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Is the deficit Britain's most important issue?

09:59 UK time, Tuesday, 3 August 2010

The prime minister and his deputy have written to cabinet colleagues to remind them that reducing the deficit is the "most urgent issue facing Britain". Do you agree?

The joint letter comes as government ministers are negotiating with the treasury over the scale of the cuts to be made. But amid fears the coalition is in danger of being defined solely by its emphasis on cuts, David Cameron and Nick Clegg also say any proposals to promote economic growth will be treated favourably in the departmental spending review.

The prime minister also said his government is seeking to "avoid" making cuts that can be "restored" in the future, at a Direct PM event in Birmingham.


Is the government right to concentrate on cuts or should economic growth be the priority? How are you planning to cope with action to cut the deficit? Have you already made changes to your lifestyle? Were you at the Direct PM event in Birmingham?


This debate is now closed. Thank you for your comments.

Comments

Page 1 of 8

  • Comment number 1.

    No - it's JOBS

  • Comment number 2.

    The attempt needs to be both for cuts and growth. Growth brings money in and provides jobs and a happy population. Cuts pay off debts now by diverting money from service and industry.

    Whoever came into power was going to struggle after labour.

  • Comment number 3.

    Of course it's the most important subject for the government.

    It's what got them into power.

    Without the deficit we would have no coalition.

    Then 'call-me-dave' would be on his own.

    We have had a few stupid initiatives from government so far:

    1 we are going to get lots and lots of jolly people off benefit and into work in the midst of a recession caused by the government cutting expenditure.

    2 We are going to have a 'big society' where lots and lots of paid jobs will be done by jolly volunteers, in their spare time, without any thought of payment.

    3 er..... thats it?

    You bet the deficit is going to be their most important issue.

    And we will be told this again and again and again....................................................................................................................................................and again until we jolly well know that this is the most important thing in jolly condem land.


    Who are they trying to kid?

    not me





  • Comment number 4.

    The government is completely wrong. If they continue it is in my opinion almost certain that next year, when the increase in VAT and the cuts start to bite, the economy will return to negative growth.

    The shortage and expense of credit will stop recovery in its tracks. Merely urging the banks to change their ways will not cure the problem. The banks are profit orientated companies and are bound to take advantage of the shortage of liquidity to boost their profits.

    The government, with the Bank of England, should act to change the conditions in the money market. To cure the shortage of money, more money needs to be created by quantitative easing and the new money should be used by the government for public investment. This they could easily do, by reviving the previous government's investment plans. This could be done quickly, because much planning and preparation is already done.

    Unfortunately, the government is likely to be too cowardly to admit that they were so badly wrong.

  • Comment number 5.

    I would say its on a par with the issues surrounding Law and Order and the current ineffectual state of the criminal prosecution service.

  • Comment number 6.

    Is the deficit Britain's most important issue?

    What else is there - lack of money impacts absolutely everything.

  • Comment number 7.

    Deficit is a con trick. Just an attempt to reorganize the economy in favour of the private sector, the old style of Tory/Lib Dem stuff from Thatcher and the early exponents of Lib Demism, known as the Gang of Four. Now it is flavour of the month by the international banking community. I am surprised at the BBC's lack of scepticism. Where are the questiioning journalists?

  • Comment number 8.

    It is important but not paramount.

    Economies are cyclical and can/will recover.

    Social values are not cyclical and the current decline in the British value system is deplorable. If sanity is not recovered soon it will be all but lost.

    Personally I am not hopeful but as one of those who can at least admit the shambles I now choose to live in France.

  • Comment number 9.

    Yes the deficit is the most important issue. Everyone with savings stand to loose if the defecit is not reduced, or better still eliminated. The countries economic rating will fall and more expensive borrowing will criple the country further, it is just hobbling at the moment.

    The state of the country and the deficit are the results of the actions of successive governments, Tory and Labour.

    The Torries changed society completely in the 1980's by getting rid of the unions and closing down inefficient manufacturing and heavy industries, instead of trying to modernise. It left a sub-group of people with no work and, generally, made employment more service based.

    When Labour came to power the country appeared to be very prosperous, but Labour being Labour they quickly ran down the road of massive borrowing to fund their "social vision". In their vision there were no poor people, there was no need for thrift, everyone should have this and that, no matter what they did for a living or didn't do for a living, in other words they ruined us. They kept up their welfare handouts to keep their voter base and basically spent money that we did not have. The banking crisis only highlighted how skint we were/are. Now it is pay-back time.

  • Comment number 10.

    The deficit is definitely one of Britain's most important issues along with unemployment. But what this government is doing, is using the deficit as an excuse to implement Tory ideology by cutting the public sector by 25%, when such high cuts are not needed in terms of cutting the deficit.

  • Comment number 11.

    the biggest problem is population growth which is the result of over production and total control of our food supply.

  • Comment number 12.

    Deficiency is important, but so are jobs. Unfortunately they go hand in hand with the economy. Off course the government needs to address the deficiency created by Labour, but job loss should be minimized since unemployed people spend less and and this on its turn affects the economy. Contracting economy means less money for the government and less money to reduce the deficiency and the circle is round.

    The solution is to reduce the deficiency by:
    - Being efficient. A lot of money gets squandered by quangos,etc.
    - Get the money back from healthy banks.
    - Review cash flow going outside the UK. Countries with a space program obvious don't need help.
    - Invest in large projects only if they are beneficial for economy e.g. Trident no, high speed trains yes.

  • Comment number 13.

    We know what happens when one spends on credit card more then he/she earns.
    Exactly the same is happening in this country for many years. It can't continue indefinitely and we have already reached a point when if something is not done we are in real trouble.

  • Comment number 14.

    It's certainly one of the biggest. The public sector is in denial, as are the Left. They still don't see the big picture. If we don't pay down the deficit the markets will slaughter us. DC and NC know this, most of the private sector know this. Only the blinkered leftists in the public sector fail to see this and believe things can carry on as they did under Labour. Well Labour created thousands of non jobs in the public sector in order to keep the dole figures down. It was the equivalent of the Tories moving people onto IB in the 90's. We can no longer afford these non jobs so they have to go. And before the leftists start whining, I'm talking about the 5 a day co-ordinators, diversity officers and the like, not nurses, firemen or police.

  • Comment number 15.

    What about the £100 billion tax revenue that is lost to the exchequer each year through tax evasion? I see Cameron and Clegg doing nothing about it. They say we all have to suffer but the richest 10% and multinational companies don't because they are the main culprits when it comes to tax evasion.

    The rest of us pay extra tax to make up for the tax evasion of the richest in this country. The deficit can be easily dealt with by closing tax loopholes and getting rid of tax havens and making the rich pay the correct amount of tax.

  • Comment number 16.

    The Sun thinks Wayne Rooney on a night out with his wife and mates is the most important issue the country faces, And its what Murdoch thinks that matters.

  • Comment number 17.

    Maybe the government could actually start acting like a government and CREATE some new jobs. We need jobs ! How many times can I say this ? Jobs Cameron - it's what people who aren't born as lucky as you have to have to survive. It's the thing your party sold to the US, India and the Middle East last time you were in power.

    Stop complaining about people on benefits when you haven't done a thing to create any new jobs for them. Most people will work if they have a choice.

    Another money saving idea would be to not spend 12 MILLION pounds of taxpayer's money on the Pope's visit. We could also get rid of the Royal Family and reduce the overinflated wages of Judges, Barristers, Police, MP's and MEP's - they are DRAINING our economy dry.

  • Comment number 18.

    Considering that the deficit will soon inflate the National Debt to an eye watering £1 Trillion and that even despite the cuts already announced will be close to 100% of GDP by 2014, then it is of course the ultimate priority.

    Anyone who thinks otherwise, should consider that the UK will soon be paying £60 Billion a year just on loan interest, significantly more than what we spend on Defence and not far short of what we spend on Education.

  • Comment number 19.

    Depends who you are. One of the wealthy capitalist class and you'll urgently want your servants Dave and Nick to get workers conditions way down so you can get back to bigger amounts of dosh for the old offshore account. A worker and you'll urgently be hoping to survive, still be employed, still be able to pay the bills, and you'll wonder why workers and the public sector are having to pay for the recession/deficit Nick and Daves' friends created.

  • Comment number 20.

    I think that the government are wise to address this issue as their main priority. The sooner we get the recovery on the right track the better. Before the election it was a burning issue, nothing has changed so it is about time that we get this sorted.

    Job cuts and cuts in public spending are inevitable and yes it is going to be difficult but we can only prepare. The only thing that makes changes easier is being positive.

    When has getting out of debt ever been easy, better to realise and prepare than complain and be stunned.

  • Comment number 21.

    I feel like I'm in Back to the Future and I've gone back to 1985!

    Anyone remember the Tories back then, same as the Tories now.

    To quote The Who - the new boss is the same as the old boss, and we won't get fooled again.

    Although we will get fooled again. Won't we...

  • Comment number 22.

    No.

    We aren't exploiting one of our major assets - the rivers of gravy that flow under the streets of London.

    A second Oxo tower with better gravy mining technology would increase production fourfold. The revenues could be astronomical. Also, a vast number of jobs would be created, bringing economic benefits to the local area and reducing unemployment.

    A minority group of hippies and eco-terrorists are advocating that gravy-mining could be causing global-thickening but their evidence is baseless.

    With minimal ecological impact, and no history of major gravy-leaks, the risks are insignificant.

    Gravy - it is our future.

  • Comment number 23.

    Actually I don't think so.
    I just read "Call for law change on quad bikes", I see @can't do this... can't do that..." for 'health and safety reasons' everywhere, I see poorly equiped soldiers, inadequate airforce, lack of navy, too many pen pushers, idiots suing because they fell off a ladder or slipped on a wet floor, failed to hold a door open in the wind... all sorts of rubbish, and of course people sitting around with nothing to do while our government spends billions on goods and services from abroad.
    We need to ...
    a) Single benefit for all, single tax for all income.
    b) Force anyone who claims any restriction for 'health and safety reasons' to have a personally signed letter from the head of the health and safety executive detailing exactly what is restricted and why.
    c) Jail anyone claiming compensation for failing to show any intelligence (on a windy day hold the door, look where you are walking, check the handle on a mug, check temperature of hotwater etc.) for a minimum of 5 years (should discourage it)
    d) Force ALL government, local authorities etc. to buy ALL goods and services from the UK

    The deficit is important, (d) above will fix it quicker than any other measure, (a) above will help massively by reducing paperwork, (b) and (c) will free companies to get on with what they are supposed to be doing rather than spending billions on stupid notices, insurance policies, daft 'policy documents' and other rubbish.

    With these things in place we might finally get somewhere.

  • Comment number 24.

    7. At 10:49am on 03 Aug 2010, Davidethics wrote:

    Deficit is a con trick. Just an attempt to reorganize the economy in favour of the private sector, the old style of Tory/Lib Dem stuff from Thatcher and the early exponents of Lib Demism, known as the Gang of Four. Now it is flavour of the month by the international banking community. I am surprised at the BBC's lack of scepticism. Where are the questiioning journalists?

    -----------------------------

    The private sector does need more favour. They are the ones who make money and provide us a public sector. The public sector has grown and costs far more but the private sector isnt earning enough to support this.

    If labour were still in power you would have a larger debt, higher tax, and as darling said 'cuts far worse than thatcher'.

    This country spent a lot on credit. Now it is time to pay it back. If you want someone to blame then talk to the labour fools.

  • Comment number 25.

    to me its:

    1st: why and how did we get into so much debt?

    2nd: a plan to reduce it without hitting the population too hard in taxes; hence slowing the economy even further as people will reduce spending.


    all this would be more visual and beleivable if the debt was transparant. how does the average joe know what the debt stands at on any given day? how do we know we are cutting the debt? how do we know we are out of debt? i personnally think we should have a electronic realtime board up in a public place displaying a big number. this would be useful to see. people who initially support illegal wars may not do in future if they suddenly see that large number get bigger over night by a few billion when the government decides to take another loan. these people will then atleast realise the financial concequences of war; nevermind the lives lost.

  • Comment number 26.

    It is for the Tories- it provides the screen behind which they are demolishing the NHS, Education and Public services, and, of course, continue the organised looting which is their version of privatisation. Under cover of their cuts they are reintroducing a 2 tier health service and a 3 tier education service, socially cleansing the wealthier areas by capping housing benefit and gerrymandering borders to create an everlasting government. The necessary cuts hide others that are spiteful or led by a reactionary agenda which makes even the Thatcher era look liberal and progressive! Meanwhile, the 'Big Society' plans roll on - as a response to the cuts, huge areas of the public sector will be farmed out to the unaccountable and unelected 'voluntary' sector whose often well-meaning efforts will all be diverted into carrying the can for failure of services. The excuse of rescuing the economy is being used by this vile coalition to revive the values of 18th Century 'reform' and the poverty and crime which came in its wake!

  • Comment number 27.

    Reducing the deficit is certainly important. The questions are "how" and "when". Given that the Tories like to make cuts in spending and services anyway, they will relish this opportunity. You only have to listen to Francis Maude (more radical than Thatcher), Eric Pickles and the like to see their self-righteous glee at the prospect. And they will blame Labour (not the bankers) and say they had no choice. What a load of ........ spin!! How long will the Lib Dems put up with this?
    For me the key task will be to reduce unemployment within 12 months. Failure to do so runs the risk of wrecking the economy, wrecking lives and wrecking social cohesion. The "Big Society" will be the "Big Con"

  • Comment number 28.

    The most important issue facing this country is what we want the country to be. Yes, the deficit is too high and tackling it is important but are the people in Parliament the right people to tackle it? Frankly I think not. They (and I mean all parties) have presided over an absolute disaster since the seventies. Career politicians are not living in the same world as the rest of us. A rule that no politiican can take office without having at least twenty years of normal living would be valuable.

  • Comment number 29.

    Ah yes, the infamous term 'deficit' that our new Coalition politicians trot out at every, highly rehearsed opportunity, on tv., radio, internet etc., etc. There a couple of definitions for deficit, and debt too in every dictionary? So, we get the idea Cameron & Co?

    However, what our new political masters fail to bang on about is HOW MUCH, and, indeed, WHAT PROPORTION of our 'deficit' is made up of the £billions EVERY man, women and child is responsible for BAILING OUT THE BANKS?

    Debt for building new hospitals, schools, roads and new infrastructure contributes to the Big Society and enables our country to be effective in business and offer opportunities for work and community in the 21st century with short/medium and long term pay back.

    Unfortunately, until the government, HM Treasury disclose the full and true amount of cash we all paid to save banks - then cuts in our jobs should not be allowed under the generic term of deficit - otherwise it's a complete con - and dare I say - a complete lie which will not take the country with them?

  • Comment number 30.

    No, it is whether Britain has a future or not so the sooner we get a PM that puts Britain first the better. The proposed defence cuts means that the whole of the armed forces will be innefective anyway.

  • Comment number 31.

    I do not think it is. I think most important thing is not rocking the boat by the powers to be. Gov. wants money, income, mainly tax. To get it you need to have working businesses to make profit and pay tax. If only goverment facilitate easy (Not cheap) credidt to businesses to open their way to do business it would end up with much more income through tax. I see no reason why goverment shouldnt have a bank of their own setting the standards or giving out loans to tax registered businesses. Since Banks for some reason are not happy lending money for investment or morgage WHY should goverment pay out money to save those banks that works against their own customers. It seems to be a One Big Sick system.
    Makes one wonder whats in it for them to keep this sick system going and allowing (in fact forcing us to use banks).
    PS I have witnessed someone detained by Police because he had about £5000 cash and suspicion was, money laundering, because he didnt Bank it. Yopu make your own conclusions from this.

  • Comment number 32.

    "Is the deficit Britain's most important issue?"

    Absolutely not.

    Economic growth and job creation should be priorities.

    Closely followed by the defecit. Which should be dealt with by ruthless - but highly targeted elimination of waste - not this mindless, random and indescriminate attack on the entire public sector. I also don't believe that the NHS should be protected from this targeted waste elimination.

    Re. economic growth - isn't it time the government took a much firmer line with those banks which are largely owned by the taxpayer - that's us! I keep hearing politicians banging on about how it's not the government's job to micro-manage banks. But I disagree. They'v had our money, so it's payback time IMO. Our political reps should not be listening to this guff that the banks are dishing out about not being able to lend to businesses which they don't consider viable. It seems to me that it's the banks' definition of viability that's changed over the past couple of years - not the actual situation of the businesses who are asking for finance.

    So, - if we own the banks, - we via our MPs - should be able to do a bit of dictating as to their lending policy.

  • Comment number 33.

    Yes, it is important the deficit is addressed, but not with the penny-pinching crusader attitude being extolled by 'call me Dave' and his ConDem cohorts. The deficit can be reduced gradually whilst still promoting and sustaining economic growth and revitalising UK businesses. This current government will inflict a sustained period of austerity and unemployment on the UK which will only penalise the UK people. Why doesn't 'call me Dave' insist the banks repay the public money used to bail them out by contributing 40% of their nett profit to the country's coffers? It's an absolute insult that many of the banks, who caused this mess in the first instance, are now reporting record profits when british people are suffering job loss and a severly reduced standard of living. How these bankers sleep at night is beyond me, but I imagine greed has no conscience.

  • Comment number 34.

    it is very important, but so is restructuring the economy so that the public sector becomes as small as possible. a large private sector encourages more growth than the public sector ever could. the public sector is just a big bloated bureaucracy, and is burning money like there is no tomorrow. labour had their chance at proving that a left wing model can work, and they failed. the budget deficit crisis has only proved yet again that the left-wing economic model has failed, and that the only way to go is the pro-business, pro-enterprise, small state right-wing model that the tories USED to offer. now they are all the same.

    when the deficit has been cut down to size, the government should go about cutting the state sector ruthlessly, and using the saved money to stimulate growth in the private sector, so that as many ex-public sector workers can find work quickly.

    the government should be responsible for only these things:

    -defence
    -health
    -education (revert to old grammar school system)
    -law and order
    -benefits (only 2 kinds of benefit- disability, which requires medical checks, and jobseekers, which lasts for 3 months only)

    we could also save a lot of money by not building all these pointless windfarms. even if i did believe in man-made global warming, it is obvious to see that they are inefficient, expensive and generally rubbish. nuclear is the only way to go.

  • Comment number 35.

    No, the deficit is not the most important issue.

    In fact the ConDems are using the deficit as a cover for their ideological dismantling of the welfare state.

    The Lib Dems are just Tories in sheep's clothing.

  • Comment number 36.

    Reduce the deficit? Ummmm, spend less??? Doh! That's why I don't have a deficit. I don't spend more than I have. Simple really unless you're a politician.

  • Comment number 37.

    Yes it's important but not the most important which is, whether we like it or not,

    No 1: TOTAL ENERGY INDEPENDENCE

    then things like population control, stopping the housing bubbles and curbing the rampant speculation

    The economy gets all messed up by the fact that work does not pay as well as sitting on ones backside watching TV whilst the bricks go up in price.

  • Comment number 38.

    We need to understand that the state should not and cannot be paying for a life of not working.

    There really needs to be a structural shift in the way in which we view society. Taxes should be paid so that essential services can be provided (fire, health, police, defence (not offense) and education). Benefits should only be paid in exceptional circumstances and for the able-bodied there should be a cut off point of about 6 months. If people won’t or don’t want to go to work why do I have to pay for them so they can sit at home and watch TV all day?

    If people find they are unemployable because they have no education why should we have to pay a lifetime of benefits as was the NuLabour way?

    We also need to stop funding the massive public sector which delivers very little and costs an awful lot of money. I often hear about employing people in the public sector generates jobs, gets people off benefits and they also contribute via the tax system. But where does the money come from in the first place? It comes from private sector employees paying tax to employ an army of overpaid public sector workers doing made up jobs. Let’s get real and employ people in real jobs not just NuLabour made up jobs to keep the unemployment figures down.

    At the same time we also need to take measures to ensure that the wealth of the nation is not hijacked by a few and that those at the top are paid relative to those at the bottom so that we can all benefit from future prosperity.

    We need to wake up and smell the coffee, we can’t go on spending money we don’t have...

  • Comment number 39.

    This gov could save itself a packet and drop the useless windfarm ideas. Review our comitment to co2 reduction and move the targets further away (by then the myth will be gone). Let the IPCC get funding from its supporters not the gov (it would fold quicker than a tower of cards).

    Divert some of this money to create jobs that are worthwhile and that does include less reliance on fossil fuel research.

    The last gov wasted a lot of our money on nothing. That should provide a good saving

  • Comment number 40.

    No, people are most important.

    This government seems to forget that. Some, even, can be accused of taking pleasure in ruining people's lives just to reduce the deficit as fast as possible.

    Of course it's important to get rid of the deficit, unfortunately the 5-year election period seems to dictate that this be done rapidly.

    Also, how are we expected to plan, when all this goverment ever does is taunt us with vague ideas of what's to come?

  • Comment number 41.

    17. At 11:06am on 03 Aug 2010, Icebloo wrote:
    Maybe the government could actually start acting like a government and CREATE some new jobs. We need jobs ! How many times can I say this ? Jobs Cameron - it's what people who aren't born as lucky as you have to have to survive. It's the thing your party sold to the US, India and the Middle East last time you were in power.

    Stop complaining about people on benefits when you haven't done a thing to create any new jobs for them. Most people will work if they have a choice.

    Another money saving idea would be to not spend 12 MILLION pounds of taxpayer's money on the Pope's visit. We could also get rid of the Royal Family and reduce the overinflated wages of Judges, Barristers, Police, MP's and MEP's - they are DRAINING our economy dry.


    I hate to bring reality into this but no government can create jobs that do not add to the public deficit. Only the private sector can do this. If enough private sector wealth is created then governments can create jobs funded by the additional tax revenue that this growth in private sector wealth brings in. However, governments have to be very careful about how much of this they do so as not to impose too much burden on the private sector to disincent its wealth creation and so as not to run up a big deficit should the private sector contract. The last government failed on both points.

    Governments can provide some incentives to the private sector in terms of tax breaks and even subsidies to relocate to areas of high unemployment. But these are rarely effective. Subsidising loss making companies to produce stuff no-one wants to buy is also a recipe for wasting money on a massive scale. A good example would be British Leyland which was state owned and produced badly designed, poor quality cars at high prices. It may have kept soem peopel in work but not at a worthwhile economic price.

  • Comment number 42.

    Deficit is most important, according to cameron and clegg! Why dont I believe those two? Oh they're politicians and their lips are moving.

  • Comment number 43.

    Obviously cutting our debt is of importance however to do this you must have in place a comprehensive plan on how you are going to create new jobs or you are just replacing one debt with another.I havent heard anything yet to suggest that any such plan exists which says we have this great plan to create work out of thin air which says much about the slash and burn policy of the Tories or ideas on the back of a fag packet.To "rely" on private enterprise is folly as they will not be taking on anyone in the near future as more and more people in the public sector lose their jobs and cease to be "consumers".Since the days of Thatcher we have stopped being a nation that makes things to a nation who relies on the sheer greed of investment bankers who virtually do as they wish with no punishment for wrong doing.Private business who would quite happily create new jobs cannot because banks will not invest in those companies if its a risk(most business is a risk-ask any business person),so we have a catch 22 situation and the Tories can do nothing about it.Gordon Brown was right and David Cameron is wrong and the collapse of business and jobs in this once great country will continue until the Tories are thrown out with the rubbish.

  • Comment number 44.

    Is the moon round?

  • Comment number 45.

    Well as far as I can see all their policies are aimed at cutting the deficit, so if they then said "The deficit is not the most serious problem facing the UK", or words to that effect, they'd look very silly indeed, wouldn't they?

  • Comment number 46.

    Totally agree with David. I just think we are a nation of moaners. Everyone moaned we needed a strong prime minister and someone who would take control. Now we have that guess what? people are moaning.

    Is it a problem if ties are broken with Pakistan? I dont think so and if there are people here aggrieved by this then there is always the option of moving to Pakistan.
    David has one thing on his mind and that is BRITAIN. about time too. there is suggestions Pakistan is involved with facilitating terrorism and David is addressing that.

    Well done David, Britain is his area of concentration not Pakistan.

  • Comment number 47.

    Well he's come up a bit wanting on diplomacy, history and foriegn affairs, so maybe he should just concentrate on the deficit.

    Cutting jobs and services is something that the Tories do really well anyway, we should all stick our strengths.

  • Comment number 48.

    No. The ConDems are using the deficit as a cover for dismantling the system that helps the poorest in society, provides jobs and income in areas where the private sector are loath to go without being paid a subsidy.

    What's needed is not the "slash and burn" of this government but a structured reduction over a period of time. All their programme is doing is making the already wealthy wealthier at the expense of the the poorer 90% of the population.

    Commentators from Hutton to Keegan have pointed out that the "deficit" is nowhere as large as it has been in the past and our "pay back" period for the loans is much longer than almost any other European country.

    The ConDems are on an ideologically driven course that will have disasterous long term consequences for England.

  • Comment number 49.

    I think its better to pay down the debt once the economy pics up.Or at least pay it down at a slower pace until things get better.

  • Comment number 50.

    Once again it is up to others to sort out the nightmare legacy of thirteen years of Labour government overspending.















  • Comment number 51.

    It is important that deficit is reduced by cutting unnecessary bureaucracy that has been bludgeoning relentlessly under successive Govts, by reducing 5 million people's reliance on state benefits, abolish legal aid, restrict all benefits to only people who have worked for at least in full time employment for 5 years in the immediate past, halve the number of MPs, sell off BBC, complete abolition of Quangos, trim NHS to basic care, all tax avoidance antics should be ruthlessly eradicated, pull out of Iraq and Afghanistan forthwith BUT

    no rise in taxes as this would be fatal for the recovery of the economy.

    I suggest the Govt ought to consider reducing taxes and increase income tax allowances to encourage growth.

  • Comment number 52.

    Everybody drop what you are doing!

    The most urgent issue facing Britain at the moment is the location of my keys. WHERE ARE THEY?! FIND THEM!

    Oh, wait, I found them.
    As you were.

  • Comment number 53.

    39. At 11:31am on 03 Aug 2010, in_the_uk wrote:
    This gov could save itself a packet and drop the useless windfarm ideas. Review our comitment to co2 reduction and move the targets further away (by then the myth will be gone). Let the IPCC get funding from its supporters not the gov (it would fold quicker than a tower of cards).


    Personally I think there should be more taxes imposed on climate change deniers then we'd see their denial collapse quicker than a tower of cards, but there you go we can't always get what we want.

    You appear to have moved beyond being "on the fence" and needing convincing about climate change to asserting with confidence that it is a "myth". On what basis did this change happen?

    You may have the insight and intelligence to spot a gaping hole in our efforts to tackle climate change, (the inadequacy of wind power to meet our energy demands) and yet you seem hopelessly incapable of distinguishing between science and politics.

    Like so many socalled sceptics you simply cannot accept or understand that the evidence for "man-made climate change" comes from scientists, and is apolitical. What we do about it is the political question.

    Your posts demonstrate that right-wing commentators have a role to play in developing viable strategies to cut greenhouse gases. Unfortunately, if you want to be taken seriously, you need to lose your childish paranoia about green policies, and understand that scientific evidence is not something to be believed or disbelieved according to personal prejudices.

  • Comment number 54.

    Being honest with the British people is the most important issue.

    Many of the economic indicators of the last three months of the Labour Government have proved far more positive than the current government would have us believe.
    However there seem to be no sign of a reassessment of the need for all the cuts.
    As the banks return to profit is their repayment of debt to government being balanced against the cuts we are told are necessary?

    Are we in as unstable a position as the right wing presss led us to believe in the run up to the election or are the cuts a result of political dogms and a wish to dismantle the state and the NHS along with it?
    How many more Lib Dem policies will be abandoned before the coalition falls?
    Are the Liberal Democrats so unelectable now that they cannot afford to leave the coalition?

    There are many more questions about Conservative policy and very few answers forthcoming.

  • Comment number 55.

    15. At 11:01am on 03 Aug 2010, Fiona wrote:
    What about the £100 billion tax revenue that is lost to the exchequer each year through tax evasion? I see Cameron and Clegg doing nothing about it. They say we all have to suffer but the richest 10% and multinational companies don't because they are the main culprits when it comes to tax evasion.

    The rest of us pay extra tax to make up for the tax evasion of the richest in this country. The deficit can be easily dealt with by closing tax loopholes and getting rid of tax havens and making the rich pay the correct amount of tax.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Tax evasion is illegal and people and companies are prosecuted for it. Tax avoidance is a little different, that is arranging your affairs within the rules to minimise your tax bill. I'm not quite sure which you mean in your post.

    Either way, the £100bn you quote is dwarfed by the deficit, as shown on this page:

    http://www.statistics.gov.uk/cci/nugget.asp?id=206

  • Comment number 56.

    Start with a shopping list.....
    Take off some of the things we don't need to survive.
    Then ask everybody in Britain to give a tenner a week towards the up keep.
    And then pay everybody that works for the goverment a bonus for getting Britain back in the Black!.

    Ah!! fantasy is a nice place to visit!

  • Comment number 57.

    So fed up with everyone talking about it , how about enjoying our lives can we discuss that

  • Comment number 58.

    Cutbacks are a necessary evil, but not at the expense of everything else. There are some areas in which we should be increasing expenditure. I was in favour of the coalition when they first started, but they seem to be acting like a 'Bull in a china shop', and trying to cut almost everything, and not be bothered what damage they cause. They may assume that it is nearly five years to the next election, however they should be very careful as the election could actually be only a year away as I can not see the coalition surviving if the electoral system is not reformed following next years vote on AV. As both the Tories and Labour will campaign against it hasn't a chance of getting passed, and there is no way the rank and file Liberals will allow the Lib Dems to remain in the coalition if it isn't.

  • Comment number 59.

    Each day that goes by Dave & Co show what amatures they really are, they seem to think that if they give the voters a lot of pain at the start of their premiership then towards the next election they can sweeten us up and we vote them back into power.....dream on guys.

  • Comment number 60.

    Reducing the defecit is important yes!
    The method of reduction is equally if not more important.

    The current method(s) are unacceptable because it is not based on need but on outdated ideollogy, the destruction of the welfare state, privatisation of the NHS and Public Sector.

    The economy is growing faster than the forecasts which shows to me that the way forward is growing the economy not destroying it.

    The letter from Flashman to the Eton Cabinet is an irrelevence.

  • Comment number 61.

    I want leaders I can believe and trust in. Unfortunately, those days are gone.. you just look after yourself, because the only person in the world that will look after you is you!

  • Comment number 62.

    It is a convenient smokescreen to be "more radical than Thatcher" and impose a political dogma that was discredited years ago of every man for himself and public sector bad, private sector good.

  • Comment number 63.

    You've got to do the nasty stuff people hate right at the start of a government term.

    Since this is a coalition you've ALSO got to stick pretty rigidly to your side of the deal as well, or all bets are off and the administration fails.

    The Lib Lab pact of the 1970s was a wishy washy disaster of indecision and muddle so at least the present incumbents have a blueprint they should avoid at all costs.

  • Comment number 64.

    Regarding Post #3 by John H:

    Not for the first time I find myself in almost complete disagreement with you.

    "It's what got them into power. Without the deficit we would have no coalition."

    Without the HUGE deficit Labour might have still have had some credibility and may have stayed in power. It was the biggest reason why they lost my vote and I suspect many others feel likewise.

    "1 we are going to get lots and lots of jolly people off benefit and into work in the midst of a recession caused by the government cutting expenditure."

    There are still jobs out there and people owe it to themselves and the taxpayers to work if they can, even if they are little better off than on benefits. The whole point of benefits is to protect people who can't work, not give them a cushy alternative to work.

    "2 We are going to have a 'big society' where lots and lots of paid jobs will be done by jolly volunteers, in their spare time, without any thought of payment."

    Well in my home town a group of local volunteers set up a society to keep the local river (chalk-bed stream) clear of litter rather than expecting the council to do it. The result? A cleaner river and much less littering because people know that local residents 'care' and are less likely to litter than they were when it was the councils job to clean-up. I'm in favour of the Big Society in principle - what is the point is paying ever higher taxes and council taxes to pay people to do things that the community can do themselves.

    "You bet the deficit is going to be their most important issue."

    That's not surprising. As labour's Liam Byrne pointed out 'There's no money left'. Well rather than treat the parlous state of public finances as a joke at least the Lib-Cons seem to want to actually do something about it.

    "Who are they trying to kid? not me"

    The coalition are not trying to kid anyone. If you think otherwise it is yourself you are kidding.

  • Comment number 65.

    We have a surplus. Just not of the right things.

  • Comment number 66.

    7. At 10:49am on 03 Aug 2010, Davidethics wrote:
    Deficit is a con trick. Just an attempt to reorganize the economy in favour of the private sector, the old style of Tory/Lib Dem stuff from Thatcher and the early exponents of Lib Demism, known as the Gang of Four. Now it is flavour of the month by the international banking community. I am surprised at the BBC's lack of scepticism. Where are the questiioning journalists?

    Working for The Morning Star I presume?

  • Comment number 67.

    The deficit is NOT the most important issue. It is merely a symptom of the most important issue which is economic growth. The deficit was not much of an issue before the global economic collapse. It was economic collapse that created an unmanageable deficit (our previous deficit was easily manageable). Cutting the deficit by cutting public spending simply treats a symptom.

    The level of cuts across the board this government proposes will be as damaging to Britain as the global economic collapse was. There is no logical reason to reduce the deficit by such a great amount in such a short time if your reason is supposedly to repair the economy. Cutting schemes aimed at creating new industries or getting people back into work is economic lunacy as the OECD have said (perhaps not in such words but essentially the same).

    Cutting the deficit is only the most important issue if your aim is to cut public services and have them replaced by private companies delivering the same services for profit. That is pure Conservative ideology and they have spun the deficit as a disaster that must be immediately treated as an excuse for them to implement their ideology.

    I just hope the public wake up to this reality before they've permanantly damaged our nation too much.

  • Comment number 68.

    "David Cheshire wrote:
    Is the moon round?"

    No, it's spherical. That's the problem, most people look at this issue as simply two dimensional when the reality is more complex.

  • Comment number 69.

    10. At 10:56am on 03 Aug 2010, darkmaster14 wrote:
    The deficit is definitely one of Britain's most important issues along with unemployment. But what this government is doing, is using the deficit as an excuse to implement Tory ideology by cutting the public sector by 25%, when such high cuts are not needed in terms of cutting the deficit.

    Really! How would you propose to cut the deficit without spending cuts. Even Labour recognised they were necessary.

  • Comment number 70.

    Well clearly the condemned government is going to say it is as this will be the only defence for the swinging cuts in services and employment that are about to descend on the public sector.

    The figures on entering the office were not as bad as Osborne et al had scare mongered and the deficit is billions less than anticipated.

    Growth is exceeding expectations the highest in Europe and employment is still high compared to European competitors.

    This gives manoeuvre room for mitigating the worst of the cuts or indeed extending by a year the time scale for cuts,without frightening the Tories chums in the city.

    On the subject of the city .

    UK banks are about to produce £16 billion of profits this year ,while because of previous years losses not in general paying any tax at all.

    Over 7 Billion of this will go on bankers bonuses,any such payment to executives of recipients of the state bail out should be taxed at 100%
    This alone will raise £40 billion in extra tax revenue over the next 5 years,enough to pay for the entire Education Department for a year on its own.

    But no we are going to see Nurses,Teachers,street cleaners, police officers , care workers etc made redundant in order to allow the "essential cuts" while the disparity between the richest and poorest continues to grow.

    You can't expect better from the Tories,the Liberal members of the Government should be ashamed of themselves, most of those who voted for them certainly are ashamed of them.

  • Comment number 71.

    The deficit is important but not the most important issue. Countries have operated for decades with large national debts and not paying back what they've previously overspent and they survive, they can borrow. I guess that I think its pretty important that we're able to demonstrate that we're not making it worse.

    I think the real task of this government, and much more difficult than deficit reduction, is to decide what sort of country we want Britain to be. There are the following major components of that.

    To what extent are we prepared to be under the thumb of and contributing towards international bodies like the EU, European Court, and so on as against being a sovereign state with alliances and trade links?

    How big do we want our population to be, and do we need to control immigration to achieve that.

    Do we have any particular objective for the ethnic/religious makeup of the UK and what do we need to do to achieve it. Is there any such thing as "Britishness" and if so then how do we maintain and protect it?


    To what extent do we intend to use government to transfer wealth from richer to poorer and how do we do that without resentment?

    How do we bring benefits into line with what we can afford. Which groups of people do we want to help and which groups are we going to need to help themselves

    How do we increase the extent of mutual respect and reduce citizen on citizen crime and antisocial behavior?

    How do we best protect the UK from terrorism?

    How are we going to respond to the changing age profile of our population and the pressures it puts on benefits and poverty.

    How can we rebalance the UK economy so that we have one?


    If our government can resolve these interlinked issues over the next ten years or so and we still have a deficit then I for one will consider that they've done a good job.

  • Comment number 72.

    I hate to bring reality into this but no government can create jobs that do not add to the public deficit

    -----------
    I hate to point out the blindingly obvious that state owned businesses which run at a profit in for example China, Russia, France, India and indeed the UK do precisely this and have done for decades!

  • Comment number 73.

    1. At 10:18am on 03 Aug 2010, RichardGrey wrote:

    No - it's JOBS

    Absolutely right, the government by cutting spending in the public sector will cut private and public sector jobs. Vast amounts of public sector spending buys services and products from the private sector. With another perhaps million unemployed there will be loss of tax revenue plus with wage freezes spending and VAT receipts will slow and benefit payments will probably increase overall even with whatever cuts are being made. The UK will not make up the shortfall with manufacturing because previous governments and the banks have not seen the need. We are fighting a war but even that does not create significant industrial activity for the UK since so much equipment is bought from abroad. Even the troops socks are to be sourced outside the UK at the cost of UK jobs and a reduction in tax revenue to the UK govt. The deficit needs urgent attention but the current slash and burn policies could well leave the UK in an even worse state.

  • Comment number 74.

    Firstly the previous Labour Government has spent all the wealth, money and a lot more over 13 years of "Incompetent wealth wasting" which WILL have to be re-paid.

    Secondly a Government which creates Public jobs does not create wealth, Private Investment, British Inventions and Industry will create Jobs and Wealth.

    End of.

  • Comment number 75.

    In my humble opinion, the last 30 years at least have been an economic disaster. Growth financed by asset sales and north sea oil. As a nation we have our collective heads in the sand, we have borrowed too much and do not have the means to pay it back without deflating our economy or inflating our prices.
    The concept of economic growth following the model of the last 60 years will not work, China and India have put paid to that. Our banks are little more than gambling houses profiting from inflated asset prices brought on by quantitative easing and will fall back on their own swords once the printing presses stop.
    The forecast of population growth for the UK only reinforces my opinion that the political aim is to move this country down market. Lot of people chasing a few jobs, keeping wages low and house prices high. The lights might be on and the shops may be open, but don't be fooled, we have not seen anything yet.
    But on the bright side, at least we are not the USA, now they really do have problems.

  • Comment number 76.

    · 50. At 11:49am on 03 Aug 2010, Rupert Smyth wrote:
    Once again it is up to others to sort out the nightmare legacy of thirteen years of Labour government overspending.


    #########################

    Change the record Rupe; we have all been listening to that one for weeks


  • Comment number 77.

    Is the deficit Britain's most important issue?

    Yes.

    The sooner the boil is burst the better the outcome. 10% of all UK taxes are now going to pay off interest on the National Debt that Labour gave us. Without the National Debt (still growing all the time via the Deficit) tax could be 10% lower and all that lovely extra money used to aid UK business recovery instead of haemorrhaging out of the UK to the mostly foreign investors that we borrow from.

    Everything else people here prefer to debt reduction costs money yet none of them say where that would come from. Those who hope an artificially stimulated recovery is preferable to debt reduction should look at the US, which is now worse off than before they threw trillions of dollars at the economy. It a real mess over there and we should thank our luck that we have thus far avoided that, almost Keynesian, dead end.

    By cutting government costs and shedding jobs we will lower average living standards and refocus on a low wage and wealth creating private sector until we ‘right size’ for our realistic place in the global economy – about 12th would be my guess.

  • Comment number 78.

    #22.... Genius. Although I am concerned about the BOP (bisto outpour preventer) breaking causing mixing of beef and chicken stock & possible damage to wetland areas.

  • Comment number 79.

    Is the deficit the most imortant issue?

    Absolutely - Take a look at what happend in Argentina and Russia when the money ran out.

    Take a look at Iceland and Greece to see how the general population can find themselves painfully responsible for the actions (or inactions) of those that govern in their name.

    And the second most important issue? Making sure that no government can ever go wild with the national credit card again.

  • Comment number 80.

    "3rensho wrote:
    Reduce the deficit? Ummmm, spend less??? Doh! That's why I don't have a deficit. I don't spend more than I have. Simple really unless you're a politician."

    I take it you don't have a mortgage then because that's essentially the same thing. You put yourself into debt to pay for the large items that you simply can't afford any other way. That's how all countries work. You pay for expensive infrastructure by borrowing what you need and paying back over time.

    It's nothing to do with spending what you don't have. We had the money when it was spent and could afford the repayments. The problem now is that we've taken a huge pay-cut which makes it harder to repay our debt (but still not impossible). We can cut our costs and all eat cheap food , use less gas or electricity and have no social life (to follow through with the analogy) but that just leaves us living in poverty. The only real solution is to increase our wage (more jobs in the economy).

  • Comment number 81.

    It is right for the government to cut the defecit, as long as they do it in the right way. I find it difficult for them to justify ringfencing our foreign aid when EVERY other department has to make cuts of 25%. They appear to be keen to help the vulnerable of other countries while ignoring the plight of the vulnerable at home.

    I also am incredulous that not only are they insisting on Trident's renewal, which if I'm honest is only good for creating a few jobs for a while, but that they're demanding the MoD pay for it out of the defence budget. This is dangerous, the men fighting in Afghanistan are doing so without enough equipment already, any reduction in their budget will directly impact the safety of those on the frontlines.

    It would have been novel if the con dems had actually lived up to their election promises & not renewed trident (Dems) and give soldiers a pay rise & extracate them from Afghanistan (CONS). Con dem is the right name for this coalition, they've condemned this country to mediocrity & selling us down the river to keep their business buddies happy.

  • Comment number 82.

    No. Or, maybe, it is important, but anyway it is not so important as other problems such as the need to reform the banking sector, or the lack of good opportunities for investment. The budget deficit shows that there is not enough money for the state expenditures because the economy weakened by the recent crisis continues to be in a desperate condition. So the deficit is a symptom of more serious and deep-rooted problems. One comparison. Economic experts used to say that money is the blood of the economy. If there were not enough blood in someone's body, we could call this state 'anaemia'. To think that the deficit is the most crucial issue is the same as to think that for a patient with a serious illness, such as heart disorder, anaemia is the most crucial issue and, therefore, must be cured first of all. What I am certain about is that it is not good to be obsessed with the budget cuts, because to provide them is quite a delicate thing to do. Americans have been facing their budget deficit for decades, and what?

  • Comment number 83.

    Deficit? What deficit, we always have to borrow money to pay for the essentials in the British Economy, as the Economy grows and revenues return to normal the deficit will shrink, to go into frugal mode is bad for Public Services, bad for employment and bad for the economy, grow from our present position, not from a situation of 5,000,000 unemployed, why pay off the debt "when the roof needs fixing"? Cut back and we go back and road forward is doubly as hard, but then what do you expect from a Tory Party Demolition Company, they demolished the country in the 1980's and now they want to repeat the policy. Manage the debt by growth not by recession, the gloom of unemnployment and poor Public Services does nothing for the mood of the country, what we need now is optimism not pessimism, but then the Tories only want the well to do to be comfortably off, the rest of us can cow-tail to the Tory Masters, this has always been their way, why does the electorate think it's different now, people like Cameron, Clegg and Duncan-Smith and all the other "Hooray-Henry's" in Government haven't the first idea what it is to be the average "Joe". It's the rich that get the pleasure and the poor that get the pain, true today as it's ever been!

  • Comment number 84.

    53. At 11:59am on 03 Aug 2010, Aristarchus of Samos wrote:

    Personally I think there should be more taxes imposed on climate change deniers then we'd see their denial collapse quicker than a tower of cards, but there you go we can't always get what we want.

    You appear to have moved beyond being "on the fence" and needing convincing about climate change to asserting with confidence that it is a "myth". On what basis did this change happen?

    ---------------------------

    Hi Aristarchus.

    I have been strongly moved off the fence because the pro-MMCC have been knocked off their pedistal and science has prevailed.

    Obviously there are no certainties but the facts and evidence have moved vastly against MMCC while the models have been shown to be on faulty data. The IPCC is ignored by other countries and organisations due to deep corruption and others working with the IPCC are stained with this damage.

    The climategate incident and the sham investigation demonstrated a loss of science. The pushing of windfarms (proven not to work in any way) demonstrated a lack of science or truth in the project.

    Finally the german and russian scientists looking at factual evidence (not math models) and showing these events have happened before and that natural causes are far more likely.

    Since the scientific community can be so split I dont see how MMCC can be so well funded, especially wind farms which are a proven waste of money. Looking at real power alternatives isnt bad, but funding a failed technology is stupidity. We could make real savings for real problems

  • Comment number 85.

    Is the deficit Britain's most important issue?

    NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO, NO IT IS NOT.

    The MOST IMPORTANT ISSUE, is PLAIN TO SEE on another BBC news subject. Which is CONTINUED and MASSIVE FAILURE of UK banks to provide CAPITAL/WORKING CAPITAL to UK businesses which are CRYING OUT FOR IT with so MANY just being TOTALLY undermined by banks current and continued ATTROCIOUS behaviour.

    WITHOUT adequate investment in businesses then the deficit will CONTINUE FOR LONGER & at GREATER OVERAL EXPENSE.

    There is a VERY SIMPLE reality here.

    If banks INVEST IN BUSINESSES, then they will ACTUALLY/FACTUALLY GROW their Mortgage and OTHER loans portfolios and make even MORE money, via increased employment and QUICKER improvment to economic conditions.

    If I was government, I would CATEGORICALLY STATE to ALL UK banks, either INCREASE business loans by minimum of 50% OR expect PENALTYS, maybe further penaltys on bonuses and renumeration packages, especially non-high street employees.

    One incentive could be to reduce tax on profit on an amount of loans ABOVE that which is presently being provided by banks. The banks will gain and so will businesses and so ultimately will government tax receipts, because the loans will DIRECTLY contribute MORE NI & taxation via employment.

    Another thing I would put to banks, is that their bonuses and renumeration packages may come under serious consideration for being further taxed and the MONEY put into a UK NATIONAL business enterprise bank, if they do not comply.

    Either banks play the game or basically bog off, if they are NOT going to play fairly,evenly and proper, then they are NOT WORTH the economic value placed on them and basically, as far as I am concerned they are then the ENEMY WITHIN and need to be treated as such.

    Even put them on probation, with penaltys if they dont comply, for the DAMAGE they caused to UK economy and peoples lives.

    Basically, they have received a banking ASBO, and we ALL know the REALITY and value of an ASBO- NISH.

  • Comment number 86.

    50. At 11:49am on 03 Aug 2010, Rupert Smyth wrote:

    Once again it is up to others to sort out the nightmare legacy of thirteen years of Labour government overspending.

    ''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''

    If that were actually true, it begs the question of why they get voted back in when everything must be so rosy under the Tories? Remember, its the same voters who swing back and forth, apparently fed up with the current set, and wanting to see if it gets better with the other lot.

  • Comment number 87.

    Blame the banks and LIEbour.

    This situation was not caused by the Tories or lib dems in any way whatsoever. A few people need to remember that. Many people stick their heads in the sand and froth at the mouth when anyone mentions the last disastrous labour government.

    We have earnt a break from labour. They are not fit for purpose so stop defending them. This has got nothing to do with Maggie Thatcher either btw - and I'm not a tory or lib dem fan, I just think they aren't as bad as nuliebour.

    The new coalition has to make cuts. What other options do they have? The way this government has to act for the next few years was decided by labour squandering all tax payers cash. Someone has to take responsibility and address the situation but Labour and their supporters aren't grown up enough, hence burying their heads in the sand.

  • Comment number 88.

    How interesting it is to watch incoming goverments, they all fallow the same well troden path. This is what we see now, nothing new. Shure the last goverment spent money like most unpopular goverments do, what's new?
    But what realisticaly was the alternative 30% unemployment? whole industies devastated. We have a hugh hole, there for all to see, and now action has to be taken. But lets not kill the patient for political dogma. We are all well aware goverment is to big and reducing it is over due, but what about that fragile economy so talked about during the election or, is that forgotten now. I'd like to think we are going down the right path, but tread wearily.

  • Comment number 89.

    Of course it is!

    Wiping clean the legacy of 13 years of Gordon Brown's now known to be hopelessly inept stewardship of our economy is everything - the economy, interest rates, education, law and order, the health service, funding the armed services and the illegal wars into which Blair and Brown led us, etc - the list is endless, and it will take generations to fix it!

    It's what comes of a party who so corrupted our political process that we had foisted onto us an unelected PM, who then went on the appoint his own unelected cronies to positions of power and who once deposed, all slunk off back under the rocks from whence they all crawled in to the light, only to darken our days.



  • Comment number 90.


    As the Banks are once again making huge profits on the back of the British population, perhaps we should start with their profits and bonuses and dividends to cut our deficit

  • Comment number 91.

    In these revelation times you should see things with your eyes wide open
    - David Cameron does not represent the people he represents Common Purpose
    - Politricks has sold out to Big Money Corporations
    - Prime jobs aren't advertised and are given to the CP networkers

  • Comment number 92.

    Yes the deficit is the most important issue. Until this is fixed we cannot get on with the real business of making this country and more successful hard working Britain.

    After the deficit the issues facing this country are:

    + Immigration - the country will not be able to accept 70m people living here so some people will have to leave.
    + Unemployment and benefits - people have to work to get their benefits. Those on benefits cannot have the same as those who work. If you do not work you do not get the benefits of LCD TV, mobile phone, broadband and a car.
    + Education - Teachers need to work harder and be paid by results. The Finnish system needs to be brought in with the International Baccalaureate to get government out of teaching.

    However, deficit first.

  • Comment number 93.

    · 74. At 12:25pm on 03 Aug 2010, johnr wrote:
    Firstly the previous Labour Government has spent all the wealth, money and a lot more over 13 years of "Incompetent wealth wasting" which WILL have to be re-paid.

    Secondly a Government which creates Public jobs does not create wealth, Private Investment, British Inventions and Industry will create Jobs and Wealth.

    End of.


    #############################

    No one “Creates Wealth”, it is one more capitalist myth, at best individuals can move the wealth around a bit, usually from the poor to the rich.

    But No one not You, Me or the tooth fairy “Creates Wealth”

  • Comment number 94.

    The deficit is not a con.
    It was Gordon Brown's "No more boom and bust" that was the con.

    The simple fact is that one man's benefit is another man's tax burden.
    When the government cannot raise any more tax revenue it has to borrow the money.
    The UK's credibility and credit rating were plummeting and in danger of sending the cost of borrowing even further out of control.
    Labour squandered billions. Now we, collectively, have got to reduce the deficit.

    The effects of reducing expenditure will be painful and difficult for many but it is the only way forward. I would, however, also urge the coalition not to ignore the fact that so many FTSE 100 companies pay precious little tax. Perhaps the media would like to name and shame those companies who avoid shouldering their fair share of the burden.

  • Comment number 95.

    Right now, let's do the maths.

    Sum 1: 25% to 40% cuts in public sector = thousands of job cuts = fewer jobs = more people on benefits = less spending in shops = more businesses going bust = recession.

    Sum 2: Huge spending cuts within a year + wage cuts + job cuts + interest rate rise + VAT rise + rise in energy prices = more poverty + more people on the dole + more home reposessions + more older people dying in their homes + more crime etc etc. Grand Total = Bankrupt State.

    Now, am I stupid or is everybody else missing out on something? I'm sure I'm not the only person out there who knows basic arithmetic! ...and you're all saying the coalition is doing a good job. I belive I've just woken up on Planet Topsy Turvy!!!

  • Comment number 96.

    Is the deficit Britain's most important issue?

    LOl NO.

    I do not understand the creation of a "BIG SOCIETY" when so much money and effort is being used to deal with obesity and REDUCE the current "BIG SOCIETY".

  • Comment number 97.

    Society needs to focus on the fact that you dont get something for nothing. Taking the deficit seriously instead of sticking our heads in the sand and waiting for the IMF to be brought in to run the country as Labour were going to do is one step on that road.

  • Comment number 98.

    Yes but who brought it about - years of Labour spending!

  • Comment number 99.

    Does it really matter what we think. Once politicians are in power they do as they please until 12 months before the next election and we just have to suffer the consequences.

  • Comment number 100.

    The most important issue to me is what is the Government doing to get the economy out of recession. Up to now I can't see that they are doing anything. They are using the deficit to implement ideological policies which will end up seeing this country in recession for years to come and alienating vast swathes of the country. When the millionaire Condems tell us that we will all have to share the pain I can only shake my head and wonder what a gullible nation we are.

 

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