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Living with the Ayatollah - join the debate


In tonight's programme, young Iranians speak out for the first time about life in a state where putting up a poster can get you jailed, releasing a rap CD calling for change gets you tortured and being gay is punishable by death.

In a country where men and women can still be stoned to death for adultery, reporter Jane Corbin asks how much longer Iran can keep a lid on internal unrest as revolution and regime change sweep across the Middle East.

We welcome your comments on the programme, please use this forum to join the debate.


Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    This report is exposing just the tip of the iceberg with these thugs. I would like to see some of the London based reporters of Press TV being confronted. Like Yvvone Ridley.

  • Comment number 2.

    It's not complicated. Europe needs oil and gas. They buy it from middle-east dictators like Khamenei and ahmedinejad. With those dollars they keep grip on power and start torturing and killing freedom fighters. western government and businesses are happy, Mullahs and Ayatollahs are happy. BBC and other media makes some noise and making some programs and do interview the next keen of hanged and stoned people. in return they get some extra funding. and life goes on....Let's pretend everything is O.K. and sing... What a wonderful world....

  • Comment number 3.

    So it looks like Iran was the big target all along.Jane Corbin's "I can't go to Iran...But..."piece was limp,crass and amature.If she was doing a programme on alcholism,she would go straight to the bottle bank for filler material.

  • Comment number 4.

    Young British people call for regime change.An English man with a catapult stands defiantly outside Buck House with a finger pointed defiantly towards God.Should the East send in Bombers to aid this slightly miffed Brit?

 

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