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President Mubarak resigns: Your reaction

16:15 UK time, Friday, 11 February 2011

Thousands of pro-democracy protesters in Egypt have returned to Tahrir Square in Cairo, the heart of the popular uprising that led to the resignation of President Mubarak. How do you see the future of Egypt developing?

Mr Mubarak resigned on Friday after 18 days of protests. He was flown to his luxury residence in the Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh having handed power to the high command, a body composed of high-ranking generals.

The army now seems undecided on how to respond to the fresh influx in Tahrir Square. The military police chief has called for tents to be cleared from the area.

Are you going to Tahrir Square? Are you already in the area? Are you in a town or village in Egypt which hasn't seen protests? What is next for Egypt?

Thank you for your omments. This debate is now closed.

Comments

Page 1 of 11

  • Comment number 1.

    I hope it works out. One Iran is enough.

  • Comment number 2.

    Much like the fall of the Berlin Wall, I feel happy for those who are there, celebrating what they have achieved.

  • Comment number 3.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 4.

    Well done Egypt. This is your victory. This was a historical moment; a peaceful, civilised revolution driven, co-ordinated and executed by the people and endorsed by all sections of society. We salute you.

  • Comment number 5.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 6.

    I hope the transition to democracy is peaceful and the Egyptians get what they want

  • Comment number 7.

    A pity. I despise the mob that cannot formulate anything more reasonable than "go mubarak". In several years they will regret the end of the Mubarak era. I wish them just that.

  • Comment number 8.

    Hoooraaay!!!...

    oh...

    Now what?

  • Comment number 9.

    now we have to see if the people get the government they want.

  • Comment number 10.

    It worries me. What will come next? Not all the scenes of protest during the past few weeks were peaceful. In many cases, it was uncontrolled fury and violence whilst at the same time, there were reports of criminality, such as looting.

    Is it not more likely that the country will fall into a state of permanent civil unrest as the people fail to agree on an alternative to Mubarak's regime and resort to street fighting rather than civilised discussion?

  • Comment number 11.

    Congratulations! This is an important step, even if only the first one to freedom and democracy and a rather symbolic one. All the best for Egypt!

  • Comment number 12.

    History in the making. I just hope that they have a better government to keep the country safe. Power directed from the armed forces is slightly worrying. Nevertheless, the people have spoken!

  • Comment number 13.

    ...and whoosh!

    Up went stock markets around the world.

  • Comment number 14.

    HISTORY IN THE MAKING.PEOPLE POWER HAS WON FOR THE TIME BEING ANYWAY.WHAT GUTS THEY HAVE SHOWN.ONLY WISH WE COULD BOTTLE IT AND USE IT IN BRITAIN TO PUT A STOP TO ALL THE UNFAIRNESS HERE.GOOD LUCK TO THE EGYPTIAN PEOPLE IN THE DAYS AHEAD - THEY WILL NEED IT.

  • Comment number 15.

    I hope it goes well for the Egyptians and that they get what they want. This will mark the beginning of massive changes in this part of the world and I think there will be inevitably be trouble. We will see opposing world views (religious v secular) polarize in many of the countries of the region.

  • Comment number 16.

    We people in westren countries must learn from agyptian and destroy the dictarorship of kaptilsts in europe, USA and Japan and estblish equalityand social justice, it's possible!!!!!!!

  • Comment number 17.

    I hope someone reasonably sane gets into power. They wouldn't do well to start getting ideas about Israel...

  • Comment number 18.

    Fantastic news and well worth the wait. Now we must see how things pan out for the people of Egypt, they will have a long struggle ahead of them and hopefully it will be bloodless.

    My concerns now are for how Israel will react to this, I don't mean openly, I'm talking about clandestine interference in the evolution of an Egyptian democracy. The peace between Egypt and Israel was at the expense the liberty of the people of Egypt and them not having a free and open democracy. Israel certainly won't like the next period of uncertainty, their current military strength was based upon a firm treaty with Egypt so their military position will be weak should Egypt become less favourably disposed towards Israel in the future. Israel won't think twice about destabilising Egypt should it be in their national interest to do so.

    Watch this space this is just the start of the wrangling, double dealing and subterfuge so characteristic of Israel when things aren't the way they like them but good will, good luck and best wishes to all of the people of Egypt who have waited so patiently for over 3 decades for this moment to arrive.

  • Comment number 19.

    Trench,

    How pathetic. This revolution has had nothing to do with religion. It is extremists like YOU, scaremongerers who always try to abuse the religion card. If this revolution means that the interests of the Egyptian people are put first, ahead of those of Israel, then so be it. This is real DEMOCRACY. Get used to it.

  • Comment number 20.

    Don't want to state that I stated so yesterday that there will be a coup d'etat and the military will take over and that I read the events pretty much well. I also did dtate that I hoped his plane was on standby to fly him to Riyadh but as we hear en-route his family villa. He wanted to have the last say and leave with dignity after all the years he had spent in power. Initially, he thought he could change and influence the mood of the Protesters but they are having none of it and stood their ground. Now the real changes begin as the old guard will need to also go and give way to new faces. It won't be easy but they will get to the promised land. So far, they showed maturity and retraint and to others how to do it peacefully. Hope others will learn from the Egyptian experience.

  • Comment number 21.

    All I hear is a great sucking sound created by an instant vacuum in both the leadership and future of a pivotal nation in the Middle East. Having desposed a dictatorship, do the Egyptians choose democracy or Islamfascism? Should we care? Possibly.

  • Comment number 22.

    Let's wait and see. Will President Hosni Mubarak be replaced with a better and democratic leader or will he be replaced by someone even more dictatorial that the Egyptians will wish they had never got rid of Mubarak in the first place? Time will tell...

  • Comment number 23.

    What's with all the "god" talk surrounding this? May "god" help everybody, etc. Mythical deities have nothing to do with this.

  • Comment number 24.

    My pal,

    Joanne,

    in Alexandria, says she feels as if she is ''walking on air''.

  • Comment number 25.

    president Mubarak joins with president bush as reduntant merchants of time wasters,people pushers,lost journals of the modern world.

  • Comment number 26.

    Whilst I am not Egyptian, I hope they will not mind my joining in the celebration of their victory. They fully deserve the euphoria they are feeling at this moment. They resisted the impulse to retaliate at Mubarak's thug tactics last week. They remained resolute and peaceful.

    This victory is theirs. Now they must remain vigilant to ensure the Army does not just impose a new dictator with a more genial face.

    That is for the future. For now they must cherish this moment. They will never be more proud of themselves and their fellow Egyptians. I salute you.

  • Comment number 27.

    if it takes a million protesting in egypt to oust him how man needed in london to get rid of the 2 daves just a thought?

  • Comment number 28.

    I am now toasting Egyptian people with a glass of red wine and wish them all the best.

  • Comment number 29.

    I am pleased that there was no more bloodshed, I am happy that the people got a result that they wanted. Now they must be just as determined to keep the government they want.

    To those that are saying it will be war and hoping Israel takes a forceful stance. Why are you wishing death and destruction? Are you so frightened in your little house wherever of the rest of the world?

    What is your mental state at this time, are you going out to buy guns next just in case??


    The Egyptians have broken a dictator, they have a chance and I wish them well, to look at constitutional reform. The young are technically savvy, do you really believe they will close off Egypt from the rest of the world?

    Yes it will be difficult but they need support not arms and not a war. The last thing on their minds is war it is freedom!

  • Comment number 30.

    I pray that the Muslim Brotherhood takes over Egypt. Ameen.

  • Comment number 31.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 32.

    5. At 4:26pm on 11 Feb 2011, Trench Broom wrote:
    Well, the European left wing and the Muslims (including Iran, Hezbollah, Al Qaeda, Hamas and Syria) have got what they wanted.

    This will only end in war, be it in a week or a couple of years. The Muslim Brotherhood will try and take the country, just as they took Gaza, just as Hezbollah took Lebanon.

    Bring it. Let's hope this time Israel unleashes everything available
    ======================================================================
    You obviously have no experience of the Egyptions. They are a tolerant,friendly peace-loving people and they have brought about change with a brave dignity.
    The problem is that they know what they do not want but there appears to be nothing in place to take over the running of the country, other than the military. Let us hope the military will ensure an orderly transfer of power to an elected government.

  • Comment number 33.

    Provisional Constitution

    We the people proclaim the following Provisional Constitution:

    1 The Republic shall renew its existence as a democracy. Sovereignty is vested in the people of Egypt.

    2 The new Republic shall succeed to all the rights and duties of the previous Republic under international law. The people of Egypt extend their hand in friendship to all humanity.

    3 Human rights shall be guaranteed to everyone at the highest internationally recognized level. The death penalty is suspended. No one shall be tortured.

    4 Existing laws shall remain in force in so far as they are not in contradiction with this Provisional Constitution.

    5 There shall be a provisional government whose first task shall be to organise free and fair elections and prepare a new democratic Constitution.

    We the people, men and women of all walks of life, we Egyptians, Muslims and Christians, proclaim our loyalty to our country and pray to God for his blessing.


  • Comment number 34.

    It was ONLY a matter of time before Mubarak HAD to GO.

    He should have realised the writing was on the wall, and left 2 weeks ago.

    What will happen next now in Egypt from now onwards, is up to its People whatever any Counrty in the West wants or saids what it thinks should happen next.

    Therefore, the Ball is now in the court of what happens next amongst ALL the Egyptian People, for better or worse FOR THEM and THE WEST.

  • Comment number 35.

    The people's revolution has triumphed in Egypt. The revolution must continue onward to Syria, Iran, Palestine, Libya, Algeria, Zimbabwe, ....

  • Comment number 36.

    Excellent news but it is not enough. Now he needs to be tried for murder etc and the media has to be freed.

    Hopefully all his vast assets have been frozen

  • Comment number 37.

    Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali... Hosni Mubarak... Next...?

  • Comment number 38.

    5. At 4:26pm on 11 Feb 2011, Trench Broom wrote:
    Well, the European left wing and the Muslims (including Iran, Hezbollah, Al Qaeda, Hamas and Syria) have got what they wanted.

    This will only end in war, be it in a week or a couple of years. The Muslim Brotherhood will try and take the country, just as they took Gaza, just as Hezbollah took Lebanon

    Bring it. Let's hope this time Israel unleashes everything available.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just like a right-winger, hoping for war. Thnak go there are so few of them

  • Comment number 39.

    Nice for the Egyptian people, as long as they don`t get stuck with another repressive regime or worse still, a religious extremist regime. It would be interesting to see how the Army, in power since 1952, will relinquish power.

  • Comment number 40.

    Well done the Egyptian people! What an inspiration to people all over the world! Egypt is ushering in a new era of openness, real freedom; where truth and democracy really mean something, not just hollow expressions rattled out by corrupt ruling elites as they oppress the people they say they serve. This is just the first step on a long road, all good wishes and success to the noble Egyptian people who truly believe their future is in their hands. And not forgetting a special thank you to Julian Assange and brave Bradly Manning who helped get the ball rolling!

  • Comment number 41.

    People power. We should do the same in Europe. Too many elite beaurocrats experimenting with our time, and money. Good luck Egypt. Next stop, Europe.

  • Comment number 42.

    Just goes to show that violence pays.

    I predict war with Israel withn 5 years from an emergent extremist Egypt. The only people to succeed in the current power vacuum will be the religious zealots/ haters.

    Some rather naive people seem to think this was a "peoples revolution", just wait to see who the puppetmaster was ( this is the middle east, nothing is spontanious).

    One thing is certain over the next few years - more dead Egyptians.

  • Comment number 43.

    We now have to wait with anticipation that peace will last, sadly as it is most of the countries in the muslimic community are having a very disruptive period. If only the religous communities could across all nations would communicate better, only then would people of all nations start to trust each other.

  • Comment number 44.

    3. At 4:25pm on 11 Feb 2011, chiptheduck wrote:
    What does it matter what I think?

    If it doesn't comply with BBC policy it will be blue pencilled.

    I know what you mean chipthduck, just don't mention the Islamic brotherhood or it will get binned.
    As for the present situation I hope it works out for them, after all Mubarak was a dictator like so many so called leaders in the Arab world are,I hope the same happens in Saudi they have it a lot worse than those in Egypt.

  • Comment number 45.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 46.

    Wow .. how quickly reality reflects The Will of the People!

    The Army is now holds executive power.

    It is imperative that The Egyptian People maintain their 'Ghandiesque' posture, perhaps with smaller but continuous numbers, in order not to let The Army get complacent.

    The game is not over just yet, but it feels good today :-)

  • Comment number 47.

    21. At 4:37pm on 11 Feb 2011, Rather_Be_Cycling wrote:

    All I hear is a great sucking sound created by an instant vacuum in both the leadership and future of a pivotal nation in the Middle East. Having desposed a dictatorship, do the Egyptians choose democracy or Islamfascism? Should we care? Possibly.
    ____________________________________
    If there was no sucking sound I'm sure you would find something else to worry about.

  • Comment number 48.

    Two reactions

    1. May the Egyptian people choose wisely in their next leadership and your neighbor would be a fine example of a progressive inclusive democracy

    2. Now lets have all the world leaders and media show the same resolution in having the illegitimate Iranain leaders and robert Mugabe leave power.

  • Comment number 49.

    Having clearly influenced the timing of this regime change in Egypt I sincerely hope the White House can now influence the opportunity for Egyptians to vote in a pro-western government. No one needs any form of Islamic Government / Sharia Law which would simply be far more repressive than the the last one.

  • Comment number 50.

    1. At 4:23pm on 11 Feb 2011, old cop USA wrote:
    I hope it works out. One Iran is enough.

    ---------------------------------------------

    So do we, one USA is also enough...mind you, I'm sure the CIA have been busy over the last few weeks in Egypt.

  • Comment number 51.

    Having been to Egypt 17 times (working for a peace organization) in the last year alone I can say that myself and my partner are delighted with the news that social change is coming to this great nation! We shall be raising a glass of Guigal Condrieu and toasting the citizens tonight I am sure!

    Over the last year in our travels to Cairo the mood has got darker and darker but it seems that the light at the end of the tunnel is finally within touching distance. I am sure that when Lydia and I discuss the last few weeks tonight over our organic vegetable lasagne we will agree that this must not be the end of it, but the start! The EU, being the democratic core of the West, must not shirk from its role of overseeing a smooth and fair transition of power to wherever the People dictate. I pray that other Arab nations follow the Tunisian and Egyptian example.

    I look forward to our next visit in just over a months time!

  • Comment number 52.

    This is brilliant news that mubarak has left, he has caused much suffering, i wonder if the west are weeping behind the doors as their right-hand man has failed them! I hope this holds a new future for the eygptians and all the muslims worldwide who are subject to western interference, when will they leave the nuslims to decide their own polotical destiny???

  • Comment number 53.

    Good to see the people triumph as happened in Eastern Europe 22 years ago.

    Now let Egypt adopt a constitutional democracy as has happened in other islamic countries such as Indonesia.

  • Comment number 54.

    It will be interesting to see which world leaders step forward over the next few hours and congratulate the Egyptian people for overthrowing tyranny!

  • Comment number 55.

    the eygptian government just needed time to find clone. does anyone really believe that anything will change? here comes the new boss, same as the old boss.

  • Comment number 56.

    Does this mean my hard earned taxpayer dollars will no longer be sent to Egypt? If that's the case then woohoo.

  • Comment number 57.

    42. At 4:49pm on 11 Feb 2011, HomeCountyCynic wrote:
    Just goes to show that violence pays.

    I predict war with Israel withn 5 years from an emergent extremist Egypt. The only people to succeed in the current power vacuum will be the religious zealots/ haters.

    Some rather naive people seem to think this was a "peoples revolution", just wait to see who the puppetmaster was ( this is the middle east, nothing is spontanious).

    One thing is certain over the next few years - more dead Egyptians.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Well that should give you profound satisfaction shouldn't it.

    Given that you seem to think non-white people of the ME are all sheep.

    And amazingly the Egyptians are thinking about their own country, not Israel.

  • Comment number 58.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 59.

    Dear People of Egypt,

    I can only rejoice with you upon this day of joy; following days of protest and loss of human lives. Living in a globalized world (where distances are short)I hope your community will participate in a democratic spirit and honour human rights; for the long term benefit of generations to come.

    Congratulations and well done!

    Citizen of Sweden

  • Comment number 60.

    48. At 4:51pm on 11 Feb 2011, MagicKirin wrote:
    Two reactions

    1. May the Egyptian people choose wisely in their next leadership and your neighbor would be a fine example of a progressive inclusive democracy

    2. Now lets have all the world leaders and media show the same resolution in having the illegitimate Iranain leaders and robert Mugabe leave power.



    But leave Colonel Ghadaffi, the Algerian gang, the Saudi "kings" etc in place?

    Lets have a clean sweep and then listen to what the people, as opposed to their imposed stooges tell us.

  • Comment number 61.

    54. At 4:52pm on 11 Feb 2011, moreram wrote:
    It will be interesting to see which world leaders step forward over the next few hours and congratulate the Egyptian people for overthrowing tyranny!

    Excellent point

  • Comment number 62.

    49. At 4:51pm on 11 Feb 2011, SPEEDTHRILLS wrote:
    Having clearly influenced the timing of this regime change in Egypt I sincerely hope the White House can now influence the opportunity for Egyptians to vote in a pro-western government. No one needs any form of Islamic Government / Sharia Law which would simply be far more repressive than the the last one.

    _____________________________________________________________________

    There are options other than pro-Western and extremist Islamic Government: e.g. listening to the people?




  • Comment number 63.

    The Vice President prefaced his remarks by, "In the name of God the merciful, the compassionate...".

    This is basically the "Basmala", the collective name of the whole of the recurring Islamic phrase b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi.

    It is recited several times as part of Muslim daily prayers, and it is usually the first phrase in the preamble of the constitutions of Islamic countries.


    Egypt's Constitution states:

    Art.2: Islam is the Religion of the State. Arabic is its official language, and the principal source of legislation is Islamic Jurisprudence (Sharia).

    This might be a good indiction of where Egypt's government is heading.

  • Comment number 64.

    36. At 4:46pm on 11 Feb 2011, Simon21 wrote:
    Excellent news but it is not enough. Now he needs to be tried for murder etc and the media has to be freed.
    Hopefully all his vast assets have been frozen
    ____________________________
    Good point, hopefully he won't be allowed to escape with the $billions he transferred out of the country and is made to answer for the torture and extra judicial killings. Come to think of it why not off to the Hague with him along with Blair, Bush, Rumsdfeld, Straw and all the other war criminals still out there living a lie.

  • Comment number 65.

    "54. At 4:52pm on 11 Feb 2011, moreram wrote:
    It will be interesting to see which world leaders step forward over the next few hours and congratulate the Egyptian people for overthrowing tyranny!"

    Possibly not those of Iran, Syria, Libya, North Korea, Cuba and China.

  • Comment number 66.

    Hopefully we will now see the first real democracy in the Arab world. The people of Egypt deserve nothing less.

    Now get all the cash stolen back from every offshore bank account so that it can be used for the good of the Egyptian people.

  • Comment number 67.

    Next stop: Syria.

  • Comment number 68.

    I hope the next govt. tries to into account the wishes of the people & doesn't allow itself to be hi-jacked by the extremists.

    Have nothing to to with the likes of the leadership of Iran & may the revolution spread to other Arab nations - not forgetting Gaza.

  • Comment number 69.

    Congratulations to the courageous people of Egypt in ousting this dictator!
    The main concern now will be what the army does with their new position of power.
    Will they engage with opposition parties to plan for a free election, or just install another US-approved stooge like the Vice President?

  • Comment number 70.

    55. At 4:53pm on 11 Feb 2011, jackinusa wrote:
    the eygptian government just needed time to find clone. does anyone really believe that anything will change? here comes the new boss, same as the old boss.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Well things do change, the US has abandoned slavery, and if fewer Egyptian children are tortured to death in the name of security, then most would agree that is a good thing.

  • Comment number 71.

    Am happy for the Egyptians, but also fear they might end up like the Pakistani`s. My Best Wishes for the Freedom. Egyptian should enjoy the freedom responsibly and hope they become a model state with good governance, Democratic system and more importantly religious tolerance.

    Hope they also respect the peace agreement with Israel, which is the real key for the fragile peace in the Middle East.
    Congrats Egypt

  • Comment number 72.

    Lets just pray that they now get democracy and not another dictator or worse some radical Islamic group in charge

  • Comment number 73.

    within a couple of years most of those who want him out will wish he was back,sad day when rent a mob can bring down a government

  • Comment number 74.

    That's right - the Americans wanted this regime change after propping it up for 30 years. Why do we listen to the Americans?

  • Comment number 75.

    I hope that the BBC are satisfied that Pres Mubarak has been overthrown. The BBC announcers and reporters seem to delight in the downfall of those in power !

  • Comment number 76.

    68. At 5:05pm on 11 Feb 2011, DPStL wrote:
    I hope the next govt. tries to into account the wishes of the people & doesn't allow itself to be hi-jacked by the extremists.

    Have nothing to to with the likes of the leadership of Iran & may the revolution spread to other Arab nations - not forgetting Gaza.



    Or the US-imposed and paid for gang who rule the Palestinian territories, again using torture

  • Comment number 77.

    Amazing, fantastic news for the Egyptain people, well done the protesters, wonderful news, at last we can now book our holiday in Egypt.

  • Comment number 78.

    Real worry to Israel.
    High time Nethenyahu finds some means to protect the peace treaty his nation has signed with Egypt.
    No amount of US military gadgets gifted to Israel can withstand the collective Arab people's power against which Israel has managed to survive so long in the Middle East.

    Israels bogey of its safety and security and its posture to kill anyone on that pretext would not work anymore. Israel has lost Egypt and Jordan is not far away to fall like it. Israel should know that like how its agents twist and turn the policy makers in Washington, Egypt and Jordan have people as Israel's victim among millions of Palestinians displaced as refugees in Egypt and Jordan. So, like today, people's power will emerge to equate the military might of Israel in the coming days.

    More than a freedom to Egyptians, this show of strength of peoples' power in Cairo is a booster to drive foreign invaders out of the Holy Land in particular and the Middle East in general.

  • Comment number 79.

    People power in action, right where do we protest to get the current dictators in the UK out. I've got a flask and made up some sandwiches for a couple of weeks.

  • Comment number 80.

    Tony Blair: Mubarak is 'immensely courageous and a force for good'
    Sorry folks, I couldn't resist posting Tony's last sound bite on the situation in Egypt. I suggest anyone in the UK reading this who share my view to write to their MP ASAP asking for Blair not to represent us any more as he is AN EMBARRASSMENT!

  • Comment number 81.

    i wonder how big of a mob would be needed in washington,dc to get rid of EVERY CONGRESSMAN AND SENATOR. EVERY ONE OF THOSE CROOKS SHOULD BE FOR TREASON.

  • Comment number 82.

    One can share the euphoria of Egyptians as their cry for freedom has borne fruit. President Mubarak ruled the country with a strong hand for thirty years but saw power slipping in the last few weeks. He had lost touch with the true aspirations of the people. The political upheaval in Tunisia became a spring-board for democratic change in Egypt. No one in their wildest imagination would have thought that such rapid change would have been possible. Now the crowds are ecstatic. One can only hope that democracy would be a rallying cry for the whole Middle East. The people deserve to be treated fairly.

  • Comment number 83.

    Mubarak has become relic of the past. Congratulations to the people of Egypt.

  • Comment number 84.

    I would not be precipitative with any feelings of euphoria just yet. There remains much to occur before any semblance of decency can be said to have returned to Egyptian politics.Indeed, there remains much to be done to achieve decency in politics in its widest sense and I mean local as well as national politics plus intentional politics and international diplomacy. We humans have placed our destinies in the hands of productively and unproductively dishonest leaders since the dawn of mankind upon the Earth. Mubarak was a good illustration of the kind of bullying,despotic, murdering dictators defended by corrupt armies and police forces the West has been supporting in the Middle East and elsewhere in order to ensure the undisturbed flow of black liquid that is much more important to us than human decency because it feeds our greed driven profit obsessed way of life. The very way of life that abhors those from the Muslim world we seek to subjugate rather than lose access to the filthy stuff and causes them to hate us so much.Everything that can be done from now will be done to ensure that whatever government Egypt ends up with it will be one that ensures the West's continuing addiction to oil and to the benefits brought by profligate,selfish capitalism are protected. You can call this the West's efforts at helping to establish true democracy in the Middle East. I have a different way of thinking. Perhaps I'm wrong. Perhaps we all should agree that what we in Britain and our cousins in the United States of Avarice believe in is true democracy. Perhaps next time we turn on the TV we shall witness the fly past of a squadron of pink elephants in celebration over Tahrir Square.

  • Comment number 85.

    The will of the majority (I hope) of the Egyptian people has prevailed. It is now for them to introduce, develop and then sustain in their turbulent times, a viable alternative, free from extremism and bigotry. Secularism must surely remain the key. If they are looking for a model, then I would suggest Turkey as an example of the way to go.

  • Comment number 86.


    PROBLEM SOLVED ???....highly unlikely !!

    If you think Democracy will take over from now on, then you've got a headache coming. It would be nice though if they could surprise us all.

    But Mubarak had been there a long time and was unable to deliver what the protestors and the country, Egypt, wanted.

    Countries in the UAEs are a perfect example what could be acieved if only people could pull together. They don't have elections like we have in the West, but have Royalties as head of states who are involved in the actual running of the affairs of the country. The Emirates realise democracy, as such, have destabilising effects on their people, So, the meet halfway and formulate what's good and right for them. They don't need some Tom, Dick or Harry from the West telling them how to live their life.

  • Comment number 87.

    76. At 5:08pm on 11 Feb 2011, Simon21 wrote:

    68. At 5:05pm on 11 Feb 2011, DPStL wrote:
    I hope the next govt. tries to into account the wishes of the people & doesn't allow itself to be hi-jacked by the extremists.

    Have nothing to to with the likes of the leadership of Iran & may the revolution spread to other Arab nations - not forgetting Gaza.



    Or the US-imposed and paid for gang who rule the Palestinian territories, again using torture

    ------

    Hamas US-imposed and paid for? Surely not. Correct about the torture part though.

  • Comment number 88.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 89.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 90.

    38. At 4:47pm on 11 Feb 2011, Simon21 wrote:

    5. At 4:26pm on 11 Feb 2011, Trench Broom wrote:
    Well, the European left wing and the Muslims (including Iran, Hezbollah, Al Qaeda, Hamas and Syria) have got what they wanted.

    This will only end in war, be it in a week or a couple of years. The Muslim Brotherhood will try and take the country, just as they took Gaza, just as Hezbollah took Lebanon

    Bring it. Let's hope this time Israel unleashes everything available.
    ------------------------------------
    Arabs will not allow to be brutalized by Israel-friendly despots for the sake of Israel. Gaza and the West Bank need a revolution of their own to get from under the yoke of Israel oppression. Arabs need military strength to deter Israeli threats you write about.

  • Comment number 91.

    For whatever reason, staying in a position of power for 30 years is just not on. It is good to see that countries around the world are waking up to this. Other rulers must be taking note of what's happening in Egypt. We should all wish that country all the best for it's future.

  • Comment number 92.

    Nothing is impossible Zimbabwe.

  • Comment number 93.

    I'll bet the protesters will be relieved to get back to their own toilets...

    Seriously, well done all and I hope the path ahead leads to the sunlit uplands.

  • Comment number 94.

    63. At 5:01pm on 11 Feb 2011, Bob Smyth wrote:
    The Vice President prefaced his remarks by, "In the name of God the merciful, the compassionate...".
    This is basically the "Basmala", the collective name of the whole of the recurring Islamic phrase b-ismi-llāhi r-raḥmāni r-raḥīmi.
    It is recited several times as part of Muslim daily prayers, and it is usually the first phrase in the preamble of the constitutions of Islamic countries.
    Egypt's Constitution states:
    Art.2: Islam is the Religion of the State. Arabic is its official language, and the principal source of legislation is Islamic Jurisprudence (Sharia).
    This might be a good indiction of where Egypt's government is heading.
    ______________________________________
    And we all sing "God save the Queen", it doesn't mean we actually believe in the invisible man in the sky Bob, Be happy that the Egyptians deposed a tyrant peacefully and with dignity. Credit where credit's due. Just think, if you are wrong how much of your life you are wasting whistling the same tune.

  • Comment number 95.

    It is a pity that Tony Blair did not respond so easily to the will of the two million British people who demonstrated in London in February 2003. This would have spared death from hundreds of thousands of Iraqi people, and allowed the world to get on with the problem of pacifying Afghanistan.

  • Comment number 96.

    Sometimes it's best to wait for all the facts before drawing any conclusions. My only reaction at the moment is to ask "what's next?"

  • Comment number 97.

    It's all romantic while it lasts... But before long El Baredei (if I typed his name correctly) will set up a provisional government. His lack of experience and excessive idealism will ironically breed more discontent and people rallying to the kind they'll soon regret. the French Revolution formed a pattern that many other Revolutions would follow: an unpopular/exausted leader is ousted, only to be replaced by an even less competent ruler or group before they get replaced by extremists/radicals who will eventually launch a wave of terror, massive crackdowns or even civil war.

    If the Brotherhood or other like-minded groups come to power, liberal and even conservative Egyptians will ironically feel nostalgia for Mubarak as they, their friends or accquaintances get rounded up, arrested, or even shot for being deemed "un-Islamic", "parasite" or other pejorative connotations.

    Not to sound cynical, but it's all a quest for power, and leaders of all hues treat people, especially the young and the gullible, as sheep to get their power and cast them aside when they stand in their way. In the Arab world, there's a reason why they need a strong centralised government to get things done and soon they'll find out why.

  • Comment number 98.

    7. At 4:30pm on 11 Feb 2011, habermas wrote:
    A pity. I despise the mob that cannot formulate anything more reasonable than "go mubarak". In several years they will regret the end of the Mubarak era. I wish them just that.

    not bitter at all then

  • Comment number 99.

    This is great news. I just hope that the army can maintain order and are ready to relinquish power to an elected government.

    Steven Quas Collins

  • Comment number 100.

    Is this just words..or is it a political manoever?

    Where is the government of transition?
    Where is the new consitution and structure to the country?
    Where are the elections?

    If none of this comes about asap..his resignation means nothing a bloody war will follow..

    Will this happen in Britain?..for those who live in denial...yes!

 

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