[an error occurred while processing this directive]
« Previous | Main | Next »

Unsprung guest: Kate MccGwire

Post categories:

Jeremy Torrance web producer Jeremy Torrance web producer | 19:32 UK time, Tuesday, 7 June 2011

If you tune in to this week's Springwatch Unsprung you'll have the opportunity to feast your eyes on the feathery delights of artist Kate MccGwire.

Evacuate by Kate MccGwire: Photo copy of Jonty Wilde

Evacuate by Kate MccGwire. Image © Jonty Wilde

Kate's feather artwork is inspired by the birds themselves.

Corvid by Kate MccGwire. Image courtesy of All Visual Arts - photographer Tessa Angus.

Sluice by Kate MccGwire

Sluice by Kate MccGwire. Image courtesy of All Visual Arts - photographer Tessa Angus.

Slick by Kate Mccgwire

Slick by Kate Mccgwire

Slick detail by Kate MccGwire

Slick detail by Kate MccGwire

Evacuate detail by Kate MccGwire

Evacuate detail by Kate MccGwire. Image © Jonty Wilde

Evacuate wide by Kate MccGwire

Evacuate wide by Kate MccGwire. Image © Jonty Wilde

Springwatch Unsprung, Wednesday 8.30pm BBC Two

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    Beautiful stuff there! Such hardwork but well the worth it in the end :)

  • Comment number 2.

    Wow, absoloutely amazing! I love this art. its amazing to see how what could be one feather found in the garden might seem a nice colour but relatively uninteresting but put together hundreds of the same feathers and it becomes such a wonderful piece of art, I want to touch it, thats how it makes me feel. love them.

  • Comment number 3.

    Flightfully pheasant !

  • Comment number 4.

    Flightfully pheasant

  • Comment number 5.

    That's what I call Britain's Got Talent ! Well done, amazing work.

  • Comment number 6.

    I really admire this concept but am concerned about the source of Kate's piece constructed from crow feathers. Were the crow feathers supplied by gamekeepers obtained from culled/deliberately trapped birds? If so, the beauty of those iridescent feathers suddenly seem to have lost their gloss for me......what a pity.

    Reply to this message

  • Comment number 7.

    As an artist I really appreciate Kate's work. However, living next to a pheasant shoot I know that crows and magpies are 'controlled' by using Larsen traps which are banned in their country of origin. A decoy bird is placed in the trap which attracts and traps other birds which are then killed. All this to protect pheasant eggs/chicks which are then later shot for pleasure. So I don't really think that it was appropriate to feature this work in Springwatch.

  • Comment number 8.

    Though i agree with the feelings of some of the comments, being made about how Kate gets her supply of feathers. i also feel that the comments are a bit harsh, i mean how many of these people eat meat from animals kept in small cages or barns, force fed & never seeing daylight, for thier pleasure or buy battery hens eggs ?. Or how many are wearing clothes or sitting on nice leather bound chairs made with animal pelts & skins, do they really know how those animals were kept or treated. Before we judge others first look at ourselves, whether we like what Kate is doing or not, lets not judge her, but marvel at the buety of her work

  • Comment number 9.

    I'm vegan and for me this is beautiful, of course because of the birds and their amazing feathers. As a vegan however I don't think it's right to display animal parts of skins and feathers for art or any other means unless educational and gathered by proper donation or means that are sourced without unnecessary suffering. Every being. Whether human or animal or fish. Has the right to happiness and freedom. I hope that my thoughts words and actions in some way contribute to the happiness and freedom for all. I would enjoy the feathers on their owners alive and well. For this purpose it's unethical.

  • Comment number 10.

    Amazing work as always! As a fan and follower of Kate's work I can assure you that all of her materials are responsibly sourced. In response to those who question the providence of Kate's feathers, the birds used in her work are mostly captive bred and therefore shed their feathers naturally in early April and October. The amount of feathers needed for a large scale piece of work take years to collect as they are sent to her from all over the country from a network of bird fanciers and keepers. You can find more information on Kate on her website http://www.katemccgwire.com/ she has also discussed her collecting habits and creative methods in numerous interviews.

  • Comment number 11.

    Amazing work as always! As a fan and follower of Kate's work I can assure you that all of her materials are responsibly sourced. In response to those who question the providence of Kate's feathers, the birds used in her work are mostly captive bred and therefore shed their feathers naturally in early April and October. The amount of feathers needed for a large scale piece of work take years to collect as they are sent to her from all over the country from a network of bird fanciers and keepers. You can find more information on Kate on her website http://www.katemccgwire.com/ she has also discussed her collecting habits and creative methods in numerous interviews.

  • Comment number 12.

    outstanding go to her website http://www.katemccgwire.com/ i can't believe you made that

  • Comment number 13.

    What is meant by 'responsibly sourced' ? And what does...'mostly captive bred' mean exactly? Sorry, but in my opinion, this item was not in keeping with the ethos of Springwatch and I hope that it is not repeated. Leave this kind of promotion to the art world, please.

  • Comment number 14.

    In my view this sort of guest appearance does not belong on 'Springwatch' am I one of the only people who finds this artwork unacceptable? Did'nt anyone else notice where the corvid feathers are colllected from? 'Gamekeepers' They kill thousands of corvids each year in order to protect their gamebirds, then the go and kill the gamebirds! Meanwhile this artist uses these poor birds feathers in this morbid art. I for one like to see feathers on live birds, collection of feathers from moults takes many many years - espicially the corvid variety. I would kindly ask this programme to think about what they include in the show.

  • Comment number 15.

    I agree with everyone!...they ARE very clever and lovely (though, as someone pointed out, even more lovely on the living creatures) but the ETHICS IS VERY DUBIOUS - and I did not think it should have featured on Spring Watch (also, I felt a bit 'uncomfortable' watching & learning how to create skeletal artefacts on a previous Spring Watch programme (grrr!!)...then again, to be sure 'nature (including man/woman) is cruel...but we humans should try to rise above it all and be moral!!!

  • Comment number 16.

    I believe feathers only show their true beauty when they are attached to a living bird. I also feel that promoting this artists work on springwatch is a tad inappropriate. I would be worried that if more artists gained an interest in creating this type of art, it would not be long before bird numbers start to decline. I am a vegetarian and do condone any suffering on animals whether it be for art or meat, and you can be sure that alot of birds suffered to create her peices of art. Farmers and gamekeepers dont really care about the welfare of animals, that they call pests.

  • Comment number 17.

    As some one who enjoys watching birds and marveling at their beauty, I cannot really see any beauty in theses peices of art. I am also very concerned that this artist was given promotion on springwatch. Though she claims to source the feathers well, I would be at tad dubious o the ones she gets from farmers and gamekeepers, in my experience, alot of the time, they do not have a very high regard for animal welfare, especially where covids are concerned.

  • Comment number 18.

    I thought the first one didn't post oops... and thats don't condone, not do condone animal suffering :P

  • Comment number 19.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

 

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.