BBC BLOGS - Phil Minshull
IN ASSOCIATION WITH
« Previous | Main | Next »

Jerez, Hoddle and a British takeover

Post categories:

Phil Minshull | 12:40 UK time, Thursday, 18 November 2010

The top flight of Spanish football may now be devoid of any British influence after the return of Jermaine Pennant, loaned to Stoke during the summer after his unhappy season at Zaragoza, but further down the divisions in Spain the Union Jack and St George's Cross are flying high.

Jerez Industrial, not a name many football fans will be familiar with even if they have a penchant for sherry, are currently in contention for the promotion play-offs from their group in the Spanish fourth division with a team consisting mainly of English players.

Goalkeeper Daniel Harford is Welsh, midfielder Lee Lynch - a former West Brom reserve - hails from Limerick, while defender Sean McCashin is a Northern Ireland Under-19 international. There are also a couple of Spaniards as well as a Portuguese midfielder - Adriano Moke, who was once on Nottingham Forest's books - but 19 of the current 25-man squad are English.

This is clearly no ex-pat pub team but a serious professional outfit with the majority of players aged 20 or under, all hoping to develop their game further and attract the interest of a bigger club in England, Spain or anywhere else for that matter.

Glenn Hoddle (right) gives instructions to Ryan Burge

Glenn Hoddle (right) gives instructions to star player Ryan Burge. Photo: Reuters

In fact, the entire squad - with the exception of Spanish striker Alberto Valtierra Martín, who, at 25, is the senior pro and the only surviving member of the squad from the start of last season - are members of the Glenn Hoddle Academy on a full scholarship.

Hoddle, who runs his academy in nearby Montecastillo, got involved with Jerez Industrial last March when he stepped in to loan the ailing club, then in the Spanish third tier, the Segunda B, a handful of players to give his lads some competitive opportunities that were missing at his live-in facility in Andalusia.

It didn't stop Jerez Industrial, who celebrate their 60th anniversary next year and who once reached the heights of the second division back in 1968, getting relegated.

But Hoddle, the former England boss, then got more involved over the summer and added a financial loan to the physical one, providing £160,000 so that the club could pay players' outstanding wages as well as clear other debts and stave off bankruptcy. It meant that the old president and board of directors exited in July, allowing Hoddle-approved officials to replace them.

The team has gone from strength to strength since then. After their 2-0 win over mid-table Mairena on Sunday, with the goals coming from former Oxford United striker Alex Fisher and Spanish midfielder Juanse Pegalajar, Jerez Industrial are only one point and one place behind division leaders Pozoblanco.

Hoddle does not sit on the bench during matches. Instead, he acts as a director of football while his Academy coaches, former England internationals Graham Rix and Dave Beasant plus Liverpool and Rangers midfielder Nigel Spackman, direct two games at a time with help from Spanish trainer Enrique Caballero.

The current star of the side is midfielder Ryan Burge, at 22 the second oldest member of the squad after Valtierra. As a talented teenager, Burge was offered contracts by both Manchester City and Manchester United when he was 15 but opted to stay closer to his Cheltenham home, eventually signing a professional deal with Birmingham City at 17.

Things did not work out at St Andrews, resulting in Burge spending stints at Barnet and in Japan before being handpicked by Hoddle and given the opportunity to re-ignite his career at the Academy.

But how have supporters of Jerez Industrial taken to their new-look side?

Having a young David Beckham or Michael Owen at your club might be one thing - both were England internationals at the age of 21 before adding to their reputations at Real Madrid - but having a team imposed upon you that is comprised of players who did not quite make the grade in England and who are looking for a second chance elsewhere, well, that is quite another.

Glenn Hoddle

Hoddle's goal is to get one of his players into a La Liga or Premier League team. Photo: Reuters


Reaction has been generally positive according to odd-man-out Valtierra Martin, although it is not difficult to detect an element of resentment from some quarters if you sift through the local media.

As Martin himself acknowledged in a recent interview: "The supporters are grateful for Glenn and the new players because they saved the club. I sometimes feel like I am in England when we train but it is no problem. On the pitch, we are all the same."

Hoddle has different targets and objectives to Jerez Industrial's long-suffering supporters - and that may ultimately cause some problems. "To get them promoted would be great but our ultimate goal remains getting a player at a La Liga team or a Premier League team playing regularly for them," Hoddle has said.

And should Jerez Industrial get promoted, would Hoddle sign other players to bolster the side, thereby denying his own Academy prospects opportunities?

Jerez has always had a link to Britain, dating back to the 18th century, when wine merchants were looking for an alternative to French wine. The names of Sandeman, Harveys and Williams are still to be seen on signs all around the area. Now locals are becoming familiar with the names of Fisher, Burge and, from a different vintage, Hoddle.

Comments

or register to comment.

  • 1. At 3:19pm on 18 Nov 2010, weezer316 wrote:

    Who knows...maybe playing in spain will give these young players exposure to football they would never see here, namely football where moving the bloody thing quickly and accurately and working to make space is key, rather than lumping it to a 6ft centre forward.......

    I like hoddle. Only in this country could we produce such a gifted technical player and then moan because he doesnt win headers and tackles and "get stuck in"

    Complain about this comment

  • 2. At 3:20pm on 18 Nov 2010, Ben wrote:

    What a fascinating story. I'd love to know what the long-time supporters of Jerez feel about this piece of benevolent colonialism!

    Complain about this comment

  • 3. At 3:30pm on 18 Nov 2010, Another Fickle Fan wrote:

    I may change my allegiances and try to buy a Jerez Industrial top!! We are constantly as a nation bemoaning the fact that we don't produce enough technically adept and tactically aware players, like those in Spain. If this project of Hoddles helps to alleviate that problem, even if only to a minor extent, then he has my backing, and good luck to him.

    Hopefully we'll see these players makeit big and show the Premier League that producing good young players is possible, if you give them the right tuition and right motivation. Currently there doesn't seem to be the motivation at clubs in England as a lot of lads know that clubs will just buy cheap players from abroad. At least under Hoddle they know that if they work hard then they'll get a chance.

    Great article, good little bit of history too!

    Complain about this comment

  • 4. At 3:30pm on 18 Nov 2010, Niki_Jelavic_Hero wrote:

    Really great article Phil. Really enjoyed it, it made me wonder could an approach like this work in Britain? Either England in the lower leagues or Scotland (where I am from) a team composed of Young players being given a second chance, and possibly one or maybe more(?) making the grade in the higher leagues?

    Agree with Weezer316 only in Britain could a player of Hoddle's undoubted ability only earn 53 (I think?) caps for his country!

    Well Done Phil.

    Andy

    Complain about this comment

  • 5. At 3:41pm on 18 Nov 2010, hackerjack wrote:

    Interesting but ultimately the project will likely never produce anything while it relies on rejects from football league clubs.

    Complain about this comment

  • 6. At 3:43pm on 18 Nov 2010, FortressFratton wrote:

    Good blog Phil - I for one had no idea that Hoddle and co were running not only this academy, but a football team in the Spanish leagues.

    As #3 says, if the project and the academy can help produce some future England players, I'm all for it. Our entire national team plays in the top 2 tiers of the English league, and I think that makes us a bit naive to how these other sides play football.

    Excellent article!

    Complain about this comment

  • 7. At 3:43pm on 18 Nov 2010, DavidME wrote:

    this is a regurgitated article and not new!

    Complain about this comment

  • 8. At 3:45pm on 18 Nov 2010, gazsmith66 wrote:

    Great Blog

    So I take it Hoddle has control of the club? I can't see much reason for the locals to complain. They will get a steady stream of talent and hopefully profit when players are sold on. I suppose Glenn could appease the doubters by including some local lads who are in the same boat as the British lads. Could be a prototype of the future. Until we British change the way we play from like what Weezer316 says I doubt it could work in any of the home countries, but something for the powers that be (SFA I'm really referring to) to look into perhaps.

    Complain about this comment

  • 9. At 3:48pm on 18 Nov 2010, Chris Wilby wrote:

    Brilliant piece! 19 Englishmen playing in one Spanish team. Flabbergasted really :)
    I hope they learn something over there, like better technique, passing ability and vision. Traits often lacked in the English leagues (at least from the English players). I hope Jerez Industrial do well and even produce one or more future England internationals.

    Complain about this comment

  • 10. At 3:52pm on 18 Nov 2010, 1987rs wrote:

    Weezer316, you have possibly just summed up the deficiencies of English football in two paragraphs.

    Our national team made a distinctly average French team look like world beaters last night on the basis they completed more than two passes along the floor and moved into space to receive the ball again.

    Complain about this comment

  • 11. At 4:17pm on 18 Nov 2010, colmaz wrote:

    Very interesting blog. I enjoyed reading this, especially as the company I work for has an office in Rota, not far from Jerez and when I go there I fly into Jerez!

    weezer316:
    'football where moving the bloody thing quickly and accurately and working to make space is key, rather than lumping it to a 6ft centre forward.......'
    weezer316 got my vote for England coach!!!

    Complain about this comment

  • 12. At 4:19pm on 18 Nov 2010, weezer316 wrote:

    Im actually scottish, its just we play exactly the same way as England andproduce players who do exactly the same thing

    Hoddle was excellent but was never given the creidt he was due. Matt le tissier was the same, Fabulous technically yet had players who couldnt tie his shoe laces in fornt of him for the england team

    Really annoyed me last night watching england, and I love watching England lose lol! We are just so inept in this country at at passing and moving anc controlling under pressure.

    Complain about this comment

  • 13. At 4:25pm on 18 Nov 2010, daveh wrote:

    Great to see Glen working in the game and helping youngsters. I don't think the problem is with British talent but with their mentality. Last night showed that with the lack of any movement, allowing the french to mark the English team out of the game and leading to us knocking hopeful balls in to Carroll.
    If you look at Ian Hollway's Blackpool, he has changed the mentality of what is a rather average bunch of players (exception of Mr Adams) and turned them into an extremly dangerous animal. Yes they are defensively naive, but some of this comes form the lack of quality.
    I say Holloway for England - at least we will get some excitement!

    Complain about this comment

  • 14. At 4:26pm on 18 Nov 2010, Phil Minshull wrote:

    In truth, I should also have given the 21-year-old striker Ben Williamson (22 on Christmas Day) a mention as well, a classic late developer as he’s never been on professional terms at any Football League club. He’s the club’s leading scorer this season with seven goals in 13 games. However, name-checking him didn’t quite fit in to the flow of the blog as I was trying to cover a lot of ground in a small space.

    The BBC has an editorial guideline of not linking, within the body of a blog, to a websites that are not in English but I don’t think my wrists are going to get slapped too hard if I give you the URL of the club’s Spanish language website.

    http://www.jerezindustrialcf.com/

    Complain about this comment

  • 15. At 4:26pm on 18 Nov 2010, FJT_Stole_My_Shoes wrote:

    Having come through English club academies and now playing in Spain one would hope they can add to the physicality the British seem to hold so high some technical and tactical know how. As we all know,England could do with some of the latter.

    Complain about this comment

  • 16. At 4:27pm on 18 Nov 2010, U14357625 wrote:

    Good luck to them. If it promotes young players and keeps a club in business then why not. Would be interesting though, to see the reaction from other clubs and fans if they start climbing the divisions.

    Agree about possible problems. If Hoddle is only thinking about player development, while the fans naturally want results, then there's likely to be a clash somewhere along the line.

    http://footballfutbolfitba.wordpress.com/

    Complain about this comment

  • 17. At 4:51pm on 18 Nov 2010, Marantz wrote:

    1. At 3:19pm on 18 Nov 2010, weezer316 wrote:
    Who knows...maybe playing in spain will give these young players exposure to football they would never see here, namely football where moving the bloody thing quickly and accurately and working to make space is key, rather than lumping it to a 6ft centre forward.......

    I like hoddle. Only in this country could we produce such a gifted technical player and then moan because he doesnt win headers and tackles and "get stuck in"

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A very interesting article and indeed pertinent comment from "weezer316".

    Matt Le Tissier is another name that comes to mind. He got, what, 7-8 caps for England? Laughable. Wasn't it Pele who said Le Tissier would have got 100 caps if he had been born Brazilian. Damning, eh? England should have built their team around Le Tissier for 4-5 years, especially when Gascoigne was having a lot of on and off field problems.

    And my heart sunk last night when Andy Townsend said about Andy Carroll; "Everyone in the crowd is genuinely excited at seeing a 'proper' English centre forward." Well, there is so much wrong with that statement it's untrue:

    a) I would hope that most people were glad to see Andy Carroll get his chance irrespective of his size. He's first and foremost a promising young striker. That he is 6'3 is secondary. I couldn't care less if in a parallel world Andy Carroll was 5'5 as long as he was still a promising young striker!

    b) This idea of a 'proper' English centre forward is so outdated, it's untrue. And an insult to Andy Carroll. Indeed, the Newcastle man is so much more than a large, stationary target man. Make no mistake, Carroll can play. Utilising him as a mere target man is a waste of his talent and depressingly regressive.

    c) Andy Townsend demonstrates that large swathes of English football people still hold on to this failed and outdated style of play. Our primitive long ball approach is laughed at on the Continent and has routinely failed again and again. But I'm starting to wonder if the majority of English football (players, former players, managers and fans) can change at all. I've never understood the English obsession for "passion, grit and determination" over talent, technical ability and flair. But I suspect the majority can't and/or won't change from wanting those "tradtionally English" yet regressive attributes to define our national game. Depressing, eh?

    Accordingly, I admire Glenn Hoddle's efforts in Spain but I can't help but think that he is swimming against the tide.

    Complain about this comment

  • 18. At 5:20pm on 18 Nov 2010, Drooper_ wrote:

    Great story Phil. Just to show what a small world it is, I wasn't expecting to find a fellow previously regular Robins season ticket holder living 5 minutes from where I live in a city in the south of Japan, let alone not so long ago telling me about one RYAN BURGE, who'd arrived in Fukuoka to have a trial with the local J2 football club, Avispa. That obviously didn't work out.

    I think I'm right in saying Ryan is the son of Rod Burge, an important board member of Cheltenham Town Football Club over the last 20 years or so. It's a pity he doesn't play for his hometown team. I get the feeling he had his sights set higher at one time but might have lost his way. Good luck to him.

    Share #1 weezer's sentiments about Hoddle's quality never having truly been appreciated at home. And let's face it, the media hounded him out of the England job. Regardless of how bizarre some of his views may have appeared, they shouldn't have been grounds for him to lose his job. I think he could have been manager for a long time and put us in the right direction.

    Complain about this comment

  • 19. At 6:21pm on 18 Nov 2010, redwatcher1884 wrote:

    Chris Fagan came to Lincoln from Hoddle's academy and although technically good he did not look up to the pressures of league football. Also another player from Lincoln has gone there, called Sam Clucas, but he struggled to find a club to take him on here when Lincoln released him so maybe the standard is not all that high, or possibly it just reflects the differences between Continental and English styles of play as highlighted by France last night

    Complain about this comment

  • 20. At 6:29pm on 18 Nov 2010, lancer01 wrote:

    Absolutely right that Hoddle (and players like him) were never properly appreciated in England, though I suspect he was more appreciated by managers than by the fans (he did get 50+ caps for England after all).

    But it says everything about english football that we are still obsessed with power and physical aggression - something that all top-level football countries have long since turned into skill and subtlety allied with power and especially speed. Last night's game against France exposed once again the one-paced donkey approach that english supporters continue to think will get us somewhere in world football (especially, apparently, if we have a 'proper' english centre-forward - someone who can give it to Johnny Foreigner where they don't like it - except Johnny Foreigner seems not to mind any more).

    As mentioned above, Hoddle also became an excellent coach, and, although it was extremely clumsy of him to appear to blame the disabled for their condition (whether you believe in reincarnation or not, you really can't go about openly saying things like that), he has since apologised and clearly remains a successful and inspiring coach. Now, don't England need one of those?..... Bygones and all that....

    Complain about this comment

  • 21. At 6:36pm on 18 Nov 2010, Dr Wang wrote:


    Marvellous story, blog and comments. My only criticism here is that Hoddle may find he has blurred the lines in which he operates.

    As Phil indicates Glen could end up with a conflict of interest if they are promoted. I also believe success for the team will result in a nationalist response from a section of Spanish fans.

    As regards the comments about Hoddle and Le Tissier as England players I completely concur, and hope that the talent of Adam Johnson and Ashley Young are not wasted by an increasingly erratic Capello.

    Complain about this comment

  • 22. At 7:01pm on 18 Nov 2010, Phil Minshull wrote:

    FootyWins: “I may change my allegiances and try to buy a Jerez Industrial top!!”

    They are available online via the club website.

    http://www.jerezindustrialcf.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=27&Itemid=43

    BTW Just in case anyone is thinking otherwise, I’m not getting any commission or any other backhanders from Mr Hoddle or the club itself!

    Drooper_: “I think I'm right saying Ryan is the son of Rod Burge, an important board member of Cheltenham Town Football Club over the last 20 years or so. It's a pity he doesn't play for his hometown team.” Close, apparently he’s Rod Burge’s grandson. He had trails at Cheltenham Town but things obviously didn’t progress and then he joined Barnet.

    He’s one of the few Jerez Industrial players to have a Wikipedia entry so I’ve included that link here and also one to a local newspaper article describing his move to Japan.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_Burge

    http://www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/news/Burge-s-Japanese-adventure/article-714953-detail/article.html

    Complain about this comment

  • 23. At 7:16pm on 18 Nov 2010, Drooper_ wrote:

    Thanks for that Phil.

    Complain about this comment

  • 24. At 7:20pm on 18 Nov 2010, Uninventiveusername wrote:

    It's all very well and good taking them abroad. But how good is this Jerez side? Can we be expecting them to get promoted any time soon, and furthermore do you reckon if they do well we'll start seeing more young British players in La Liga?

    Complain about this comment

  • 25. At 7:21pm on 18 Nov 2010, legodonce wrote:

    Well I will get one of those shirts too!.

    If I just could get them signed by Hoddle too!

    Complain about this comment

  • 26. At 8:35pm on 18 Nov 2010, Virtuet wrote:

    Hoddle was always an excellent coach in the Wenger mould just no good at off field judgement i.e. talking to the press about beliefs best kept to discussing with people you trust.
    His problems seem stem from a disdainful attitude towards the British press.

    Complain about this comment

  • 27. At 9:24pm on 18 Nov 2010, JayPee wrote:

    4. Niki_Jelavic_Hero wrote:

    "...it made me wonder could an approach like this work in Britain? Either England in the lower leagues or Scotland"

    Check out Stalybridge Celtic in the Conference North:

    http://www.stalybridgeceltic.co.uk/index.php

    They are doing something very similar, taking young players released by full time clubs. They have gone full time as well. Jim Harvey is the manager. I think he did similar things at Morecambe and Forest Green.

    Complain about this comment

  • 28. At 9:25pm on 18 Nov 2010, Vikdaddy wrote:

    It's the Union Flag, not Union Jack. It's only called the Union Jack when it's on a ship.

    Complain about this comment

  • 29. At 9:30pm on 18 Nov 2010, Stevat wrote:

    In many ways both Hoddle and Keegan were great for British football. They produced genuinely exciting teams that played good technical, attacking football - yet as they are a little different from the norm in the UK they were pilloried by the press and we're left with a first division of unimaginative and insipid football that is painful to watch at times.

    On the young British players abroad theme, another one that most people don't know about is a former Newcastle youth team centre-half that has been playing in Italian Serie B for Reggina and Ancona and is now at Andria BAT in Lega Pro Prima. Promising young centre-half that can carry the ball out of defence, here's hoping he continues to develop and ends up in Serie A soon.

    Complain about this comment

  • 30. At 9:31pm on 18 Nov 2010, Stevat wrote:

    Oh, should add, he's called Kris Thackray, here's his profile at Andria:

    http://www.asandriabat.it/scheda.php?id=120

    Complain about this comment

  • 31. At 9:38pm on 18 Nov 2010, debatable wrote:

    Hoddle: a wonderful player, and an excellent tactical coach, but a poor man-manager at Spurs. I always felt he was much better suited to the England job than the day-to-day interaction with players. It would have been interesting if France had appointed him when they interviewed him for that job a few years back. Domenech got it.

    Complain about this comment

  • 32. At 11:17pm on 18 Nov 2010, clarksosboyos wrote:

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the House Rules.

  • 33. At 11:30pm on 18 Nov 2010, clarksosboyos wrote:

    It is great that this has been given some prominence but, a particularly unoriginal piece Phil. Per #7, it is pretty poor that this article doesn't at least reference the "When Saturday Comes" article - Nov 2010 pg 26. A coincidence that written in the same month??

    Complain about this comment

  • 34. At 11:41pm on 18 Nov 2010, drew wrote:

    Im really glad Hoddle is giving this a go. Although he had some wacky ideas with eileen drewery and the disabled gaffe. Although it was a bit daft to say in an interview, I think he shouldnt have been sacked by england as he was doing quite well with the national team compared to keegan, mcclaren and especially turnip head taylor.

    It makes me laugh when Sam Allardyce gets mentioned as england coach in waiting. He would be a disaster. Long ball, kick and rush, rough house teams. It could be effective but i doubt it.

    After watching that terrible performance against france last night Capello doesnt seem to know much either. England do too many hopeful long balls especially with crouch or carroll type up front. There is no patience. Lescott was the worst I have ever seen doing that. Big hoof up the pitch to nobody. The Italia 90 england squad with bobby robson was almost a turning point for england. The team had many talented players and the attacking elements of that team could almost get into any national line up. Robson was really under-rated and his teams could really play sometimes. They could pass on the deck. Waddle, Beardsley, Barnes ,Gascoigne and Platt all flair players with finesse and technique backed by Robson ,Butcher, Mcmahon, Pearce. Real spill yer guts "english" style players. Look at the team now. Rooney is the only flair player. England's answer to Totti. Who else. If england go a goal down, they get 10 times worse. There is no patience. Woof it up. Even Rio does it. Its moronic how many times eng give the ball away. Isnt it time for england to try and keep possession with every other top national team seemlessly playing keepball? Hoddle could have succeeded as national boss. He seems to have a tactical nous but as others have said, he's got a bit of a man management problem like benitez or capello

    Hope this little dream of his comes good. He's a top coach. Matt Le Tiss was another genius. Where are the modern equivalent of bearsdley le tiss, hodd, waddle, gazza? Gerrard and Lampard are meant to be heirs, but they are "english" style players

    Complain about this comment

  • 35. At 00:08am on 19 Nov 2010, Ross Quinn wrote:

    From what I know from the World Football Phone In there's a Scot called Ikechi Anya in the Spanish leagues, is he doing well?

    Complain about this comment

  • 36. At 00:21am on 19 Nov 2010, Tommo1948 wrote:

    @ 12 I seem to remember that a certain Matt Le Tiss was overlooked time and again by a certain Mr Hoddle. I believe jealous is a term used by Southampton fans but I could be wrong.

    Complain about this comment

  • 37. At 01:02am on 19 Nov 2010, Stevat wrote:

    #35 I'm not sure, but was Anya not a graduate of Hoddle's Academy? Making your comment even more relevant to this column. He was at Sevilla Atletico if it's who I am thinking of?

    Complain about this comment

  • 38. At 02:23am on 19 Nov 2010, Faustino wrote:

    Phil #22, I thought that commercial advertising on the BBC was a complete no-no? Should you be telling people where they can buy football shirts? Might your post be "reactively moderated"?

    Complain about this comment

  • 39. At 08:40am on 19 Nov 2010, Mikey wrote:

    Good piece.. fair play to Hoddle for attempting this too.. it may just show a way for footballers of today who get paid handsome sums and frequently talk about 'ways of giving something back' when they finish their careers..

    Complain about this comment

  • 40. At 08:56am on 19 Nov 2010, hackerjack wrote:

    Where are the modern equivalent of bearsdley le tiss, hodd, waddle, gazza?
    -------------
    Rooney, Joe Cole, Walcott, Lennon, Bale...

    Not hard to find if you take of the rose specs.

    Complain about this comment

  • 41. At 09:54am on 19 Nov 2010, StevenDavisNo1 - Lennon got Butchered wrote:

    Bale is Welsh

    Complain about this comment

  • 42. At 10:18am on 19 Nov 2010, Vox Populi wrote:

    29. At 9:30pm on 18 Nov 2010, Stevat wrote:
    1. In many ways both Hoddle and Keegan were great for British football. They produced genuinely exciting teams that played good technical, attacking football - yet as they are a little different from the norm in the UK they were pilloried by the press and we're left with a first division of unimaginative and insipid football that is painful to watch at times
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    You're talking about Hoddle and Keegan as managers? I think you're taking the theme a little too far.

    As a club manager, I think Glenn Hoddle has been very ordinary. He was a very good England coach though, and he was unfairly castigated- however, he put himself in trouble there and only has himself to blame.

    2. Where are the modern equivalent of bearsdley le tiss, hodd, waddle, gazza?
    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    For english players, you're right- they don't exist. Adam Johnson is the closest to a Waddle. Waddle and Beardsley were underrated. We don't have a winger as tricky as Waddle right now or a deep-lying forward as clever and creative as Beardsley. Beardsley was a subtle player, Rooney bludgeons. Joe Cole is not in their class either. Paul Scholes is still the most technically gifted english midfielder at the moment, and he's years past his prime.

    Complain about this comment

  • 43. At 10:37am on 19 Nov 2010, DaggerPOB wrote:

    #40

    No, not hard if you open it up to non-English players like Bale

    I wouldnt call Lennon or Walcott those types of players either. The type being described had real strength in their passing or how comfortable they were with the ball at their feet, like a continental type. Lennon or Walcott main attributes are almost solely around explosive pace or acceleration to beat their man. Kind of limits their effectiveness as players when they get older or suffer a big injury (like Michael Owen for example)

    So of your easy "off the top of my head" type list, 2 of those dont work to type, arguably Bale doesnt either AND he doesnt qualify for england, so just Rooney and Cole if he plays.

    Any more?

    Complain about this comment

  • 44. At 11:38am on 19 Nov 2010, blaineyboy wrote:

    I've followed their progress quite slowly. I think what Hoddle is doing is a great for young players that have been overlooked for whatever reason.

    I myself know a few players that were on the books of Villa, Birmingham and Albion that got released, some of them - in my eyes were very good players and even if they weren't good enough to make the grade at a top club probably gone on and played in the lower leagues. Instead, they end up doing what most teenagers do and get drunk, put weight on and turn out for a pub team or a semi pro team.

    I do think a lot of kids are probably slipping through the net that may forge a good career if given a 2nd chance.

    Complain about this comment

  • 45. At 11:46am on 19 Nov 2010, Ivan Drago wrote:

    Who knows...maybe playing in spain will give these young players exposure to football they would never see here, namely football where moving the bloody thing quickly and accurately and working to make space is key, rather than lumping it to a 6ft centre forward.......

    I like hoddle. Only in this country could we produce such a gifted technical player and then moan because he doesnt win headers and tackles and "get stuck in"
    --------------------------------------------
    spot on, makes you wonder how a player like Jack Wilshire will fit into the England team....

    Complain about this comment

  • 46. At 12:37pm on 19 Nov 2010, Roberto wrote:

    Hi Phil,

    Excellent and informative blog! I was wondering if the club/Hoddle provide for the boys in other means that will help them set up for a life in Spain? Are the lads taking Spanish courses/classes for example and has a level of proficiency developed amongst the English lads yet? It would be a shame for the local people if the club was too 'Anglo-sized' ie turned into a kind of football Benidorm where the locals aren't able to communicate with their own players and feel left out!

    Hopefully some of these youngsters will develop the technique so sadly lacking amongst so many young English players!

    Thanks

    Complain about this comment

  • 47. At 12:52pm on 19 Nov 2010, MrT wrote:

    20. At 6:29pm on 18 Nov 2010, lancer01 wrote:
    Absolutely right that Hoddle (and players like him) were never properly appreciated in England, though I suspect he was more appreciated by managers than by the fans (he did get 50+ caps for England after all).

    But it says everything about english football that we are still obsessed with power and physical aggression - something that all top-level football countries have long since turned into skill and subtlety allied with power and especially speed. Last night's game against France exposed once again the one-paced donkey approach that english supporters continue to think will get us somewhere in world football (especially, apparently, if we have a 'proper' english centre-forward - someone who can give it to Johnny Foreigner where they don't like it - except Johnny Foreigner seems not to mind any more).

    As mentioned above, Hoddle also became an excellent coach, and, although it was extremely clumsy of him to appear to blame the disabled for their condition (whether you believe in reincarnation or not, you really can't go about openly saying things like that), he has since apologised and clearly remains a successful and inspiring coach. Now, don't England need one of those?..... Bygones and all that....

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Spot on. A player such as Hoddle (who out shone Johan Cryft in a spurs european game) only managed just over 50 caps. Yet the all action non stop bryan robson got far far more. just sums up what's wrong.

    Just wonder where England would have been in world football had Hoddle been in charge for longer. You felt with his England side that there was a plan a strategy and a reason to be optimistic. With Capello that simply isn't the case.

    Another point Phil - why is this article so hard to find!? I only noticed it this morning and by lunchtime it had disappeared from the main page!

    Complain about this comment

  • 48. At 4:36pm on 19 Nov 2010, nutgone wrote:

    At last some common sense. The English premiership is sinking due to the money that is used to buy success and bears no relationship to the club revenue. Why don't the chairmen get together at the start of the season, see who's got the most money and award the title without playing a game?
    The old football league had strength through depth. Clubs like Burnley could survive amongst the big clubs by having a good youth system. By buying off the peg players big clubs are ruining our game.

    Complain about this comment

  • 49. At 8:54pm on 19 Nov 2010, Phil Minshull wrote:

    Clarksosboyos: “it is pretty poor that this article doesn't at least reference the "When Saturday Comes" article - Nov 2010 pg 26. A coincidence that written in the same month?” I think I have to respond to this and, actually, it is a coincidence, believe it or not. I wasn’t even aware of the When Saturday Comes article until you mentioned it, and I have still not seen it. It’s absolutely no reflection on the publication, but I’m prepared to take a lie detector test that I haven’t read a copy of WSC for around 10 years, and this is despite playing a couple of times for their Sunday league team in the mid-90s. As far as I’m aware, WSC isn’t available in Spain, at least I haven’t seen it on any of the news stands in the big cities that carry international magazines or in any of the English-language bookshops. For the record, the genesis of the blog is in a conversation that I had with a friend in my regular Madrid watering hole Finbars about two weeks ago. He spends time in the summer in nearby Cadiz and alerted me what had been happening at Jerez Industrial.

    Ross Quinn: “From what I know from the World Football Phone In there's a Scot called Ikechi Anya in the Spanish leagues, is he doing well?” Anya made a decent impression in the Sevilla reserve team that played in the Segunda B last season and has since gone on loan to the Celta Vigo B team in the same - third - tier of Spanish football. I haven’t seen him in action, even on the TV, but reading newspaper reports, he’s been playing regularly, scoring a few goals and been a contributing factor to them being on top of their division – one of four in the regionalised Segunda B.

    Roberto: “I was wondering if the club/Hoddle provide for the boys in other means that will help them set up for a life in Spain? Are the lads taking Spanish courses/classes for example?” My understanding is that the Glenn Hoddle Academy does provide Spanish lessons for the lads. I think Hoddle offers scholarships on the basis of a person’s personality combined with their playing skills and football potential. I’m sure they are not all little angels off-the-pitch but, certainly, I haven’t seen anything to suggest that there is any of the more outrageous and disturbing behaviour or activities that gets regularly perpetrated by some players in England, and then gets reported in the ‘red tops’.

    Complain about this comment

  • 50. At 5:14pm on 20 Nov 2010, lee wrote:

    great for all these young lads but it should be here in this country uk.mr hoddle best manager we have had in years(ENGLAND).wish he was still managing in the uk,and what a brilliant player.

    Complain about this comment

  • 51. At 5:37pm on 20 Nov 2010, javiorange wrote:

    Recently stayed at the Monte Castillo Golf Resort in Jerez where Hoddle runs this academy with 311 days of sunshine. It is 5 star hotel plus villas, with 18 hole golf course, 2 outdoor pools, an indoor pool, spa centre, gym, top restaurant, great bars and every member of staff is friendly and helpful.
    No wonder these lads are doing well!!...I wouldn´t mind a second chance myself, though not sure if he´d take the chance with a 48 yr old!

    Complain about this comment

View these comments in RSS

More from this blog...

Topical posts on this blog

Categories

These are some of the popular topics this blog covers.

Latest contributors

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.