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Unsprung need more wildlife questions, stories, photos and objects

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Jeremy Torrance web producer Jeremy Torrance web producer | 14:29 UK time, Friday, 3 June 2011

With one Springwatch Unsprung down and two left to go the team are still keen to get more of your fantastic stories, questions and images ready for the next show.

Here's a personal message from The Unsprung team.


Unsprung inbox

The Unsprung inbox is precariously close to another very important box in the office.
We definitely don't want the contents mixing!

Hi everyone,

We are LOVING the energy and excitement with which you’ve been sending in your letters, comments, ideas, objects, poo, bones, feathers and things!

We’ve got so many ideas flying around that we can barely move for Martin’s notes covering our desks; Level-headed Joe’s working flat out to keep them in order.

But the thing is, we want more! More questions, more stories, more mail that we have to lather ourselves in antibacterial handwash after opening!

You can send us your questions and stories for Unsprung by commenting below on this blog post, add your photos to the Photo group and here is an address for "things": BBC Springwatch, Broadcasting House, Whiteladies Road, Bristol BS8 2LR.

If you missed last week's Unsprung, you can watch it again on iPlayer.

Update 7 June: how to tell the difference between a bee and a wasp, when is it too late for a wren to lay eggs, and how to make your cat wildlife-friendly... Find the answers to these and more here.

Comments

Page 2 of 12

  • Comment number 101.

    Dear Springwatch,
    I was out for a walk on Sat afternoon in the Pewsey Vale and came across this wonderful badger:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/dpbilverstone/5799636643/in/pool-bbcspringwatch

    It was about 15:00 and I was lucky to approach it from down wind. The wind was very strong, masking my presence, and I eventually got to within a few feet of it, spending about 15 mins watching it in awe!!

    My question is what was it doing, out and about at that time of the day??? It seemed to spend the entire time listening and snuffling for worms - could it be a hunger problem because of the spate of dry conditions?? I look forward to your response and keep up the good work with such a wonderful program - Britains genuine talent!!

  • Comment number 102.

    Dear all, really enjoying the show and, as a Welshman, especially its current location!!
    I have just put together the following article for our local paper and website and thought it may be of interest to the springwatch team and viewers. I have some pictures of the chick, but being technologically challenged not sure of the best way to get them to you!

    Best wishes, Richard Jones, Cheshire.

    "Orphaned Welsh peregrine given second chance in Scotland!

    A wild injured peregrine falcon chick was taken into the vets at the end of May by Gary Dickenson of North Wales Raptor Rescue after sustaining a wound to its back. The chick was found by climbers in North Wales being attacked by crows at the base of a cliff. Vet and avid bird watcher Alan Humphreys is use to dealing with such delicate creatures, and after cleaning up the wounds, carefully stitched the paper like skin of this tiny patient. The bird recovered uneventfully from its anaesthetic and was transferred back to Gary for aftercare.
    At this point Avian Veterinary Services in Knutsford were contacted for advice on what to do next. Richard Jones, avian vet and active member of the British falconers club, having spent a number of years at a specialist bird rehabilitation facility in the U.S. knew that its best chance of survivial in the wild was to get it back with its parents as soon as possible. The parent birds as well as providing optimal nutrition for the developing chick, have to actually teach the young falcons to hunt. This they achieve by flying around them, teasing and luring them with food items until they give chase. Eventually after a simulated hunt the food is released from sometimes considerable heights into the waiting talons of the hungry and often initially quite clumsy young falcons!
    Unfortunately in this case when the site was re visited the next day no other youngsters were evident in the scrape (peregrines don’t make a nest, they ‘scrape’ a hollow in the soil/shale on a cliff ledge into which the female lays her eggs) with parents apparently deserted. Young ‘downy’ falcons, in this case approximately 10 days old are particularly vulnerable to extreme weather or predation by corvids (ravens and crows) and given the circumstances in which the bird was found the latter was assumed to be the case.
    Plan B was to try and track down some foster parents.Fortunately falcons can’t count, and if another begging chick ‘mysteriously’ appears in the scrape they will feed it and raise it as their own.%

  • Comment number 103.

    hi from 53vw tthis ones for martin.where are your glasses mate.have you been fitted with contacs .has we all have a laugh about your glasses ...up .down down up has a glasses wearer myself i know its no joke. we bet on how many times there up or down

  • Comment number 104.

    Dear all, really enjoying the show and, as a Welshman, especially its current location!!
    I have just put together the following article for our local paper and website and thought it may be of interest to the springwatch team and viewers. I have some pictures of the chick, but being technologically challenged not sure of the best way to get them to you!

    Best wishes, Richard Jones, Cheshire.

    "Orphaned Welsh peregrine given second chance in Scotland!

    A wild injured peregrine falcon chick was taken into the vets at the end of May by Gary Dickenson of North Wales Raptor Rescue after sustaining a wound to its back. The chick was found by climbers in North Wales being attacked by crows at the base of a cliff. Vet and avid bird watcher Alan Humphreys is use to dealing with such delicate creatures, and after cleaning up the wounds, carefully stitched the paper like skin of this tiny patient. The bird recovered uneventfully from its anaesthetic and was transferred back to Gary for aftercare.
    At this point Avian Veterinary Services in Knutsford were contacted for advice on what to do next. Richard Jones, avian vet and active member of the British falconers club, having spent a number of years at a specialist bird rehabilitation facility in the U.S. knew that its best chance of survival in the wild was to get it back with its parents as soon as possible. The parent birds as well as providing optimal nutrition for the developing chick, have to actually teach the young falcons to hunt. This they achieve by flying around them, teasing and luring them with food items until they give chase. Eventually after a simulated hunt the food is released from sometimes considerable heights into the waiting talons of the hungry and often initially quite clumsy young falcons!
    Unfortunately in this case when the site was re visited the next day no other youngsters were evident in the scrape (peregrines don’t make a nest, they ‘scrape’ a hollow in the soil/shale on a cliff ledge into which the female lays her eggs) with parents apparently deserted. Young ‘downy’ falcons, in this case approximately 10 days old are particularly vulnerable to extreme weather or predation by corvids (ravens and crows) and given the circumstances in which the bird was found the latter was assumed to be the case.
    Plan B was to try and track down some foster parents. Fortunately falcons can’t count, and if another begging chick ‘mysteriously’ appears in the scrape they will feed it and raise it as their own.%

  • Comment number 105.

    Hi Team!
    I've been on holiday in the highlands this week with my parents. We've seen so much: golden eagles, otters, nesting sea eagles, black throated divers with chicks and eider ducks. And on the morning we left we saw a pine marten! It was just running down the side of the road in broad daylight. We drove past and then turned the engine off and it came right up to the car and ran under it carrying on down the road before bounding into the forest. We'd been watching springwatch and from seeing the piece on pine martens visiting a b&b in the middle of the night we felt very lucky to have seen this one. I managed to take a quick picture through the window:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/63704654@N03/

  • Comment number 106.

    On a day trip to the Lake District on Friday 3/6/11 we heard our first cuckoo this year (and first for several years) calling strongly and at great length. How late in the year do cuckoos call in the UK?

  • Comment number 107.

    Much is being made of the young herons' punky hairdos. How about this skinhead blackbird, seen in our garden last year. http://www.flickr.com/photos/weirdcrank/4896854711/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/weirdcrank/4976882751

  • Comment number 108.

    Hi Team!
    I've been on holiday in the highlands this week with my parents. We've seen so much: golden eagles, otters, nesting sea eagles, black throated divers with chicks and eider ducks. And on the morning we left we saw a pine marten! It was just running down the side of the road in broad daylight. We drove past and then turned the engine off and it came right up to the car and ran under it carrying on down the road before bounding into the forest. We'd been watching springwatch and from seeing the piece on pine martens visiting a b&b in the middle of the night we felt very lucky to have seen this one. I managed to take a quick picture through the window:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/63704654@N03/

  • Comment number 109.

    In France at moment and have heard many cuckoos from campsite. Have never been able to see a cuckoo. How do we do this. Thanking you. FAb programme.

  • Comment number 110.

    I have recently moved to North Wales. The house is a coastal property and have noticed that the house martins hane begun to build thier nests. On my house which has a weathershield paint, I have noticed that the Martins are unable to stick the mud to the building. I believe this may be due to the paint being water repelant. Would you agree? If this is the case could the popularity of such paint be a contributary cause to the decline of the House Martins?

    As an emergency measure I have just purchased two custom built House Martin nests in the hope that they will be of use.

  • Comment number 111.

    Dear Springwatch,
    I often hear blackbirds and sometimes robins make a high-pitched whistling sound and I just wondered if you could tell me what it means? I have heard it all year round (blackbirds especially at the moment) at any time of day. I've taken a video clip to show what I mean (if it works!):
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/63663404@N05/5799841113/in/photostream
    Many thanks!

  • Comment number 112.

    Dear all, really enjoying the show and, as a Welshman, especially its current location!!
    I have just put together the following article for our local paper and website and thought it may be of interest to the springwatch team and viewers. I have some pictures of the chick, but being technologically challenged not sure of the best way to get them to you!

    Best wishes, Richard Jones, Cheshire.

    "Orphaned Welsh peregrine given second chance in Scotland!

    A wild injured peregrine falcon chick was taken into the vets at the end of May by Gary Dickenson of North Wales Raptor Rescue after sustaining a wound to its back. The chick was found by climbers in North Wales being attacked by crows at the base of a cliff. Vet and avid bird watcher Alan Humphreys is use to dealing with such delicate creatures, and after cleaning up the wounds, carefully stitched the paper like skin of this tiny patient. The bird recovered uneventfully from its anaesthetic and was transferred back to Gary for aftercare.
    At this point Avian Veterinary Services in Knutsford were contacted for advice on what to do next. Richard Jones, avian vet and active member of the British falconers club, having spent a number of years at a specialist bird rehabilitation facility in the U.S. knew that its best chance of survival in the wild was to get it back with its parents as soon as possible. The parent birds as well as providing optimal nutrition for the developing chick, have to actually teach the young falcons to hunt. This they achieve by flying around them, teasing and luring them with food items until they give chase. Eventually after a simulated hunt the food is released from sometimes considerable heights into the waiting talons of the hungry and often initially quite clumsy young falcons!
    Unfortunately in this case when the site was re visited the next day no other youngsters were evident in the scrape (peregrines don’t make a nest, they ‘scrape’ a hollow in the soil/shale on a cliff ledge into which the female lays her eggs) with parents apparently deserted. Young ‘downy’ falcons, in this case approximately 10 days old are particularly vulnerable to extreme weather or predation by corvids (ravens and crows) and given the circumstances in which the bird was found the latter was assumed to be the case.
    Plan B was to try and track down some foster parents. Fortunately falcons can’t count, and if another begging chick ‘mysteriously’ appears in the scrape they will feed it and raise it as their%2

  • Comment number 113.

    Dear Springwatch
    I often hear blackbirds and sometimes robins making a high-pitched whistle - I just wondered if you could please tell me what this means? I hear it all year round, and at any time of day. I have recorded a video to show you what I mean (if it works!)
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/63663404@N05/5799841113/
    Many thanks! Thank you also for a really enjoyable first week of the show.

  • Comment number 114.

    am i doing a disservice to birds by feeding them sunflower hearts? they really go for them, but as i put whole sunflower seeds in another feeder they are no means as popular, so do the parent birds show their young how to remove the husk to get at the seed, or will we have birds that cannot feed from sunflowers in the autumn.
    Love your show

    KEN

  • Comment number 115.

    Hi Guys, I was at a friends house in West Dereham in Norfolk on Friday when we were buzzed by a huge wasp like creature, we think we have identified it as an Asian Hornet. We would like to know a little bit more about them and why they are so far from home! Thank you.

    Necky123

  • Comment number 116.

    Hi Team,

    Congratulations on continuing to turn out a varied and fascinating show.
    I'd like your thoughts on what could be living beneath my lawn - last autumn I noticed five small holes approximately 25-37mm in diameter in the lawn. At the latest count there are 26 holes! Many of the holes are in "pairs" i.e. two quite close together. They are all on one side of the lawn and seem to be in the region of an old mole tunnel. This afternoon my wife discovered a similar hole in one of our heather borders. I do not mind the lawn beginning to resemble a sieve, but would like to know if the residents are something to be encouraged or removed.
    I will try to attach some photos on flickr but am not the most PC literate person on the planet so may have some difficulty!
    We live in a house with a large garden in Kelso (Scottish Borders).
    Any thoughts?

  • Comment number 117.

    Hi Team!
    I've been on holiday in the highlands this week with my parents. We've seen so much: golden eagles, otters, nesting sea eagles, black throated divers with chicks and eider ducks. And on the morning we left we saw a pine marten! It was just running down the side of the road in broad daylight. We drove past and then turned the engine off and it came right up to the car and ran under it carrying on down the road before bounding into the forest. We'd been watching springwatch and from seeing the piece on pine martens visiting a b&b in the middle of the night we felt very lucky to have seen this one. I managed to take a quick picture through the window:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/63704654@N03/

  • Comment number 118.

    On a day trip to the Lake District on Friday 3/6/11 we heard our first cuckoo this year (and first for several years) calling strongly and at great length. How late in the year do cuckoos call in the UK?

  • Comment number 119.

    Hi all, our 5 year old son James would like to know where butterflies sleep at night. It would be great if you could tell him. ta!

  • Comment number 120.

    My Mum lives in Didcot, not the most rural of places and each evening (and especially after having a sunday roast) they throw the carcasses of meat onto there summer house in the garden and up to 10 pairs of Kites turn up for dinner. They swoop so low and fly very close its amazing. They never land, just swoop and its fab how unphased they are by people sitting in the garden watching them.

    I'm unsure where they nest though as its a reasonably built up area. I'm unsure if Kites travel far from where the enst or stay relatively close.

  • Comment number 121.

    Hi Team,
    I recently moved to Brighton and was sad at losing my garden and bird life[I have a kind of 'yard' here] only to find a nesting pair of blackbirds in the ivy at the top of the back wall. Sadly the male has disappeared and I think got by the local cat[its gone for 5 days] that they were being terrorised by.
    The female is makiing a verry mournful[and no,Chris, Im not giving her emotion..] cry that is similar to the frantic hi pitched noise they make but , well, mornful[really!] and not frantic but with long gaps in between the cries. My question is will she be able to raise any eggs/young by herself or will she have to wait and find another male?
    P.S I also have a birds eye view of a pair of seagulls nesting in the opposite chimney pots-successfully raising two chicks-which are very entertaining and surprisingly animated and dare I say it- quite playful.

  • Comment number 122.

    Hi Martin, and all. I have been having a slight problem with my horse manure, which I put around my Rose trees. Something has been stealing the large lumps of it.(Chris might like this tale). This has been going on for a about 6-8 weeks. Well....... the other night I found the culprit. I was taking the rubbish out last Tuesday night about 11 o'clock when I heard this strange grunting sound. Then blow me down a large hedge hog was carrying a blob this horse poo, and dragging around the back of my patio. I have had problems with a hedgehog pinching my partners smelly socks some years ago. By gum did they wiff. But, horse poo???? Why. If you would like the low down on the sock thief, I will gladly reveal all. Just ask. It's very funny. But could Chris answer the 'poo nicking thief question please'. Thanks all. Great show :)

  • Comment number 123.

    Hi Team
    I have a question about a seagull. Earlier today I heard a banging noise on my roof and when I looked a huge Seagull was on the roof eating a dead Blackbird. He jumped away when he saw me and then took off with the dead bird.
    I was a bit surprised to see a Seagull eating a bird. I've only ever seen them eat chips and scraps! Did this Seagull kill the bird and is this normal?
    Thank you
    Deborah

  • Comment number 124.

    We have red berries on our Holly bush already,(first week of June).
    Is this normal? I've never noticed it before.

  • Comment number 125.

    Hi All, just thought you might like to see this footage shot yesterday of a female Green Woodpecker feeding one of its nestlings at the nest hole. I also filmed the male feeding them, and one of the fledglings catching flies at the entrance.

    http://vimeo.com/24674127

    A real privilege to get a glimpse in the life of this beautiful illusive woodland bird. Best Wishes - Pete

  • Comment number 126.

    Dear all, really enjoying the show and, as a Welshman, especially its current location!!
    I have just put together the following article for our local paper and website and thought it may be of interest to the springwatch team and viewers. I have some pictures of the chick, but being technologically challenged not sure of the best way to get them to you!

    Best wishes, Richard Jones, Cheshire.

    "Orphaned Welsh peregrine given second chance in Scotland!

    A wild injured peregrine falcon chick was taken into the vets at the end of May by Gary Dickenson of North Wales Raptor Rescue after sustaining a wound to its back. The chick was found by climbers in North Wales being attacked by crows at the base of a cliff. Vet and avid bird watcher Alan Humphreys is use to dealing with such delicate creatures, and after cleaning up the wounds, carefully stitched the paper like skin of this tiny patient. The bird recovered uneventfully from its anaesthetic and was transferred back to Gary for aftercare.
    At this point Avian Veterinary Services in Knutsford were contacted for advice on what to do next. Richard Jones, avian vet and active member of the British falconers club, having spent a number of years at a specialist bird rehabilitation facility in the U.S. knew that its best chance of survival in the wild was to get it back with its parents as soon as possible. The parent birds as well as providing optimal nutrition for the developing chick, have to actually teach the young falcons to hunt. This they achieve by flying around them, teasing and luring them with food items until they give chase. Eventually after a simulated hunt the food is released from sometimes considerable heights into the waiting talons of the hungry and often initially quite clumsy young falcons!
    Unfortunately in this case when the site was re visited the next day no other youngsters were evident in the scrape (peregrines don’t make a nest, they ‘scrape’ a hollow in the soil/shale on a cliff ledge into which the female lays her eggs) with parents apparently deserted. Young ‘downy’ falcons, in this case approximately 10 days old are particularly vulnerable to extreme weather or predation by corvids (ravens and crows) and given the circumstances in which the bird was found the latter was assumed to be the case.
    Plan B was to try and track down some foster parents. Fortunately falcons can’t count, and if another begging chick ‘mysteriously’ appears in the scrape they will feed it and raise it as their own.

  • Comment number 127.

    Hi Chris,
    I've noticed that small birds completely close their wings periodically when flying. Is this a raptor defence mechanism or is there another reason for this behaviour. I have a (poor) photo to illustrate this but you can't attach photo's here.

  • Comment number 128.

    Dear all,

    Sincere apologies that I have appeared to have posted the same story about the peregrine chick multiple times.I didnt realize it was going through and actually have also managed to miss out the ending! I said I was technologically challenged, Sorry!!

    Anyway this is the second half and I promise I will say this only once!!

    .............Plan B was to try and track down some foster parents. Fortunately falcons can’t count, and if another begging chick ‘mysteriously’ appears in the scrape they will feed it and raise it as their own. It is crucial that the chicks are roughly the same age and size and that the parents do not already have a full clutch of 4 or rarely 5 to deal with. After numerous phone calls to fellow falconers, birdwatchers and various wildlife agencies Richard was finally put through to James Leonard of the RSPB who has the enviable job of monitoring wild peregrines up and down the country. Thankfully James knew a number of possible sites and so begun a transport relay team involving 3 people and over 300 miles, taking the chick from North Wales, via a pit stop in Knutsford to its destination site in Scotland. Thankfully because of the quick action and cooperation of all involved the bird has settled into his new family and fingers crossed will fledge with its adopted brothers and sisters in July!"

  • Comment number 129.

    We run a wildlife hospital in north London and are currently receiving a high number of crow and magpie fledglings, all fit and well ,it means they are taking up space that we could use for birds that really need help.Can spring watch help to get the message out to leave fledglings alone ,and in the case of crows ,where people think that the young are adult birds that can't fly

  • Comment number 130.

    Hi all - loving the show as always. I have a question. I took my children for a walk through the local countryside and when we arrived back around 2pm, there was a hedgehog in the back garden looking totally lost and distraught! I immediatly rang the RSPCA helpline to ask advice as to what to do with it - it was obviously distressed and very twitchy. They asked if I could confine it to a box and take it to my local vet which I did.
    I explained to the vet that I had found this hedgehog and had just been on the phone to the RSPCA and they told me to take it to her. She was brilliant and took it without question. However, when she opened the box, the hedgehog had a maggot coming out of it's left eye! The vet saw that I had my very young children with me and said that it 'didn't look too good' - meaning she was going to put it to sleep. I didn't ask her diagnosis with the kids being with me but have been wondering what was wrong with it and is this a common complaint with hedgehogs?

    PS I've watched every series of Springwatch and Autumnwatch and think that Chris, Kate and Martin are fantastic!

  • Comment number 131.

    Hi, we are confused !! We noticed this week that our bird box (which normally houses a family of blue tits) was being occupied by bumble bees. This morning we were alarmed by a "knocking" noise, this continued for about five minutes so my husband went outside to investigate...to his amazement there was a woodpecker "knocking" at the bird box hole. Obviously it flew off when it was disturbed. After a day out, we returned home and immediately went to look at the bird box, thinking it would be demolished !! The hole was a lot bigger but what shocked us more than anything was there was a lot of dead bees on the ground. Was the woodpecker after the bees? Trying to nest? What? and also Why so many dead bees? Is it the case of 'one sting' and then die? We would be grateful for any reply !!

  • Comment number 132.

    Hi went to Bridlington 3/6/11 to 5/6/11 for a break with the wife and 6yr old lad, who was also very interested in the trips we went on. We went on the Yorkshire Bell Boat trip from Bridlington Harbour, around Flamborough Head, and on to the bottom cliffs of the R.S.P.B Reserve at Brempton. Fantastic tip, they gave a us good information about the wildlife in and around the cliffs. We where that impressed we went and visisted the R.S.P.B the next day at Brempton, got some very good photo's of Puffins,Gannet's,Guillemots,and Razorbill. And also a Linnet, Reed Bunting, this has now increased my interest in wildlife even more. It is a really good place to visit and they do guided tours with expert R.S.P.B. members.

  • Comment number 133.

    As I was letting my dog out in the garden around 6pm today I noticed a huge crow on our low garden fence, it tried to fly away but could only flap one wing, fell off the fence onto the ground and hobbled up our garden and sat behind the shed. It was obvious it was injured and because we have 2 dogs and a cat and we have alot of other cats and foxes in our area I was concerned about what would happen to it if we left it. We phoned the RSPCA who weren't interested at all, they said that they didn't have anyone who could come and get it and to leave it where it was and that they would phone in the morning. We looked on the internet for anywhere else locally that we could contact to come and get it. Nowhere was open or could take it and so we phoned the RSPCA back and told them we had tried local rescue centres and that they couldn't take it in. The RSPCA then asked if we knew anyone who had parrots or birds and to ask them if they could pick it up so we could put it in a box or pet carrier, fortunately our neighbour has parrots and so they came and picked it up, checked it over and put it in a pet carrier that we had. It had a bad wound to its wing which was clearly infected, the crow was weak and didn't struggle when handled. We still didn't know what to do with it and didn't want it left on it's own all night in the garage in a pet carrier in the state that it was in as we felt that was cruel. In the end we managed to contact a local 24 hour vets surgery who said that they would take it and treat if if they could. We took it to the vets and unfortunatley they put it to sleep as its wing was so infected and damaged.
    I feel quite angry at the RSPCA as they're supposed to care about wild animals and yet they were happy for us to leave it in our garden on the ground all night, injured, stressed and unable to defend itself against predators. I thought thats what the RSPCA are for, to help when an animal is in trouble. Obviously not.

  • Comment number 134.

    Hi all!

    I took my children for a walk round the local park and nature reserve on Friday. When we got back home around 2pm, we found a hedgehog in the back garden looking totally disorientated and in discomfort. I rang the RSPCA helpline to ask advice and they asked me to confine it to a box and take it to my local vet.

    I did this and the vet was brilliant, she took it without question however, when she opened the box, there was a maggot coming out of it's left eye! The vet said 'leave it with me and thanks for helping it'.

    I was wondering, what was the cause of this and is it a common hedgehog problem? I couldn't ask he vet as she had a big queue and didn't want to ask in case the answer was something that would have upset the kids.

    PS Chris, Kate and Martin - you are all fantastic and I've never missed an episode of Springwatch or Autumwatch!

  • Comment number 135.

    Garden holes, big and little.
    I have had bees using a little hole in my grass path for a couple of years now, they go in and out about every 5 to 10 secs and it is a buried hive of activity. I wondered if it is usual for them to keep using the same place, how big the underground hive might be and if there is any chance of the path collapsing as it is a main garden thoroughfare? The mower rattles their antennae but only deters them for a minute or so!
    Hole number 2 is much larger and getting bigger due to animals unknown. I have assumed this is an occasional fox residence as I have seen a visiting fox lower down the garden and have had 2 egg shells left on the lawn last winter. This hole is next to an old tree stump, it extends in 2 directions one side going under some slabs but there is no excavation mess anywhere and I have never seen a fox near it. It is definitely in use by something at the moment as the entrance is clearly well used. (Spiders webs spread across the entrance last Autumn for a while). There are lots of my neighbours cats around and yesterday I'm sure one come out of this hole. Do cats ever go down holes like this? Is it still most likely to be a fox hole? Is there anything else that could have made it? (Fully walled garden means no access for badgers but foxes can get over the top).
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/teach2bgreen/

  • Comment number 136.

    Hi Martin and team,

    We have a badger visiting our wildlife patch! He/she comes every nitght at 9.30 and seems to be foraging just under our bird table. We can't work out what he is eating as all that is left there are the seed husks from the birds and in the morning we can find no evidence of digging, any ideas?

    We also have noticed this seems a very large badger and we were wondering if he was a she that could be pregnent? Or is it too late in the year?

    Thanks!

  • Comment number 137.

    It was a breath of fresh air to hear Charlie remark that a beaver was about 30 yards from him. That was a language I, and thousands of others my age (76) can understand. It is alright Chris quoting kilometers and meters and I know it is progress but please, please humour your aging population. I knew instantly how far 30 yards was. 30 meters has to be worked out and it spoils the show having to do so. Do you think, for the benefit of your elderly following, you could give it in both and let us totally enjoy. Other than that, your show is terrific.


  • Comment number 138.

    Hi Team,

    There was a discussion on one of the shows this week about magpies possibly disrupting the little birds.

    Has anyone else noticed and felt a bit concerned about the increase of corvids in general, worldwide. I grew up in South Africa, and ten or twelve years ago I noticed a definite increase in the number of pied crows in and around our town - and a decrease in the smaller birds.

    As far as I can tell from a little internet research most of the crow family are growing in number all around the world - yeah I know, not South America! ;-)

    Why is this? If local studies show that magpies are influencing other birds' numbers, could that be extrapolated to say that corvids generally are the cause of the decline of smaller birds?

    Scary thought! Thanks for the great show.

  • Comment number 139.

    Hi Team,

    Thanks for the great show. Love the diversity of the new location.

    I'm sure this question gets asked a lot: How does one tell the difference between a wasp and a bee?

    There is a little critter that is gnawing at my fence, and I'd like to know more about him (or her). What is he, and why is he stripping the wood?

    Not the greatest photo, but please look here to see the creature in action:
    http://flic.kr/p/9QFGjj

    Thanks

  • Comment number 140.

    Albino hedgehog visited us tonight at around 8.30pm, as soon as he was spotted in the garden we all went out to see him up close before he disappeared, we took some photos and some video, we gave him some water and found him some slugs which he ate happily in front of us, we sat with him for about half an hour before he decided it was time to get going, the children were so excited, we are all hoping to see him again soon. OX12 area.

  • Comment number 141.

    Hi team why do male killer whales (orca) have bigger dorsel fins than the females?

  • Comment number 142.

    Hi - advice please
    I live in a small terrace house in a fairly built up area in Whitehaven cumbria. I am overlooking the sea with a very small hill to the back of the property. It has an extremely small back yard which has a single patio door opening on to it from the sitting room. There is decking balcony on 1st floor which overhangs over the patio door with a rain catch pipe directly below it.
    Every year I hang a couple of feeders in the yard and love watching the birds - but I only seem to get sparrows, brown finches & blackbirds. However this year I noted 2 swifts. The other morning I had the patio door open and one of them was EXTREMELY verbal - I thought it was just waiting for the feeders to be filled - which I did & I noticed they were back & forth throughout the day - but the food wasn't touched!!!! Eventually I hid but watched them & noticed them sitting on the drain pipe under the decking overhang. That night they stayed there all night and every night since - they are completely ADORABLE & now obviously must trust me because the allow me to watch & move around, put light on etc without getting noisy or panicked they are about a foot away from the window. I've looked and there's no nest or eggs there, but their behavior makes me think they are a pair & they are guarding this area.
    Can you please advice me, are they still laying eggs & if so should I shoo them because they've picked an extremely inappropriate site. I have blocked the part of the pipe thats open to the rain with plastic bottles & packed plastic bags around it, but rain & winds are brutally here sometimes so don't know how much of a difference that will make. Or could they just have chosen this area because it's a good place to shelter & be fairly protected from the elements in order to have a decent kip each night???????
    I feel extremely privileged they have given me this honour to be allowed to watch them so close up, but I would be mortified if they had babies and got washed away into the downpipe attached.
    Thanks for your time - please advice.
    Dorothy

  • Comment number 143.

    Hi - advice please
    I live in a small terrace house in a fairly built up area in Whitehaven cumbria. I am overlooking the sea with a very small hill to the back of the property. It has an extremely small back yard which has a single patio door opening on to it from the sitting room. There is decking balcony on 1st floor which overhangs over the patio door with a rain catch pipe directly below it.
    Every year I hang a couple of feeders in the yard and love watching the birds - but I only seem to get sparrows, brown finches & blackbirds. However this year I noted 2 swifts. The other morning I had the patio door open and one of them was EXTREMELY verbal - I thought it was just waiting for the feeders to be filled - which I did & I noticed they were back & forth throughout the day - but the food wasn't touched!!!! Eventually I hid but watched them & noticed them sitting on the drain pipe under the decking overhang. That night they stayed there all night and every night since - they are completely ADORABLE & now obviously must trust me because the allow me to watch & move around, put light on etc without getting noisy or panicked they are about a foot away from the window. I've looked and there's no nest or eggs there, but their behavior makes me think they are a pair & they are guarding this area.
    Can you please advice me, are they still laying eggs & if so should I shoo them because they've picked an extremely inappropriate site. I have blocked the part of the pipe thats open to the rain with plastic bottles & packed plastic bags around it, but rain & winds are brutally here sometimes so don't know how much of a difference that will make. Or could they just have chosen this area because it's a good place to shelter & be fairly protected from the elements in order to have a decent kip each night???????
    I feel extremely privileged they have given me this honour to be allowed to watch them so close up, but I would be mortified if they had babies and got washed away into the downpipe attached.
    Thanks for your time - please advice.
    Dorothy

  • Comment number 144.

    Hi Springwatch team

    We have some bees taken up residence in a blue tit nest box. I am intrigued to know what kind of bees, also what kind of structure they will have build inside, plus will there be honey?
    Are they likely to hibernate in the nest box?

  • Comment number 145.

    Asked this question on message boards but haven't received an answer so it was either a completely dumb question or a very difficult question- perhaps you can help. How do nestlings (I was thinking of the hot barn owl chicks) keep from becoming dehydrated? Are they getting enough liquid from raw flesh of voles etc? I was thirsty just watching them panting away in the heat of their nest!!
    Love Unsprung, love Springwatch

  • Comment number 146.

    Hi. I have noticed over the past few days that the adult sparrows are feeding their young torn off pieces of flowers. They seem to particularly like the Campanula flowers. Is it usual for them to do this?
    I look forward to your reply. Many thanks.

  • Comment number 147.

    At last I can proove our story for the team, we have photgraphes of the chicks in there makshift nest, all doing well.

    Victoria Vizard 14yrs

  • Comment number 148.

    Hi ,
    Love watching Springwatch . However , can you tell me why the need for the owl last week to fly through the arms of Chris and Kate . It clearly did not wish to do so and could not get its wings through properly . Seemed to be more about entertainment than welfare ?

  • Comment number 149.

    I have a question relating to Raptor clutch size and fledgling survival rates.
    Apologies if this has been asked before but don't have energy to check through all the previous posts :-)

    Has a comparative study ever been done to compare the survival rates of single chicks (eg Buzzard on Webcam) and those from larger broods say three or four.
    Obviously if there are four chicks there would be less food to go around, the parents would have to work much harder, there is always a runt chick which seems to get left behind and growth rates must be slower for all.
    A single chick as in this case gets all the food, full protection from parent in poor weather, and grows fast and strong so increasing its chances of survival.

    If all a pair has to do during its lifetime is produce two surviving offspring to replace themselves then I wonder why natural selection hasn't lead to more BoP laying just one egg ??

  • Comment number 150.

    15 fat seals on holiday-walk!
    Spotted 15 fat seals on a walk from Fishguard to Strumble head, in the sheltered bay of Aber Felin! Also listened to the sound they make, amazing! (sunday 29th of May).
    I had a fantastic holiday in Wales, and I especially enjoyed my trip to Skomer, what a magical place! Really looking forward to the show tonight, thanks you all, for refreshing my happy memories and for adding more information about this beautiful part of the world!
    Hanne from Holland.

  • Comment number 151.

    Hi Martin & all the team!
    We recently had a pair of nesting bluetits in our box who seemed to be doing fine-
    then one of the pair (i imagine the male?) became obsessed with looking at himself in the ornamental mirrored window on our wall - thinking that he may have thought he'd found another perfect mate,we took the window down only to find him constantly hanging on a steel suncatcher nearby ,once again looking at himself!
    A couple of weeks later,after returning from holiday, we noticed that neither birds were visiting the box so we checked inside and found the female(we presume)sitting tightly on a clutch of 6 eggs,but sadly dead,obviously abandoned by her mate - is this normal behaviour and should we ideally take any mirrored ornaments down during the breeding season?
    Brilliant show by the -love it!

  • Comment number 152.

    We have been incredibly entertained this year through our wireless RSPB camera bird box. We had a family of Blue Tits who had a 9 egg clutch, 7 hatched & 5 fledged. Although incredibly cute & fascinating we never realised there is such sibling rivalry & the bully boy tactics employed to grab the parents food offerings. A few questions have arisen: -
    1. There was plenty of room in the nest at night (especially before hatching), so why doesn't the male sleep in the nest at night & where does he go?
    2. Why don't the parents realise they are feeding the bigger ones all the time at the expense of the smaller weaker ones - the difference in size is surely noticeable to them?
    3. The two little ones that lost out on the food & died in the nest box, should we remove them? They will obviously disintegrate but will birds nest in there if we haven't removed the evidence of the dead ones - or will they clean that out themselves when the skeletons are light enough to throw out?
    Please do encourage people to get their own camera nest boxes, it has been the highlight of our year - addictive but brilliant.
    Thanks in anticipation of learning your views on the questions above.
    Jacci

  • Comment number 153.

    Dear Springwatch team. I have a question: I have starlings in my garden and have found that the youngsters seem to stick together like lambs do in sheep flocks when they have their mad hour together in the afternoon. Do starlings, which also flock do the same to learn how to be part of the big groups?

    Kind regards

  • Comment number 154.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/66339356@N00/5757782895/in/pool-bbcspringwatch/

    Could you please tell me whether this fox has mange or is just moulting?

  • Comment number 155.

    we have black squirrels living locally My friends upp teh road see them often; I even had one in the garden once, but it was scared off by our local greys, after I'd taken a hurried photo...
    My questions: are these just a variation from the greys (or dare I hope, reds)? And have any studies been done into them? ie when did they appear? what's the current population etc?
    Thanks!
    If I can work out how to attach the photo, I'll do so :)

  • Comment number 156.

    Could you please tell me whether this fox has mange or is just moulting?
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/66339356@N00/5757782895/in/pool-bbcspringwatch/

  • Comment number 157.

    We have black squirrels living near us. My friends up the road see them often; I even had one in the garden once, but it was scared off by our local greys.

    Anyway, my questions: are these just a variation from the greys (or dare I hope, reds)? And have any studies been done into them? ie when did they appear? What's the current population? etc

    Thanks!

  • Comment number 158.

    Hi Guys,
    Due to the unqiue way the BBC is funded (ha ha), I have fallen in love with British nature thanks to great shows like yours. My question is to everyone really, where do you start in getting to know nature? There's so many different animals, species, etc how do you getting to remembering and recognise all of our animals?

  • Comment number 159.

    I would like to know if the team think this fox is moulting or if it has mange?
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/66339356@N00/5757782895/in/pool-bbcspringwatch/

  • Comment number 160.

    Hi gang. I have a question about Swallow behaviour. I have a pair of swallows coming chattering in and out of my barn and sit on the barn owl box, they fly about a bit and then leave. They have a large saucer of mud in case they want to build a nest and they have picked up a few beakfulls and thrown it on the beams. There is no other evidence of nest building. They flew away for a week and are now back doing the same thing. Could they be an inexperienced pair or is there hope that they may still nest. I live in the Lincolnshire countryside surrounded by crop fields.

  • Comment number 161.

    My husband noticed quite a lot of flapping outside our living room window. He saw a male backbird "leaping" up the Mahonia bush, grabbing the little black berries and feeding them to two young chicks on the ground. Although I do know that blackbirds like fruit, I always presumed that they would feed their chicks with insects. Is this unusual behaviour?

  • Comment number 162.

    Hey Springwatch team!

    Here's a link to some images i posted on Flickr, if you get a chance please have a look.

    Thanks,

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/lvw_photography/

  • Comment number 163.

    Please could you tell me do Swans eat goslings and ducklings, with reference to a photo that appeared in the papers last week as per the following:

    www.dailymail.co.uk/.../Birdnap-The-shocking-moment-swan-tries-steal-gosling-right-mothers-beak.html

    Thank you



  • Comment number 164.

    Hello unsprung,
    In my Cambridgeshire garden this morning, I saw 2 of the same bird walking up the lawn. I have never seen this bird type before, red/orange beak, white around eyes and chest, with mid. brown flecked wings. In my limited knowledge I could put this down to a type of grouse. They were bigger than the plump pigeons. They were looking in my grass for food and then flew off low over the fence and across the wheat field. What were they doing here? Another thing to say is that Red Kites and Buzzards are now becoming popular here - previously I had to go around Wales for this treat. Great show, glad you are back and glad to see Martin's hair under a bit more control - suits you sir.

  • Comment number 165.

    Hi Springwatch team.

    Please can you advise me if it is to late to move my nest boxes? I have had them attached to my house wall for two years now with no success. Where would be the best place to position them? they are for LBJ's and tits. Other houses along my street have birds nesting in their eaves and under their roofs!!

    Many Thanks

  • Comment number 166.

    Hi. We recently went to Yorkshire and while we were there we hired a rowing boat along the river. Under a bridge we spotted an unsual bird. It had a very vivid yellow tail and back and had a similar wing action to that of a hummingbird. It flew into its nest under the bridge. What bird could this have been? We were amazed to see such a colourful bird by the river. We would really appreciate your help. Thanks.

  • Comment number 167.

    Hello all at springwatch i have very much enjoyed the webcams over the weekend especially the barn owls and the oystercatcher. one question i live in brightlingsea have a small courtyard garden, i have a small bird table but only seem to attract starlings andy ideas to attract other birds? thankyou

    Keep up the excellent work well worth my license fee !!

  • Comment number 168.

    Hi Springwatch we have a Turtle Drove who seems at home in our garden nothing different there you are thinking but as we live on the Isle of Skye it seems to be off course what do you think??

  • Comment number 169.

    Hello Team!

    Has Martin had his eyes lasered or are his notes in bigger print?

  • Comment number 170.

    Hello to all the Springwatch team.
    Yesterday i got woken up by a very loud buzzing. I assumed it was a large bee until i ventured to look between the blinds to find a very big and very scary hornet. Well at least i think it was a giant hornet! It was much too big to be a wasp. Can you tell me if its rare to see these in the midlands?

  • Comment number 171.

    Hi Team
    I have a male and female bullfinch visiting our garden at the moment and am wondering whether they may be nesting nearby - we have a lot of mature trees around the area - could you tell me what sort of nests these birds use please? Do they nest in trees, hedges, ground, etc. They really are quite beautiful birds and don't seem phased at all by my watching them out of the kitchen window as they proceed to feed from the seed feeder.
    Thanks for a great show and look forward to hearing from you in due course.

  • Comment number 172.

    Hi Jeremy,

    Would it be possible to let me have an address where I can send Kate one of my handcrafted glass owls, a bit like this one ~ http://www.flickr.com/photos/23484072@N03/5795870241/in/set-72157626794930630

    [Personal details removed by Moderator]

    Many thanks in advance,

    Loving the new series, especially the birds of prey.

    Clare

    =)

  • Comment number 173.

    Hello all!
    I've found out something about wasps that I thought might interest Chris. I am one of those people who are unexplicably afraid of wasps and as a keen gardener have often wondered if there was a plant which would keep them away from my garden. It turns out I actually needed a plant to attract them, one they loved so much they no longer dive bombed me, and I've found it! I think it is called Marsh Figwort and I noticed it growing last year. I knew it was a wildflower and left it to grow to see what it might attract. It was full of wasps all summer until the last flower died, but the great thing was my daughter and I had no wasps in the house and were not bothered when we were in the garden. We can walk within inches of the wasps on the Figwort and they take no notice of us. It has seeded well and I have a little patch of it now, the plants are at slightly different stages so hopefully this will extend the flowering period and keep us wasp free for longer! :) I also have a question. I am still developing my garden, slowly digging up grass and replacing it with flower borders. I am trying to plant for bees, butterflies, birds and other wildlife, have left a nettle patch for caterpillars and have made a log pile. The small area of grass I am leaving to sit on I am planning to plant with wildflowers, and I want a small patch of soft fruit and veg. I have also planted shrubs and trees for privacy including rowan, hawthorn and buddleia. There are already lots of bees, and holes in the ground which I am hoping are nests, and later last summer we had lots of butterflies, day flying moths and ladybirds. Altogether I have about 110 square metres. My question is how many invertebrates (not including worms) do you think a wildlife garden of this size could support? My daughter really wants to know the answer to this, she has always loved invertebrates and has spent hours, since being a toddler, investigating them. She wants to study ecology eventually and would love to be an entomologist. I know it's a tough question but I have every faith in you all!

  • Comment number 174.

    I have a question for Chris,where do the male birds stay when the female is on her chicks ?

  • Comment number 175.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 176.

    When we were on holiday in South Uist at easter we found some large pellets, the sort of thing an owl coughs up. They were about 3'' long, and grey in colour, no distinctive smell, but made up of fur and bones. One of them had what looked like hedgehog spines in it. We found two or three of these, in different places over the week that we were staying. What bird were they likely to have come from? and do they really eat hedgehogs?

  • Comment number 177.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 178.

    My husband and I moved from Swindon in Wiltshire last October, to Brynamman on the edge of the Brecon Beacons National Park. I feel extremely lucky to be able to sit in my craft room and watch Red Kite soaring above my garden. Also I have seen chaffinch, nuthatch, coal tit, thrush in my garden that I never saw in Swindon. But I have one big problem, how do I keep Jackdaws off my bird feeders? Help, please!

  • Comment number 179.

    on 6/6/2011 ive seen at least one newt tadpole in my pond but it seems as if adult newts are still doing mating display is this normal & does this mean more young will come later .cheers don
    p.s. level headed jo looks hot xxx

  • Comment number 180.

    Dear springwatch. We are lucky enought to have stag beetles in our area. This year there do not seem to be as many and a large number we have found on their backs/ We place them right way up but they seem to want to be on their backs. Any ideas why? I also have a photo you may like to see of a stag beetle

  • Comment number 181.

    Hi Team,

    We have currently a wren nest which is underneath our decking close to our bird feeders.
    Can you give us any advice on what kind of food we can place out to help the young wrens as we have terrible trouble with squirrels eating all the nuts etc on the feeders.

    Thankyou

  • Comment number 182.

    We have posted a picture of a black and red butterfly on your Flickr page, please could you tell us what it is? Thanksx

  • Comment number 183.

    Hi team....absolutely love the programme by the way..fantastic. My question is...a few years ago on Radio 4 there was an article about our native lizards and snakes and that they were in decline. A reason put forward was that is might be due to the introduced pheasant. The theory was that because lizards etc., are 'programmed' to look for predators that fly,they are less likely to see a ground feeding bird. Apparently Norway had looked into this as their indigenous reptiles were declining as well, and had decided to breed less pheasants. I have never heard any more about this and wonder if there is any truth in it? Shan

  • Comment number 184.

    Since late March i have had a bee hive under my decking, they are still busy and I enjoy having them so close

  • Comment number 185.

    Wonderful show this year.Just spent the afternoon watching red kite overhead,blue tits feeding their young morsels from the fat balls and a greater spotted woodpecker hanging off the fat filled coconut.

  • Comment number 186.

    Hi Everyone at Springwatch, I need some advice please. My neighbours have just inherited four cats and they are causing no end of trouble with the birds in my garden. They are regularly killing birds and we have lost quite a few ground feeders. I am happy for people to own cats as they provide company, but it is very upsetting for myself and my young family to repeatedly find dead birds in our garden. It is sad when I feel that I should stop feeding the birds just to keep them safe. Is there anything deterant that works to discourage them? Thanks in advance for your help.

  • Comment number 187.

    Also, our daughter Menoly drew a picture of one of her favourite birds, the Kingfisher. She loves watching Springwatch, she is 9 years old. We can't wait for tonights episode, roll on 8 o'clock!! :-)

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/63502217@N02/5804357805/

  • Comment number 188.

    On Saturday 4th June we heard a lot of noise coming from a sealed-up fireplace in our house and we thought it would be a starling or a pigeon that had fallen down the chimney. We could not easily get it out as it was sealed with plasterboard and papered over, and we were resigned to the fact that it would eventually die. However, after a few hours the noise was getting louder and, with the help of our daughter-in-law, we managed to cut the paper and lift the board up. Imagine our surprise to find a duck!!! A very bewildered fully-grown male mallard looked up at us from his nest of soot and let out a quack! We picked him up and took him outside and he immediately flew off towards the river. I don't know how he managed to get down the chimney as it was quite narrow in places and the duck filled the fireplace.

  • Comment number 189.

    Hi springwatch team. This Common Lizard was inside the building at work today. Any idea why it would come inside? Maybe the colder wet weather drew him in. ]
    [

  • Comment number 190.

    Do Swans eat goslings and ducklings?

    With reference to the pictures that appeared in last newspapers as per the following?

    www.dailymail.co.uk/.../Birdnap-The-shocking-moment-swan-tries-steal- gosling-right-mothers-beak.html

    Thank you

  • Comment number 191.

    Hi springwatch team.
    This Common Lizard was inside our goods-in area at GA Telesis in Ferndown, Dorset today. Any ideas as to why it would come inside? It was cold and wet outside.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisroughley/5805075524/

  • Comment number 192.

    Hi all at Springwatch
    During this past winter we noticed a house sparrow in our back garden that had a very white wing and tail, is this a result of nutrient deficiency? Also a black and white blackbird was also seen, is this common?

  • Comment number 193.

    Hi team, the show is brilliant as ever! I have a question to ask, my husband and I noticed a mass of tadpoles (of various stages of development) trying to "beach" themselves at the edge of a large pond.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/63765597@N03/5804565673/in/pool-1051403@N21/
    I did notice quite a few minnows in the same area and wondered if they had "corralled" them together to feast upon? (Lost Gardens of Heligan 6/6/2011) Any info much appreciated!!!

  • Comment number 194.

    hi team
    i was watching last weeks show on tuesday and wanted to help with the hedgehogs. unfortunately, we have pet rabbits running around our garden so we cant cut a hole in our wall(apart from anything else, its brick!). we'd all like to help though, so what can we do instead?????
    thanks
    juliet

  • Comment number 195.

    Hi Team,
    I have a question about magpies: might they attack a small tortoise? This time of year our little Hermanns tortoise (Harry) is usually in his outdoor pen. However, we have recently had quite a number of magpies visiting the garden (we leave food out for the birds, but don't usually see magpies). They are very noisy and seem aggressive and I haven't dared leave Harry out in the garden unsupervised in case they attack him (as his pen doesn't have a lid). Could this happen?
    Many thanks,
    Helena Redbird

  • Comment number 196.

    my garden is full of moths/ butterfly's there is one type that is more frequent than other could you tell me what it is and why they like my garden so much
    (will post photo to gallery)

  • Comment number 197.

    I love to feed the wild birds that come in to my garden but these days I find I am only feeding wood pidgeons, magpies & crows etc. The small birds have all but gone because of the bigger ones hoarding the feeders. I have no baby birds nesting this year & blame the bigger birds for this also. Is there any way I can feed only the wee birds again ? I also feed foxes but that is another story !
    Squirrel

  • Comment number 198.

    out running at 6.30pm tonight, heard loud squawking and flapping from what sounded like herons. We walked further into the wood and saw 4 herons in the tree tops either fighting with each other or another bird?? underneath the nests we found 1 dead heron, 2 fish and 2 eggs. On another tree we saw a dead heron hanging from the lower branches. Are herons territorial or was this a buzzard or some other larger bird? Amazing noise and what sight to watch!!

  • Comment number 199.

    Dear Springwatch
    I often hear blackbirds, and sometimes robins, making a high-pitched whistle. I was just wondering if you knew, and could please tell me, what this means? I hear it all year round (mostly blackbirds) and at any time of day.
    I have recorded a video of a female blackbird to show what I mean (if it works!)
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/63663404@N05/5799841113/
    Many thanks, and thank you also for a fantastic first week of the show!

  • Comment number 200.

    I store my peanuts in my shed inside a large plastic box. Recently mice have been attacking the box and made a hole to get at the peanuts inside.However after they visited they have covered the hole they made with old nails (also in the shed). I removed the nails and filled the hole with steel wool. Next day the steel wool had been eaten and the nails returned. Any suggestion as to why cover the hole with nails?
    Nigel Theobald. Haltwhistle , Northumberland

 

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