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What next for BP?

21:21 UK time, Monday, 26 July 2010

BP will emerge from the Gulf of Mexico oil spill crisis a smaller and wiser company, according to the man who is due to take over the reins. What is the future for BP?

Bob Dudley, currently in charge of BP's clean-up operation, will replace Tony Hayward as chief executive in October. Mr Dudley described the oil spill as a terrible tragedy from which the company and the industry would learn a lot.

Earlier, BP reported a record $17bn (£11bn) loss, having set aside $32bn to cover the costs of the spill.

What does the future hold for BP? What impact will Tony Hayward's departure have on the company? What should the next chief executive do to improve BP's image?

Thank you for your comments. This debate has now closed.

Comments

Page 1 of 6

  • Comment number 1.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 2.

    Let us wait and see. The USA - our supposed ally - clearly is waging some sort of war against BP, so changes might well occur only when that begins to abate.

  • Comment number 3.

    I think BP have had a raw deal, they were the owners of the well but American contractors were doing the actual work, there is no mention of them

  • Comment number 4.

    "What impact will Tony Hayward's departure have on BP?"

    The moaners will have somebody else to whinge about, that's what. Oh, and they'll be able to complain about Tony Haywards pension too. Fantastic, double the bleating.

  • Comment number 5.

    Re #2

    Yep, just another war the Yanks are waging ...

    The war on BP is designed to drive down the share price so that Exxon Oil or some other wholly American Oil Giant can pick off BP and make BP USA Petroleum.

    When the sanctimonious Americans have picked off BP and made their money out of the British Pensioners perhaps someone might like to remind the Yanks of Bhopal, India and the fact that 25,000 people died and yet, still, there is no compensation from Union Carbide for the poisoned water tables and the ongoing calamity caused by a wholly USA-owned Chemical Firm.

    It is one rule for the Yanks and another rule for the Rest of the World.

  • Comment number 6.

    As I understand from various sources of news, the new chief exec will be more acceptable as an American speaking with an American accent. How politically incorrect is that in UK speak? Silly me, we're the only ones to be politically correct, aren't we?

    Dr Hayward inherited a poisoned chalice from the previous chief exec, who left BP under a cloud. A company of that size cannot be overhauled within three years.

    After the appalling treatment Dr Hayward received at the hands of the US Senate, I think he deserves a large pension, simply for his patience and good manners in dealing with inane questions put to him repeatedly. I think the Senate should pay for it.

  • Comment number 7.

    What impact will Tony Hayward's departure have on BP?
    - I don't really care either way. BP was once a great British company, but now it has been privatised so it is owned by the money-men.

    What should the next chief executive do to improve BP's image?
    - Give BP to the Americans. American owned companies can (as we have seen many times) do no wrong. This won't hurt the man in the street - we pay through the nose for essential fuel anyway. Let's face it, American needs oil.... we must do everything we can to help them in their quest.

    What do you think of Mr Hayward's pension?
    - £600,000 annual pension? What do I think? My gut-reaction would be absolutely un-printable. A sanitized version would be "Oh, so that's why I'm paying so much for Petrol/Diesel."

    Have you been affected by the oil spill?
    - The whole planet has been affected by the oil spill, so Yes, I have.

  • Comment number 8.

    Truth will rise above falsehood as oil above water.

  • Comment number 9.

    Well done, Tony! You get the golden parachute you deserve! Bah. Just when you think the disaster in the Gulf couldn't get more obscene, along comes this. I guess the Masters of the Universe take care of one-another. Is it too much to ask that great privilege be balanced by responsibility?

  • Comment number 10.

    The oil spill has happily had zero impact on me. As for BP...not being a shareholder i could not care less.

  • Comment number 11.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 12.

    At 10:04pm on 26 Jul 2010, Alasdair Campbell wrote:
    The USA - our supposed ally - clearly is waging some sort of war against BP.

    If UK beaches were fouled, if UK fishing and tourist industries were devastated, if thousands of able-bodied citizens were thrown out of work, you can bet that there would be calls for compensation from the UK government, too. Walk a mile in our shoes, friend.

  • Comment number 13.

    It depends on whether a new CEO will have the will and the means to put safety first throughout the company. If it is treated as an "image" problem rather than a substantive problem with the operations are conducted, then it makes no difference.

    More important than what happens to BP is what happens to the Gulf and other places they operate. what we need is more effective regulation of oil operations in US waters. We should not depend on the companies to operate safely on their own.

  • Comment number 14.

    "When the sanctimonious Americans have picked off BP and made their money out of the British Pensioners ..." (from Menedemus at #5)

    There are plenty of Americans who have retirement funds in BP as well. This line of argument is a red herring.

  • Comment number 15.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 16.

    I think he deserves every penny, having to put up with the myopic Yanks whining on about everything EXCEPT their part in causing the mess (Transocean, Halliburton, Anadarko), even to the point of accusing BP of arranging the release of the Lockerbie bomber.

    No doubt his replacement will soon be wondering about that funny taste at the bottom of the chalice.... but at least he's American, so maybe there is justice or, failing that, some irony.

  • Comment number 17.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 18.

    It's a shame that Tony Hayward has been forced to step down. Those who moan about BP forget that BP pays a lot of Tax.

    It's critical now that the British Government stands up for BP - and that our Government makes sure that the US does not load any unfair fines on BP. The suspicion is that the US government will try and get hold of BP's assets on the cheap by levying all manner of unjust fines on BP. The US has already caused our banks to be trashed - we don't need them trashing BP as well.

  • Comment number 19.

    I think this whole thing is hilarious, we fought a war in Iraq for oil we got an oil spill in the gulf of Mexico and one in China, . The whole world is just a joke, when are we going to realise we all got cars we all got computers we all got the internet , when we as a world, stop driving cars, making consumables, computers, TVs and every other piece of modern technology we can moan. This guy is head of an oil company half owned by the Americans (EXON) LOL they are now paying him off for creating all that employment , didn't you just see it coming hahahahahahahahahaha Dummies. Stop whinging , get real, lol this is a joke.

  • Comment number 20.

    "... I hear comments sometimes that large oil companies are greedy companies that don't care, but that is not the case at BP. We care about the small people."--BP Chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg.

    Will Mr Hayward's replacement be much of an improvement?

  • Comment number 21.

    What next for BP? I would say the question should be expanded to - What now any company that the US president or the trained media doesn't like?

    This has set a scary precedent because an American will now fill his shoes in what some could perceive as political installation to slip US folk into the ranks of power.

    On another note it's nice to see the BBC and Peston make such a big deal of this guys pension as if it's their business - bravo for cheap tacky news. I am fed up of Pestons points of view on what is meant to be an impartial channel.

    Let me spell it out - BP is a private firm who employ the best and pay the premium and this guy must be one of them. Sure the US has made him a hate figure but that doesn't mean he's a bad guy so please stop telling us he is the one to hate.

    BTW At least he's not leaving the company on a final salary pension eh? What will your pension arrangement be Mr Peston?

  • Comment number 22.

    The sums involved are obscene. Nobody should be getting this sort of money for being required to leave their job, whatever the situation. But when you add that he, as the head of BP, is responsible for the world's worst environmental disaster, it is doubly obscene.

  • Comment number 23.

    It is an absolute disgrace. He should have been jailed for crimes against the planet, instead he does better than winning the lottery. If this man has the slightest decency he will contribute this pay-off towards the costs of cleaning up the mess he presided over.

  • Comment number 24.

    Re post #15 could you please spell out which house rule my comment broke and do me the kindness of returning it to my email address for editing as with this new system there is not rejected comments which only the user can see.

  • Comment number 25.

    Good riddance! But stop his pension. Another failed CEO, being amply rewarded for his failure!

  • Comment number 26.

    12. At 11:16pm on 26 Jul 2010, Jacques Bouvier wrote:
    At 10:04pm on 26 Jul 2010, Alasdair Campbell wrote:
    The USA - our supposed ally - clearly is waging some sort of war against BP.

    If UK beaches were fouled, if UK fishing and tourist industries were devastated, if thousands of able-bodied citizens were thrown out of work, you can bet that there would be calls for compensation from the UK government, too. Walk a mile in our shoes, friend.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------
    BP are cleaning up and making good the damage, but the yanks are showing signs that they want to screw additional billions out of BP in fines, which are unrelated to cleaning up the coast. Strange thing is the Yanks do not compensate us or pay fines for causing melt down in our banks. This country has lost billions in the banks due to the US. They don't act much like allies - more like thieves.

  • Comment number 27.

    Why are so many people pointing the finger at the US. Yes BP own the well, and Yes Americans contractors were doing the work, but like any other commercial arrangement with any company it is ultimately the owners responsibility to ensure all works are carried out safely and correctly. BP is the owner. If the work was not done safely and correctly BP did not have the correct people there, if any, to oversee the works being carried out.
    With regard to Tony Hayward's 600,000 pension, NO, he should not get it. That money should go toward the cleanup costs. Why is it that so many of these 'high fly executive' always seem to get a large payout when they mess up. If I messed up in my job I would get fired with out a payout so why should people like him get a golden handshake of 600,000.

  • Comment number 28.

    One more example of the extraordinarily high premiums Britain pays for failure in the private sector compared with the minimum amounts people are rewarded with for high levels of success in say the NHS,teaching, the fire service,the police etc.etc. This is a seriously damaged country.

  • Comment number 29.

    Any man who does that to the US Senate and their loaded and leading questions deserves a pension like that.

  • Comment number 30.

    Well did you see the smirk on his face after the interview, don't forget the £millions of bonus for last years enormous BP profit. BP America will make the loss wait and see, not BP PLC. Tony takes on a role in the Russian oilfield, probably another huge salary followed by more boost to his annual £600k pension.

    Carefully hidden but well placed in a report Saturday - the senior person on the rig a Transocean employee, admitted they turned the early warning system off so as not to wake the guys ashore at 3am through false alarms. This is within the US offshore regulations that this can be done he said.

    Obama - hours after the event said "Something serious must be wrong, oil rigs don't just explode like that, with today's technology and safety procedures this could not happen" so what did happen then, we all want to know. At the beginning of May Obama stated "The federal government have taken complete charge of the whole incident", Dr Hayward was asked the question in the inquisition, "Why have we been waiting 6 weeks for a signature to build a barrier" the answer should have been the federal government are in sole charge as stated by President Obama. Nothing was done for over 3 months and I doubt much is being done now.

    The latest evidence clearly shows nothing wrong with the well head, absolutely nothing, except a failed BOP, the rig blew at the surface, in the words of Obama this can never happen.
    Slack American practices, poor American equipment and a negligent American rig owner operator, and maybe an explosive device? So I think BP have a huge claim to make.

  • Comment number 31.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 32.

    grainsofsand (#26): "... the yanks are showing signs that they want to screw additional billions out of BP in fines, which are unrelated to cleaning up the coast."

    Fines for oil spills are provided for in US law, and they apply to US companies as well. They are subject to review by federal courts. In the case of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, for example, the original $5 billion fine was ultimately reduced to $500 million. Whatever fines are paid by BP, they will be determined by due process. A company which does not like the provisions for fines in US oil drilling law can choose to not operate in US waters.

    US companies which operate in the UK are similarly subject to UK law. If you believe that US banks have stolen anything from the UK, you ought to look to your own government for relief.

    The Piper Alpha disaster in the UK reportedly cost Occidental Petroleum about $15 billion US. I don't know how that was divided, but certainly US oil companies don't get a pass in the UK for causing death and destruction.

  • Comment number 33.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 34.

    The big reward is not that given to the outgoing head of BP under the terms of his contract of employment. The big reward is for the US government to drag BP through the courts and place sufficiently large punitive damages on the company that it has to sell off assets to meet the debt.
    BP is rich in oil reserves, many US oil companies are not and the US needs to secure oil reserves.

    Not that this is the first time the US Government has acted in favor companies it either owns, or is owned by. Having bought out the US Automotive Industry the US acted swiftly to damn their biggest competitor Toyota in a shameful display of looking after one's own assets.

    Let us compare the response to the Gulf Spill to that of the Bophal disaster.

    And let us see who gets their hands on BP's assets when the US courts have done 'their duty'.

  • Comment number 35.

    It is good to see that the chief executive of BP is to receive a £600.000.00 pension (worth £11m) plus a years salary and benifits worth more than a further £1m, but then that is how those at the top are paid for failure in the UK, Nice one Tony Hayward!

    Lets hope that his replacement is more safety, rather than greed, minded, which sadly seems to be the rule of thumb in the UK these days.

    His legacy will be the effects of the huge oil spill polution in the Golf of Mexico which will wipe out marine life for perhaps hundreds if not thousands of years - doubt? then have a look at the result of the so called clean-up after the Alaskan spill 22 years ago - it looks OK on the surface, dig down a few inches - thick tar and oil, Sea Life hardly a shadow of what it was, Sea Otters with unknown diseases and infections as the oil destroys their immune systems all feeding down through the food chain - fact. When it affects Humans perhaps something will be done - unless of course a big fat brown envelope comes along with 'Greed Oil Inc, or Ltd, all over it.
    Britian has been the 'Greedy Dirty man of Europe' for many years now, perhaps its right to call BP 'British Polution' after all.

    Just when will the men at the very top listen to the facts rather than the greedy Oil Barons, we have the technology in the here and now to produce the Electrolytic Engine amongst others (Originally invented in the mid 1800's) the only exhaust from this engine is steam, they work well, as does the Fuel Cell, also an 1800's invention, 1802 to be precise - perfected in 1837, but shelved after the early internal combustion engines came on the scene, heavy oil, and gasoline, diesel engines came a few years later - but even these modern diesel engines you can run perfectly well on used, waste, filtered cooking oil, there are sites on the 'net all over the place about this for all to see.

    Planet Earth will no doubt still be orbiting the sun in hundreds and thousands of years to come, but even if the most dangerous creature on the planet - Human Beings - haven't blown it to peices, it may not be habitable at the rate we are wrecking its fragile ecosystems.

  • Comment number 36.

    The imapact: None except if he takes all his severence pay in cash. The next CEO of BP have to understand how really stupid Americans are. They are blaming BP for what Dick Cheney did instead of hauling him up before Congress, they are being sidelined by Lockerbie.

    All the Lockerbie families were compensated, but neither the Corrie or Dogan families have been.

    The next CEO should be seen drinking Bud so that the Good ole Boys can say about him what they said about George W. Bush: He's the kind of guy I'd like to have a beer with.

    He should not relax himself or relieve his tension watching anything a redneck would not enjoy, and since he is an American, he knows what to watch. He should always go to little league instead.

    The only effect I have felt with the BP fiasco is anger, not at BP but at Dick Cheney and the Neocons that allow safty regulations to drop. All the Senators you hear baying after the Ex BP CEO were the biggest fans of Off Shore Drilling and small government, including Bobby Jendal.

    I fell sorry for the "little people." The CEO was right to call them that. And I know the HYS Censor does not agree, but the Gulf States, especially Louisiana has not made much social progress since Slavery. The poor are still dirt poor and the rich landowner class are still super rich and their politician make sure they stay that way.

  • Comment number 37.

    I understand why BP had to honour the agreement with Tony Hayward. The pr disaster would have even more ramifications on the stockmarket in the short term if she wouldn't have. But it does mean putting public opinion and a sense of moral justice on the scrapheap. I woner what will effect BP more in the longrun. If Tony Hayward cared at all about "his" company he would have insisted on a much "more" modest package then what he is to get now. I mean his former employees will be lucky if there pension will hold out in the future and wither employment levels are sustainable.
    In short be reasanable please mr Hayward, and Gp don't be overcorrect here and less so later for your other employees.
    yours sincerely,
    Bernard Timmer

  • Comment number 38.

    I find it hard to understand why some people want to make this tragic oil spill a UK vs. US thing. It doesn't solve the problems that have been created, it simply diverts attention away from the real issue, which is the clean-up.

    If Mr. Hayward is a decent human being, he will donate his "pension" to those who are fighting to save injured wildlife and to help those families financially devastated by the spill. This isn't about rewarding someone for a bad job, it's about taking a job, accepting responsibility when things go wrong, and setting an example of the kind of leadership the world needs.

    Sad to say, these opportunities for acting in a decent and upstanding way are being lost.

  • Comment number 39.

    He is leaving his job and will be remunerated as agreed in his contract like any other UK worker, you can blame Obama and a handful of vindictive US senators for that.
    In my view he has done exactly what he was paid for and is now being used as the fall guy, for US incompetence on their own rig.
    Don't blame Hayward, most criticism is no more than jealousy, yes even from Peston.

    Comparatively he is overpaid as are thousands of City workers, Media employees, Footbalers, etc etc, only your politicians can change that and look who you voted in by default, the biggest bunch of lying nomarks since the war.
    Bit by bit they're going back on everything they promised, and you'll end up with the very policies you did'nt want.


  • Comment number 40.

    Tony Hayward has been a good CEO for the company and shareholders (high proportion US pension funds). He is getting nothing more than his contracted terms which is right.

    Frankly I am tired of the politics of envy - and that also applies to reporting "tone" - please take note Robert Peston. You are tending towards bias which is unprofessional.

    Nothing is going to appease the Americans - not even a CEO that literally speaks their language. I just wonder how much of this is a smoke screen to cover up local management issues. Its a case of blame others and take no responsibility - think of the incident in the North Sea. And Us Government should not immediately jump in but wait and take a considered view based on the evidence - but I don't suppose that would improve his credit rating.

    Can't wait to read the real story in a few years time.

  • Comment number 41.

    As the CEO Hayward was ultimately responsible for a lack of proper oversight that led to the massive oil in the Gulf. By his actions BP stands to lose billions of dollars to the cleanup costs alone, let alone lost revenues and potential legal costs. That merits 600,000 pounds a year for life? If I were a BP shareholder (and I may be via mutual fundss) I would be livid.

    Whatever happened to pay based on performance? If Hayward was some common roustabout who'd dropped a pipe and started a fire on a drilling rig would he be given a generous retirement? Of course not, he'd be fired and lucky to get two weeks severance pay.

    It must be nice to be one of the privileged class who get taken care of in style and avoid accountability no matter what they do.

  • Comment number 42.

    Let's get a minor little factor out of the way here:

    THE OIL RIG IN QUESTION IS OWNED AND MAINTAINED BY AN AMERICAN COMPANY!

    This simple little fact seems to be ignored by everyone from both the British and American media, and their associated governments. Yes, they are subcontracted from BP, who ultimately have to claim responsibility, and Tony Hayward is the buck where it stops, but let's not completely bypass the fact that it was the Americans that caused this chaos themselves, not BP, and certainly not Mr Hayward.

    I see no reason why he should have to throw himself on his sword because of the inept abilities of a bunch of Texan riggers. Come on people! Get some perspective!

  • Comment number 43.

    Rather unfortunate that Tony Hayward would step down, considering the fact that he was the only chief executive to take on real responsibility for the Deepwater Horizon disaster. A sign of real leadership, which is something quite scarce in the world today even among chief executives. Despite the prevalence of corporate devilry in the whole of the economic world, Mr. Hayward, and thus BP, stepped into the breach voluntarily taking on far more responsibility for the situation than BP was ever likely to be solely and wholly liable for in any contest in the courts. The United States government simply stepped back and in fact stabbed BP in the back on that one, having had far more foreknowledge about the dangers of deep sea drilling in that particular location long prior to BP's venture along side the U.S. governments hunger for new oil reserves within its own territorial boundaries. It will be difficult for Tony to find something adequate to his experience and skills, unless he chances to venture into politics. I must say he would do a far better job of it than Mr. Obama did when the two are contrasted in their handling of the same situation.

  • Comment number 44.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 45.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 46.

    This pension is due to the corporate greed at the expense of investors. There is no ethics on this madeness.

    Many people are without jobs, countries are in economic downturn, investors are bleeding on their investments but corporate abuses continue to go.

    This is similar to the former chairman of Natwest and the governments must consider bring more regulation to prevent greediness.

  • Comment number 47.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 48.

    Whilst I think that BP have the final responsibility for the Gulf coast oil spill, (as the operator)it is unfortunate that Tony Hayward is being made the scapegoat to appease the hypocritical American political cabal.I think that in the fullness of time it will be apparent that the real culprit will probably turn out to be Transocean - the Swiss registered US company and it's maintenance and procedural methods. In the end analysis, all BP did was to hire a car (read rig) from Hertz (read Transocean)to go from A to B but the car's brakes didn't work and the car (rig) wasn't fit for purpose. When the BOP finally comes to surface, I think we'll find that Transocean's hobby engineering (on the BOP)had a direct impact on the ability of the BOP to perform it's normal function to shut in the well without any problem. However, in about 9 months time, this will probably be reported in the minor columns of US newspapers. After all, they will have already found BP guilty and given them the "chair" before looking at the bothersome truth that it was actually the US rig guys wot dun it guv !

  • Comment number 49.

    It is really frustrating that the amount of the pay he is going to receive has been published in US dollars on the homepage headline. It seems slightly provocative when it is a British media organisation, almost as if you are pondering to your American readership. A US media organsiation would never report something similar in British currency and it should be the same with the BBC. Shoddy transnational digital journalism.

  • Comment number 50.

    AHhhhhh. All this time I thought that my country was the only country in the world filled with idiots. Thanks to you Brits, I have been proven wrong. I see now that I have been much too hard on my country. England seems to have their share of ill informed, reactive, stiff legged fools. The problem is this... The platform blew up, killing people. The preventor did not prevent. The oil was gushing out unabated. Oil kills living things. So, let's fix it. It's not the Yanks vs. Brits. Corporate greed is multi-national. It's not some Yank invention. You suffer through it, just as I. I thought all this was over when Blair and Bush left office. In the US, we don't attach the Brits to BP. We look at BP as a world corporation with greed. The question to ask yourselves is, "How has BP made my life more enjoyable?" Your answer is probably similiar to mine. "None." Please stop this Yank nonsense. As a wise man said, "Don't spit in the soup. We've all got to eat."

  • Comment number 51.

    Please, Please, Please....can someone tell me how I too can make so much money from nose diving my business into the ground and then running away when things heat up? If he resigned his job then he should sign on the dole and bide his time until he is 65 and then get the state pension just like the rest of us.

    Only we Brits can reward complete failure with such riches...

  • Comment number 52.

    When the US congress discovers the scheme to make oil from kittens watch the share price plummet! Tslk about a witch hunt.

    The results of all this are that millions of ordinary working people in the UK and US have lost out and can look forward to smaller pensions, whilst the men responsible can retire confortably in paradise. Shareholders should be given the power to block such rewards for failure! Furthermore, any criminal procedings in the US over the gulf oil spill should focus on the directors and managers responsible rather than the company.

    (I was only joking about the kittens by the way, just in case any US congresmen read this)

  • Comment number 53.

    THE WHIFF OF HYPOCRISY WHAFTING DOWN THE POTOMAC FROM THE WHITE HOUSE

    " If UK beaches were fouled, if UK fishing and tourist industries were devastated, if thousands of able-bodied citizens were thrown out of work, you can bet that there would be calls for compensation from the UK government, too. Walk a mile in our shoes, friend."

    We DID walk in your shoes my friend - it was called Piper Alpha and despite what the media circus surrounding the Gulf of Mexico spill would have you believe, it remains the biggest oil rig disaster of all time. But did the British Government hound the American oil company that was responsible for it out of existence? No, of course not. What I am about to write is not out of hatred for America but out of love for, and disappointment with, a country where I chose to spend three of the best years of my life to study at University.

    Nobody in the British Isles, or any place else for that matter, feels anything but horror over the environmental impact of the spill and sympathy for those affected. What we take issue with is the SHEER BLINDING HYPOCRISY AND DOUBLE STANDARDS of the USA. Exxon Mobil's pipelines have been and STILL ARE leaking oil into the fragile eco-system of the Niger Delta at a rate of 40 Exxon Valdez equivalents per year. Hats off to the International Herald Tribune - they made it front page news - for one day. But because those are brown folk over there whose lives are being ruined, it certainly gets nowhere near the "30% of all news coverage over two months" that the BP disaster has received.

    Tony Hayward has suffered a lot of criticism for the way he has handled this crisis. But let's face facts: America would have found fault with any human being who was in his position. They needed a scapegoat and lucky for them the guy heading BP (or British Petroleum as Obama insisted on incorrectly calling it) was a foreigner, so they felt he was fair game. Yet when you compare Hayward with that COWARD WARREN ANDERSON (American CEO of American company Union Carbide at the time of the worst industrial disaster of all time - BHOPAL - the victims of which haven't had even a teeny-tiny fraction of the support over the past 25 years that BP has provided to the US over the past 25 weeks) Hayward looks like a SAINT. Not only did he NOT run away as an American CEO would do (if Anderson's behaviour is anything to go by), but he walked into the eye of the storm, he took all the punches and character assassination Obama and his hatchet men could throw at him, and still by words AND deeds he delivered the message that the company was going to do everything it could to fix the problem.

    When the dust settles, Hayward can be proud of not being a coward like Warren Anderson, but Obama, if he is an honest man, should be thoroughly disappointed with his performance as a President, as a world leader and as a human being. He promised us a different kind of politics, but the way he has bullied Hayward, the Putinesque way he is milking BP to cover costs far beyond those of the oil spill and the smoke-screen he has created by accusing BP of influencing the Scotland to release Al-Megrahi (which it now appears the US Embassy green-lighted), prove that he has chosen the path of least resistance and it's dirty politics as usual from now on in America.

    I find America's double standards intolerable. What angered me most was the way Rahm Emanuel took Hayward to task for taking a day off to spend time with his family. Well if Hayward can't spend a day with his family, then by comparison, Obama should not be able to have a wink of sleep or spend a moment with his girls until all our boys - American, British and other allies - are out of Iraq and Afganistan - arguably a far greater disaster than all the oil spills of the past decade put together.

    Request to America: put things in perspective, practice what you preach and stop attacking your allies. Otherwise you might find that we're suddenly less willing to sacrifice the lives of so many hundreds of our young men to protect American interests.

  • Comment number 54.

    BP are once again Kowtowing to the US. Mr Hayward is being used as a scape goat. Next our "allie" will want to get their hands on BPs assets and BP will likely agree. The Americans want all BPs US operations just as they want Canadas OIL Sands and all the oil they can get out of South America " even if it means inciting wars between neighbors like Ven. and COlumbia they would love that, and Chavez is playing right into their hands. America is only friends with America and the sooner the rest of the world realises this the better.
    John Barry

  • Comment number 55.

    Just clean up the mess! Corporations have been both a blessing for the business world and a horror show in the making. Limited liability or in most instances no liability at all means no consequences. Lost profits means you don't have to pay taxes. Billions in clean up costs...boo hoo...when you're big OIL that's a bump in the road.

  • Comment number 56.

    Did he blow up the rig? He has been the scape goat for the BP board who have hidden themselves while this whole problem has unfolded,Now he can have his life back and after all the crap he has put with.Take the money its yours you have earned it enjoy.

  • Comment number 57.

    What impact will Tony Hayward's departure have on BP?

    NONE AT ALL - it is a bit late for cosmetic change ...

    ------------------------------------------------------------
    What should the next chief executive do to improve BP's image?

    Move US citizens to the forefront - let Americans kick each other's ass

    ------------------------------------------------------------
    What do you think of Mr Hayward's pension?

    Overpaid - Im envious

    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Have you been affected by the oil spill?

    Any environmental damage anywhere on our planet affects us all.

  • Comment number 58.

    He worked for the company, what? 28 years. American subcontractors screwed up. Go enjoy your pension Tony.

    And complaints from the US about the height of this pension would be soooo hypocritical.

  • Comment number 59.

    Lie, cheat and steal, ruin the environment, and then get financially rewarded for it! This is what is wrong with Capitalism!

  • Comment number 60.

    I can barely believe the American Bashing in these comments. I am not American (I am Canadian), but many times wish that I was. They are the only people (so far) that are affected by this mess that BP has created because of the gross negligence of everyone involved. Now that they are heavily involved, all you people (mainly British I would assume) have absolutely nothing good so say about them.

    Yes there was a Brit running BP. Yes he screwed everything up. Yes now it is an American taking over. Hey all you Brits - get over it!

    Sometimes people really sound pathetic..........

  • Comment number 61.

    The problem of BP today (regarding the oil spill) does not depend on who is the chief, but how to handle it. We all are tired with the effects from the spill that regardless who is the next chief, he should tackle this problem as soon as possible.

  • Comment number 62.

    I have to laugh at the ignorance from the British on the whole situation.

    No one likes to remember that BP was WARNED hours before the explosion and they blew it off and left.

    Secondly how dare people call it being anti-British when it's nothing of the sort. If anything its hypocritical considering the amount of anti-Americanism that spews from Britons on a insane level.

    Thirdly about the rig BP did lease the rig but when you lease a car it is your responsibility to keep it maintained. When you lease a car and you run the brakes down to the metal and you crash into a civilian is it the fault of the car manufacturer that you didn't properly maintain the vehicle?

  • Comment number 63.

    Poor Tony. I think many US executives will be amazed at how little he makes - less than a Washington DC litiator with a big firm - and how little severance he gets, far less than the guy who ran Home Depot in to the ground or even Cheney when he left Haliburton.

    This is the CNN age, we want immediate solutions. How can we vilify Hayward and yet think it is OK to have George Bush et al start wars and then go off on the lecture circuit and make a financial killing?

    But now we the propect of an American taking the reins means all is well, a guy from the Gulf who knows how Washington works. Let's see how he plays the system and sqirms out of the obligations placed upon the company...

    Complete double standard and I hope Hayward writes a book about the corrption in his business and in US politics.



  • Comment number 64.

    Wasn't Bob Dudley in charge of American operations when this disaster happened? Wasn't he also in charge of the TNK-BP fiasco? Is this the best guy BP have to replace Tony Hayward?

    I don't begrudge Hayward his pension. He's taking the fall basically for not coming over well on TV. He's agreed to take the flak and the press are falling for it. We will hear more about Hayward's pension than we will about who was really responsible for this disaster.

  • Comment number 65.

    It seems so easy for so many people to just look at someones history in the last 10 minutes. This guy has been with the company for 28 years and worked his way up.

    For the Americans to consider he is solely responsible for this disaster is clearly a good indication of their mentality or the fact the Obama honeymoon with the US public is becoming strained. I think there is a lot more trouble underneath that country and their administration and they are using BP or Lockerbie are smoke screens to detract from the real home problems.

    He's earned his pension, he's not jumped corporate organisation to organisation, he's dedicated his life and built up a pension in this one company. He's entitled to it. There aren't many people today who can say they've spent all their working life at the same company.

    I'm intrigued as to why no-one is questioning the manufacturer and owner of the rig about the blow out prevention valve which clearly failed to do it's job when it was needed and even under manual control with the subs it still wouldn't do it's job.

    Odds are that it's probably a US company who makes it and I hope BP having said and done the honourable thing in setting up funds to compensate the people most impacted by the leak begin issuing legal proceedings against their so called 'partners' and suppliers who seem to have walked away from this terrible event washing their hands of anything to do with it or the process of cleaning up.

    I hope he has a comfortable retirement and gets to spend the time with his family!

  • Comment number 66.

    I love all this anti-British / anti-American stuff really its just great
    - People NO country has an unbleamished past and no company (certainly no oil company) is blemish free.

    Another rich guy getting richer
    Another (partly owned) British company struggling

    I'm so surprised words fail

  • Comment number 67.

    Let them eat cake

    That is not from this BP-Boss's wise words to the poor people who lost their fishing grounds. But it would fit him. No it was actually put in the mouth of Marie Antoniette the French queen who lost her head in the guillotine. She was really modest in comparison with modern managers. Can somebody please tell me what has it changed since the implementation of democracy? Apart that everything is far more absurd?

    Q

  • Comment number 68.

    @62. At 01:33am on 27 Jul 2010, Adam wrote:
    "........Thirdly about the rig BP did lease the rig but when you lease a car it is your responsibility to keep it maintained. When you lease a car and you run the brakes down to the metal and you crash into a civilian is it the fault of the car manufacturer that you didn't properly maintain the vehicle?"

    Actually, not quite the same situation, the car leaser would be liable if the brakes were never turned on! (aka early warning system)

    In the instance of the car manufacturer? remember the toyota recall?

  • Comment number 69.

    Everyone keeps saying poor Tony, poor poor Tony. The fact is that BP executives ignored every warning that something was about to go terribly wrong (yes poor Tony ignored the warning too).

    Now for the last three or four months, BP has been the subject of many stupid jokes as the baffoons try to cap the mess unsuccessfully. What a ridiculous joke the whole thing has been.

    Now they have finally put an American at the helm of this mess, which is what should have happened much earlier in this sit-com. I am sure that he will get the support from the entire USA to get this under control and cleaned up properly.

    I know that you Brits couldn't care less (as many of you put it), but there are a lot of hard working people in the US that have had their livelyhood shattered by this event. Some may never recover, but all you want to do is bash the Americans, right? Some of you made comments like "Americans need to shutup and stop whining like little girls". You really need to take a hard look at yourselves - you are the ones that I am feeling embarrased for.

  • Comment number 70.

    That's a very strange collusive relationship here between the British government, BP and the BBC!

    The British system is a "quasi-republic" or "pseudo-democracy" though the British do enjoy electoral freedoms of public representation and civil liberties comparable to American constitutional guarantees. The British sometimes do tend to go extremely overboard on the social issues side though.

    I wonder if this "dynamic trio" - the British government, BP and the BBC - do have "interlocking board directorates" during which all three sit down to strategize "good press!" Is the BBC taking a "sounding" or what?

    BP or British Petroleum is owned by the British government which is still a monarchy whereby the Prime Minister performs the executive duties of the civil authority. BBC or British Broadcasting Corporation is also a British government organ. It is hard for us in America to reconcile with these flagrant contradictions masking these "cozy relationships" that BBC employees don't seem to mind.

    I am tempted to ask if the BBC ever considered becoming a private free press enterprise, but I would still be asking British government employees if they have ever dissented from within to request that the BBC become a private enterprise corporation.

    So how do we tackle this British government organ, the BBC, asking us this question regarding the future of another government organ, BP, when they already know the answer - they are civil service employees of the same British government!

  • Comment number 71.

    Mr., Jacques Bouvier - Please walk in the shoes of thousands of people killed and maimed for life by Union Carbide.

  • Comment number 72.

    That's a very strange collusive relationship here between the British government, BP and the BBC!

    The British system is a "quasi-republic" or "pseudo-democracy" though the British do enjoy electoral freedoms of public representation and civil liberties comparable to American constitutional guarantees. The British sometimes do tend to go extremely overboard on the social issues side though.

    I wonder if this "dynamic trio" - the British government, BP and the BBC - do have "interlocking board directorates" during which all three sit down to strategize "good press!" Is the BBC taking a "sounding" or what?

    BP or British Petroleum is owned by the British government which is still a monarchy whereby the Prime Minister performs the executive duties of the civil authority. BBC or British Broadcasting Corporation is also a British government organ. It is hard for us in America to reconcile with these flagrant contradictions masking these "cozy relationships" that BBC employees don't seem to mind.

    I am tempted to ask if the BBC ever considered becoming a private free press enterprise, but I would still be asking British government employees if they have ever dissented from within to request that the BBC become a private enterprise corporation.

    So how do we tackle this British government organ, the BBC, asking us this question regarding the future of another government organ, BP, when they already know the answer - they are civil service employees of the same British government!

  • Comment number 73.

    HYS has hits its motherlode.... Cameron's "junior partner" in WW2 comment, the BP-Libyan-Scottish issue and now Tony Hayward "getting his life back". This is better for American-loathing Brits than a sunny Bank Holiday, England winning anything, something in international sport and a new season of Big Brother.

    Nothing says more about a country deep in its dotage than what passes as its heroes, its exemplars of national character. The Land of Hope & Glory that gave us Nelson, Drake, Churchill, Shakespeare and Elgar is reduced to this: a Cowes Week milquetoast who pushes a once great British (oops, I know we can't say that, BP stands for what this week, Bunny Picnic?) company to its knees because of a little oil "in a big ocean" elevated to Great Briton status as the latest victim of American something or rather. There's an OBE for this guy, surely, just for enduring those meanie American rubes.

    Imagine had Exxon paid its Chief Executive a 600,000 quid a year pension after he presided over the worst oil spill say off the British isles. And then foisted him off to Russia (which has no environment that hasn't already been ruined, right) where he can do no more harm or rather we don't really care one way or another. We revoked the Master's License and convicted the captain of the EXXON VALDEZ, you guys pay Hayward a packet and wrap the Union Flag around him.

    Yep, it's a great HYS summer.

  • Comment number 74.

    Your comment that Dudley might be seen as having a public relations advantage over Hayward because he is American needs to be qualified. Some Americans - mostly US politicians - may find him more acceptable because he is American but the rest of us don't really care or, given the record quantity of embarrassing and unhelpful rant which has gushed unabated from the White House in the wake of this terrible accident, might even feel faintly hostile to the appointment. By all accounts out of the glare of the cameras, Hayward was an effective CEO. A company which chooses its senior management to appease blustering public figures is going down a dangerous road.

  • Comment number 75.

    This economic depression, persisting since 2007, has destroyed me and, no doubt, thousands of others. It has dismantled everything I had built-up through decades of hard, honest work. And now, whilst contemplating the winter of my life on a park bench, I see that, the gap between well-connected posers such as Hayward and us, the honest, toiling majority, is widening, at an alarming rate. Hayward, Goodwin and their ilk, who were elevated through nothing else but the gift of the gab, should be in tiny death-row cells, awaiting execution, for all the environmental and financial damage they have inflicted on us. During the course of this economic depression, people have been killing themselves and their families because they cannot make ends meet and, here you have these well-connected parasites being handed millions for failure!

  • Comment number 76.

    I think BP have had a raw deal, they were the owners of the well but American contractors were doing the actual work, there is no mention of them.
    I completly agree with this! No mention about the American contractor contracted in from BP to drill the well. Not the first time this contractor's had MAJOR problem's with there BOP and Riser in recent years.

  • Comment number 77.

    At 11:35pm on 26 Jul 2010, grainsofsand wrote:

    "Strange thing is the Yanks do not compensate us or pay fines for causing melt down in our banks. This country has lost billions in the banks due to the US. They don't act much like allies.

    Yanks didn't cause the bank melt down any more than anyone else. Just because some of the biggest banks are headquartered in NYC doesn't make this a Yank problem. Your Northern Rock and RBS invested in shady real estate and derivatives, so did that bank in Iceland and so did a good few others. All ignoring risk to try to raise their profit margin. If your UK bank melted down, better ask your greedy bank manager to explain.

  • Comment number 78.

    legb (65): "For the Americans to consider he is solely responsible for this disaster ..."

    You are exaggerating. Nobody thinks Mr. Hayward is solely responsible for the disaster. The company, BP, is responsible, and he was the man in charge.

  • Comment number 79.

    I have little brief for these top executives. There is no possible way they can earn what they get, that money has to come from others. However, I do belive Tony Haward is nothing but a scapegoat here to deflect attention from the American companies that built, equipped an ran this well. BP management should be ashamed of themselves allowing this.
    Peter D South Carolina

  • Comment number 80.

    legb (65): "I'm intrigued as to why no-one is questioning the manufacturer and owner of the rig about the blow out prevention valve which clearly failed to do it's job when it was needed and even under manual control with the subs it still wouldn't do it's job."

    The Graham-Reilly commission has just begun holding hearings. I expect they will be questioning everyone connected with the incident. This will take a few months.

  • Comment number 81.

    BP has transferred its CEO to Siberia to salvage its image. This is a good PR move. The locals are happy about his 'sacking' as good riddance. Prez Obama extended much time to Tony Hayward to set matters right but the latter was haughty and arrogant in his approach. It is a sad irony that Mr Hayward will be richer by $930,000 when he winds up his operation. There should be clause of forfeiture of benefits in the appointment of CEOs when they leave the office in disrepute.

  • Comment number 82.

    Us Little people usually get a bonus when you do a great job, He gets over a million a year plus keep stock for doing a poor job. Who was behind cutting corners at the well to save cost and ignore workers warnings, causing the largest disaster in the history of mankind. All the affects of this oil spill will be felt for years to come and some areas may never recover. How many animals have died from the oil spill. He said he wants his life back so do the people who depend on the Gulf for their livelihood.

  • Comment number 83.

    This will have no impact on BP at all, Nobody is irreplaceable no matter how deep their snout reaches into the trough.

  • Comment number 84.

    What next for BP?

    Well, I for one think that Tony Hayward was caught between a rock and a hard place during the oil leak crisis. I watched some of the Senate hearings that were aired on T.V. and was amazed at how they used this man as the scapegoat for all that went wrong with the leak. Tony had told them multiple times that he was NOT involved with the company's decision making process and they STILL hammered away at him as if he caused the whole thing!

    Normally, I hate to see exorbitant pension pay-outs but, in this case, I truly think he deserves it for all the trouble he has been through. He certainly has my sympathy. Of course, so do the people of the gulf region too.

    As far as our Senate is concerned, well, what I want to write about them would not make it past the moderators.

  • Comment number 85.

    Wow, Looks like loads of BP employees are commenting here.

    This is just another example of greed taking priority over the wellbeing of people and the environment. It was greed that motivated short cuts and unsafe practices to maximise profits - resulting in the oil spill. The immorality of management has been highlighted by attempts to down play the disaster and understate its impact.

    It is greed that results in the 'old boys clubs' giving incompetent people large salaries at the helm of companies that cause disasters (environmental or financial) then waltz off into retirement or another job with millions in payouts.

    Perhaps those in charge of BP should have considered all the pensioners and others reliant on the value of BP shares for their livelihood before undertaking shonky practices to save money.

  • Comment number 86.

    46. At 00:33am on 27 Jul 2010, V Siva wrote:
    This pension is due to the corporate greed at the expense of investors. There is no ethics on this madeness.


    I have to correct you on this. It is not at the expense of investors insofar as investors really are a form of parasite in that the profits they get are not earned. The only people who earn and generate wealth are those workers who produce
    Peter D South Carolina

  • Comment number 87.

    Hey,
    Do you know why they keep saying Tony Hayward is responsible for The worst oil spill in "US" history. Because, the Americans havent kept a record of the American CEO responsible the worst continuous oil spill in the world history.

    regards

  • Comment number 88.

    If that is the deal that Tony Hayward is entitled, then fine. BP have been made the scape-goat for the Obama admistration tying their hands from the outset. It is almost as if Obama wanted the leak to perpetuate so that the idle rigs would have to be moved esewhere. Er, like to Petrobras facitities. He was quick to play the environmental card and use the situation to bolster his progressive policies.
    If it wasn't BP the Obama adminstration would have to find another enemy without to quieten the problems within.

  • Comment number 89.

    12. At 11:16pm on 26 Jul 2010, Jacques Bouvier wrote:
    If UK beaches were fouled, if UK fishing and tourist industries were devastated, if thousands of able-bodied citizens were thrown out of work, you can bet that there would be calls for compensation from the UK government, too. Walk a mile in our shoes, friend.

    -------------

    I think Tony Hayward deserves his settlement. He has been treated badly & his career has been ruined. He behaved well throughout.

    Any environmental disaster is a tragedy, but judging by the hysteria of the US, one would think they were the only country ever to suffer a serious environmental disaster.
    And yes, UK has had devastating oil spills (from a US company) wash up on their less extensive shores. Many countries have walked in those shoes.

  • Comment number 90.

    At the top, whether it be at corporations or government, behaviours, whether bad, good or criminal, are rewarded. This has always been. At the bottom, poor behaviour, work habits, and results usually mean firing,fines, and worse. The peasants are powerless to resist.

  • Comment number 91.

    Severance pay is normal for management. However, it should be compared against the compensation for those who lost family and livelihood and culpability for mismanagement.

    Incompetence should not have a reward.

  • Comment number 92.

    The American contractors will also face penalties so some of the comments here are premature. There is anti BP sentiment in the US however it has not spilled over to all things British. Of course in the States there is certainly no great affection for the American companies involved in the spill.

  • Comment number 93.

    His goodbye package is sickening. As sickening as some of these selfish and greedy posts.
    Everybody moans and groans about their pensions.
    Well, there are people who live in this area without a dime in the bank and nothing on their tables.
    There are eco systems being completely compromised that will effect the oceans for years to come.
    If you think these two things don't effect you long term as much as your depleted pension then you are all out of your minds.

  • Comment number 94.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 95.

    How do most Americans feel about Tony Hayward and BP? Very different from what is in the news! This morning a poll was taken by one of the news stations here and to the great shock of the moderator over half of those who responded thought Tony Hayward should continue as CEO. I was sorry to see him go and don't begrudge him his pension.

    Emotionally this spill is affecting the US the way 9/11 did (but in slow motion) It is a great wound to a precious part of the country and the people in that region. Most of us do not see this as damage done by a "British" company. Actually, BP is really seen more like a joint venture between the UK and the US--about 40% of the shares are owned in the UK and 40% in the US and the same is true of employees and assets. This disaster was a terrible accident not an international incident.

    I do think Obama misspoke when he said Hayward should be fired--and Congressional hearings are becoming an embarassing joke. Congressmen posture and make comments that reflect little knowledge but they seem to believe rude behavior will get them more votes. Those who testify say little of substance because that is what their lawyers advise them to do. Bottom line, most of us just ignore the whole ugly process;Congress is less popular than BP!

    It makes no sense to me that Tony Hayward has become a sacrificial lamb and focal point for the lunatic fringe's hatred--this was a horrible accident and so far the facts suggest multiple mechanical and human failures were involved and certainly it was not entirely BP's fault--Transocean, Halliburton,Cameron et al will all have their day in court. The lawsuits will go on for years and maybe the causes will be sorted out. At this point, BP is responsable for 65% of the cost of the clean up and they have promised to take care of that. I think we all need to calm down and focus on the fact that we have a lot of work to do to clean up the mess and rehabilitate the region.

  • Comment number 96.

    It is amazing that Heyward is gliding away from the problem with a goldern parachut. Is this justice ? How on earth BP is "honouring" their contract ? He should instead be in the gulf right now, with the workers, CLEANING up the mess. Millions upon Millios of dollars for Heyward, and what do those people in the gulf who are directly and indrectly affected by the spill get ? Absolutely Nothing, cipher. I am not even considering the environmental cost of all these oil spill. One doesn't have to be a rocket scientist to realize the tremendous environmental impact this oil spill will have on the local ecosystem. What do the govt. do ? Nothing. They have to honour the contract. Right ? If I am Heyword, I would be dancing in joy. I am sure the axe, if any, will fall on the people who works on the ground, who everyday risk their life to bring boat load of money into these CEO's pockets. Wow!! 'Justice' is only for the poor people, like in those, SO CALLED, third world nations.

  • Comment number 97.

    I cannot understand the actions and words of a supposedly educated intelligent CEO that Mr. Hayward impersonates. Surely, he had his references checked. Oh, yes. He was a company man. What an embarrassment to everyone everywhere. The man wants the position and pay, but not the responsibility. "I want my life back". Egad, the audacity of the CEO complaining that his routine was interrupted by the silly little oil spill. I was on call every second to every third night during eleven years of medical training, then, took call every night for 35 years as a physician. I averaged approximately $110,000/ year during my years in practice. Where did I go wrong? For only L790,000 more, I could whine about being inconvenienced for 4-5 months. This spill has the potential to radically change/endanger our entire civilization. This pompous ingrate should be drawn and quartered in the classic Brit style. The buck stops at his desk. Is he too stupid to realize the potential impact on world environment, not just the gulf of Mexico? That's why he was getting paid all that filthy lucre. Yes, there is plenty of blame to go around: the regulators from the dept of minerals that snuggled in BP's back pocket, for example. Hayward's lack of empathy for us little people is amazing. Can he buy his way out of sharing our plight if the oceans die in the next ten to fifteen years? They are all linked together, you know. How much pollution does it take to fatally damage the marine environment? I don't want to find out, do you? The land may get the oil spill as rain from clouds that form over and from the seas. We've become atuned to global pollution but, it may be too late now. How much of our entire world food supply comes from the sea? This tragedy is just beginning. God help us all.

  • Comment number 98.

    Tony Haward's behavior has been sickening. He is obviously a member of the elite who has no ability to even thing about his occupation and lifestyle, and possibly his childrens' occupation and lifestyles being ruined by the actions of others. He is the man responsible and BPs decision to send him out in this style above also sickening.

  • Comment number 99.

    Who even cares what will be next for him ? He's set for life with all that money. He doesn't need to work ever again but he's part of the old boys network so he will get another cushy, overpaid job soon. MP's will pretend to be outraged, we will have all the drama in the media and nothing will change as usual meanwhile working people's lives have been ruined in the US and those people won't get the help they need. Same old world.

  • Comment number 100.

    Tony Hayward demonstrated a complete lack of understanding of what had resulted from BP's cost cutting measures at the oil rig, as well as a total lack of sympathy for the people whose lives were affected by this disaster. His policies were directly responsible. It was all about profits first, livelihoods, wildlife and the environment last.

    The man was the worst possible public face for BP to put forward night after night on American TV.

    It seems BP will now appoint an American to his job in the hope of mending the damage Hayward did. And of course... not losing oil contracts to Mobil and Exxon!

    Mr. "I want my life back" seems to have gotten much more than he deserves.

 

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