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Should school sports lessons focus on fitness?

13:27 UK time, Friday, 26 November 2010

Leading sports doctors have strongly criticised the way PE is being taught in English schools and claim children are not getting a proper workout. Should PE focus on fitness or sports?

The British Association of Sports and Exercise Medicine (BASEM) would like all schools to use a short exercise routine called "five-in-five" to improve children's agility skills. BASEM chairman, Dr Richard Budgett, has called for the routine to be incorporated into all PE lessons in order to help develop strength and agility skills.

The "five-in-five" routines involve squatting, lunging, pushing, bracing, rotating, and getting puffed out. The government said PE was a matter for individual schools to decide.

Should schools take on more responsibility for a child's fitness? How can children's fitness by improved? Should there be a re-think in the way PE is taught in schools? Should PE be about competitive sporting games or fitness?

Thank you for your comments. This debate is now closed.

Comments

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  • Comment number 1.

    All schools used to be competitive in sport. I can recall football matches against other schools. In the summer we would have athletics against local schools it was a way of meeting, greeting and making new friends. Our children were reasonably fit. It was all lost when the Tories under Thatcher sold off the playing fields.

  • Comment number 2.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 3.

    Definitely. There has to be an emphasis on fitness. Those that shy away from exercise are going to have their obesity related health issues funded by the tax of their fitter peers.

    Fitness-based PE needs to be implemented together with child cruelty prosecutions against those parents negligently raising fat kids.

  • Comment number 4.

    I used to work out during the break chasing skirt about the playground.

  • Comment number 5.

    "Should school sports lessons focus on fitness?"

    What else are they supposed to focus on?

    It's certainly a good idea to have a proper exercise routine rather than a lot of uncoordinated actions. There's no reason to make PE competitive - children that want to be competitive will do it amongst themselves anyway - but fitter children are more likely to enjoy (and engage in) competitive sports.

  • Comment number 6.

    I was the fat kid that hated PE with a passion. The only sport I was interested in was rugby, but the school refused to allow girls to play rugby so I took a stand & avoided participating in PE at all.

    I feel that kids are not properly supported in PE unless they show interest & talent. It can be emotionally damaging to the self conscious kid forced to get changed in a communal area.

  • Comment number 7.

    1. At 1:45pm on 26 Nov 2010, Darwins Chimp wrote:

    All schools used to be competitive in sport. I can recall football matches against other schools. In the summer we would have athletics against local schools it was a way of meeting, greeting and making new friends. Our children were reasonably fit. It was all lost when the Tories under Thatcher sold off the playing fields.


    Are you Andy Burnham in disguise? The Labour government sold off more than 2000 playing fields during their time in office.

  • Comment number 8.

    "Should school sports lessons focus on fitness?"

    Absolutely so.

    As an introvert who is most certainly NOT a team player my life was made a misery in secondary school (1967 - 73)by being made to play football, rugby (mostly in either teeming rain or on ground that was frozen iron hard) and cricket - all of which I detest. It didn't change my attitude to sport and I'm still not a team player - on or off the playing field. Our school had a gym and a weights room - both never used. It also had grass tennis courts - which could only be used if you were good enough to play for the school. If you were good enough, but refused to play for the school/county - you weren't allowed to use them.

    I longed for the day I would be allowed to do some gym work or to work out on the weights - never happened in the six years I was there.

    At least I could play tennis on the municipal cement courts.

  • Comment number 9.

    Darwins Chimp wrote:
    All schools used to be competitive in sport. I can recall football matches against other schools. In the summer we would have athletics against local schools it was a way of meeting, greeting and making new friends. Our children were reasonably fit. It was all lost when the Tories under Thatcher sold off the playing fields.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    It all stopped when Labour authorities and labour influenced quangoes launched an anti-competitive sports policy. No body was allowed to lose in case it hurt their feelings. The teachers at my school who enacted the policy has Vote Labout posters in their classromms.

  • Comment number 10.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 11.

    //2. At 1:50pm on 26 Nov 2010, Confuciousfred wrote:
    Nothing new, Adolph Hitler had a similar program to create a master race. History repeating itself!//

    Yes, absolutely.

    That's exactly how it started. One minute, kids doing a bit of fitness, next minute, Auschwitz. Obviously.

    Sports teachers and fitness instructors look harmless, but they're all basically nazis.

    Obviously....or maybe not.

  • Comment number 12.

    When at school we had separate lessons for PE and sport.

    Further , all the sports we played gave you some aerobic exercise. There were no minorities allowed to bunk off and play golf or whatever. We also were forced to spend all dry breaks and lunchtimes outside, which inevitably meant football rather than fiddling with the mobile phone. Very few fat kids in my class, and those there were spent their lives trying to get out of participating.

    So frankly its not hard to get kids to take more exercise, though I'm sure that the "rights" lobby would say that the kids have to be given a choice. However fitness is a function not only of exercise but of diet. I'm sure that there's a lot of today's kids that could exercide profusely and still be fat and unfit because of what they eat, and there's little doubt that today's kids get a lot more to eat, and a lot more choice over what to eat than a generation or two ago. That's more difficult to control.

  • Comment number 13.

    "Should school sports lessons focus on fitness?"

    Yes and no. I dislike our education system and the system used in a lot of the world. The model of education assumes 1 size fits all and then there are specialist schools which are costly to run to support those who dont fit in with such a system.

    Primary school as applicable to all to give everyone the basics and the first couple of years at high school too. But by this point it is obvious who is sporting, who is mathematic, who is skilled with language etc.

    The small school I went to had limited options with little of much use to me available. I left school feeling like there was little that I was good at and went to college and uni to do the only thing I was any good at. Now I have the money I buy various books with flights of fancy on various subjects. I have descovered in my last 2-3 years that there are a lot subjects which I am naturally skilled at and thoroughly enjoy, but getting closer to my 30's and with heavy commitments I cannot pursue such subjects for some time.

    So without formal training I am trying out a number of skills which have become hobbies. My life could have been very different if schools were geared towards finding what people enjoy and are good at and educating them in such ways.

    I also feel that it would produce a huge saving to the education system because people with 'learning disabilities' such as dyslexia (which I dont believe is a real disability but one created by the education system) can find the many practical skills they truely possess.

    So in the end I think PE should be focused on for those interested in sports, but more diverse skills should be focused on too. Depending on the child.

  • Comment number 14.

    A work out? Juggling balls against a wall; skipping ropes; sock or ball football, rugby or whatever; any hunt and capture game you care to name. All at playtime, all in the playground, and all now mostly banned I guess.

    PE? Climb the wall bars, ropes, straddle the vaults, floor exercises. Twice a week.

    Games? Oh dear the playing fields have gone.... never mind we can all go down to McBurger.

    And we keep chipping away at the tried and tested until...

  • Comment number 15.

    Fitness is, surely, an element of PE just as much as learning how to play various sports. If nothing else, surely some kind of exercise routine needs to be used to warm up before playing a game of 'whatever' and to warm down afterwards.

    Although my daughter said her PE class tended to be asked to run first and stretch afterwards... even she thinks that's the wrong way round, so goes to stretch - she likes ballet-style leg extensions against a wall, and wishes there was a barre in her school hall! - before the PE lesson begins. Takes after her mum, I used to confuse Army PTIs by doing a martial arts warm up before PT...

    Neither of us are 'sporty' types and I certainly was one of the rubbish kids who got chosen last. About all I was good at was spear-chucking (javelin) and umpiring tennis. But it was a chance to get out in the fresh air, even if the price paid was having to run around...

    ...and endure the sort of PE teacher who was more interested in chewing you out because you weren't wearing regulation games knickers than noticing that she'd only seen them because you'd just done a spectactular diving catch on the cricket pitch :)

  • Comment number 16.

    It would be good if the PE teachers discuss health issues in combination with the sports, i think that might work well. When i went to school PE was sports, no real verbal relation was made to health benefits and interesting physiological/psychological facts.

  • Comment number 17.

    "Fitness", or lack of, is indeed a factor in sport anywhere, not just in schools. But the greater point about teaching sport should be to create winners and losers, just as in life. Winners do so by having all the values required for success in commerce, business and industry. Losers work for the winners. Generally, fitness is one of the pre-requisite qualities of a winner. Winners too, learn that overall success of their enterprise is through teamwork, again learnt in many sports. But maintaining fitness is so boring; it is Friday and I am off to the Pub tonight for a pint or three and I'm calling in at the chippy on the way home.

  • Comment number 18.

    Errm, is PE not about fitness any more? The mind boggles.

  • Comment number 19.

    I can rememeber back in the late sixties, early seventies PE being taken by sadistic teachers shouting in your ear and giving a smack with pump or bat and woo-betide those who forgot their kit or could'nt afford it.
    Smugly I can say I was alright at footie and cross-country and was pretty fit. However PE is not for everyone and should be encouraged with understanding and patience plus the judgement of a childs ability.

  • Comment number 20.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 21.

    Wot you mean we are going back to how it was 50 years ago? Well I'll be.

  • Comment number 22.

    19. At 3:05pm on 26 Nov 2010, M5J29 wrote:

    I can rememeber back in the late sixties, early seventies PE being taken by sadistic teachers shouting in your ear and giving a smack with pump or bat and woo-betide those who forgot their kit or could'nt afford it.
    Smugly I can say I was alright at footie and cross-country and was pretty fit. However PE is not for everyone and should be encouraged with understanding and patience plus the judgement of a childs ability.

    ---------------------------

    In the 90's we had an abusive PE teacher. Due to his abuse a number of kids did all we could to get out of PE and a couple had consent from their parents not to suffer him. I had him dragged into the office twice for threats and abuse in circumstances I could do nothing about.

  • Comment number 23.

    Perhaps it would be best to split 'PE' into separate entities - 'Fitness' and 'Sports/Games' one of which would have to be chosen by the pupil. Those, like me, who disdain team sports could then opt out of 'Sports/Games' but still keep fit. And vice versa of course. And the real jocks could opt for both maybe.

  • Comment number 24.

    7. At 2:04pm on 26 Nov 2010, Magi Tatcher wrote:

    1. At 1:45pm on 26 Nov 2010, Darwins Chimp wrote:

    All schools used to be competitive in sport. I can recall football matches against other schools. In the summer we would have athletics against local schools it was a way of meeting, greeting and making new friends. Our children were reasonably fit. It was all lost when the Tories under Thatcher sold off the playing fields.

    Are you Andy Burnham in disguise? The Labour government sold off more than 2000 playing fields during their time in office.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Sorry rain on the Neo Cons parade but there are a few errors

    Magi you are out by a factor of 10 School playing fields sold off between 1997 and 2009 200 (two hundred)

    School playing fiels sold between 1979 and 1997 10,000 (Ten Thousand)

    My source Pravda, sorry I mean The Daily Mail.

    Am I Andy Burnham? I had better check on the label in my shirt
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    9. At 2:06pm on 26 Nov 2010, PFC_Kent wrote:

    It all stopped when Labour authorities and labour influenced quangoes launched an anti-competitive sports policy. No body was allowed to lose in case it hurt their feelings. The teachers at my school who enacted the policy has Vote Labout posters in their classromms.

    That might apply to the egg and spoon race for 5 year olds, when everyone likes to win. I must conclude that the reason competitive sports for Secondary Schools was scaled back is because there were no playing fields to run about on by 1997. It is quite difficult to Play Rugby in a class room.

  • Comment number 25.

    Yes. They should also focus on healthy competition, trying your best, sportsmanship and, most importantly, making it fun!

  • Comment number 26.

    At 1:45pm on 26 Nov 2010, Darwins Chimp wrote:
    All schools used to be competitive in sport. I can recall football matches against other schools. In the summer we would have athletics against local schools it was a way of meeting, greeting and making new friends. Our children were reasonably fit. It was all lost when the Tories under Thatcher sold off the playing fields.

    ___________________________________________________________________________________________
    Not all. At least, not in my day. We had football in the winter and cricket in the summer. I was placed in the third football team, together with the other seven or eight odd bods who proved to be no good at the game (curiously, nobody thought to teach us how to play - I might have liked that), and left to kick an old, battered ball around without supervision. The only time I ever touched the cricket ball with anything was when being laid out after my attempt to catch it failed miserably. Oh yes, we had an hour in the gym once a week, sheer torture to be told to do something without being taught how to do it. It doesn't come naturally to everyone, you know. I liked running, and throwing the discus, the only event we were taught directly, but that only ever happened on one day out of three years. Physical Education of thirty years later was an enormous improvement. Mind, we walked or cycled just about everywhere, so there wasn't the same need for fitness in schools, as we had it in a fairly large measure. There might be a clue in there somewhere. However, if the intention is to create a small pool of winners, and the rest all losers, I imagine that is quite a different thing to school fitness.

  • Comment number 27.

    When I was at school, we had daily PT and competitive team sports on a regular basis. But then the trendy left took over the education system to condemn competition and create their socialist (we are all equal) utopia and things went rapidly downhill. Hopefully, we are now beginning the climb back up this particular mountain, but boy, has it cost us!

  • Comment number 28.

    "Should school SPORTS lessons focus on fitness"? is the HYS question.

    As we all know from famous, and infamous SPORT celebrities, sport doesn't equal fitness.

    The whole issue of physical exercise (PE) for all pupils in school needs radical evaluation. The persistent mindless and bullying attitude of some teachers have to be moderated and diverted to those who enjoy a verbal hammering to succeed. Job done for team sports jockeys.

    Physical Exercise in schools is sooo out-dated and should focus on providing for the majority:

    1) Gym facilities in a large enough gym environment for ALL pupils.
    2) 'Wii' clubs for pupils who want these facilities in school time.
    3) 1) and 2) available during free periods and after school too.

    There is clear evidence that most children today in State Education are forced into the same model of 19th century private school model of physical education introduced into State Education during the 60s/70s/80s?

    PE should not be about running pupils around muddy fields in the freezing cold or the heat of summer and ritual humiliation of fascist PE teachers. This only increases truants, or puts pupils off for life. As I said before fitness is not about training children for the army - it's about exercise for life.

  • Comment number 29.

    1. At 1:45pm on 26 Nov 2010, Darwins Chimp wrote:
    It was all lost when the Tories under Thatcher sold off the playing fields.


    Thatcher didn't sell them, the schools did.

  • Comment number 30.

    ....short exercise routine called "five-in-five"....

    Or they could play, say, just off the top of my head, as I'm no expert you understand : Football, rugby, cricket, swimming, hockey, badminton, athletics ( lots of running, jumping and throwing things ! ). The list is almost endless, I wonder why no one has considered these sports before ?

  • Comment number 31.

    I think this all comes down to the individual, when I was at school in the 60s I hated being told what to do (still do) and I hated being made to participate in sports with a passion and in the end just refused to take part and after many threats from teachers, being man handled out of the dressing room and on to the sports field and in the end resulting in a couple of canings I was eventually banished to the library which suited me, even now I loathe the teachers that forced me to take part.

    When I left school I became heavily involved in sport of all kinds from rugby to martial arts which I loved until injury forced me to stop, the reason I loved it then is that it was my choice, I wanted to do it and no one was forcing me to do it.

    Of course children need exercise but forcing someone to do all kinds of sports that they do not want to do and have no interest in only has a negative effect on both the child concerned and the other children in the class who may want to do it.

    There is nothing wrong with giving a child other activities to do instead of forcing them to participate in something which they hate and which they will remember for the rest of their lives and surly it is down to the parent/s to make sure that their child is fit and not over weight.

    I used to take my sons to play football, for long walks, swimming etc why should it always be left up to the school?.

  • Comment number 32.

    When I was at school, we had PE (single lesson) and Games (double lesson).

    PE was too short for any decent competitive sports so they just sent us on a run and punished those of us who took too long.

    Games was a term of Rugby a term of Soccer and a term of Cricket and/or Athletics.

    The result - I never learned about fitness or how to excercise.

    We need a similar timetable, but during the shorder PE period, teachers should be teaching students about fitness and how to ecxercise not kicking the slow, fat kid round the cross-country circuit.

  • Comment number 33.

    No, they should concentrate on creating a winning mentality.

  • Comment number 34.

    A focus on fitness for all kids rather than competitions for the most fit is what should have always been the focus. Fun should also be a major part of school PE.

  • Comment number 35.

    At 3:50pm on 26 Nov 2010, HaveIGotThatWrong wrote:
    ....short exercise routine called "five-in-five"....

    Or they could play, say, just off the top of my head, as I'm no expert you understand : Football, rugby, cricket, swimming, hockey, badminton, athletics ( lots of running, jumping and throwing things ! ). The list is almost endless, I wonder why no one has considered these sports before ?

    _____________________________________________________________________________________________
    It's been done, of course, as you clearly know, but may I offer another viewpoint? When it was time to play cricket in my school, I was always at the end of the batting list, so never got to hold the bat at all - not once in my school career, spending my time waiting (not) to be called on to the field. When fielding, I was made back stop, if that's the right word, and came into contact with the ball on only one all too memorable occasion. Memorable, that is, after regaining consciousness. Not a lot of fitness from those games, I can assure you. Still, maybe things have improved in the past sixty years.

  • Comment number 36.

    PE is Physical Education which entails physical activity for fitness and should a child excel in any of the activities, might lead to sporting achievement or the beginning of it.

  • Comment number 37.

    The Tories sold the school playing fields. The supermarkets took there place,
    our kids could not be competitive so they stuffed their little face.

    Now the supermarkets profits are made by selling fat,
    and the kids are now obese and the NHS pays for that.

    So we had better get them moving but where will they play?
    Take them to some private grounds so they will have to pay.

    Their obesity is child abuse parents are to blame
    they just sit there on their consoles playing the latest game.

    So now they are going to do exercise we have done a full turn
    It all down to the politicians. When will we learn?




  • Comment number 38.

    How about concentrating on educating?

  • Comment number 39.

    There are few sports of any significance where at least a certain amount of fitness doesn't make things better. I play squash, football, cycle, run and generally even work better when I'm fit.
    Kids need to be fit, a well designed 5 or 10 minute fitness session at the start of a sports lesson would enable them to (a) improve fitness, (b) warm up properly and (c) enjoy the main lesson - and their subsequent sedatory school day - somewhat more.

  • Comment number 40.

    . At 2:04pm on 26 Nov 2010, Magi Tatcher wrote:

    1. At 1:45pm on 26 Nov 2010, Darwins Chimp wrote:

    All schools used to be competitive in sport. I can recall football matches against other schools. In the summer we would have athletics against local schools it was a way of meeting, greeting and making new friends. Our children were reasonably fit. It was all lost when the Tories under Thatcher sold off the playing fields.

    Are you Andy Burnham in disguise? The Labour government sold off more than 2000 playing fields during their time in office.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Sorry rain on the Neo Cons parade but there are a few errors

    Magi you are out by a factor of 10 School playing fields sold off between 1997 and 2009 200 (two hundred)

    School playing fiels sold between 1979 and 1997 10,000 (Ten Thousand)

    My source Pravda, sorry I mean The Daily Mail.

    Am I Andy Burnham? I had better check on the label in my shirt
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    9. At 2:06pm on 26 Nov 2010, PFC_Kent wrote:

    It all stopped when Labour authorities and labour influenced quangoes launched an anti-competitive sports policy. No body was allowed to lose in case it hurt their feelings. The teachers at my school who enacted the policy has Vote Labout posters in their classromms.

    That might apply to the egg and spoon race for 5 year olds, when everyone likes to win. I must conclude that the reason competitive sports for Secondary Schools was scaled back is because there were no playing fields to run about on by 1997. It is quite difficult to Play Rugby in a class room.


    A classic example of why this country is in such a mess - silly blinkered idiots trying to blame each other. It is not the tories' fault, it is not labour's fault - it is ALL thier fault. Both parties have monumentally screwed up the education system in this country over the last 30 years, and that includes physical education.

    I think it is entirely appropriate that it is students who are starting the backlash. There is a lot more to come.

  • Comment number 41.

    Well what else are they going to focus on? Hair and make-up?

  • Comment number 42.

    Forty years ago when I was at school we had two PT lessons a week and one half day of games (cross country running if the football pitches were unplayable) We were taught maths geography history French commerce etc etc etc. We were even taught how to read and write. This was in a school that was considered very average at that time.

  • Comment number 43.

    All sport and PE should be encouraged. It has to be fun to engage the obese little tinkers nowadays, they barely get to walk let alone run these days.
    Of course not selling of the playing fields might be a good start.

  • Comment number 44.

    I must say that particular sports require certain types of fitness which will improve performance and, usually, enjoyment. However, each sport is rather different in that regard so it's hard to say that school PE should be 'fitness', because 'fitness for what?' is the question which needs to be asked.

    If you compare a cross-country runner (often hugely strong legs and rather less upper body muscle bulk)with, say, a boxer or a canoeist who need spindly legs and hugely strong arms, shoulders, pecs and stomachs you will see that the 'fitness' required is completely different.

    To me, the logical approach to 'PE' should be primary school age children being engaged in two things:

    1. General kinaesthetic activities which are beneficial to all.
    2. A really good scheme of being able to try out lots of different sports/exercise regimens before focussing in on 1 - 5 (depending on how sports mad and gifted they are) which they wish to concentrate on and, hence, gain appropriate specialised fitness for.

    When you get to secondary school, therefore, the real question comes as to whether you reorganise schooling to be an extended morning or afternoon activity, with the afternoon/mornings designated to extracurricular activities such as sport, performing arts, crafts community work etc etc. Or whether you try and integrate sport into the school curriculum. Different schools in the neighbourhood could alternate to allow maximisation of facilities usage for sports where either numbers are relatively low or cost of fixed facilities pretty high if you went for the former approach.

    I suspect the answers may be different depending on whether you are in a big city, a mid-sized town or a rural country area.

    But the key question is not whether PE is done at school per se, but whether it is done at all. And if so, how it is funded.

  • Comment number 45.

    Most schools where I live have pretty good PE programmes, modern gyms, competitive sport, outside football, hockey etc in all weathers. I sometimes wonder if I live in a blessed part of the world, or if most people live in a make believe one.
    Hands up who has actually seen a school PE lesson in the last 10 years?

  • Comment number 46.

    It's sad, to see so many podgy-legged double-chinned children waddling about these days, especially the ones cruelly-attired in junior XXL Premiership football shirts. Of course, standing next to them is the inevitable hyper-laddish lard-arsed parent, of which they are an obvious greasy chip-off-the-block.
    Once again, schools are expected to correct the shortcomings of lazy, self-indulgent and inadequate parents. Charged with improving their manners, behaviour, social skills and diet, "leading sports doctors" have now added physical fitness to the list of things for schools to do.

  • Comment number 47.

    ''Should PE focus on fitness or sports?''
    What a foolish question. It must surely be about both. There's no point in doing physical exercise unless there is a motivating point to it and that's where sports come in. Simples!

  • Comment number 48.

    Perhaps children should be taught that if you spend 8 to 12 hours a day sitting at a desk working in a rushed, possibly even predatory atmosphere you will become very ill suprisingly quickly, regardless of how many marathons you run or Salas classes you take at the weekend. Unless more manual work is reintroduced into our economy - and education - we shall all suffer ill health.

  • Comment number 49.

    It looks like I am not alone in having to put up with dreadful PE at school - matters only improved when I got to sixth form and the options opened up to something other than nightmarish team games where you weren't taught the rules and were ignored by the teacher if you were no good. Anything that gets round this is an excellent idea; only issue is that the five minute exercise seems too short, why not make it 15 to make it worth the effort of getting changed?

    Just make sure that the PE teachers help and encourage the less able pupils, in the same way as those in the academic subjects should.

    despite the lack of efforts of my idiot PE teachers, I didn't end up fat or inactive and in fact I became a sports instructor; but in an accessible sport that doesn't require the nastiness of the 'team' and can be done by anyone. So there, 'miss'.

  • Comment number 50.

    I work in a chav-infested school in Solihull. From my classroom window I can see the girl's PE lesson. The girls are worried about breaking into a sweat and their hairdo's, while their teacher is screaming at them to participate. Every now and then one girl will make a half-hearted, pathetic, languid move - perhaps to stave off the constant nagging - but this only sets the cycle off again: the teacher barks, the girls complain of sweating and spoilt hairdo's. It's quite funny!

  • Comment number 51.

    There has just been a review of whether exercise helps with obesity, which showed it did not. The issue is whether being fit helps with health and yes it does. PE lessons were a chore for me and many more as we are not naturally athletic. Playing football at break and in our local park kept us fit, smoking kept us slim as it is an appetite suppressant. Growing up removed the football and the smoking so I ended up obese and walking! And no, I do not think smoking a good thing. What is wanted is more sports fields and kids who actually get out there and play, run, climb and explore life. The sooner the better. PE Lessons will put them off for ever if reorganised as fitness regimes!

  • Comment number 52.

    Should PE focus on fitness or sports?
    Simple answer. YES!!!
    Pupils who do not like PE, I think it is due to lack of self confidence. They believe other people will laugh at them because they are 'fat' etc.
    PE lessons should be fun not hell for all pupils.

  • Comment number 53.

    WHO CARES?

  • Comment number 54.

    again it proves the old system was right with PE AND sport team competative give the children a urge to win for the team ,and helps create fitter children ,
    as with all the modern changes they have there side effects,

  • Comment number 55.

    No they should based on having fun and enjoyment-- partaking in sport is fitness anywway - some youngsters do not like sports of any sort and maybe these should have 'physical training' in place of sport .

  • Comment number 56.

    When I was at school PE was really just sports education. In fact PE was often refried to as games and the PE teacher refried to as the games teacher. If like me you were no good at competitive sports (or games) you were at best ignored or at worse ridiculed.

    I gave up on PE at the first opportunity and have avoided any exposure to sport be it watching or participating ever since.

    While I am now unfit and overweight at least I haven’t spent any of my life drudging away at soul destroying sports activities in the vain hope of deferring death.

  • Comment number 57.

    wrong idea yet again from this very stupid government ...get back to basics and remember sport is to be enjoyed ..this desperation to win and be super fit spoils the whole purpose

  • Comment number 58.

    What a silly question. These are quite different things.
    Sport is about teaching and practising the technical, individual and team skills required for individual sports, to understand the rules and to encourage healthy competitive insticts.
    PE is meant to develop physical agility, muscle development and co-ordination, not 'fitness' as such, though it will improve that too.
    I hope that schools are clear about the different objectives, which the BBC obviously isn't.

  • Comment number 59.

    I do often wonder if PE in schools would be improved if it changed so that in early primary school the general ideas of fitness were introduced along with introductions to a wide variety of sports and games. Then later on in schools if the day started with a choice of a couple of get-up-and-go sessions (to help children concentrate) and there were no PE lessons, the school day finished earlier and children were encouraged (and subsidised) to go and do whatever sports took their fancy, be it swimming, trampolining, football, rugby or canoing or even just general fitness classes. They would then get the chance to succeed, to do something they enjoy and to get taught by people who enjoy the sport ratehr than the sadistic bunch that seem to end up in schools. As a bonus it would improve local leisure facilities for everyone. But sadly I know that will never happen, there will always be the children with 2 left feet who can't hear the beat or see the ball but who can maybe row and enjoy that but are made to suffer in schools.

    It is such a shame we don't give more time over to letting children enjoy excercise, whatever it is they like.

  • Comment number 60.

    With all the total utter rubbish pushed into a childs head who needs another load of useless work outs in school?There is no time for all this hogwash.Kids have to learn fast or fall behind in lifes race,there isnt time for PE!!!

  • Comment number 61.

    Should bears sh%t in the woods? ...next question

  • Comment number 62.

    when i was at school (70s) we used to do a sponsored cross country run once a year to fund the sports dept and gyms, we had full athletics tracks,long jump, high jump pits, cricket practice nets and a tennis court...not bad for a secondary modern school...its all houses now though

  • Comment number 63.

    The trouble is that there are two things going on here -learning a sport and getting fit.

    Not that the two are mutually exclusive, but recognising that there are two reasons why someone might want to do a PE lesson.

    Maybe there should be a short, daily work out for all pupils at the beginning of the day - just to wake people up, and then use the PE lessons to learn to enjoy sport.

  • Comment number 64.

    What the 'authorities' should do, is merely refer back to 1930's /40's 50's 60's...(old newsreels etc.) to a time when Britain appeared to be inhabited by a much healthier and fitter population. Why do we persist in un-learning in this country? We know what's wrong, why do we have to ask such basic questions these days. People in education just need to respect the past a bit more, if they can stand being a bit more humble about their evident shortcomings in the common sense department.What's gone wrong with this country? Wearing sportswear doesn't make you fit or even look fit!

  • Comment number 65.

    Why is it that I got the image of the 1950's when I hear any of the Coalitions brainaves for schools? This is my impression of what I am hearing: Firstly, we are being told schools will "have to" regress back to focusing 99.9% on the left-brain scholastic subjects (focus on logical thinking, analysis, and accuracy), and as such leaving those children who are naturally drawn to right-brained subjects (focus on aesthetics, feeling, and creativity)get put off academia (problem solved about Uni, as many students will be so dehumanised and demoralised by their school experience, they will drop out). Now, schools are being told to do this army-style fitness tests....

    Bottom line...It's all a little old fashioned.

  • Comment number 66.

    24. At 3:19pm on 26 Nov 2010, Darwins Chimp wrote:

    7. At 2:04pm on 26 Nov 2010, Magi Tatcher wrote:

    1. At 1:45pm on 26 Nov 2010, Darwins Chimp wrote:

    All schools used to be competitive in sport. I can recall football matches against other schools. In the summer we would have athletics against local schools it was a way of meeting, greeting and making new friends. Our children were reasonably fit. It was all lost when the Tories under Thatcher sold off the playing fields.

    Are you Andy Burnham in disguise? The Labour government sold off more than 2000 playing fields during their time in office.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Sorry rain on the Neo Cons parade but there are a few errors

    Magi you are out by a factor of 10 School playing fields sold off between 1997 and 2009 200 (two hundred)

    School playing fiels sold between 1979 and 1997 10,000 (Ten Thousand)

    My source Pravda, sorry I mean The Daily Mail.

    Am I Andy Burnham? I had better check on the label in my shirt


    Well according to my sources over 2000 playing fields were sold betwen 1997 and 2010. No one seriously believes the Daily Mail do they?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2646750/Minister-accused-of-spinning-figures-on-playing-field-sales.html

    As for blaming Margaret Thatcher for all this country's ills, Labour had 13 years to right the wrongs. They never did. I wonder why?

  • Comment number 67.

    40. At 4:26pm on 26 Nov 2010, steve butler wrote:

    . At 2:04pm on 26 Nov 2010, Magi Tatcher wrote:

    1. At 1:45pm on 26 Nov 2010, Darwins Chimp wrote:

    All schools used to be competitive in sport. I can recall football matches against other schools. In the summer we would have athletics against local schools it was a way of meeting, greeting and making new friends. Our children were reasonably fit. It was all lost when the Tories under Thatcher sold off the playing fields.

    Are you Andy Burnham in disguise? The Labour government sold off more than 2000 playing fields during their time in office.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Sorry rain on the Neo Cons parade but there are a few errors

    Magi you are out by a factor of 10 School playing fields sold off between 1997 and 2009 200 (two hundred)

    School playing fiels sold between 1979 and 1997 10,000 (Ten Thousand)

    My source Pravda, sorry I mean The Daily Mail.

    Am I Andy Burnham? I had better check on the label in my shirt
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    9. At 2:06pm on 26 Nov 2010, PFC_Kent wrote:

    It all stopped when Labour authorities and labour influenced quangoes launched an anti-competitive sports policy. No body was allowed to lose in case it hurt their feelings. The teachers at my school who enacted the policy has Vote Labout posters in their classromms.

    That might apply to the egg and spoon race for 5 year olds, when everyone likes to win. I must conclude that the reason competitive sports for Secondary Schools was scaled back is because there were no playing fields to run about on by 1997. It is quite difficult to Play Rugby in a class room.

    A classic example of why this country is in such a mess - silly blinkered idiots trying to blame each other. It is not the tories' fault, it is not labour's fault - it is ALL thier fault. Both parties have monumentally screwed up the education system in this country over the last 30 years, and that includes physical education.

    I think it is entirely appropriate that it is students who are starting the backlash. There is a lot more to come.


    What we need is a coalition government to sort this mess out!

  • Comment number 68.

    As a kid at school we had our gym lessons in the 'playground' (A concrete yard). We had the use of coconut mats, some old benches and some very old skipping ropes; But boy did we get a work out! Then we had to run about 5 to 6 miles through city streets and on to a canal tow path. Then back on to the city streets and back to school. IF! You didn't want to do PE then you had a choise of either being caned or do PE!
    Then walk 4 miles up hill to get home AND then go out to play. This inc. anything from football (soccer) to playing in the woods to playing hide and seek across an entire housing estate! Then supper (bread and dripping and cocoa) if you were lucky. No TV. No telephone (didn't even have a phone in the house). Then bed by 9pm! In winter the ice would be on the inside of the windows (a kind of early double glazing)!
    FIT? Fit to drop!

  • Comment number 69.

    63. At 11:54pm on 26 Nov 2010, Hastings wrote:

    The trouble is that there are two things going on here -learning a sport and getting fit.

    Not that the two are mutually exclusive, but recognising that there are two reasons why someone might want to do a PE lesson.

    Maybe there should be a short, daily work out for all pupils at the beginning of the day - just to wake people up, and then use the PE lessons to learn to enjoy sport.

    ________________________________________________________________________

    How about kids walking to and from school, there's a multitude of benefits to had there including keeping mothers off the road while I'm driving to work. As regards PE being intended to help children to keep fit, when did it stop being for that purpose?

  • Comment number 70.


    66. At 00:56am on 27 Nov 2010, Magi Tatcher wrote:

    As for blaming Margaret Thatcher for all this country's ills, Labour had 13 years to right the wrongs. They never did. I wonder why?

    Margaret Thatcher was the worst prime minister in living memory (stupid, arrogant ill informed and ill advised) until Toady Bliar came along, but it was Thatcher who started selling school assets, these assets being mainly the land that had been playing fields.

  • Comment number 71.

    As I remember it school sports used to be football every week barring one game of cricket and one week of track sports in the summer. If you wanted to do anything else you had to arrange it yourself outside school hours.

    Anything they do now has to be an improvement on that.

  • Comment number 72.

    Simple.

    Build schools uphill, miles from anywhere, with no road/vehicle access, with a deep canyon to cross over just a high wire (for a balanced approach to the subject). The entrance to the school will be via a steep stone spiral staircase climbing at 50% gradient, with thick oak doors to push open every ten steps. At the end of this will be a one hundred metre three foot high tunnel with death traps randomly encountered.

    Students or pupils with mobility issues will have helicopter taxis for access to overcome any discrimination issues. Parents will be required to attend schools six times per year to prove their fitness.

  • Comment number 73.

    I was always useless at soccer. At school we were lined up whilst the team captains (the best players in the school year) walked along the line choosing their team members. Myself and another guy were always the last to be chosen. We were put in as left-back on each team with strict instructions that if ever the ball came near us we were to kick it out for a throw-in as this was perceived as the least dangerous option for us.

    How I hated those afternoons. How I hated the teachers and the team captains. How I hated everything to do with organized sport.

    After I left school I found I really enjoyed playing badminton. I got quite good at it. As time has gone on, I have taken up golf and love it…

    But my heart goes out to those kids who are suffering the same humiliation and degradation that I did over forty years ago.

  • Comment number 74.

    Sigh there is nothing wrong with the PE lessons in school, None of our children are obese, Its the culture of TV, Video games and bad diet that cause obesity. Britain has a cold climate most of the time, and that burns calories, that and a poor diet and excesive excersise in school gives underdeveloped children.
    The excersise regimes in the past were too much for some of the poorest, who on a bad diet fared badly.
    its only recently that schools cottoned on and started doing breakfast. imagine doing excersise when you have not eaten all morning. and dont say it doesent happen kids skip breakfast all the time.
    I dont see why the whole school system has to change because there are one or two children obese. It makes more sense to give the obese children extra fitness classes in school.

  • Comment number 75.

    Oh dear, this is a minefield, the poor little dears have rights these days you know, don't these people know just how exhausting it can be opening a laptop and logging on to my space.....

  • Comment number 76.

    Some of the teachers could also use a workout daily, obesity seems to be one of the teaching profession's essential qualities, maybe a compulsory session for teachers and kids every day is what is called for.

  • Comment number 77.

    Education needs improving!
    Discipline in school needs improving!
    Children need to exercise more!

    When are the politicians going to accept responsibility for the damage their political ideologies have done to this country since I left school in the late 60’s.

    We had a great sport time table, Cross Country, Athletics, Rugby, Netball, Rounders etc with competitive games against many of our local schools promoting pride in your school and sportsmanship and most of this took place at weekends and in the evening.

    We also had after school clubs like young farmers, film club, chess club, tennis lessons again all after school, run by willing and enthusiastic teachers.

    Then in 70’s onwards something change. Education and teacher bashing became a political football and the whole face of teaching and schools responsibilities changed. Nice one politicians!

    As for young people taking more exercise then I recommend you read the books written by Arthur Lydiard he had it right in the 1960’s.

    Of course kids should exercise more but where do they do this exercise as most schools were allowed to sell of their playing fields by, yes that’s right, the Conservatives.

  • Comment number 78.

    Take a walk about any town centre on a Saturday afternoon, and look around you - there'll be hundreds of teenagers, window-shopping and just hanging out with their mates. Among them will be girls who could have made terrific hockey or netball players, 200 metre sprinters or top-class skiers, and boys who could have made the grade in rugby, table-tennis or swimming.
    The problem is that we are not Australia or Sweden - we have an anti-exercise culture and lack the school sporting infra-structure to pick these kids up, expose them to a range of sports, so they find something at which they might excel.
    It's all such a waste of potential talent.

  • Comment number 79.

    PE stands for Physical Education. It means by definition 'Education in the care and development of the human body'. Excercising your body is as important as excercising your mind.
    It appears that many within teaching fail to value excercise as an important faucet of teaching, possibly because an unduly high proportion of teachers are academics who do not excercise enough themselves.
    It needs to be addressed for the sake of the health wealth and happiness of the nation.
    Teachers should be forced to take part in some form of excercise themselves daily and it doesn't have to be contact sports or even strenuous excercise

  • Comment number 80.

    Why just schools? Why not make it mandatory for every establishment in the land, it might cause just a few heart attacks in the first few weeks but then we might end up with a fitter population.

    Just imagine PMQs on parliamentary TV closely followed by the sight of all those MP's doing their keep fit as an example to the nation.

    It sounds very much like the routine that the Canadian armed forces introduced for their staff a generation ago known as 5BX or some such.
    It would be far better than giving everybody a five minute break for a coffee and an iced doughnut.

  • Comment number 81.

    50 years ago, those of us who are still young had two kinds of physical lessons in grammar *and* secondary schools. We had PE which was in the gym: climbing ropes (I couldn't do that), vaulting horses (I wasn't much good at that either and caused laughter), vertical climbing frames, country dancing (lovely) etc. We also had Games comprising hockey, netball, tennis, rounders. I loved those and (wow!) played hockey for my form. There were no fat children in the school which also played matches in various sports against other schools, leading to county competitions.

    I can remember that, at primary school in Cheam, I was taught how to bunny jump through rolling hoops. There were no fat children there either.

    All of that was before the current things that people eat were introduced. However, I do think that PE and Games as described above are essential for wellbeing because so many fewer people now have manual jobs that use their calories up.

  • Comment number 82.

    70. At 01:49am on 27 Nov 2010, Syni_cal wrote:


    66. At 00:56am on 27 Nov 2010, Magi Tatcher wrote:

    As for blaming Margaret Thatcher for all this country's ills, Labour had 13 years to right the wrongs. They never did. I wonder why?

    Margaret Thatcher was the worst prime minister in living memory (stupid, arrogant ill informed and ill advised) until Toady Bliar came along, but it was Thatcher who started selling school assets, these assets being mainly the land that had been playing fields.


    And it was Labour who introduced tuition fees which is also a pointless argument as the coalition government could easily adopt a different policy if they wanted to. Blaming someone who left office over 20 years ago is too simple an argument made by unfortunately by too simple a person.

  • Comment number 83.

    Fitness = excellent

    Competitive sports = tedious and unnecessary.

  • Comment number 84.

    Should PE focus on fitness or sports? Both!

  • Comment number 85.

    All schools used to be competitive in sport. I can recall football matches against other schools. In the summer we would have athletics against local schools it was a way of meeting, greeting and making new friends. Our children were reasonably fit. It was all lost when the Tories under Thatcher sold off the playing fields.

    Are you Andy Burnham in disguise? The Labour government sold off more than 2000 playing fields during their time in office.

    ------------
    Actually the figure isn't Two Thousand it is 187. (Source would you credit it the Daily Mail!) While this is regrettable it compares quiet favourably with the OVER FIVE THOUSAND sold off under Thatcher and Major.
    Also 234 NEW Schools were built under Labour so if you are a Tory and from a party that is about to crucify school sports I certainly wouldn't be criticizing Labour's performance on this as it is by any standards far superior.

  • Comment number 86.

    I remember every Wednesday being sports-day. Regardless if it were football, rugby, athletics etc. All the kids enjoyed and looked forward to it. It did not disrupt any schooling and the teachers also enjoyed the break from the classrooms. Hot showers afterwards and then home.
    We also played football, rugby against other schools and the girls played netball etc against other schools. The Health and Safety grumpy sad people were nowhere to be seen, a kind word and magic water on a bruise always helped. And the Parents did not threaten the school with being sued if their child came home with a bruise or two. We must have been tougher in those days.
    Sadly the kids are wrapped in cotton wool these days, which is such a shame.

  • Comment number 87.

    66. At 00:56am on 27 Nov 2010, Magi Tatcher wrote:

    As for blaming Margaret Thatcher for all this country's ills, Labour had 13 years to right the wrongs. They never did. I wonder why?

    Margaret Thatcher was the worst prime minister in living memory (stupid, arrogant ill informed and ill advised) until Toady Bliar came along, but it was Thatcher who started selling school assets, these assets being mainly the land that had been playing fields.

    And it was Labour who introduced tuition fees which is also a pointless argument as the coalition government could easily adopt a different policy if they wanted to. Blaming someone who left office over 20 years ago is too simple an argument made by unfortunately by too simple a person.

    --Unfortunately under the Thatcher and Major Governments up to 1997 not 20 years ago over 5,000 School playing fields were sold off.Primarily for development.You can't get them back they are under houses and office blocks consequently yes we can blame these governments for the current situation as there was no net loss under Labour (187 Sold off 200+ new schools built).

  • Comment number 88.

    "As for blaming Margaret Thatcher for all this country's ills, Labour had 13 years to right the wrongs. They never did. I wonder why?"

    If I sell your house, car and all your possessions and give the money away to others will you be able to go out and buy the same items back ? I also doubt those living in houses built on my old school playing field would appreciate being evicted ! Many of the playing fields were sold for housebuilding without providing a suitable alternative.

    Labour weren't perfect but it really is a pity that the internet wasn't as developed and popular during the Thatcher and Major years so their successes and failures were as well documented as those of the Labour government of 1997 to 2010. To read these pages some would believe that the Tories didn't leave their fair share of issues. Some of the views expressed here often leave me with the opinion that the writers believe the world didn't even start until 1997 !

    As for the question, most sports federations have regional development officers these days who have the ability to promote a basic version of their relevant sport. Why don't the schools invite them in to give kids a taste of different sports, initially together at the very start of the year and then a different one each week. For those who want to do the mainstream sports they can be taught by the existing teachers. The rest can be given the chance to find a sport they like which, even if they cannot do it in school, may take it up during their leisure time. Mix these in with discussions on nutrition, benefits of exercise and even potential jobs within the sports industry and hopefully more will benefit. Football, rugby, cricket, hockey and netball are not for everybody but that doesn't mean that there isn't a sport that will not appeal.

    Also where possible address any issues as to why some kids don't like sport. Contrary to the opinion expressed by some it isn't always about laziness.

  • Comment number 89.

    After reading so many other comments - the main conclusion on this whole area of fitness and sports for children - is that sports do not necessarily equate to fitness if children are humiliated and bullied.

    Some posters have suggested that overweight children must do more sports.

    However, if sports bore you - and you are of a 'normal' weight - you will still be humiliated, bullied or patronised by a breed of PE teachers that still infest schools.

    Some posters have suggested that lack of competiveness has dumbed down PE in schools?

    We know that Physical Education, Physical Exercise, Physical Training is such a broad subject in schools that we don't know anymore what it means - and neither do the schools, nor government.

    The selling-off of school 'playing' fields has also been mentioned as a detriment to physical fitness of children? Possibly.

    However, any form of exercise or activity should be fun, or enjoyable and accessible to all children in school. Which means, that if a child is mad about football or other team sports, then they should be forced to take part in aerobics, yoga, pilates, wii, etc., that suits other pupils and learn some humility - as should PE teachers.

    In fact, it's increasingly obvious, that many grown-ups today are an obvious result of the narrow and horrendous experience of PE teaching in schools for generations - that continues today?

    It's time we had Physical Activity as a subject that is more inclusive and teaches life long habits of physical health in ALL it's forms?

  • Comment number 90.

    Surely there should be both fitness and sport, especially as most proper sports need a level of fitness.

    However, pure sport is not appropriate for those who are not naturally good at it, whilst a reasonable level of fitness is desirable from a health point of view. As always, moderation in all things.

    My recollection of PE (I was not "sporty") was all about humiliation by ex army sadistic "teachers" and long road runs because they needed little supervision. Completely put me off sport until I discovered golf at age 40.

  • Comment number 91.

    The question "Should PE focus on fitness or sports?" is plain stupid. PE should be about both and should focus on the three Ss - Stamina, Strength and Suppleness. Learning teamwork and strategy is also a good thing. It does not have to choose between fitness and sports.

  • Comment number 92.

    This Question makes me think that school-sports are conducted by teachers who haven't a clue if pupils have any level of fitness...

    What next...special talent tests for those who appear on BGT and X Factor...

    Members of Parliament to live on the Minimum Wage...

  • Comment number 93.

    The school-children's fitness cannot be improved without their parents' cooperation. The PE should seek such cooperation, especially and particularly for the children who're prospective sports-persons/hopefuls, and laying a general stress upon physical fitness.

  • Comment number 94.

    Why not take a leaf out of the Japanese industrial fitness book..

    15 mins of medium exercise at assembly every morning for everyone staff and pupils before lessons would allow PE to be abandoned or could be replaced by sports clubs within the school for those that enjoy competative team games. With alternatives for those who do not.

  • Comment number 95.

    Should school sports lessons focus on fitness?

    LOL.

    The 1001% WHOLE and FACTUAL reason for sport in schools etc was to INCREASE fitness to enable industry to get MORE out of workers, same with activity leisure time such as opening up national parks etc and encouraging people to go on long walks etc.

    Its HISTORICALLY DOCUMENTED.

    Encouraging a fitter society is NOT a NEW thing.

  • Comment number 96.

    More tiresome nonsense about going back to some glorious but non existent past when people did real exercise blah blah. No-one is going to exercise unless they enjoy it. Kids will find endless ways of getting out of it unless they enjoy it. It does not matter what any of us adults think they should be doing whether we are Doctors or any other wonderful pundit class - if the kids are not having fun they will not bother doing the exercise and then they will not get fit. Competition is great if you win once in a while but if you just keep losing then you just stop competing and do something more rewarding instead.

    There is your challenge. Exercise that they enjoy - bearing in mind they are individuals with different levels of capability and initial fitness and taste. It is not some Nazi requirement to improve ze fitness of ze nation. These are children!

  • Comment number 97.


    MrWonderfulReality wrote:

    Should school sports lessons focus on fitness?

    LOL.

    The 1001% WHOLE and FACTUAL reason for sport in schools etc was to INCREASE fitness to enable industry to get MORE out of workers, same with activity leisure time such as opening up national parks etc and encouraging people to go on long walks etc.

    Its HISTORICALLY DOCUMENTED.

    Encouraging a fitter society is NOT a NEW thing.


    The reason for the debate has clearly gone flying way over your head, so allow me to help.

    This has nothing to do with working in industry (which we no longer actually have anyway), it is all about the fact that we have a generation of very unhealthy kids because they don't take enough exercise.

    I know I have used a few big words there, but hopefully you can understand, and hopefully that helps.

  • Comment number 98.

    Do we need anyone to remind us of what we know? Reduce the traffic, encourage children to walk to schools and they will be fit in mind and spirit. It is time we put sports back in school curriculum. What is wrong with competitive sport? Bring back the old House competitions.

  • Comment number 99.

    " It does not matter what any of us adults think they should be doing whether we are Doctors or any other wonderful pundit class - if the kids are not having fun they will not bother doing the exercise and then they will not get fit. Competition is great if you win once in a while but if you just keep losing then you just stop competing and do something more rewarding instead."

    PE lessons used to be part of the run of the mill timetable. No one questioned it. Not many children have fun in the Maths classes or History or even a foreign language so why should 'fun' be in every class? Classes are not there for fun. They are there to *teach* things. The classes were there to be experienced whether we liked them or not. They were there to *teach* children knowledge. What's the matter with parents today?

  • Comment number 100.

    72. At 05:07am on 27 Nov 2010, holly_bush_berry wrote:

    Simple.

    Build schools uphill, miles from anywhere, with no road/vehicle access, with a deep canyon to cross over just a high wire (for a balanced approach to the subject). The entrance to the school will be via a steep stone spiral staircase climbing at 50% gradient, with thick oak doors to push open every ten steps. At the end of this will be a one hundred metre three foot high tunnel with death traps randomly encountered.

    Students or pupils with mobility issues will have helicopter taxis for access to overcome any discrimination issues. Parents will be required to attend schools six times per year to prove their fitness.

    ----------------------------------------------------

    Excellent. Many thanks for today's chuckle. :-)

 

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