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Paper Monitor

12:21 UK time, Monday, 4 August 2008

A service highlighting the riches of the daily press.

The winner of headline of the day is clear. The winner is so clear that it will immediately need to go for drug testing.

"Dog owners told to stop using starfish as Frisbees".

Obviously, as the authorities in Grenada have pointed out, throwing starfish is "cruel and should be strongly discouraged", but there's no way you can say this Guardian nib ("news in brief") doesn't grab the eye.

Their front-page lead - "Archbishop blames liberals for church rift" - just doesn't do it in the same way.

Also in today's Guardian, and also with a marine biology flavour, is one of those extraordinary photos of a great white shark leaping out of the sea while putting on its bitey face.

Paper Monitor is minded to conclude that either these animals are always looking to pose for new photos for their Facebook profile, or there are a lot of intrepid wildlife photographers out there.

How was this photo - which appears to look almost directly down on the shark - taken? What was it trying to chew? Is this merely a great white being playful? Answers on the proverbial postcard.

And still on the theme, there's an extraordinary photo of snack food in the Times. Forget mundane lollipops, here's an image of dried seahorses on sticks, apparently a delicacy in Beijing.

Finally leaving the world of marine biology and entering the world of human biology, the Daily Mail is returning to an old obsession. The Oxford English Dictionary does not yet carry the phrase "knee age", but if it ever does it will be the Mail that claims the credit.

The entry would go something like this:

Knee age, n. 1. the discrepancy between the age suggested by a star's youthful face and the true age revealed by their wrinkled knees

Today's victim is Lulu.

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