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Paper Monitor

11:23 UK time, Tuesday, 12 February 2008

A service highlighting the riches of the daily press.

Some things have changed in the world of newspapers.

The Times leads with a story about illegal downloaders getting their comeuppance by having their broadband shut off.

It's a milestone of how far coverage of technology issues has come. The Times only mentioned "internet" for the first time in January 1990*, some time after its colleagues on the Financial Times, Guardian and Independent. Now it is hip, happening and down with the kids.

Some things have not changed in the world of newspapers.

Just look at the "humorous" Beatles references to mark the occasion of Sir Paul McCartney's titanic divorce struggle with Heather Mills. Just look at them. Look at them and weep.

In the Times, the headline is "Yesterday". This being both a song by the popular beat-combo's bassist and also the time frame in which the story occurred.

In the Metro the "wob" (white-on-black headline) says "SHE HATES YOU YEAH, YEAH, YEAH". This being an ironic reference to the song She Loves You and also to the breakdown in relations.

The Daily Mirror goes with "GET BACK". This being a… oh you get the picture.

As for the Sun's "A Hard Day's Fight" and "With legal help from my friends", further words are unnecessary.

Paper Monitor feels for the subs who have to do this thing. They are only obeying orders. And should the legal battle drag on, their sanity will surely be tested.

As for the rest of the coverage of "Macca v Mucca" (Copyright: The Sun newspaper), it's all rather ho-hum.

Only the Mirror provides levity.

"The grim-faced ex-model was accompanied by her make-up artist Mark Payne."

Did she really get up on Monday morning and ask him for "grim"?

* Dated 11 January 1990, and headlined "Software virus creator Robert Morris in court", the article referenced the net as "the Internet network, used by thousands of scientists".

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