BBC BLOGS - Have Your Say
« Previous | Main | Next »

Does 'capitalism kill competition'?

09:23 UK time, Monday, 20 September 2010

Vince Cable has insisted he has a pro-business agenda but refused to apologise for attacking excessive bank bonuses paid to "spivs and gamblers". Did you listen to the business secretary's speech?

Business Secretary Vince Cable has warned banks they could face more taxes if they pay out "outrageously large" bonuses.

Meanwhile, Nick Clegg has said ministers had to start cutting spending early because of "perilous" economic circumstances after the general election.

Lib Dem members have voted to ensure spending cuts do not hit the poorest disproportionately.

What is your reaction to Vince Cable's warning? Is the cuts programme fair? What does the future hold for the Lib Dems? What do you think the Lib Dem conference will achieve?

Read the views of some young Lib Dems

This debate is now closed. Thank you for your comments.

Comments

Page 1 of 15

  • Comment number 1.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 2.

    Yes I think it is. The benefit is that both parties have reduced the more bizarre ideas of the other to deliver a realistic approach.

    I would very much hope that this is a pattern for the future. Where moderation and reason takes over the former politics of the extreme members of each party.

    It is a good thing.

  • Comment number 3.

    It could be 'right for right now' in the sense that enough people were fed up with Labour.

  • Comment number 4.

    Oh its certianly RIGHT, infact it's more RIGHT than mrs RIGHT herself.as for NOW,do you mean for this second, yea,i'll go along with that...

  • Comment number 5.

    No too much Liberal interference - it is just the same as NuLab different faces, same lame do-gooder policies and all the trappings of a nanny and PC state.

  • Comment number 6.

    'Is the coalition 'right for right now'?'
    Well, it has to be better than the alternative of a bunch of reckless spendthrifts 'in charge' of the country and its economy for a fourth term.

  • Comment number 7.

    Is the coalition 'right for right now'?
    Let the Lib-Dems have their moment of power.
    It's been a long time coming, and it will be along time before it returns.

  • Comment number 8.

    The coalition is a terrible thing, and the Lib Dems have sold their souls to the Tories.

    When the cuts hit this autumn, we will all pay a terrible price in terms of unemployment and social unrest.

  • Comment number 9.

    Is the coalition 'right for right now'?

    What possible alternative is there?

    Mind you I can't see how the Lib Dems are going to get out of this one with anything ressembling a political party still in tact.

  • Comment number 10.

    Well we do need strong government and the election result did not give that. If the coalition hadn't been formed the Conservatives would have formed the Government and tried to push through their policies. They would have probably been able to do so, although if anybody was ill when a key vote was taken they could easily lose a vote.
    The biggest problem we would have had is internationally as the people financing the loans that allow the Government to provide the services we currently enjoy, may have refused to lend any more money, or if they did loan ask for a higher rate of interest to be paid, which would have forced the Government to introduce similar measures to those adopted by Greece, which are a lot worse than the spending cuts that are likely yo come our way in October.

  • Comment number 11.

    What does the future hold for the Lib Dems?

    Good question. This is the problem they have to solve. How to sell the austerity scam to the British people and thereby keep in favour with the tories. How to fulfill their promise to their party members to lavish large amounts of taxpayer's money on the third world? One objective seems to rule out the other.
    Note the time I have posted this. Before Clegg's speech, and I predict a standing ovation despite predictions of gloom and doom among the ranks.

  • Comment number 12.

    Absolutely. It's right for right now, but not for much longer. It was good for the country to have a quick resolution after the election.

    Unfortunately, for what should have been an interim government, they seem bent on causing further damage to the country, following Labour's departure.

    The people in power from each party certainly seem to be exactly the same, quite a way right of centre. However, the backbenchers from each remain true to form.



    The Lib Dems have no future with Clegg in charge, he's too much of a Tory boy in disguise.

  • Comment number 13.

    The liberals sold out on their principles in return for a possible change in the voting system that should see them get a fairer share of MPs ever after. It must be very hard for true liberals to have to back a Tory agenda of damaging cuts. It remains to be seen whether natural liberal voters will thank or punish them at the ballot box.

  • Comment number 14.

    I am not too sure I understand the question! Are you asking

    "Is the coalition 'right for right now'?"

    Does this mean -

    is the coalition right 'for right now?'

    or

    is the coalition 'right for right' now?

    or

    is the 'coalition right' for right now?

  • Comment number 15.

    Well Clegg is correct on one thing, this government is a coalition of the right. The Lib-Dems in the government keep saying they are ensuring 'liberal values' are part of the government program. These would be the Manchester Liberal values, anti-state, anti-union, low-tax, anti-welfare, not a cigarette paper between them and the values of the Tory Party.
    Every time the Liberals have entered a coalition with the Tories, they have split, the right to the Tories, the left to Labour, the centrists left as a rump.

  • Comment number 16.

    8. At 11:02am on 20 Sep 2010, Beige Rage wrote:
    The coalition is a terrible thing, and the Lib Dems have sold their souls to the Tories.

    When the cuts hit this autumn, we will all pay a terrible price in terms of unemployment and social unrest.

    ---

    I prefer to think that they've sacrificed themselves and their future in a rather admirable effort to help the tories put the country back together after labour broke the economy.

    If they'd stuck rigidly to their guns we'd have a lame duck minority tory government that would be simply unable to get anything done.

  • Comment number 17.

    What ever you - or Clegg for that matter - think about how well (or otherwise) the current government is doing, they are the result of what the electorate said at the ballot box. The only alternative to the present state would have been if Cameron had had the courage to attempt a minority government, seeking to convince other MPs on an issue-by-issue basis.

    Unfortunately the options we were given were blue mediocracy, yellow mediocracy or red mediocracy (which had already made a mess of things).

    And now unsurprisingly a coalition of two mediocre men is not doing too well, with a complete lack of understanding of the priorities that they have if they are to meet the government's obligations to its citizens.

  • Comment number 18.

    Absolutely NOT!

    I didnt vote for this collection of spineless wonders holding the country to ransom. Just look at the nonsense Vince Cable has been spouting - the man should be sacked! But because the coalition are too busy holding hands while dizzy with power this wont happen.

    As for what the future holds for the LibDems, my sincere wish for them is oblivion, and it cant come quick enough!

  • Comment number 19.

    5. At 10:58am on 20 Sep 2010, Graham wrote:
    No too much Liberal interference - it is just the same as NuLab different faces, same lame do-gooder policies and all the trappings of a nanny and PC state.


    And not a hint of a backbone between them!

  • Comment number 20.

    After wars, lies, spin, corruption, the police state, spying, censorship, murder and teflon any government is "right for now" since it's not the last one. How much worse can they be. I would venture to suggest that if you have a job (a real one) you will find that the new government will be a welcome tonic. If you are on the dole with no good reason, pretending to be sick or in a made up job at the expense of the rest of use you have big problems coming.

  • Comment number 21.

    The Labour Government under Blair and Brown spent the first 4 years in office paying off the debts left by the previous Conservative Government. At the end of 4 years they tried to improve schools and the health service only to find their spending cuts over the previous four years had resulted in fewer teachers, nurses and doctors coming out of University to fill the new places. We then had to try and recruit these highly qualified people from countries like India.
    It looks as if the new administration is in danger of repeating the same mistake. However I suspect there will be a battle going on behind the scenes, the Lib. Dems. believe even more strongly in expanding free education than the Labour Party while the Conservatives seem to think your children only deserve a good education if you can pay for it yourself.

  • Comment number 22.

    It's certainly right for the Conservatives. They're in a 'Win-Win' situation. I fear that the Lib Dems are about to be thoroughly shafted though.

    If everything turns out great the Conservatives - being a much bigger party with a far superior media machine - will claim - and get - all of the credit. If it's a disastrous result, the Tories will use their media machine to make sure that it's Clegg standing in front of the fan collecting the brown and smelly straight in the face!

  • Comment number 23.

    It's absolutely right for the country. The inevitable cuts will come sooner and less deep than if Labour had got back in.

  • Comment number 24.

    No it is not. Any government in power just now needs to take tough action on the public sector waste, Benefit and Tax fraud and Immigration. The coalition has succeeded in watering down the actions that are necessary to bring Britain out of the financial mess left by New Labour. This wishy washy coalition will not succeed.

  • Comment number 25.

    Clearly it is right for those that agree with the coalition’s actions and wrong for those who don’t.

    "Do the Lib Dems and Conservatives remain distinct parties, despite the coalition?"

    Yes. That is why it is called a ‘coalition’!

    "What does the future hold for the Lib Dems?"

    My crystal ball is at the cleaners I am afraid.

    "What do you think the Lib Dem conference will achieve?"

    My crystal ball is at the cleaners I am afraid.

  • Comment number 26.

    Absolutely yes. Had the Liberal Democrats joined with Labour they would have been swalloed alive and there would have been no chance of undoing the damage of thirteen years.
    As a lifelong Conservative voter, I am pleased with the way things are going.
    It is clear to anyone with half a brain that cuts do have to be made. Had Labour continued in office we would eventually end up going to the IMF to be bailed out as happened once before with Labour.
    The Liberal Democrats did what was best for the country a concept that Labour has never been able to grasp.

  • Comment number 27.

    Don't make me laugh, when is a tory government ever right for the UK.

    As for the other lot hanging on their coat tails.

    They have signed their political death warrant.

  • Comment number 28.

    Whilst I am not a supporter of the Lib Dems or the Tories it has to be said that the coalition represents the will of the people based upon the General Election result.

    What was the alternative? A rainbow alliance of losers? Had Nick Clegg turned down David Camerons offer of a coalition, with the Lib Dems having a tangible grip on power, he and his Party would have looked like a joke. They would appear to the public a Party too scared to have their hands on the reigns of Government.

    To many of the left wing commentators on here whinging about cuts they need to look at the facts. Under the Nu Labour Project the country was borrowing £1 in every £4 of the money it spent. Look at the tax payers alliance report and see how much was squandered on QUANGOS.

  • Comment number 29.

    Can anyone explain to me why we actually need government? Are we as human beings not capable of logical reasoning and global co-operation. Or am i living on another planet?

  • Comment number 30.

    18. At 11:25am on 20 Sep 2010, pzero wrote:
    Absolutely NOT!

    I didnt vote for this collection of spineless wonders holding the country to ransom.

    ------

    However, collectively the rest of the country DID vote for the coalition and as we live in a democracy that is what we have got. Looking at the comments here, the right-wingers are upset at the 'namby-pamby liberal government' and the liberals think they've sold their souls to the devil. I suspect therefore that what we actually have is a quite a good compromise.

  • Comment number 31.

    It appears to be a coalition working under the normal guiding principals of Tory economics,IE If it isn't broken break it and if it doesn't need fixing fix it.

  • Comment number 32.

    5. At 10:58am on 20 Sep 2010, Graham wrote:
    No too much Liberal interference - it is just the same as NuLab different faces, same lame do-gooder policies and all the trappings of a nanny and PC state.
    -------
    Although the outcome of the election, which I hope everyone on this HYS thread voted in, did give the Liberals a mandate to 'interfere' (or 'act as junior partner in a coalition' to give it it's proper name).

  • Comment number 33.

    We have a government? Really? I thought it was some sort of cosy middle class “love fest” between some bland clones.
    New election please!

  • Comment number 34.

    After wars, lies, spin, corruption, the police state, spying, censorship, murder and teflon any government is "right for now" since it's not the last one. How much worse can they be. I would venture to suggest that if you have a job (a real one) you will find that the new government will be a welcome tonic. If you are on the dole with no good reason, pretending to be sick or in a made up job at the expense of the rest of use you have big problems coming.
    ----------
    I am sure all those firefighters,care home workers, nurses, teachers, police officers, prison officers, road sweepers, school dinner ladies, home helps, mental health workers, soldiers,sailors and air force personnel etc representing 90%+ of the public sector out there (including in the above both myself and my wife) will be glad to know that these are not real jobs.

    The next time my wife has to save someones life at work I suggest She says to the patient "sorry mate" I've got a made up job" and suggest they seek medical help from their friendly local multi millionaire merchant banker!


    Numpty!!

  • Comment number 35.

    The Conservative Party is keen to cut public sector pay, pointing out that the pay of the top 5% in the public sector has risen 51% in ten years. However the pay of Directors of the top hundred companies has tripled over the last eight years. If it is right to cut the pay of the top public sector employees then it even more important to cut the pay of the top company Directors who have created this pressure to raise pay at the top.

  • Comment number 36.

    Don't know if it's true but somebody told me that his audience has halved due to disgruntled members either joining the Labour Party or realising they were Tories all along and joining them.

  • Comment number 37.

    At this moment in time...YES!
    The alternatives are:
    1. A Conservative Minority Government...going from hand to hand on doing Government business until...
    2. Another Election is called where we go over it all again and could end up with another Labour Government and more years of waste.

    This coalition needs to run its time and sort the country out that has been mismanaged by both Blair & Brown...

  • Comment number 38.

    The parties themselves may remain distinct, but Nick Clegg has certianly shown where his loyalties lie.

    As a life long Lib Dem voter I am disgusted with this "coalition" and will not be voting Lib Dem again. If there will even be a party to vote for when this abomination finally ceases.

  • Comment number 39.

    17. At 11:22am on 20 Sep 2010, Megan wrote:
    What ever you - or Clegg for that matter - think about how well (or otherwise) the current government is doing, they are the result of what the electorate said at the ballot box


    They are not the result of what the electorate said. I didn't see coalition as a choice on my ballot paper. The result of the election was that the country blamed the Labour party for the recession, the Tories could not get enough votes for outright power and the Lib Dems came third. In order to get some power the Libs went along with the Tories because Labour would not agree to a coalition, Clegg would have gone along with anyone. The outcome may well be bad for both parties , many disaffected Libs and many Tories, keeping their heads down for a while, both are mad at any concessions made to the others. Tories keep their resentments behind closed doors until they suddenly burst out big time. Labour and Lib Dems are more open about their disagreements
    I don't doubt Clegg can get on with Cameron and Osborne persoally but I doubt the coalition goes much deeoer than that. I also know that the biased Press will paint a rosey picture of the financial policy but it will be an uphill task. I'm sure the cuts won't be as bad as predicted. They constantly repeat what an awful situation we are in and blame Labour, they get everyone terrified and then when the cuts turn out to be not quite as bad as we were first told we will finish up by being grateful

  • Comment number 40.

    The electorate got the government it deserves rather than what it voted for. The Lib Dems eventually caught the ball playing piggy in the middle between Labour and the Tories. Back in May a newspaper stated that out of 29 Ministers entitled to attend meetings, 23 had assets and investments over 1million sterling. I would imagine that it’s in their best interest to keep the bankers happy and squeeze money from the little people. Remember your Government ministers’ investments can go up as well as up. I’m sure that Labour was just as bad. Let’s stop deluding ourselves that the coalition is any better.

  • Comment number 41.

    Is that 'right wing for right now'?

    Liberal Democrats have entered into a coalition supporting right wing ideology. Not just on cuts, but immigration policy which is also harming business.

    When the cuts bite, it will be many of those Lib Dem voters who will be effected, who will be put in the dole queue, who's businesses will suffer, who's children could spend years searching for work, who's child benefits will be cut, who's social housing could be at risk, who's society will be decimated as opposed to becoming the 'big society', who will see less police police on the streets and a two tier education system.

    It will be then and only then when Lib Dem members and voters will begin to see the right wing agenda which they are in league with and the damage they are doing to their reputation.

  • Comment number 42.

    The Liberal Democrats should consider themselves lucky to be anywhere near government, the public voted for the Tories and Labour ahead of them .... they came third.

    Nick Clegg is starting to sound like the tired old "progressive" politicians he replaced. What is this nonsense about "targeting" those members of public who use legal means to pay the correct amount of tax? Barking. If you don't like it Nick, then change the law - you are the Deputy Prime Minister !! ( what about reforming the grossly ineffective HM Revenue and Customs department first before lashing out at law abiding citizens, but perhaps that would be too difficult).

    What next - arrest people for being wealthy?, Fine them for driving a flash car?

    The Lib Dems are looking a bit accident prone and indeed a party that never expected to be in government. I am suprised at the lack of discipline and disloyalty shown by Vince Cable and Simon Hughes - who do they think they are, they should shut up and get on with the job, as frankly Cable is looking a bit out of his depth and needs to start performing.

    They will be mauled at the next election because they held the British public up to ransom to bargin what was good for the Liberal Democrats, not what is best for the country. Also, they don't seem to have the depth of talent to produce the quality needed to be a minister.

    They should be a party in perma-opposition - it is the best they are capable of.

  • Comment number 43.

    He has to say that! He has yet to fully sell the idea of a coalition with the centre-right to predominately left-wing grass roots members, some of whom are probably taking a long hard look at their own future in the party. This is the first big test of his leadership. The next will come in the wake of inevitable obliteration next spring in the Scottish and Welsh devolved elections. If he comes through that without a challenge to his leadership, we can legitimately start calling him Teflon Nick.

  • Comment number 44.

    This line must be taken in context, namely from the leader of the LibDems to party activists. A leader cannot lead without followers, so Clegg has to show that the decision to enter into a coalition was a Good Thing.

    He has two questions to address. First, can you [the party activist listening] get more of the things you care about done under a Lib-Lab coalition than the current arrangement? In turn, this breaks down into aspects. First there is the 'political' aspect focused on how a LibLab Coalition would actually work. Labour, in my judgment, needs the Libs less than the Tories, because Labour views the Libs as fellow travellers, Labour-Lite/Labour-Wacky. Cameron, OTOH, needs the Libs to convince voters of the softer, new party he party he has brought into being. This means that the Libs are more likely to heard in this coalition.

    The second half of this first point is policy. Here, there are more difference with Labour than is usually claimed by those who talk about a "progressive" coalition. For example, Labour could have cancelled Trident, but they didn't. Labour has expanded the size and power of the state beyond any notion of 'liberal democracy.' Etc.

    The second issue is whether the LibDems want to be a permanent opposition party, or do they actually want to be in government? There is no doubt that some LibDems are just hippies, with no desire for power. But some are serious about seeing the policies they believe in put into place.

    Clegg should be able to sell this story, except to the hippies and the true-red Labour supporter who finds themself in the LibDem party (Shirley Williams, for example, a nutcase to the last).

  • Comment number 45.

    The electorate decided that no single party should have absolute power, the only choice left was a coalition. This necessitates compromise by both sides so the current government was 'elected'.

    Is it right for the country, probably. I think the Lib dems have toned down the rhetoric of the Tories, and some of the policies and policy statements as a result are more palatable. If it offends both Tories and Lib dems, it is probably about right.

  • Comment number 46.

    Is the coalition 'right for right now'? Yes!

  • Comment number 47.

    I wouldn't say they're right for right now, they're all we've got for right now. There is no viable alternative to make a government. Westminster is full of idological idiots who have no clue about real life & who know the cost of everything but the value of nothing.

  • Comment number 48.



    Two stories I read on BBC news yesterday, "Lord Ashcroft to quit as Conservative deputy chairman" and then "Alexander launches 'ruthless' tax evasion clampdown". No mention by the BBC of the obvious connection there then. After thirteen years of NuLabour misrule I have often complained that despite earning 35K per year, at the end of the day I am financially no better of than the 6 or 7 children, terminally unemployed families who reside at the council (therefore my expense) down my street.
    Their house is damp, needs new double glazing, new roof, one phone to the council and it is put right. My house as damp, needs rewiring, new boiler etc, I have to pay top tradesmen prices to get it done out of what little take home pay I have after paying, PAYE, NI, CSA, Pension, travel to work costs, council tax.
    I can’t get parked outside my house after a long day at work, because their many vehicles have been clogging up the street all day whilst they sit inside their centrally heated, double glazed houses watching Jeremy Kyle all day. Their ferile children running havoc in the streets vandalising all they come across.
    What is the Con Dems answer to this, Take tax credits off the working couples and give more to those who have never worked and never intend to, have a crackdown on "tax evasion " for the workers, tax workers to park at work and to park at hospitals when they visit their sick.
    My answer, I think I will just stop trying 100% at work on my performance management, and when I get laid off in the next batch of redundancies because I wont work an extra 10 hours unpaid a week or expect to take my full holiday entitlement, or dare ask for a wage rise, I will get a council house, everything paid and join the parasites watching Kyle all day or drinking cider in the garden when its sunny.

    THIS COUNTRY STINKS!

  • Comment number 49.

    Well it is a damn sight better than the last lot of useless idiots that ruled this country. Tony Blair was the worst PM ever with Gordon Brown the worst chancellor ever. They were a joke and the candidates contesting to be the new leader of the labour party are a joke. They are laughable. If they ever get to power then I am leaving this country. The coalition are making some horrible and hard choices at the moment and they are not popular, but they have a double blow on their hands. Firstly we have to make more cuts than we would like because Tony and Gordon really did spend all our money and Gordon spent what little was left, plus the Conservatives have a different idea to labour as in they do not like the over generous welfare state that has been created and lack of immigration control, and the over employment that has come into our public sector under our last government. The conservatives would have cut the useless departments that were created to give people jobs to reduce the unemployment tables anyway. All the paper pushers were always going to be cut. we need to build the private sectors again and get companies trading in this country.

  • Comment number 50.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 51.

    To paraphrase Bill Hicks:

    I'll show you politics in the UK. Here it is, right here;
    "I think the puppet on the right shares my beliefs."
    "I think the puppet on the left is more to my liking."
    "Hey, wait a minute, there's one guy holding out both puppets !"

  • Comment number 52.

    Personally I think it was a big mistake that the LibDems will live to regret.
    People voted for one party and got two.
    When you vote you can only vote for one party...if you vote for two your ballot paper is deemed to be invalid.
    I think that the temptation to hold some power blurred the LibDems thinking and damaged forever their independence.
    I, for one, will never again vote for them as they have proved to me that they grabbed the opportunity because they know that they are to weak to win an election outright.
    They have aligned themselves with Tory policies and will be judged in the near future by the voters many of whom must be very uneasy with this slight of hand.....but that's politicians for you!

  • Comment number 53.

    The Liberals will become extinct after the next election - if there is one and the current government don't change the rules further in their own interests!

    Whether that is justified or not, I don't know because I'm not party to the amendments the Liberals are making to Tory policy. Maybe they are sacrificing popularity to soften the blows. Whichever, they will suffer badly in future. It is reported that half of those who voted Liberal Democrats in the last election would not have done so had they known their preferred party would ally themselves with the Tories.

    I'm not so sure there is a need to cut as drastically as is feared and in terms of jobs. I work in the public sector and see terrible waste of money. Rather than hack job numbers, modify the system to reduce waste. Ring fence administration and management costs to keep them separate from front line services, and then squeeze them year on year. Freeze appointments to managerial\admin posts, natural wastage will soon reduce costs as staff turn-over is high. If necessary, reduce the value of Public Sector pay bands. It is better to have a lower paid job than no job.

    I'm also not sure that it is safe to slash spending so drastically. 1 in 5 of the population works in the Public sector. If their numbers are dramatically reduced - and they would have to be to make a big impact - what will be the effect on the economy? Both in terms of the private companies that provide goods and services to public bodies, and in terms of all those public workers suddenly having no money to spend in the shops.

    I'm also concerned about how benefit cuts will be implemented. Reducing benefits for all would be unjust. Cuts have to be targetted. I know people scared to start working because they fear that, if they do, they will not be able to cope. Not that some mythical cushy life on the dole will end, but that they won't be able to eat or have a roof over their heads.

    Agreed Steve #34 People in the public sector provide the services those working in the private sector need and want. Why should they be second class citizens?

    Devils reject - no, people are not capable of logical reasoning and global co-operation - unfortunately.

  • Comment number 54.

    Yes, the coalition is right for right now. More of the public voted for Tory policies than anything else, so, even though the Lib Dems finished a distant third and really shouldn't be in any form of power (I say this as a Lib Dem member), the Tory policies are mainly being implemented at the public's wish.

    I suspect however, that when the crux of our public sector is axed, whereby teachers, nurses, firemen and police are out work and these front line services badly affected whilst the rich business owners carry on as normal, the public will realise just how naive they actually were.

    Personally, I believe the cuts are far too harsh and directed at the wrong areas. No one doubts the need for frugality in these times, but we could easily have kept our front line services with the withdrawal of Trident funding and not paying a bloke in a silly hat to come here for a few days and spout insulting comments at the majority of the population.

  • Comment number 55.

    Well i never tought i would say it but yes it is right, and i wish them all the very best, as it all needs sorting out.Voted labour all my life, and never thought i would like David Cameron,but i like the way he talks, never seems to dodge a question, one thing they need to stop saying is what they have been left with and blameing this that and the other, and get on with it, all the best to them both.

  • Comment number 56.

    Is the coalition 'right for right now'?I think it is right for Clegg and his 5 minutes of power.I as most LibDems think there will be no party to vote for when a Election is called.

  • Comment number 57.

    Nick Clegg said yesterday "we did not win the Election" nether did the Conservatives. Only time will tell if it is the "right time" Looking back at the history of the Tories I won't hold my breath.

  • Comment number 58.

    The liberal dems didn't really have a choice. They could back the coalition and have an opportunity to influence policy and perhaps get a change in the voting system, or remain out of power for a further 100 years.
    I know a number of people who voted Lib dems feel betrayed, but in reality if they had voted differently it wouldn't have made any difference. I voted Lib Dems, but in my constituency my vote didn't matter as it was a safe Labour seat. This scenario was true in the majority of constituencies. In the 60 or so seats the Lib dems won, if people hadn't voted Lib dem approximately 2/3rds would have been won by the Tories and a third by the labour party, so the policies that the coalition are following would still have been put into practice in any case. By having a coalition Government some of the more extreme Tory policies will not see the light of day.
    The rank and file Lib dems really have no choice but to support their leadership, as the alternative would see them destroyed at another election. They need at the very least electoral reform before another election is held. The Tories also need to support the coalition as they could not risk another election against a new labour leader who wouldn't have Gordon Browns baggage. It is almost certain that whoever wins the Labour leadership will enjoy a honeymoon period which would preclude another election in the next couple of years.

  • Comment number 59.

    The "I'm a left of centre liberal" charm routine might work again for him with the LibDem rank and file but its sure isnt going to work with the general populace who saw his true colours as soon as the ballot boxes closed.
    The truth is this little venture into power for a few years is going to cost them dear. Even with their charm offensive surge they lost 5 seats and are also likely to lose out on the electoral reforms they hold so dear (as people - including me - will punish them for their betrayal).
    Its time a few spoke out in an attempt to get a bit of credibility back - it might cheer Vince Cable up a bit too, poor chap...
    Hanging onto a fly-by-night like Clegg will finish them off.

  • Comment number 60.

    Short of holding another election immediately following the first one, there is little real, practical alternative to the coalition. To all those who "didn't vote for" a coalition - I didn't vote for 13 years of NuLabour. What one individual voted for is irrelevant.

    I was pleased with the way the coalition got going. It appeared to be actually doing some of the things it promised to, which can't be bad. Unfortunately, in recent weeks it seems to me that they are turning into NuLabour2.0 and much of their recent activity is pretty much what one would have expected from the last lot of greedy, out-of-touch incompetents.

    I therefore suspect that they have convinced themselves that they have some sort of invincible alliance. They haven't any such thing, and they need to bear that in mind.

  • Comment number 61.

    Steve

    "After wars, lies, spin, corruption, the police state, spying, censorship, murder and teflon any government is "right for now" since it's not the last one. How much worse can they be. I would venture to suggest that if you have a job (a real one) you will find that the new government will be a welcome tonic. If you are on the dole with no good reason, pretending to be sick or in a made up job at the expense of the rest of use you have big problems coming.
    ----------
    I am sure all those firefighters,care home workers, nurses, teachers, police officers, prison officers, road sweepers, school dinner ladies, home helps, mental health workers, soldiers,sailors and air force personnel etc representing 90%+ of the public sector out there (including in the above both myself and my wife) will be glad to know that these are not real jobs.

    The next time my wife has to save someones life at work I suggest She says to the patient "sorry mate" I've got a made up job" and suggest they seek medical help from their friendly local multi millionaire merchant banker!


    Numpty!!"


    I can see who the numpty is here. I suggest you read first and type second. Did I say that all public sector jobs are "made up jobs"? No, I didn't because they are not all made up jobs. Many in public services do excellent and necessary work and I appreciate them for doing it. I would possibly argue the percentage figures with you. I would say that nearer 70% do worthwhile jobs. Of the remaining 30% a proportion do half of a worthwhile job due to overmanning and job creation. and a larger proportion do nothing of any use to man or beast. I would suggest that the ones who can't read 7 lines of text without jumping to the wrong conclusion are likely in the 30%. To deal with some specifics.

    NHS; we now have a doubled health service budget for a 7% increase in output. Value for money?

    GPs earning in excess of £300k per year while qualified doctors are on the dole, is that value for money?

    The police service; can't rescue a drowing child from a lake as they are not trained in swimming. They can chase a motorist to the ends of the earth for a speeding ticket but can't attend a burglary. Strikes me they have too much time on their hands and too many of the wrong sort.


    Road sweepers; we have 5+ million on the dole why are we employing road sweepers at all?

    Teachers; my son now has a teacher plus 2 "classroom assistants", why?



  • Comment number 62.

    I have just one thing to say to Clegg - left-of-centre Parties do not side with Tories - particularly those led by old-Etonians. I have voted for all Parties in my time, but only worked for, and become involved with, one - the Lib-Dems. Never again - they've lost my vote and my labour - permanently. The only thing that will change that decision is if the Party Conference gets rid of Clegg, or at least does him serious and lasting political damage.

  • Comment number 63.

    #21 "The Labour Government under Blair and Brown spent the first 4 years in office paying off the debts left by the previous Conservative Government. "

    Nothing like re-writing history!

    Given that in the first 4 years Lab govt ran a budget deficit not a surplus exactly how did they pay off debts... by borrowing even more money and still spending what they did not have. The fact that this was also the Tory spending plans shows how useless our politicians are or possibly were.

    None of the political parties have the guts to enter into govt and adopt policies based on living within their means. Now before you write me off as some right wing ranter I have not said how govt should balance the books. It could be by significant tax raising and less budget cuts or even no cuts and much bigger taxes - that is the function of a different debate

  • Comment number 64.

    34. At 11:58am on 20 Sep 2010, steve wrote:
    After wars, lies, spin, corruption, the police state, spying, censorship, murder and teflon any government is "right for now" since it's not the last one. How much worse can they be. I would venture to suggest that if you have a job (a real one) you will find that the new government will be a welcome tonic. If you are on the dole with no good reason, pretending to be sick or in a made up job at the expense of the rest of use you have big problems coming.
    ----------
    I am sure all those firefighters,care home workers, nurses, teachers, police officers, prison officers, road sweepers, school dinner ladies, home helps, mental health workers, soldiers,sailors and air force personnel etc representing 90%+ of the public sector out there (including in the above both myself and my wife) will be glad to know that these are not real jobs.

    The next time my wife has to save someones life at work I suggest She says to the patient "sorry mate" I've got a made up job" and suggest they seek medical help from their friendly local multi millionaire merchant banker!

    Numpty!!
    Sorry, but I think you are the numpty, no where does the poster say that you and your wife have none jobs, I too am in the public sector and have seen at close hands how many non jobs and overpaid jobs there have been under the last government, we have always had a civil service and good people in the top jobs without having to pay them more than the PM and give them bonuses. One of the top earners in No. 10 is a career civil servant, so why do we need to pay him so much? Would he have really walked away, given up his pension etc.? I doubt it, he should be paid no more than anyone else of his grade and certainly no more than the PM.
    Yes the coalition is the best for now, what other choice was there, to let labour back in after losing the election?

  • Comment number 65.

    Is the coalition 'right for right now'?

    To be more precise its neither right nor left, but more right right right of right left of right centre.

    I havent got any monkeys, so I cant give any, maybe others can give a monkeys!

  • Comment number 66.

    I didn't like the Labour lot, Cameron's a disappointment and error prone, whilst Clegg's just an irrelevance.

    There isn't a statesman amongst them, I worry for the future.

  • Comment number 67.

    No, it isn't the right government for right now, and less people think it is than they did four months ago.

    Labour share up to 37%, Conservatives down to 38% and the balance of power holders at 15%.

    Yes that's 15% and they are deciding government policy (well agreeing with the Tories and voting the right way to keep power).

    So how can it be the right government? Basically it's a Tory one with hangers on commanding 53% of the vote. BUT the 15% didn't want a Tory government, they voted against it so in truth 52% oppose the government.

  • Comment number 68.

    30. At 11:48am on 20 Sep 2010, Billy wrote:
    18. At 11:25am on 20 Sep 2010, pzero wrote:
    Absolutely NOT!

    I didnt vote for this collection of spineless wonders holding the country to ransom.

    ------

    However, collectively the rest of the country DID vote for the coalition and as we live in a democracy that is what we have got. Looking at the comments here, the right-wingers are upset at the 'namby-pamby liberal government' and the liberals think they've sold their souls to the devil. I suspect therefore that what we actually have is a quite a good compromise.
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    Really Billy, perhaps mine was the only ballot paper in the country not to have a Con-Dem option printed on it according to your logic. I think you will find that no one actually voted for this shambles that has been imposed upon us.

  • Comment number 69.

    It doesn't matter what colour of government we get now. We have had years of liberal, namby pamby, spinless bleeding heart brainwashing. We have gone over the tipping point and have sold the values of a once great nation down the river.

    All very sad really.

  • Comment number 70.

    Mr Clegg has hit the nail on the head.

    Nothing could have been more disastrous for the UK had Labour been returned to power, and it is taking the combined efforts of two otherwise-opposed parties to sort out the utter shambles that Gordon Brown left behind.

    I should like to think that the present coalition will set a modern precedent for politics. Two heads are better than one, and the best ideas from each deserve our support.

  • Comment number 71.

    "35. At 12:00pm on 20 Sep 2010, Tom Bombadil wrote:

    The Conservative Party is keen to cut public sector pay, pointing out that the pay of the top 5% in the public sector has risen 51% in ten years. However the pay of Directors of the top hundred companies has tripled over the last eight years. If it is right to cut the pay of the top public sector employees then it even more important to cut the pay of the top company Directors who have created this pressure to raise pay at the top."

    What private companies do is up to them. If I start a company from nothing and make it a multi-billion pound operation, I think I deserve whatever pay rise I feel the company can afford. If my company was owned by the government, I'd expect them to dictate salaries and the like as it is their (i.e. public) money. You simply cannot equate the two as they work in very different ways. If a private company fails, it goes (Ask Woolworths). If a public company/department fails, it'll get a reshuffle and the cost is passed to the taxpayer. That's what the private directors get paid more for.

  • Comment number 72.

    I don't think so. We need public sector / welfare cuts but the brunt should be borne by council and civil service executives, nanny-state holdovers such as 'smoking cessation officers' and 'child obesity strategy compliance monitors' and the huge system of child-based benefits apparently designed to encourage the least educated and responsible to have large families (and in doing so creating generation after generation of the child poverty they claim to be trying to prevent).

    Instead it will be frontline workers such as police officers and the sections of the welfare state on which sick, disabled and elderly people subsist (no 5-bed council homes or plasma TVs here) that suffer savage cuts and the rest of us, working or otherwise, who are left to pick up the pieces. If the result of these cuts is increased tension and civil unrest, it is law-abiding property owners, particularly those outside the leafy suburbs, who will suffer most with no effective police force to protect us.

    Through all this I've maintained that it is surely preferable for the government to pay someone £20K a year to do something productive (and I don't mean knock on people's doors and tell them they're too fat) than 8K a year to sit on their behinds, lose their skills and self-confidence, resent the state instead of supporting it and pass all these bitter and cynical values on to their kids, but then as we all know the Tories have ideological reasons for their strategy of a mass unemployment society.

  • Comment number 73.

    20. At 11:28am on 20 Sep 2010, RightWingIDBanned wrote:
    After wars, lies, spin, corruption, the police state, spying, censorship, murder and teflon any government is "right for now" since it's not the last one. How much worse can they be. I would venture to suggest that if you have a job (a real one) you will find that the new government will be a welcome tonic. If you are on the dole with no good reason, pretending to be sick or in a made up job at the expense of the rest of use you have big problems coming.

    -----------------------------------------

    So business owners in places where the biggest employer in town lays of 1000's are gonna love the drop in demand for their goods are they??

    As for this coalition I find it mainly undemocratic. One of the reasons the Tories didn't get a majority (despite being against a bruised and battered Labour Party) is because the public didn't want cuts so severe this early on. The Lib Dems have allowed them to do this despite what they campaigned for before the election.

    What's more galling is that Nick Clegg will allow the city he is MP for (Sheffield) to rot again under a Tory government. At least he gets his moment in power though.

  • Comment number 74.

    27. At 11:40am on 20 Sep 2010, OwainGlyndwr wrote:
    Don't make me laugh, when is a tory government ever right for the UK.

    ==================================

    When we have no money left because labour spent it all. AGAIN.

  • Comment number 75.

    Yes it is.

    I think the days of clearly defined party politics is behind us. It may have been right decades ago when there were clear divisions between social groups. As we've morphed into a common middle class, the politics have merged as well, making no single party right for the country. Witness the new (right) Labour... who could really tell the difference between that and new (Left) Conservatives.

    While the Lib Dems might not be getting exactly what they want - the fact is they are in very strong position of power to influence policy in a serving Government. They didn't win the election and by not being part of the Coalition they would be nothing more that a diversionary sideshow in Parliament as they have been for years - not even a strong opposition.

    This 'tempered politics' is probably a good thing as it reflects the social and political makeup of the country and I think we should welcome it. I for one support different policies stemming from all political parties and would be very uncomfortable with a single party political ideology calling the shots - it can only lead us to swinging right and left every couple of years!!

    The Lib Dems should stop griping and recognise what they have got in their hands is very valuable, even if it isn't the pure undiluted Lib Dem approach they would ultimately prefer.

  • Comment number 76.

    36. At 12:03pm on 20 Sep 2010, shillo wrote:
    Don't know if it's true but somebody told me that his audience has halved due to disgruntled members either joining the Labour Party or realising they were Tories all along and joining them.
    -----------------------------------

    I heard something similar. It's incredible that so many people who voted for Lib Dems now complain that Lib Dems are in government.

    I'm starting to feel sorry for Nick Clegg. He's the leader of the first party in history to be actively supported by people who never want to see them in power.

    The co-alition will steer the country clear of bankruptcy and millions of people will hate them for it. The Labour propaganda machine has done well. If only Labour could have put the same amount of effort into regulating the financial sector instead of telling the FSA to "keep their hands off" the banks, as Gordon Brown put it.

  • Comment number 77.

    I favour a Coalition Government based on the number of votes cast by the elector, not based on the seats won. The current fudge ignores the votes of over 30% of the electorate by ignoring not only Labour but also the votes of minority parties.
    If the Government wants/needs to impose severe cuts it needs to have the support of the population. At present, it not only does not but it cannot have that support.
    With few exceptions we all understand the requirement to cut Government spending, and waste, but the tight coalition does not have a clear mandate to carry out most of what is proposed.

  • Comment number 78.

    72. At 1:24pm on 20 Sep 2010, richie79 wrote:

    "Through all this I've maintained that it is surely preferable for the government to pay someone £20K a year to do something productive"

    That's the key word - PRODUCTIVE. Do the lamp-post counters, equality officers, etc. actually do anything productive? I'm all for productive government jobs but slapping 35K a year on a job that is simply making work for the sake of it? No way!

  • Comment number 79.

    I believe the Coalition Government is right for now, because in general terms it reflects the outcome of the General Election in terms of popular vote, so is democratic in real terms. Far too many of our recent governments have been placed in office by only a minority of the voters. The Coalition Govt has bucked that trend. Secondly, the country has been left in a real mess by the recent Labour Administration; reaching crisis proportions. Only a coalition that reflects the popular will as counted in the ballot box has any chance of sorting things out. Third, the chances of introducing some form of electoral reform have been improved. Without it, our 'first-past-the-post' electoral system is unsustainable and turnout at elections will continue to decline. Fourth, the extreme elements of the coalition parties in office are held in check. So, all in all, this Coalition is a good thing, at least for the next few years.

  • Comment number 80.

    Statesmanship is called for, not narrow party political interests, which is why the Country voted for a Coalition government: Clegg is on course.

  • Comment number 81.

    29. At 11:43am on 20 Sep 2010, DevilsReject wrote:

    Can anyone explain to me why we actually need government? Are we as human beings not capable of logical reasoning and global co-operation...

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    No, sadly we aren't. I refer you to recent events involving a certain book...

  • Comment number 82.

    Yes - this is the right government for now. All these people who say the Lid-Dems sold out or they've betrayed their principles are really not looking at the facts. At the election, no party won a majority. A Lib-Lab arrangement would not have commanded a majority in the House of Commons and judging by the negative attitude of the Labour negotiators (see the updated edition of Andrew Rawnsleys book about the decline of the Labour Party), a deal was not going to be struck. No - Nick Clegg brilliantly negotiated a deal with the Tories that has produced a clear programme for 5 years based on a Conservative Manifesto, tempered by Lib-Dem input and with a reasonable number of Lib-Dem policies thrown into the mix.

    This may not be what any individual voted for - but as a whole - it is what the country voted for - and it's what we have got. These parties have come together to try and dig us out of a hole dug by Gordon Brown and his friend Ed Balls who fooled us (and probably themselves as well) that there would not be another recession and went about deregulating the financial sector without a thought. We should support them.

    As another contributor has said - what happens in 2015 is for the crystal ball gazers. If the outcome of the coalitions policies is a stable growing economy with debts substantially reduced and the inevitable harsh cuts at least having been applied fairly - then it will have been a success. Who will reap the benefit of that success will be down to the skill of the politicians in presenting themselves to the electorate. But Cameron and Clegg will have done the right thing for the country.

    If these policies fail and are seen to have been unfair - then it will be a spell in the wilderness for both of them and a turn for New New Labour under a Mr Miliband.

    Personally - I wish the government success. We all depend on it.

  • Comment number 83.

    Oh what a load of tosh so far on this HYS. The electorate chose not to give any party an overall majority. So what do we do? Close Parliament, have another vote, come on people get a reality check.

    I voted Tory, and under the circumstances, I would have voted for this coalition. The parties are putting their politics aside and working for the benefit of the country, to get us out of this mess. We do not have an alternative, so we have to let this work, or we will all be living in cardboard boxes, no benefits, no pensions.

    Give David and Nick a chance to deliver the goods.

  • Comment number 84.

    61. At 1:02pm on 20 Sep 2010, RightWingIDBanned wrote:

    Teachers; my son now has a teacher plus 2 "classroom assistants", why?

    -------------------------------------

    Are you complaining that your son has access to what is considered a very successful method of classroom education?

    You should feel lucky to be in this situation. We need more classroom assistants, not less.

  • Comment number 85.

    Unfortunately there aew Still people with the LibDem party that think politics is a Parlour game that you play on a Sunday after the evening meal.
    Until the Majority of the LibDem party realise the the LibDem is not a " Hobby ,sit on the fence party".Then you will alway get members voting the "cop out action "
    It seems on the face of it the some with in Libdem party wish the miss the opportunity to govern. Deputy Prime Minister Clegg,( when was the last time liberal party had a deputy prime minister) is taking the party down a road to government , At the same time giving some Libdem the experience of run a Government dept.!!!

    What unearth is up with some members of the Libdem party is rebelling against the party .. the electorate are watching and judging the Libdem performance. The Libdems should stop there silly parlour games for the good of t he Party
    Do they really want the Labour party back in ?
    Unfortunately UK Ltd can't play with Monopoly Money anymore

  • Comment number 86.

    Judging by the lack of enthusiasm at the Lib Dem conference it looks like Clegg will be tolerated by his party for a short time and after the honeymoon is over he will be dumped.

    The country didn't vote for this government but we will all suffer whilst they play games dish up whatever they see fit for the working class and those least able to cushion themselves against the cuts.

    We are being governed by a bunch of spineless wonders who only want their place in history and have no interest in the good of the country. The next General Election will be facinating.

  • Comment number 87.

    The Coalition was the only way forward in May. The alternative was minority government and an almost certain second election with a high likelihood of a more extreme Tory administration following on. Despite its rhetoric Labour would never have sorted itself out to get back into power within such a short space of time.

    Cuts are regrettable but necessary. The only issue is whether they are happening at a rate and depth which will derail whatever fledgling economic recovery is trying to happen. If I have to have Osborne as the Chancellor I should far rather have Vince Cable keeping him honest and Danny Alexander making sure the spending review is done properly.

    The Liberal Democrats need to hold their nerve and step up their PR. They also need to remind the Tories that without the Lib Dems they could not have formed a stable government and use that fact a little more in debates and policy discussions. The Lib Dems are not in government by kind permission of the Tories, they made government possible and should wield an influence disproportionate to their size.

  • Comment number 88.

    No. The libdems are even more left wing whacky nulabour are. Given that the Tories are well right of centre, this mess will never work.

  • Comment number 89.

    The coalition as it stands, with its intentions and policies is not right for right now. Right now we don't need idealism and extreme measures, designed to send millions of people into an inferno of debt and poverty, which will complete the job of turning this country into a crime ridden and culturally redundant abyss. Britain will become like a Latin American state circa 1970, where life is cheap and the black economy is the only way to go to survive. We need sensible politicians who will take us through this crisis in a calculated and measured way. As far as the Lib Dems are concerned, they were in a no win situation. Either never be in power or take a shot, even though it means they'll be consigned to oblivion from the next general election to who knows when. Yes, Clegg made a big mistake but for those who wanted power, he made the only choice available to him. It's a shame though because he dirtied his hands and I'll never vote Lib Dem again.

  • Comment number 90.

    29. At 11:43am on 20 Sep 2010, DevilsReject wrote:
    Can anyone explain to me why we actually need government? Are we as human beings not capable of logical reasoning and global co-operation. Or am i living on another planet?

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Another planet, mate. Human nature is not kind, if left unchecked. Somalia have no Government - why don't you go and check out that particular little piece of paradise? Or save yourself the horror and just study history. I despair as much as you, but I'm afraid our Government is probably one of the best in the world ..... (cringe) ...

  • Comment number 91.

    Of course Clegg is right. He is affecting Government policy and modifying tory dominated thinking. The electorate has had enough with all the parties, does not trust anyone and more to the point, those Yattering on about strong purposeful government forget the fact that we had that for 12 years. Result I queered up economy, 2 illegal wars and a bunch of idots with their snouts in the trough. Frankly I'll try anything that works.

  • Comment number 92.

    78. At 1:46pm on 20 Sep 2010, Sue Denim wrote:
    72. At 1:24pm on 20 Sep 2010, richie79 wrote:

    "Through all this I've maintained that it is surely preferable for the government to pay someone £20K a year to do something productive"

    That's the key word - PRODUCTIVE. Do the lamp-post counters, equality officers, etc. actually do anything productive? I'm all for productive government jobs but slapping 35K a year on a job that is simply making work for the sake of it? No way!

    -----------------------------

    Far too much propaganda about so-called "lamp-post counters" (which I doubt even exist).

    Much of the non-essential public sector workforce supports essential public sector staff and enables them to do their job.

    Yes, there are levels of management that could be taken out but no where near a smuch as people try to claim.

  • Comment number 93.

    Far too far to the right in my opinion.

  • Comment number 94.

    Is the coalition 'right for right now'?

    YES YES YES!!!

    But on planet Zogg and NOT planet earth.

  • Comment number 95.

    One would have hoped that the Lib Dems would have at least got some sort of concessions on the planned spending cuts, prior to the election they agreed with Labour that cutting too much too quickly was a mistake, the way they caved at the first whiff of power leaves a very bad taste in the mouth.

    The coalition had potential, finally the worst excesses of the Labour spend too much, Tories cut too much looked like it might be addressed and the silly cycle stopped by the Lib Dems, but they didn't have the spine to do it.

    As for the future of the Lib Dems, I can see Clegg moving to the Tories and the rest of the party picking up the pieces.

  • Comment number 96.

    76. At 1:36pm on 20 Sep 2010, CaptainJameson wrote:
    I heard something similar. It's incredible that so many people who voted for Lib Dems now complain that Lib Dems are in government.

    I'm starting to feel sorry for Nick Clegg. He's the leader of the first party in history to be actively supported by people who never want to see them in power.

    ------

    I am one of those people who voted for them and will never vote for them again. They have sold themselves short and Nick Clegg has shown that he does not have a backbone and is a "yes" man. He won't stand up for the Lib Dems and I think he's lost the support, not only of the public, but also his own party. It wasn't discussed with them as it should have been and he seems more interested in David Cameron than his own party.

    He should step down and someone with a pair should take his place and pull the Lib Dems forward in this Government. David Cameron is walking all over them and Clegg is accepting it. Until he stands up for his party and puts his foot down they will never again receive my vote.

  • Comment number 97.

    80. At 1:47pm on 20 Sep 2010, ian cheese wrote:
    Statesmanship is called for, not narrow party political interests, which is why the Country voted for a Coalition government: Clegg is on course.

    =============================

    I'd lay off the cheese if I were you. I dont know what ballot paper you voted with but mine did NOT have a coalition box to tick and as far as I am aware, nor did the millions of other voters have such a voting choice.

  • Comment number 98.

    86. At 1:56pm on 20 Sep 2010, ziggyboy wrote:

    We are being governed by a bunch of spineless wonders who only want their place in history and have no interest in the good of the country.

    ===========

    Perhaps you could enlighten us on your view of Brown and Blair?

  • Comment number 99.

    71. At 1:21pm on 20 Sep 2010, Sue Denim wrote:

    What private companies do is up to them. If I start a company from nothing and make it a multi-billion pound operation, I think I deserve whatever pay rise I feel the company can afford. If my company was owned by the government, I'd expect them to dictate salaries and the like as it is their (i.e. public) money. You simply cannot equate the two as they work in very different ways. If a private company fails, it goes (Ask Woolworths). If a public company/department fails, it'll get a reshuffle and the cost is passed to the taxpayer. That's what the private directors get paid more for.

    ---------

    What you are arguing is that market forces should apply within the private sector but not in the public sector. Why should a highly qualified executive accept a public sector job at a fraction of the salary they would get in the private sector. It is the private sector that is creating the market for highly paid executives and it is inevitable that that will spill over into the public sector.

    The multi-million pound bonuses that are distorting the market are not paid to entrepreneurs but to executives in the the top hundred companies like Banks and Oil Companies. The Bank executives "earned" their high bonuses by gambling with depositors money on the basis that if the gamble succeeded they would collect the winnings but if the gamble failed the depositors would pick up the bill. High bonus rates have not operated in the public interest and need reigning in.

  • Comment number 100.

    I just wish the left leaning BBC journalists would leave well alone for the time being. The coalition needs time and is not getting any at all, the intrusive journalists are at their throats at every opportunity. I think the majority of free thinking individuals are far, far happier with this government - regardless of their individual political bent than they were with the previous administration. I know that myself and my wide scope of friends most certainly are.

    JUST wait and see, enough of supposition and conjecture, there is a distinct shortage of facts around at the moment SO stop the scare stories, it is not necessary. The vast majority of us can make our own minds up !!!!!!!

 

Page 1 of 15

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.