did not get the world cup

  • Comment number 74.

    funny comments some people make. diouf is the "nastiest,most ungrateful etc" so there is a table.pray tell who is second on the list and whilst u r at it who is the most grateful footballer ever wayne rooney?

  • Comment number 75.

    slightly off topic but reading some of the comments I can't believe that the myth that Roy Keane ended Alfe Haalands career is still flying around. Haalands career ended due a long standing injury to the other knee of which Haaland himself has stated, but I suppose that wouldn't make a good story!
    Going back to Diouf, in the Mackie incident he was defending a team mate who was the victim of a poor tackle, he didnt know Mackie himself had broken his leg and anyway know one knew what was said..... as for being called 'lower than a sewer rat by Warnock' talk about pot kettle and black!

  • Comment number 76.

    steviebhoy good old british righteous indignation is a poor substitute for logic. diouf is a baddie footballer so are many others whether he takes the biscuit is a matter of taste or should i say distaste there is yet no machine that can tell who is the foulest of the lot and so when you pick on a guy who happens to be black you leave yourself open to charges of prejudice. the fact that this discussion is going on about diouf and not the several other british players who arguably are as nice as diouf suggests there is some bias going on.people just go with the flow without doing any research of their own. you talk about his list of misdemenours ok. but there are footballers with criminal records who have done time so please.........................

  • Comment number 77.

    Jagajaga,

    I cant even seen the logic in your defence of Diouf. You say you dont like him, and then try to defend his behaviour by justifying it with bad discipline of other players. Thats absolutely illogical.

    Oh, its ok for me to steal because so and so stole; or its ok for me to fight because by friend fights; or even, its ok for me to spit at others because Ronaldo tried to get Rooney sent off and he should of known better and kept his discipline.
    This is the most unlogcal argument I have heard for a long time.

    Racism is hatred, should not be tolerated at all in football;
    trying to harm or injure a player is most likely motivated by hatred;
    spitting at a person, its certainly not a way of showing your love for someone.
    Act such as these should not be tolerated in a game which is broadcasted to viewers of all ages all around the world. Kids watch games and I certainly wont want any children in my home to watch these incidents, would you?
    And, its not the offensiveness of these acts we are debating. They are just plain violent, evil and nasty. Yes, spitting at someone is nasty.

    If you want to defend Diouf then fine, but please dont try and defend his actions by justifying them by comparable (or uncamparable) incidents by others. All players who commit degrading acts should be thrown in the pit if you ask me.
    And by the way, i'm not white and I am with the white, black, blue and purple who think Diouf is a nasty person. This is a colour free (or multi coloured) united stance and therefore it cant be racist, does that make logical sense to you.
    It is our humble opinion that Diouf is the nastiest football player that comes to our minds by the criteria we have set. Our criteria may not be perfect, but that does not make Diouf a saint. It may merely make him number two or three of the most nastiest players that come to our mind.

    Have a logical good night my friend.

  • Comment number 78.

    the problem with ranters like abdul wajid is a limited capacity for clear thought. pray tell me where or how i defended diouf i could not care less about diouf. read my articles again I DID NOT DEFEND HIM he can do that himself if needed. obviously you hate him with a passion. again i don't have a problem with that i hate some people too that is human nature .my point is do not try and dress up emotional reactions as being somehow logical.in my view diouf is not the "nastiest or most ungrateful" on what basis do you come up with this. the abdul wajid rating scale of nastiness or the abdul wajid gratefulness inventory rating scale.this is my point . quite simple and not long winded at all. on what basis is he the number one nasty footballer? like i said he has not been to prison so he is probably number 12 or 13 not number 1 on the JAGAJAGA all-time nasty footballer table. as for ungrateful i dont think you have a point. there are several footballers who have been to prison without all this noise. if an individual arouses your passions so much you need to look at yourself and ask what YOUR problem is .

 

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