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Calm down dear - a phrase worth repeating?

Michael Crick | 16:11 UK time, Wednesday, 27 April 2011

A prediction. After David Cameron's advice during Prime Minister's Questions (PMQs) to the Labour front-bench MP Angela Eagle, to "calm down, dear", I reckon it's a phrase we'll be hearing again. And rather a lot.

Indeed, I suspect we'll be hearing it from Ed Miliband's lips pretty soon - the next time David Cameron raises his voice at PMQs. Which will probably be next week.

If I were Cameron at PMQs next week I'd think of some way of getting the phrase in first - something along the lines of "However, Mr Speaker, I mustn't get too excited. I must calm down dear."

I'll leave the precise wording up to them.

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    IT'S ONLY DAVE SHOWING HIS INHERANT TOFF-NASTINESS AGAIN

    Dave can, and will, go on like this, and the light will slowly dawn:

    WE HAVE GOT OURSELVES ANOTHER ONE.

  • Comment number 2.

    The theory on these threads seem to be volume compensates for quality, which may not be strictly the case.

    'I suspect we'll be hearing it from Ed Miliband's lips pretty soon'

    Was this via a 'source'?

    If so, such a rehash would likely conjure in the minds of those of us less concerned with the 'are too, am not' world of petty playground politics an even lower opinion than has been managed already.

    Though I am sure the WUVI gallery is all atremble.

  • Comment number 3.

    #1 - had Angela Eagle not been shouting out when the PM was speaking he wouldn't have had to say anything. Rudeness was rewarded with rudeness. All politicians behave badly - PMQs is testament to that.

    Before any Labour supporters make this a class thing, lets not forget that Brown smiled at and shook the hand of a Labour supporter for the TV cameras then called her a bigot when he thought he was out of earshot.

    They are all as bad as each other.

 

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