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Should children be allowed in pubs?

10:06 UK time, Friday, 12 November 2010

Pub landlords are increasingly having to deal with aggressive behaviour from parents who bring their children in to pubs and fail to keep them quiet when asked. Should pubs be child-free zones?

According to the Good Pub Guide the number of complaints about children in pubs has continued to increase for several years. Some pub landlords also claim the pub is the last bastion of adulthood and children in pubs alienate their adult customers.

Before 1995 children under the age of 14 were not allowed in pubs in England and Wales, but now many pubs rely on the family market with a billion pub meals being served in the UK every year. Other pub landlords have also said that far from ruining a pub, children can enhance the pub-going experience and make it a family affair.

Does the presence of children in pubs ruin a visit to the local or does it make it more enjoyable? Should pubs be the preserve of adults? Is your local pub child-friendly? Does teaching children about drinking at an early age help prevent alcohol abuse?

This debate has now been closed. Thank you for your comments.

Comments

Page 1 of 4

  • Comment number 1.

    We've been through this TWICE before!

    Pubs should be for adults! It's probably on of the only places that does not have children running everywhere!

    Pubs have suffered enough with the smoking ban & high tax on alcohol.

    No No No!

  • Comment number 2.

    Pubs are licensed premises. Children should be allowed into a children only area under adult supervision. Any adult who allows their children to run riot or becomes abusive to any member of staff should be banned for life from ALL licensed premises in the UK. harsh but it would work. needs some work done by gutless politicians to make it law so I don't hold my breath.

  • Comment number 3.

    Should children be allowed in pubs?

    Back in the late 70s when i was about 5 or six, my parents used tp send me and a friend to the bar to get the round in at our local rural pub.

    Anyhoo,

    can' t they just leave it up to the landlord's dicretion as to whether he wants in children in his pub?

    Or is that too grown up - do we need some kind of blanket national law on this, because we can't be trusted to behave sensibly?

  • Comment number 4.

    Wrong question, it should be 'Why do UK parents refuse to take responsibility for their children's conduct?'
    On holiday in Europe this summer, the only disruptive children were Brits.

  • Comment number 5.

    Kids are kids. They'll get bored, run around and generally amuse themselves because a pub isn't somewhere to bring kids in general. If the parent has the common sense to bring something to amuse them, great stuff. If they haven't then don't get upset when the landlord (quite rightly) asks you to control your kids.

    There are pubs that are considered 'kid friendly'. Try to stick to those and be prepared to fork out a few quid to keep them amused. If you can afford to go for a couple of drinks, you can surely afford to make sure the kids are amused too?

  • Comment number 6.

    No, they shouldnt, cant adults have a place away from screaming children. I am not a child hater but a pub is a place for over 18 year old to relax, enjoy a drink and chat, i may sometimes swear in conversation and hate it when some parent feels the need to come and ask to tone it dowm !! granted if i were crude or obnoxious but the odd 'adult' word shouldnt be unheard of in a pub. Also as a studen and working in numerous bars, i hated having to approach parents about loud / wild children, the amount of complaints at the bar would be OTT

  • Comment number 7.

    No.

    There are plenty of family friendly licensed restaurants, wine bars, etc etc. Pubs are for adults. Don't want to miss out - get a baby sitter.

  • Comment number 8.

    I have no problem with kids being in pubs but what i would suggest is a return to kids rooms, where they can be kids and not annoy those who have gone to the pub to get away from such things.

  • Comment number 9.

    To be honest I don't think children should be allowed in Starbucks let alone pubs.

    Seriously though there are pubs and then there are pubs.....

    Some pubs - with restaurants - should be "family friendly" and others should be somewhere adults can go & be child free. There should be a clear difference between them.

    I actually think that the issue is more to do with parents unwillingness to control their children (hence my Starbucks comment at the top) - when I was a child I was taught how to behave in a restaurant / cafe / etc.

  • Comment number 10.

    NO

    I have been in Pubs where parent let their little darlings run round and shout and scream. These parents are shown up as to having no control over their offspring and letting them treat the public House as a playground. I would love to see them ban from a pub or, better still, let the pub decide if it is profitable to let them through the doors. Maybe we could have a bar where it is adults only.

  • Comment number 11.

    I don't take my children in to pubs but:
    wouldn't it be better to socialise children into going into pubs (for a meal etc) before unleashing them into a pub for the first time as teenages.
    any children, like any adults, who cause a nuisance to other visitoirs should be asked to leave (this does not only apply to pubs, but also cinemas, etc)
    after a given time it should be adults only -should young children be out after 8pm?
    any parent drunk whilst caring for their children is negleting them.

  • Comment number 12.

    THIS IS SHEER STUPIDITY.....what we ought to be doing is erase the pub culture totally from our way of life and only sell alcohol in restaurant and nowhere else, not in retailers' outlet or supermarket. Pub landlords are not famous for their brain so ignore them. The first positive steps are in place already and quite a success too: that is Smoking Ban. The next step is to totally eradicate pubs from our high streets. Children should be at home doing their homework, not brainwashing them early in life as future customers.

  • Comment number 13.

    "Should children be allowed in pubs?":

    No - why rush them into the Drinking-habit?

    Pubs can be a dangerous place for Children - moreso since Adults are becoming intoxicated there. Nobody can deny that alcohol does bring out the WORST in SOME drinkers - including the criminally-minded.

    I don't know many drinkers - except Parents - who enjoy the prescence of Children in Pubs. Many Adult drinkers go to a Pub for a bit of peace from the 'chaos' of home or work-life.

    IF Children ARE to be allowed in Pubs - there should be a designated 'Playroom' for them - where they should be contained. Children running about in Pubs are a real danger sometimes - to themselves and others.

    Parents who DO wish to take their Children into Pubs - should re-think.

  • Comment number 14.

    Most pubs in Edinburgh are for over 18s only (or over 21s in some cases) and I agree with this. Pubs are full of adults getting drunk, having a laugh with their friends, or trying to chat up the opposite sex and this means that they are often chatting away about things that kids shouldn't hear! Happy for there to be a 'child friendly zone' in family orientated pubs, but the local pub/bar should definitely be adults only.

  • Comment number 15.

    Pubs need to go back to where they where in the sixties where you had seperate rooms. It beggars belief that breweries (most pubs are owned by them), cannot organise the rooms on their premises to cater for smokers in comfort without endangering their staffs health and children where they don't annoy people who go for a pint and relaxation without the hassle of children. The one big room syndrome might work fot the likes of Wetherspoons, but they're not what I call a decent pub. Breweries have ruined their trade by chasing young customers rather than adapting to the changes and catering for all. It's that greed thing again, people in high places get big bonuses and salaries for bringing about the downfall of their industry. I've been a customer for the pub trade for over fifty years, I'm a customer, the customer is always right, take note breweries, wake up before you lose everyones business.

  • Comment number 16.

    Shouldn't it be down to the discretion of the landlord?

    Some pubs have a 'family pub' business model, this allows parents with children to enjoy a trip to the pub. They also allow (most) parents to show children how adults should drink and behave responsibly in pubs. If these types of pub have a problem with families they shouln't let them in.

    Personally, I avoid "family pubs" as for me the pub should be a haven where adults can get away from children.

  • Comment number 17.

    No, children should definitely NOT be permitted in pubs...I go to a pub for adult company and certainly don't want to have to put up with other peoples offspring screaming and running around. I even take my holidays out of season to avoid screaming brats

    OK if a pub chooses to have a children's room while their parents drink well away from them, so be it....it's exactly the sort of pub I would avoid like the plague. If parents want to drink, get a babysitter or drink at home, don't inflict your kids on those of us who prefer grown up company.

  • Comment number 18.

    children 14 and under should not be allowed in a pub after 5 however children over 14 should be allowed generally as there not a problem, the only downside is i enjoy it when the under 16's are in to watch the footy sometimes they are funny.

    it is a major problem however there are to many kids usually 4-10 that just run about screaming like they are simple in the head and the parents do nothing, what can they do they certainly cant hit them?
    whats the other option tell them you will go home and ruin your own night aswell?

    i think making shandy legal for under 18's should also be allowed,
    i remember when i went to the pub young i loved being allowed to have a shandy it made me feel more like i fit in with the adults and generally kept me happy after all its a SHANDY

  • Comment number 19.

    It would be nice to think that children were able to enjoy a family atmosphere but the reality is that the majority of parents do not seem to want ( or are able) to control their kids, therefore NO.

    THe doting behavious of UK parents is spoiling not only pubs but restaurants too. We now live in France and you really don't know the kids are around except for them being polite and acknowledging adults. If they misbehave, they get a clip around the ear from their parents...so much for Europe being to blame for UK rules and regulations and the stupid attitude of many UK parents.

  • Comment number 20.

    . At 10:43am on 12 Nov 2010, Aneeta Trikk wrote:
    No.

    There are plenty of family friendly licensed restaurants, wine bars, etc etc. Pubs are for adults. Don't want to miss out - get a baby sitter.

    ----

    Why make it yes or no, why not compromise.

    That why I can meet my sister and little nieces for lunch in a family friendly pub with play area, then head down the adults only boozer in the evenings - evryone's a winner (except my liver - shut up stupid liver).

  • Comment number 21.

    The traditional British pub is dead - killed by the smoking ban. Those lucky to survive had to compromise in various ways - selling cheap junk food, becoming 'gastropubs', becoming karaoke bars, being 'child-friendly'...

    The Great British public allegedly voted for smoke-free pubs - these are the direct consequences. We have only ourselves to blame.

    How long before even more restrictions are placed on pubs to 'protect the children'. How many more thousands will close as a result?

  • Comment number 22.

    Yes, but in family rooms, not where they can screech and disrupt others.

  • Comment number 23.

    I'm 30 now and when I was under 16 many pubs had a 16+ only policy you even saw the sign outside.

    It's a bad thing of letting children into pubs and also they could get pulled by peados.

  • Comment number 24.

    12. At 10:52am on 12 Nov 2010, matt-stone wrote:

    THIS IS SHEER STUPIDITY.....what we ought to be doing is erase the pub culture totally from our way of life and only sell alcohol in restaurant and nowhere else, not in retailers' outlet or supermarket. Pub landlords are not famous for their brain so ignore them. The first positive steps are in place already and quite a success too: that is Smoking Ban. The next step is to totally eradicate pubs from our high streets. Children should be at home doing their homework, not brainwashing them early in life as future customers.

    -------------

    your comment is shear stupidity!

    so you wont mind when all the football fans come into your resturant and start shouting etc and have the footyball etc in the background?
    thought so
    think before you speak alot more goes on in pub that just geting sloshed
    i always go to the pub for the match to have a laugh let of some steam and just talk to people something that has died along time ago conversation. i also go down for some food on a wednesday they have an all you can eat buffet different country each week and its £5.
    id much rather do that than sit in a resturant with people like you like you moaning how we are being to rowdey for your liking yet your the one who wants pubs shut.

    and i say children should be children not stuck in doing homework i doubt you stayed in everytime you had homework dont be so hypacritical.

  • Comment number 25.

    Are you asking that parents take responsibility for their kids? My word but you are asking a lot.

  • Comment number 26.

    Children should not be allowed in pubs. Children on the continent are fine in licensed premises, but their parents appear to be more responsible. So for the anti-child feeling, you need to blame the adults who think that wherever they take their children is a giant playground and everybody else is responsible for them.

    You can also watch these parents happily ignoring their children spreading messy food over the seats.

    It is a shame, because there are children who are fine in pubs, but you don't notice them.

    I'm also not sure I would want children listening to some of the "adult" talk that goes on in pubs.






  • Comment number 27.

    The U.K is anti familys and hates children, Pubs landlords who are fussy about the customers, should have they lincence to sell alcohol taken off them

  • Comment number 28.

    Absolutely NOT.

    The pub should be the one place where adults can relax in peace. Many of today's children have no discipline, which is not their fault, but most of the parents do nothing about their childrens' behaviour, and consequently is of great annoyance to everyone else.

    To be honest my partner and I now only frequent pubs that are child free, or are child free by 8pm, as this is when most children should be in bed anyway. We have noticed that in recent years many pubs are becoming child free because of the feedback from other adults, so I think this is a problem that will sort itself out anyway eventually.

  • Comment number 29.

    RAPISTS AND PAEDOPHILES start off their day in pubs where they get stoned and work themselves up. If children are there, chances are they'll be turning on them, eyeing them up for possible assault. Do parents really want that type of setting to take their kids to? Grow up !!

  • Comment number 30.

    Unless you are having pub food, there is no point taking a child into a pub. The pub should be a place to go to get away from children. I have been in hotels and left prematurely because of children being out of control. I blame the parents for their failure as parents.

  • Comment number 31.

    As I understand it children are only allowed in pubs IF they have an area with out a bar, such as a dining/family room. It would also help if parents had proper control over their children. When I was young my parents would take my brothers and I to the pub BUT we were never allowed to come in, we had to play in the outdoor play area and were under strict instructions not to bother the other adults. A glass of lime & soda and a packet of crisps were enough to keep us amused.

  • Comment number 32.

    My wife & I have three boys, aged 15, 13 & 10, and believe me, they know how to behave anywhere, not just in a pub. We've taken them to restaurants & pub restaurants all their lives, so to them it's just another thing we do. Note that I said pub restaurants, of the gourmet variety, usually for Sunday lunch, or birthdays etc. I would never take them into the 'boozer' type pub, as they're not suitable for children.

  • Comment number 33.

    Should be entirely at the landlords discretion and the pub rules should be clearly stated on the door. Hence no confusion, no aggravation, if you don't want kids around then find a different pub. How can it be any more fair and reasonable than that?

    I think after maybe 9pm a blanket ban is approriate though.

  • Comment number 34.

    They should be allowed i pubs, but as people have rightly said above. IF the parents cannot control them, they should be required to leave.

    If I am having a quiet drink with friends, I don't want a load of brats running aropund screaming, running into me (which has happened before- and the parent had the nerve to get ME an evil look for it!).

    If we bacame unruly and were disrupting other pub goers because we were too drunk etc, the landlord would ask us to leave- why not the same for families with kids?

  • Comment number 35.


    Matt Stone Post # 12
    What can I say !
    Please tell me you are only trying to get a reaction from people who, like me, are ready to waste time on you.
    Simply put if these are your genuine feelings I suggest you don't ever respond to this type of debate again.

  • Comment number 36.

    No they shouldn't be!

    There are designated restaurant 'pubs' to take your children but into a regular pub.... no!

    What really infuriates me is going into a pub with children running riot and when I ask if my very well behaved, leashed dog is allowed in they look at me like I've asked for a free drink! Why is it acceptable to have a child running free in a drinking establishment but a leashed dog tucked away in the corner is frowned upon? I know what i'd rather have in a pub (even before I was a dog owner)

    I now avoid pubs that have taken this stance with me even if the dog is at home and the ones that welcome the dog always get my business.

    I would like to clarify, I understand that some pubs just aren't suitable for dogs (ie they are serving food) and understand that, it's the onesthat have screaming kids in, don't serve food and still decline that annoy me! Most dogs (or most dogs where an owner would take there dog into a pub) are usually pub trained which is more than I can say for kids. And most importantly my dog loves the pub, he gets lots of fuss! :)

    Pet hate, desperately grasping 3 pints and heading over to the table only for a kid to run past and make you lose half your beer!

  • Comment number 37.

    I think that this should be taken into account with the wider issue of drinking in general in our society.

    Drinking is thee most harmful legal substance alongside smoking there needs to be a cultural shift of not just drinking for drinking sake (Happy hour style promotions) Drink becuase it is social and helps you to relax or compliments what you are eating not so that you cannot remember what you did the night before.

    Parents should introduce alcohol into the home at a younger age (watering down wine with meals) and the odd small glass of beer rather than it being something that only adults do.

    I do not feel that pubs are the right way to educate children, it is place for adults to unwind and relax. Children need to learn they are children and not mini adults...there needs to be clear lines and boundaries for adults and children alike.

    The only places that should sell alcohol..Pubs,Bars,Off licenses and restaurants not supermarkets or only selected supermarkets in rural areas...that way selling illegaly is easier to police and it there less need to small shops to make it stupidly cheap.

  • Comment number 38.

    Yes they should, however parents should not be suprised if they are asked to leave because of disruptive behaviour from children for who the parents are responsible, in the same way any adult can be asked to leave.

    Most pubs have a declaration that allows the owner to refuse any person on site

  • Comment number 39.

    12. At 10:52am on 12 Nov 2010, matt-stone wrote:
    THIS IS SHEER STUPIDITY.....what we ought to be doing is erase the pub culture totally from our way of life and only sell alcohol in restaurant and nowhere else, not in retailers' outlet or supermarket. Pub landlords are not famous for their brain so ignore them. The first positive steps are in place already and quite a success too: that is Smoking Ban. The next step is to totally eradicate pubs from our high streets. Children should be at home doing their homework, not brainwashing them early in life as future customers.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------

    I am thrilled to see that I am not the only person who sees your comment as stupid.

  • Comment number 40.

    No! Definitely not! Pubs should be child free zones. Pubs are not a suitable environment for children and besides, the pub is practically the only place that I can go to escape from other people's screaming unruly sprogs getting under my feet.

  • Comment number 41.

    Whether children are out of place in a pub depends a lot on which pub it is. I don’t think the law should ban kids from pubs, but I have no problem with landlords who do.

    But to be honest, as a pretty experienced customer of pubs, I can say that groups of 18 year old senseless binge drinkers bother me more than people’s children.

  • Comment number 42.

    Basically - no.
    Definitely no under 12s ever
    No under 18s without parents and then only until 8pm at latest.

  • Comment number 43.

    Oh dear, the pub landlords are complaining again. No wonder pubs are closing across Britain. Never mind a child free zone landlord - how do you fancy a customer free zone? We've all got difficult jobs. (except for Neil Kinnock of course.) Deal with it.

  • Comment number 44.

    Pubs in Ireland allowed kids in many years ago and I can't recall encountering any problems.

    I have been in a five star hotel on the continent where kids were playing their games running up and down the aisles in the restaurant, nobody got hot under the collar about it.

    Yes kids can be a nuisance and so can adults, it all depends on how well have been brought up, both the kids and the adults.

  • Comment number 45.

    #20 Jack Napier pleads “Why make it yes or no, why not compromise.”

    We already have a compromise available. It is called a “family friendly licensed premise”.

    Pubs are for adults….. period.

  • Comment number 46.

    No children should not be allowed in pubs. Children are everywhere these days and I think the pub is a place where adults can go to get away from them. It's not a good environment for kids anyway.

  • Comment number 47.

    "27. At 11:11am on 12 Nov 2010, Lewis Fitzroy wrote:
    The U.K is anti familys and hates children, Pubs landlords who are fussy about the customers, should have they lincence to sell alcohol taken off them"

    I don't have a problem with children, it's brats I hate!

  • Comment number 48.

    12. At 10:52am on 12 Nov 2010, matt-stone wrote:
    "THIS IS SHEER STUPIDITY.....what we ought to be doing is erase the pub culture totally from our way of life. . .Pub landlords are not famous for their brain so ignore them. The first positive steps are in place already and quite a success too: that is Smoking Ban. The next step is to totally eradicate pubs from our high streets. Children should be at home doing their homework. . ."

    Mmm: ever thought of changing your ID to "Fascist"? You're right that the smoking ban is a positive step towards your Craptocracy, in that it is successfully closing about 5 pubs a week. The last time I went to pubs they were quite jolly little affairs where people could meet, talk and even sing together round the old joanna. Luckily there were places, too (probably the ones you're thinking of, actually) where the mindless Tetleys could be safely kettled away from us civilized people.



    3. At 10:38am on 12 Nov 2010, Jack Napier wrote:

    ". . .can' t they just leave it up to the landlord's discretion as to whether he wants in children in his pub? Or is that too grown up. . .?"

    Sorry, Jack, but did you miss Thatcherism and New Labour (you lucky so-and-so)? Of course we can't be trusted to live our own lives: that's why we have a government to tell us exactly what to do.

    Meanwhile, on the subject of children in pubs, yes: why don't we let them have the opportunity to see a lifestyle they will themselves be denied by the time they are adults?

  • Comment number 49.

    So, Children are allowed into pubs, Hmmm. Can someone tell me how long it will be before all pub patrons will have to be CRB checked before they can go into their local and have a quiet drink? (Don't laugh someone will think of it)

    Pleeeeese think of the cheeldren. (hahahah) they should be up chimneys not bothering me because YOU think YOUR children are lovely, whereas everyone else seems to think they are badly behaved.

  • Comment number 50.

    Children will be children. If a landlord does not like noisey children then put a sign up banning them, simple.

  • Comment number 51.

    It depends on the pub, there are pubs which make good family pubs and ones which clearly don't. The real problem though is peoples failure to control their children generally whether its in a pub, the supermarket and shops or anywhere else. Britain has moved from a culture where children were probably more controlled than other countries to one where there's no control at all and where parents seem to lack even the most basic commonsense.

  • Comment number 52.

    We were in Prague a couple of weeks a go and I could not see any problem with going into a pub or a bar with my kids. There were other people in there with their kids.
    All we have to do is be responsible parents/adults. This country has gone too far with political correctness and nanny state.
    If I am going to pay for food and drinks in a pub I expect to take my family in there.

  • Comment number 53.

    Sure why not?

    Just so long as the parents don't mind their kids overhearing the filthy jokes and obscenities that come out of my mouth after a few pints with my mates.

  • Comment number 54.

    NO NO NO

  • Comment number 55.

    Surely it depends on the pub? You get 'Beefeaters' and 'Hungry Horses' that are child friendly and are really more based around meals than drink that are entirely child friendly, you get city bars where the door staff probably won't let under 18's in in the first place and there are a couple of pubs within a mile of where I live where I'M scared to go in much less take some kids! Its not that big an issue surely? If you don't want kids in your pub drink in a pub that doesn't encourage kids.

  • Comment number 56.

    A quiet well behaved child in a section of the pub designated for families is not a bad thing (but not a separate kids room). Parents of noisy disruptive childen running around chasing each other causing havoc should not be surprised if they are asked to take control or go home. Also children in a pub after 9 is not acceptable.

    Various pubs I go to have a policy of either asking parents to leave after 9 or not allowing the under 14's in at all. Their attitude is that there are enough pubs in the area that are family friendly, also business has increased since they put the policy in.

  • Comment number 57.

    Please forgive me for upsetting the "PC" brigade, but who gets served in pubs should be the Landlords decision.

    If a landlord wants to promote a family friendly "enviroment" then don't go there if you don't like kids.

    If the landlord wants to promote live music don't go there if you want peace and quiet.

    If you're drunk - you should be thrown out!

  • Comment number 58.

    As pubs are technically private premises then the landlord/landlady can dictate who is allowed into his pub, if he/she wishes to make it adults only then there is nothing stopping him/her, obviously this only applies to the licensee being the owner, if they are tenants then the brewery will make the rules; some hotels and holidays are adults only and this doesn't seem to cause any problems.

    Children are not allowed the area that is licensed, i.e. the bar area.

    Children over the age of 5 are allowed to drink alcohol even in a pub (again because it is private property), providing it is not in the licensed area, e.g. the garden.

  • Comment number 59.

    "27. At 11:11am on 12 Nov 2010, Lewis Fitzroy wrote:
    The U.K is anti familys and hates children, Pubs landlords who are fussy about the customers, should have they lincence to sell alcohol taken off them"

    Read this:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-11733406
    Not only is it right that Pub Landlords be 'fussy' about who they serve they have a legal requirement to do so. If an adult is disorderly in a pub they should be kicked out... the same should apply to kids.

    Incidentally about 30 years ago I was banned for life from a pub in Yorkshire (I was 4 at the time) after having a screaming tantrum and quite right too (although they didn't recognise me when I broke the ban last year!)

  • Comment number 60.

    Common sense and freedom of choice should apply.

    Leave it to the landlord to decide what customers they wish to attract to their pub.

  • Comment number 61.

    By choice, my wife and I decided not to breed and we have a circle of like-minded friends. A couple of times a week, we meet at our local and chew the fat over a drink as this is our way of unwinding after a hard day's work.
    Pubs are not the places to have small children moving about by themselves. An adult could easily turn round, not see a child and knock it flying or, more dangerously, accidentally hit it with a glass. If someone is playing pool, the cue is at the ideal height to catch a child in the face.
    Unfortunately, I've seen too many parents bring children into a pub, get their drinks, sit in the corner and ignore the children. They, in turn, get bored and start exploring the place. If they get into trouble, the parents are quick to blame everyone else except the real culprits, i.e. themselves.

  • Comment number 62.

    29. At 11:13am on 12 Nov 2010, matt-stone wrote:
    RAPISTS AND PAEDOPHILES start off their day in pubs where they get stoned and work themselves up. If children are there, chances are they'll be turning on them, eyeing them up for possible assault. Do parents really want that type of setting to take their kids to? Grow up !!

    ----


    There are British pubs where you can get stoned?

    Please tell me where so that i can, um, avoid them. Better yet, if you could give me their postcode I can GPS them so that I can ,um, avoid them more successfully.

  • Comment number 63.

    I went into my quiet country local not so long ago, and there were some horrid townies in there, with their little angels. The aforementioned angels were running around screaming at the top of their lungs, parents oblivious.

    I loafed against the bar nursing a cheeky little red, one leg crossed behind the other, toes on the ground heel raised slightly.

    One screaming brat sorry angel ran into my foot, Lord knows how, I never moved.

    Splat of brat on the floor YOU, She screamed YOU! (Oh God the police will come and take me away for being a pervert - jeez I was only having a drink, minding my own, oh dear.


    Oh I'm sorry Dear did mummy trip you up? There there, YOU horrid mummy from the child, sigh of relief from me that I would not be explaining to the Fascist CRB/Social workers rozzers that I was only lounging against the bar.


    Please keep your children at home, unless the pub has a child friendly area, not everyone thinks your kids are perfect, and I suspect if you looked you wouldn't either. I am not a kid hater, some parents bring up children to be polite and considerate, and others, well they just give parents a bad name.

    The last thing we need here is ANOTHER law foisted on us.

  • Comment number 64.

    I think it should be up to the landlord whether or not children are allowed in any given pub, although if a landlord does choose to allow children I would prefer there to be a 'parents & children' area for them so that people in the normal bar can get some peace if they wish.

    And of course children should only be allowed in under the proviso that parents make sure their kids do not cause a disturbance. I rarely went to pubs as a child but on the few occasions I did I was always expected to be on my best behaviour.

    Misbehaved kids drive me nuts, particularly when parents seem to make no effort to do anything about it. Supermarkets are the worst for this and I've taken to shopping as late as possible to get a child-free experience.

  • Comment number 65.

    I'll make a deal. I won't sit in your playground, swearing, smoking and drinking a pint of lager, if you won't sit in my pub running around, shouting, crying and generally bringing your self-entitled, self-centred constant neediness into every corner.
    Pubs were invented to get away from moaning women and whinning brats. But now you can't smoke or avoid having football blasted at you on massive plasma screens and with pints costing nearly £4, the pub has had its day. They may as well just be turned into unhygenic creches for the stay-at-home mums and benefit scroungers during the day.

  • Comment number 66.

    46. At 11:25am on 12 Nov 2010, Icebloo wrote:
    No children should not be allowed in pubs. Children are everywhere these days

    -----

    genius. total genius.

    Exscuse me while I clean the coffee from my screen...

  • Comment number 67.

    Pubs that let kids in will be like Tesco
    Pubs that don't will be like Waitrose

    People take their kids to Tesco to smack them....hence I shop at Waitrose...the same will apply to my choice of pub for the very same reason.

  • Comment number 68.

    It depends what you mean by a pub. If you mean a proper place whose purpose is to sell beer then no children. However people should also be allowed to smoke in these establishments.(I'm a non smoker)
    If however you mean one of those awful alco-food outlets with the Laura Ashley copy furnishings and a selection of bland food and drinks then children should be allowed.

  • Comment number 69.

    Why should a Child have a greater right than a Cigarette to be in a Pub?

    The spirit to plow Tradition asunder at every opportunity is corrosive on the Social mind and has degenerated into a Psychosis in its own right.

    Children are already quietly found in Establishments on occasion but they're far better off learning Elsewhere.

  • Comment number 70.

    Lewis Fitzroy wrote:
    The U.K is anti familys and hates children, Pubs landlords who are fussy about the customers, should have they lincence to sell alcohol taken off them

    Dear Lewis is it any wonder?

    And now you want to bring in laws (you could try bringing in a law that forces people to use a spellchecker or a diksghunry but I think that wun wil pas u bye)

    Have you never heard the statement, the management reserve the right?
    The reason the UK is anti families is becase most of them are so awful and badly behaved.
    Why should my landlord be FORCED to have your brats in his pub?

  • Comment number 71.

    37. At 11:20am on 12 Nov 2010, adam23 wrote:
    "The only places that should sell alcohol..Pubs,Bars,Off licenses and restaurants not supermarkets or only selected supermarkets in rural areas...that way selling illegaly is easier to police and it there less need to small shops to make it stupidly cheap."

    You get far more illegal selling in pubs than in supermarkets. Alcohol sales make up a small proportion of the supermarkets profits and the staff are on an hourly rate so have little incentive to sell the stuff, plus spotting 'suspicious purchases' is easier. Few under 18's try sneaking their booze in with £80 of groceries paid for on a credit card. 2 bottles of vodka and nothing else on the conveyor gets attention.

    Pub landlords on the other hand (especially given that many are going bust) are far less fussy.

    At 33 I get ID'd maybe 3 or 4 times a year in supermarkets.... I haven't been ID'd in a pub since I was 18 or 19 (and I was served in one or two much younger than that!)

  • Comment number 72.

    First of all no.12 - you need to get a life!!!!

    This is a difficult question as there are pros and cons for each answer. When i was young we used to sit in the pub garden or the car whilst our parents went in for a drink. We were allowed a bottle of coke with a straw and a bag of crisps and we were quite happy, never caused any disturbances. I then took both of my children (now adults) into pubs and restaurants right from a few days old and have always taught them good table manners and never to run about and i thinkif you instill this from an early age you will be ok. My children were able to commuinicate and ineract with adults as well as their friends and were perfectly happy whether in a smokey pub, a restaurant or watching football. I have always let my kids have alchol on special occasions or the odd sip of mine and it never did them any harm as it didn't me. They both drink in moderation now and never get paraletic - they just enjoy themselves as they should do. My daughter actually runs a pub with her fiance and they love the social life it brings. If a pub had a bar it is over 18's only so where is the problem, if you don't want to be around kids go into the bar where you say you prefer!!!

    I would agree that the smoking ban has killed the traditional pub life and did not vote for this - everyone knew that if they wanted to go to the pub what to expect (a smokey, happy atmosphere)all you had to do was wash your clothes - not difficult. I am a non-smoker so do not get on your high horse people!!!

    Also, being drunk in front of your children does not make you neglectful or irresponsible, its part of most peoples lives, going to parties, having a drink etc, if your children have been brought up properly and are grounded they will not be in any harm but just enjoy the fun (or what should be fun) of it. If people are violent then that is different but i believe most families with children who like a drink are sensible.
    There are too many do-gooders and politically correctness today which is why we are in this mess as a whole - just enjoy yourselves, life is too short

  • Comment number 73.

    27. At 11:11am on 12 Nov 2010, Lewis Fitzroy wrote:

    "The U.K is anti familys and hates children, Pubs landlords who are fussy about the customers, should have they lincence to sell alcohol taken off them"

    As someone who does not have any children I have to take issue with your comment.

    What you need to understand is that, while yes, it is nice to have place where as a family you can socialize, this must come with conditions in that you do not allow your children to become a menace to other patrons, something that seems to be getting worse in this country. I was horrified on a recent trip to the pub to see some little brat screaming and doing cartwheels up and down the pub, all the while the parents completely apathetic to the obvious annoyance their children were causing to other paying customers. It is also nice to have place where as adults, we can go safe in the knowledge that no children are present and we can swear, crack rude jokes and fart to our hearts content.

    There is a fine line and a balance that needs to be struck, not calls for landlords to loose their licenses or the closure of pubs or the total exclusion of children of every sphere of society.

    You need a little Yin and Yang in your thinking…

  • Comment number 74.

    36. At 11:18am on 12 Nov 2010, gemthehawk wrote:

    "Pet hate, desperately grasping 3 pints and heading over to the table only for a kid to run past and make you lose half your beer!"

    Top tip... make sure the beer lands all over the kid. Its the quickest way for the parent to remove it from the pub.

  • Comment number 75.

    "Should children be allowed in pubs?"

    As a general rule? No!

    If a pub is large enough to have a fully separate room? There may be a case. I wouldn't go anywhere near one myself. But no-one under the age of 18 should be allowed in a room with a bar.

    Pubs are places for adults. If I'm in a pub with some friends, I want to feel able to express myself freely, without having to watch my language, watch whether any opinions I express are suitable for young ears etc.

    There's also the problem of behaviour. Many parents seem to think that their children (or children in general) should not be subject to any rules and that they should be allowed to run around indulging in a load of 'self-expression' (transl: bad behaviour). Personally I don't want a lot of badly behaved ankle-biters ruining my pint.

  • Comment number 76.

    I guess that some pubs should be family oriented and some should not. I would not like to see a law that children should be allowed into all pubs or vice versa. To be honest,parents are often well used to and oblivious of the noise and chaos their children can make. Many of the rest of us are not. That's the reason why arguments start over this. If a customer's dog started barking loudly,ran around and annoyed the customers,the publican would simply ask for it to be taken out,and I'm sure the owner would agree without too much fuss. Why are parents with badly behaved children any different?

  • Comment number 77.

    Everyone knows a pub that is children friendly and that a certain amount of running and shouting can be expected. These are generally low end of the market eating places that cater for families, so the answer is simple; don't go there if you don't have or cannot stand children. Stop being cheap and go to real restaurant where you can rightfully complain about other children's behaviour.

    Children under 14 should not be allowed into a real pub but then again food should not be served with only a pie or a packet of crisps on sale.

  • Comment number 78.

    This keeps coming up from time to time
    If there are provisions for children then YES
    IF NOT then NO
    And provisions means a Seperate Place other then the BARS
    A lot of pubs HAVE a separate buildings and it works very well

  • Comment number 79.

    "Should children be allowed in pubs"? is the Friday HYS question.

    Well, the link in the report will do wonders for the Good Pub Guide? Fair enough. Many pubs are struggling and need to re-invent themselves, so should be supported.

    We used to take our twins from the age of 7 upward to a 'pub' that had a sunday eat all you like fixed priced lunch buffet that encouraged families. As working parents it was a good day out for us, and our children. No cooking, just all of us joining a polite queue with other families for a plate of good food to take to our table for sit down meal together and no mess or washing up for anyone.

    However, if parents just go to pubs to drink only and take their children with them .. obviously that's a different question entirely.



  • Comment number 80.

    The choice should be there - its up to individuals whether they wish to frequent pubs which also cater for families, and thus put up with kids running around screaming due to the complete lack of discipline from inept parents. It should be up to licensed premises whether to allow children or not - this is an issue for pub companies, landlords and their customers. Take note government and snooping/interfering council managers - this is an area where legislation and tickboxing is *NOT* required!

  • Comment number 81.

    Proper pubs - Yes
    Bars - No

  • Comment number 82.

    29. At 11:13am on 12 Nov 2010, matt-stone wrote:
    RAPISTS AND PAEDOPHILES start off their day in pubs where they get stoned and work themselves up. If children are there, chances are they'll be turning on them, eyeing them up for possible assault. Do parents really want that type of setting to take their kids to? Grow up !!


    What? It sounds like you've been down the pub.... or more likely never been to one if you think they're full of paedophiles. Most kids who are abused are abused by close family members not total strangers. Your kid is probably far safer in a pub than at home on-line! If recent prison sentences are anything to go by your kid is probably safer in a pub than in a nursery!

  • Comment number 83.

    Should pubs be child-free zones? I would leave that up to the landlords discretion.

  • Comment number 84.

    #57 Clive Hamilton says it is down to the landlord.

    Landlords are making decisions based on cash flow and income, not the essence of what a pub is and always has been. They are trying to recover from the stupidity of the blanket ban on smoking.

    What next do we ban? Drinking, profanity, people who do not want children around them 24/7?

  • Comment number 85.

    As the parent of well behaved twin daughters I have no problem with landlords who refuse children entry to their premises- i am happy to take my business elsewhere.

    I agree that the issue is with parents who allow their children to behave badly- as a parent part of my role is to make sure that my children beahave in a way that is aceptable to others.

  • Comment number 86.

    I've always thought of a pub as a public house and, as such, children should be welcomed. I think the addition of children (and pets) is the difference between a bar and a public house, it gives the pub a bigger role in the community, something other than a place to consume alcohol.

    However, the problem isn't children in the pub, the problem is 'out of control children' in the pub (or the library or the grocers or anywhere). Would we want or accept out of control pets in the pub? The problem is parents who won't or can't control their children, allowing them to annoy people. It is not the publican's job to babysit.

    Since it is impossible to write a law or regulation defining proper child behaviour in a pub the decision must be left to the publican, not the government. All well behaved and under control kids welcome.

  • Comment number 87.

    3. At 10:38am on 12 Nov 2010, Jack Napier wrote:
    can' t they just leave it up to the landlord's dicretion as to whether he wants in children in his pub?

    Yes - private landlords DO have the right to decide whether or not to allow children in. Some allow them, others don't.
    In my opinion, pubs aren't creches and if some people don't know how to control their offspring or teach them manners, they should keep them at home. After all, I don't drink in their playgrounds.
    Give me a pub with a "no kids, but well-behaved dogs are welcome" policy every time.

  • Comment number 88.



    Pubs are for adults

    Schools are for children


  • Comment number 89.

    61. At 11:38am on 12 Nov 2010, BJ wrote:
    By choice, my wife and I decided not to breed and we have a circle of like-minded friends. A couple of times a week, we meet at our local and chew the fat over a drink as this is our way of unwinding after a hard day's work.
    Pubs are not the places to have small children moving about by themselves. An adult could easily turn round, not see a child and knock it flying or, more dangerously, accidentally hit it with a glass. If someone is playing pool, the cue is at the ideal height to catch a child in the face.
    Unfortunately, I've seen too many parents bring children into a pub, get their drinks, sit in the corner and ignore the children. They, in turn, get bored and start exploring the place. If they get into trouble, the parents are quick to blame everyone else except the real culprits, i.e. themselves.

    ------------------------------

    I would love to go to your local and sit in the seats that you normally sit in. I bet the landlord would have to deal with some childish tantrums from your "fat chewing" lot.

    The world is better for your failure to breed.

  • Comment number 90.

    Took my 5 year old into a village pub with his grandparents for fish and chips meal at around 6pm. He behaved and after we had eaten we left. I did ask the publican before we went in and he was fine with it.
    However,
    I wouldn't take him to a pub later than that and had he misbehaved I would have left.

    Pubs are open long hours now and to make the most of this there are different times of the day for different people. Also as already mentioned, some pubs are set up for family eating and others are more tailored to the prop up the bar drinker.

    The grandparents wouldn't be in the pub after 6pm either.!

    Now Starbucks.... I avoid it because it is used as a meeting house for buggies and screaming kids. No control by parents at all. So i go to the coffee shop with the steps, which deters the buggy brigade.

  • Comment number 91.

    NO NO NO AND NO

    children should not be allowed in pubs,

    this will sound selfish but I want to go somewhere where I can relax and drink with out screaming kids,

  • Comment number 92.

    My understanding has always been that under 18 you are not allowed to buy alcohol anywhere, at 16 you are allowed alcohol with a meal as long as an adult has bought it and at 14 you are allowed in pubs with an adult. I presume that adults can stand at the bar but under 18's have to be away from the bar. I do think that pubs unless they have a separate restaurant should not allow children in them unless they are outside or in a separate room. Pubs are supposed to be for grown ups not children, and I thought that children running through a bar area was against the law anyway. It is very annoying going to the pub and people have babies and small children there. If they are outside then it is not that bad, but ultimately it should be at the discretion of the landlord or landlady if they are allowed in there at all if the law allows them to be, but I am all for banning children from the main bar of pubs if they are not already and also banning them altogether after 7pm. I hate it when there are screaming children running around. They are not allowed into bars or clubs so why pubs?

  • Comment number 93.

    No kids in pubs. If they want to come in and have something to eat with their parents it should be in a designated area away from the sight of the bar.

  • Comment number 94.

    It really should be up to the landlord, but the fault lies with parents who don't teach their children to behave appropriately. My son has very severe autism and still manages to avoid disturbing other customers because I have always made a big effort to show him how to behave in public. We prefer to go to restaurants, but at 15, I think it is appropriate for him to enjoy a lemonade and a packet of crisps while I have a pint in a pub.

    I don't like small children in pubs, but I also don't like the over 21 rule that many bars and pubs have adopted. That really doesn't seem fair on 18-20 year olds. This was exactly the age when I spent most time and money in pubs. Now I'm lucky to go more than two or three times a year.

  • Comment number 95.

    My children are all grown up and I look upon a pub as a place where I can now go more freely and often (without the shackles of children keeping me at home). I want to enjoy my later life in child-free comfort when enjoying adult conversation in an adult environment with adult drinks.
    I do not want unruly, uncontrolled kids ruining my social time. If modern parents had the decency to control their unruly hordes then maybe this debate would be redundant. Sadly, modern parents don't use any form of discipline to keep their kids in check.
    Ban children. Ban them now. Ban them forever. Even my grandson.

  • Comment number 96.

    No, pubs should not be child-free zones, though each landlord should be able to decide their own policy on this. When I was a child I had many happy times socialising with my family and friends in pubs - pubs can be healthy places where people can socialise.

  • Comment number 97.

    29. At 11:13am on 12 Nov 2010, matt-stone wrote:
    RAPISTS AND PAEDOPHILES start off their day in pubs where they get stoned and work themselves up. If children are there, chances are they'll be turning on them, eyeing them up for possible assault. Do parents really want that type of setting to take their kids to? Grow up !!
    ----------------------------------------------------------------

    I have to say I do like this post, only for the sheer absurdity of the comment of the obvious intentions to provoke and garner a reaction. It’s actually quite refreshing when, as mine does - my brain actually touches my spinal chord - to read comments from someone who's evidently doesn't...

  • Comment number 98.

    Personally, I wouldn't allow children under 14 into pubs.
    A pub near us introduced such a rule a few years back and were on the receiving end of a lot of abuse from angry parents. It went down very well with most of the locals, though!
    I have lost count of the times where we've had to endure badly-behaved children when out for a quiet drink or meal. The parents either ignore them and shout above any noise they are making, rendering it impossible to hold a conversation or (the old favourite) they abandon them to run amok in a different room/the pub garden/skittle alley.
    It has now got to the stage where I congratulate the parents of any well-behaved children I encounter, because it is such a rare occurence!

  • Comment number 99.

    I think children should be restricted solely to designated Family Rooms. It used to be like this. Too many parents can't be bothered to keep their kids quiet and reasonably still. Too often pubs ( and restaurants, and cafes) are treated as a playground. Personally if I walk into a pub, restaurant or cafe thats doubling as a creche I walk. Part of the atmosphere of any of these places is down to the other customers. If i see lots of kids, I'm in the wrong place.

  • Comment number 100.

    I strongly believe that adults should be able to enjoy a drink or pub meal without screaming babies or children running around. There are many more appropriate venues for families with young children.

 

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