BBC BLOGS - Have Your Say
« Previous | Main | Next »

Should Turkey join the EU?

09:31 UK time, Tuesday, 27 July 2010

Prime Minister David Cameron has promised to "fight" for Turkey's membership of the European Union, saying he is "angry" at the slow pace of negotiations. Should Turkey be in the EU?

In a speech at the Turkish parliament, Mr Cameron said he wanted to "pave the road" for Turkey to join the EU, saying the country was "vital for our economy, vital for our security and vital for our diplomacy".

He went on to say Turkey could become a "great European power", helping build links with the Middle East. Turkey opened accession negotiations with the EU in 2005 but is considered very unlikely to join in the next 10 years, partly because of opposition from countries such as France.

Is the prime minister right to advocate Turkey's membership to the EU? Will Turkey's inclusion help build links with the Middle East? Has the EU grown too large? Is opposition to Turkey's membership driven by protectionism and nationalism?

Thank you for your comments. This debate is now closed.


Comments

Page 1 of 7

  • Comment number 1.

    In the light of the recent banking sector meltdown and endemically ludicrous legislation, I fail to understand why Turkey would want to join the political and bureaucratic nightmare that is known as the E.U.

  • Comment number 2.

    Why is Cameron fighting Turkey's battles? He's enough to do on the home front without poking his oar in their business.

  • Comment number 3.

    Yes.

    Give them a basic economic health check and if they pass, then let them in immediately. Its a huge market representing a wealth of oppurtunities.

    Soooo, who's going to be the first to claim that the entire population of Turkey will try to move to the UK if they are allowed to join?

  • Comment number 4.

    Just as soon as they get out of Northen Cyprus, they should be considered.

  • Comment number 5.

    Turkey must not join (should never be allowed) the EU because there will more flooding of cheap labour. Have David Cameron learned his lesson yet? Don't we have enough cheap labour from Poland and other countries stole enough jobs? I would have agreed to have Turkey joined if we were to leave or put a cap on EU immigration. Also how do we know Turkey won't cause any trouble once joined?

  • Comment number 6.

    Opposition is driven by a fear that Turkey is an Islamic nation with a poor record on human rights. Islam also oppresses women. Nor is it European in any sense - its language, culture, history, religion and policitcs are Asian.

  • Comment number 7.

    No

    Turkey is not a European power - this is the European Union

    It is an important country and one with whom we should enjoy very good relations but it is in predominantly in Asia Minor.

    If Turkey, where next? Lebanon, Syria, Israel, Egypt.

  • Comment number 8.

    NOT - if it means yet more Millions of immigrants, asylum-seekers, health-tourists, economic-migrants, criminals - AND WORSE entering the UK.

    WILL it mean that?

  • Comment number 9.

    There is something fundamentally wrong with the present EU. In stead of forming a strong economical entity, politicians only seem to be interested in make it a big political power block like the old Nato or Warsaw-pact. This has more to do with lust for power - trying to tip the balance of power in favor of Western Europe - rather than forming economical bounds which are mutually beneficial.

    Not that I have anything against Turkey but including Turkey in the EU would mean a slap of face of their arch enemy Greece.

  • Comment number 10.

    Inclusion of Turkey is a sure means to stop EU from becoming the United States of Europe.
    France knows this. Hence, they oppose Turkey.
    Cameron knows this. Hence, he supports Turkey.

  • Comment number 11.

    No, no and no again. Turkey is a long way from being ready to join the EU. Although it has come a long way already there's still much more that needs to be done.

    CameraOn is proving once again to be a clueless leader by claiming he's "angry" at the slow pace of negotiations. Perhaps he should instead be "angry" at Turkey's slow pace of change (health, infrastructure etc.) Perhaps this slow pace is down to a little something called recession?

    There is a far more deserving cases for the EU: the Ukraine. Although half the country may not be completely comfortable with it, at least by acknolweding their possible entry the EU will be sending a message to the ever more agressive Russians.

  • Comment number 12.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 13.

    Well it is all becoming clear that Dave seems to be more interested in th PC brigade than what the electorate thinks. Turkey will be another Greece/Poland and hundreds of thoudands of econmic migrants to deal with.
    It is a shame that he does not get angry with what the majority of the public does.

  • Comment number 14.

    Why does Cameron need to fight for and why can the French fight against. If Turkey is part of Europe and is able to meet any 'qualifying criteria' then surely they should be in?

  • Comment number 15.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 16.

    Definitely not. We have enough problems with appeasing the Islamic religion without adding to these. David Cameron said previous to his election that he would call a referendum on any extension to the EU. The UK will certainly vote against.

  • Comment number 17.

    Turkey in the EU Hmmmmm, why not go the whole hog and invite Egypt or Syria to join as well after all the EU fanatics seem to think that the continent of Europe covers 2/3rds of the world’s surface.

    The truth is we cannot financially afford Turkey to join, the EU has very few net contributors (countries paying in) and many more takers (countries getting hand outs) and we cannot afford any more takers.

  • Comment number 18.

    Yes, join in but leave Islam in Asia please...

  • Comment number 19.


    It would be very ironic that as a supposedly EU sceptic, Cameron is making unreasonable demands on the other EU members as to who should be let in to the EU but then the US wants this to happen so this is why we have this incredibly selective argument from David Cameron that blatantly ignores the Armenian genocides, Cyprus, the Kurds and the sheer logistics of coping with the sheer volume of new migrants from a radically Islamic country.

    France and Germany are absolutely right to insist that Turkey is unable to join just on the account of its human rights records alone (state censorship and torture still takes place in Turkey) so they will, quite rightly, simply ignore our new US poodle of a PM.

    After this appalling speech that willfully misunderstands the problem with Turkey's membership then maybe we should ignore him as well.


  • Comment number 20.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 21.

    What are the rules required to be part of the EU?

    If Turkey is to be considered for an EU application, because SOME of it's land is in Europe, then why not offer Russia the same?

    I also think what influences a lot of peoples thoughts on the matter is the religion and uncontrollable migration. People already fear their culture has been diluted.
    What is the point in rushing everyone into a melting pot?
    Why not give some people time to adapt to the current recent additions to the EU before adding more?

    WHAT IS THE RUSH?

  • Comment number 22.

    Should Turkey join the EU?

    No. Simply put. At least not until some form of an EU immigration cap is put in place. In addition to an EU immigration cap there should be an EU wide security check for people moving between countries.

    The amount of pretty heinous crimes being committed by unchecked foreign nationals is more than should be allowed. See the number of mutilations, murders, rapes etc and this is just reported in Scotland.

    Before making grandiose statements of how we should let Turkey in to the EU perhaps Mr Cameron could consult with the people in the UK who will be directly affected by it.

    I notice he also mentioned how the UK had to fight to gain membership of the EU, well that was a mistake wasn't it. Being in the EU hasn't damaged the UK at all, apart from damaging our economy, fishing, mining etc. Oh wait, we did get some EU funded bus lanes, hurrah.

    Put the immigration plans in place, sort out of Cyprus once and for all (we do have some responsibility to our former colony after all) and make sure Turkey has a good counter terrorism force in place and then consider if they should join.

    Turkey may be in a great position for the west to put pressure on Iran but it also offers an easy way for extremists to gain free entry to any EU country, including the UK.

  • Comment number 23.

    I used to think they should. However turkey has drifted towards its middle east bretheren. I do not see our values are compatible. The eu is to big anyway. It should be downsized instead.

  • Comment number 24.

    As long as Turkey is honest about their finances unlike Greece, and come to terms with Cyprus, then I think it would be a good thing. Turkey would add alot to the EU and all the UK people who enjoy vacationing there can do so using the Euro...

    Hmmm... Euro in Turkey.... Not sure if that's a good thing afterall. Time will tell.

  • Comment number 25.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 26.

    When turkey joins the EU just light the fuse and stand back.turkey is a very large religious country to join the EU.This is when the internal trouble starts.

  • Comment number 27.

    Perhaps our own membership of the EU should be resolved before we start deciding who else should be in it.

  • Comment number 28.

    No. Turkey should not join the EU. We have absolutely nothing in common with Turkey and to describe them as European is stretching the bounds of geographical nomenclature beyond breaking point.
    David Cameron is dropping into the role of the typical British 'I know what's best for you' politician even better than his other job of subservient lapdog 'junior partner' to the U.S. We only 'need' Turkey to back up our pointless engagement in Afghanistan where we are supporting another U.S. conflict for minerals, oil and influence; sacrificing our bravest and our best in the hope of picking up a few scraps from the table.

    David Cameron should be giving us the choice to get out of the bloated corrupt political cesspit that is the EU instead of inviting another tidal wave of uncontrolled unstoppable mass immigration on our behalf. He's 'angry'; let me tell you about angry.......

  • Comment number 29.

    I don't mind the EU really - I'm sure it costs me a load of cash but it keeps EU bureacrats and politicians away from normal people like me.
    Taking on Turkey would keep Brussels very busy and would make the chance of meeting one of them in a social context even less likely.
    I'm not sure what industry Turkey does have or what they could contribute to the EU but as long as it keeps the insufferable red tape merchants occupied, excellent.

  • Comment number 30.

    The answer to this question is easily found - on a map.

    It's the European Union, no the Eurasian Union.

  • Comment number 31.

    No - it would just mean more 'Islamification' by the back door.

  • Comment number 32.

    No absolutely not.

    The UK would be swamped by Turks as they all want to come here and their human rights laws are arwful.

    I understand they are making an effort such as handing back Cypriot land to Greece but it would not be good move to allow Turkey to join.

    We would not cope at all.

  • Comment number 33.

    Cameron is wrong. Turkey's human rights record is far from healthy and politically it is moving away from the ideals of Attaturk's westernisation and reverting to Islamic influence. Erdogan and his party are intent of returning Turkey to its former position of dominance once exerted by the Ottoman Empire. The Prime Minister and his advisors should look more closeley to what is happening where ever in the world where Islam is in the ascendency. Islam is a borderless nation state intent on world domination either by the crudity of violence or the wombs of its subjugated women. European tolerance is blind to the intolerance of Islam and that is simply wrong.

  • Comment number 34.

    4. At 10:08am on 27 Jul 2010, CarlRigby wrote:
    Just as soon as they get out of Northen Cyprus, they should be considered.


    That'll happen about the same time as the UK gets out of Northern Ireland. Or Iraq. Or Afghanistan. Which is just about the same time as a flying pig will eclipse a blue moon.

  • Comment number 35.

    Just what we need to get out the recession and make the world a better safer place, more kebab shops!!!

  • Comment number 36.

    Turkey should not be allowed to join the EU until they own up to the Armenian genocide. Also they need to sort out their problems with the Kurds within their own country and they need to return Northern Cyprus to Greek Cypriot control.

  • Comment number 37.

    Absolutely and categorically NO.

    First of all, the country is slowly becoming more and more Islamist and extremist. The old 'trust' we had in Turkey being secular and therefore a 'safe' Islamic country, is gone. My friend living in western side of Turkey says he's noticed a real change since the Islamist government took hold. He says after 10 years he's decided to emigrate back to the UK before Islam puts the squeeze on western Turkey.

    Additionally, they have a porous border with Iran. Allow 70 Million + Turks free movement in the EU and you allow Iranians with forged Turkish documents to come in too.

    We've already seen the crime, drugs and people-smuggling rings set up by the Turks in Europe, we do not need 70 million having free reign in Europe.

    Cameron has astounded me with this. The idea of Turkey joining the EU has been a left wing project in order to pacify the Islamist entity. It seems we are determined in western democracies to commit national suicide in order to bend over backwards for Islam.

    Enough is enough.

  • Comment number 38.

    Just where does Europe end. As for the UK we have all the bad aspects of being in europe with none of the benefits. No social chapter no workers rights no right to cross our border without a passport. Excluded from the single currency and on and on and on and on. Why are we even in this club anyway certainly not for the benefit of the people of the UK.
    Time for another referendum and allow the people not the political elete to decide if we continue to stay in this ever enlarging monster called the EU.

  • Comment number 39.

    I really don't care who joins the EU as long as the UK leaves it, and the sooner the better.

  • Comment number 40.

    Definately not. There are good reasons not to allow them. But they cannot be recorded here as they would never be aqpproved by the Moderation system - even though expressing them would not break any house rules.

  • Comment number 41.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 42.

    Anybody smell US making UK policiy, funny this after a vist to the cousins across the pond.

  • Comment number 43.

    Yes please, let them join...............just so long as we can leave.

    One in, one out

  • Comment number 44.

    Turkey is welcome to join the EU. The Turks can be as happy as pigs in clover with the rest of the EU.

    What really needs to happen is for the UK to leave the EU.

    Leaving the EU would save the UK from being one of the only 6 net funding nations (all other 21 nation are net recipients!)when the UK is borrowing £1 in every £4 spent by the UK Government ... in other words the UK tax-payers are borrowing money to fund the EU and they do so despite the annual EU Budget Rebate which Labour reduced by 20% without getting anything concrete in return.

    If the UK can have a Referendum on Electoral Change why can we not have a Referendum on staying or leaving the EU - the 1975 Referendum was for membership of a "Common Market" not an enlarged EU Superstate with Political Agenda!

  • Comment number 45.

    Prime Minister David Cameron has promised to "fight" for Turkey's membership of the European Union, saying he is "angry" at the slow pace of negotiations.

    Does this mean Cameron is going to offer out Angela Merkel and Nicolas Sarkozy.

    Can't wait. I reckon spending £500billion on a huge stadium for such an event will be much better use of money than present olympics. Maybe the winner could take on Obama.

    My only concern is that Cameron will do as many sneeky and low punches and a bit of deceitful cheating as he is already doing with his reversal of pre-election promises.

    Maybe his excuse for maybe nutting Merkel would be that due to increased knowledge of costs factors he cant afford NOT to nut her!!!

  • Comment number 46.

    To safeguard Britain, Turkey should not be allowed to join the EU imagine the influx of islamic migrants to this country. we cant stop the east europeans let alone Turks, Get us out of this community NOW we cant afford to subsidise the world. We should never have joined this is another ploy to get rid of the British people and confine us to history Wake up Britain

  • Comment number 47.

    At 10:09am on 27 Jul 2010, anneque2 wrote:
    "Opposition is driven by a fear that Turkey is an Islamic nation with a poor record on human rights."

    Turkey is in fact a secular country (I believe this is laid down in its constitution) , but it does have a poor record on human rights , particularly with regard to its treatment of the Kurdish minority.It would have to improve on this and also repeal the law that forbids any mention of the 1915 Armenian "Genocide". There would also need to be some initial restrictions on the free movement of labour , but if these issues could be resolved , then I see no reason to object.

  • Comment number 48.

    David Cameron wanting Turkey to join the EU is the equivalent of someone saying 'I'm not racist, I've got friends who are black' - we want to appear a bit more Islam-friendly, so we accept a watered-down secular country (i.e. not a hard-core Islamic nation with Sharia law or anything) into our little gang, in a bid to appease Muslims the world over - whilst trying sweep the small matters of Iraq and Afghanistan under the carpet.
    It's fooling no-one, and will lead to more mass immigration into the UK. We all got accused of being racist when we said the same thing about Poland and the eastern european countries - hate to say I told you so, but... well... I told you so! Don't let it happen again, and dont compare me to anyone from the BNP. Charity begins at home. Why not allow one Turkish person into the UK for every British citizen that emigrates to Turkey - that'll be about 100 people a year then.
    Turkey should allow the Kurds within the country to form their own autonomous state - then the USA / UK could hand over a bit of Iraq and ask the other neighbouring countries to do the same. Until the republic of Kurdistan is agreed in principle, and Cyprus is made into a fully-autonomous state also (i.e. Greeks out as well) - Turkey should stay out of the EU.

  • Comment number 49.

    7. At 10:13am on 27 Jul 2010, common-tatter wrote:

    No

    Turkey is not a European power - this is the European Union

    It is an important country and one with whom we should enjoy very good relations but it is in predominantly in Asia Minor.

    If Turkey, where next? Lebanon, Syria, Israel, Egypt.


    ------------------------

    Actually Turkey is partly in Europe and partly (the largest bit) in Asia, it has also been an associate member of the former EEC since 1963, and reached a customs union agreement in 1985.

    As for Israel, it doesn't seem to worry the European Broadcasting Union (Eurovision) that it is not in Europe...

  • Comment number 50.

    Mr Cameron will not be very popular with his 'true blues' and the anti- immigration lobby.
    Turkey is not even a European nation, has a bad human rights record, illegally occupies northern Cyprus and refuses to acknowledge it's attempt to wipe out the Kurds in the 1920's.
    I wonder if Mr Cameron has shares in Turkish company's' time-share or some other motive for this politically suicidal action....or is this 'New Tory' policy?
    ConDem seems very appropriate.

  • Comment number 51.

    At 10:09am on 27 Jul 2010, anneque2 wrote:
    "Opposition is driven by a fear that Turkey is an Islamic nation with a poor record on human rights. Islam also oppresses women."
    Actually, Turkey's constitution guarentees that it is a Secular nation (like Lybia). Mind you: it's human rights record hasn't been terrific, but then again you could say the same foor Germany over the last century.
    I have no objection to Turkey joining the EU, so long as they occupy the place made vacant by the UK leaving.
    I further propse that the UK joins up with Norway, Denmark and Greenland to form a Viking-oriented hegemony then go off on a rape & pillage spree of the rest of Europe, in stead of the other way round which is how it seems to be working at the moment.

  • Comment number 52.

    Yes, as an excellent 'bridge' state between Europe and the Middle East.

    And it's a nice place, friendly people, etc., even if the language is a bit tricky (heck, Malti is easier to pick up!).

  • Comment number 53.

    7. At 10:13am on 27 Jul 2010, common-tatter wrote:
    No

    Turkey is not a European power - this is the European Union

    It is an important country and one with whom we should enjoy very good relations but it is in predominantly in Asia Minor.

    If Turkey, where next? Lebanon, Syria, Israel, Egypt.

    ----

    Why on earth not.

    Unless you are arguing that there is a common 'European' culture, which I doubt many would agree with, then what is the problem with other, non-European countries getting in on the act?


  • Comment number 54.

    11. At 10:19am on 27 Jul 2010, RedandYellowandGreennotBlue wrote

    There is a far more deserving cases for the EU: the Ukraine. Although half the country may not be completely comfortable with it, at least by acknolweding their possible entry the EU will be sending a message to the ever more agressive Russians.

    ----

    Personally, I'd like to see Russia as a full member as well - the more diverse the membership, the stronger the EU is economically, whilst hopefully diminishing its influence as a united political block, which should annoy the federalists.

  • Comment number 55.

    Never mind that 90% of Turkey isn't even in Europe eh?

    Actually I don't care whether Turkey are in or out. I'd like England (and I mean just England) out as soon as possible.

    Sadly it appears that that the British government will never let us have a vote on membership of the EU. An English parliament however - would.

    So I work for an English parliament.

  • Comment number 56.

    I would have been in favour Turkey joining the EU if it could be guaranteed that the UK would not ending up with yet more cheap labour in a shrinking long term job market.I suspect that the other EU countries have this in mind as well. To Cameron,who doesnt need the money,the cheaper the labour the better regardless of the damage done because most Tories have vested interests in business.Anything the Tories do is only about how much they can get personally and if that means destroying the minimum wage through cheap imported labour so be it.

  • Comment number 57.

    i partly live in turkey....should turkey join the eu...NO..NO...NO....back off...cameron,has just come back from the states...now lets think about this...yanks...turkey..missiles...does this mean anything to anybody...like thousands off other brits,we're there because it's not in the eu....so as i say...NO...

  • Comment number 58.

    The last thing we want is another poor country joining the "club" and diluting its economy even more.

  • Comment number 59.

    We have way too high an immigration level at the moment and there already thousands of Turks already here. If they were to join, it would be even worse than when the Eastern Bloc countries joined. Back then they claimed we would only have about 50,000. The reality is we have allowed in over 600,000 Eastern European migrants since 2004. This country simply cannot withstand the overload. We should be going for zero net immigration and manoeuvring into position to strategically withdraw from the EU altogether.

    If Cameron wants us all to tighten out belts to find this massive deficit, he should look no further than the £45m we pay out EVERY DAY to that useless bunch of bureaucrats in Brussels. That would immediately make a huge saving.

  • Comment number 60.

    @Togodubnus


    "Give them a basic economic health check and if they pass, then let them in immediately. Its a huge market representing a wealth of oppurtunities."


    Give them a basic check on their miserable record on human rights and immediately refuse entry on this basis.


    "Soooo, who's going to be the first to claim that the entire population of Turkey will try to move to the UK if they are allowed to join?"


    So who's going to be the first to play the race card when perfectly legitimate reasons are given by the vast majority as to why Turkey should not become a member of the EU?


  • Comment number 61.

    Turkey straddles both Europe and the Middle East, it is predicted to be the second largest economy in Europe by 2025. It sees membership of the EU as recognition of its status as a modern nation.
    Cameron purports to be in favour of Turkey's membershi, however as a Europhobe, he sees Turkey's membership as a brake on further political integration.

  • Comment number 62.

    I don't understand. European Union. Only Istanbul is in Europe.

    From a defence point of view, I can understand a little more.

    But rights to work anywhere in Europe, and claim social security monies if then needed, must not be allowed.

    I thought Turkey's human rights didn't quite meet up to EU requirements, though? And I think that is one case where the human rights legislation is actually required, as opposed to our piffling claims about rights to wear jewellery or rights not to wear school uniform. Or can we then use Turkey as an excuse to withdraw from the Human Rights Bill?

    (The Turkish people that I have met, I have to say, have been delightful.)

    Does EU stand for Empire (e)Urope now?

  • Comment number 63.

    No - and the EU should be disbanded. I am all for trade agreements but being ruled by them - NO!!!

  • Comment number 64.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 65.

    Yes, as long as the UK leaves Europe.

  • Comment number 66.

    who cares if turkey joins. all i care about is that we leave as fast as possible. if they want to commit themselves to losing their civil liberties and national identity, then thats their problem, not ours. the eu is the newest soviet union, and must be fought at every point. the eu is yet to do something of real benefit to the uk, and membership is compromising our security and compromising our nation.

  • Comment number 67.

    No it should not and unless France and/or Germany change their minds this is a non-issue.
    I like a good cultural exchange as much as the next person but accepting Turkey as it is would be a mistake. Maybe in a couple of decades when the EU is a non-entity drifting between America, China and India but not until then.

  • Comment number 68.

    I don't think I have ever read a bigger load of nonsense than Cameron's speech to the Turkish parliament. Not a mention of Turkey's appalling human rights record and its suppression of the Kurds. It's all about trying to get Turkey into the Western club after its recent swing against the West.

    As usual, the UK will ignore a country's human rights record if it can help secure us the oil in the Middle East.

  • Comment number 69.

    We would be mad, mad, mad to allow Turkey into the EU.

    Why is our charlatan of a PM going around and storing up more troubles for ourselves. Who needs enemies with friends like him, eh?

    Where's my vote on this?

  • Comment number 70.

    This is good news. The positives to Turkey eventually joining the EU, or at least having very close ties with Europe, far outweigh the negatives. Europe is not a true continent in the physical sense anyway, and there are enough areas of Europe with ties to Turkey, good and bad, to justify their inclusion in the club on cultural and historical grounds. They are a key ally and an important nation, and the barriers to eventual membership are not insurmountable if they are given a chance and they believe they have a chance and hence reason to tackle those issues.

  • Comment number 71.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 72.

    31. At 10:47am on 27 Jul 2010, dontbelievethepapers wrote:
    No - it would just mean more 'Islamification' by the back door.

    ---

    sounds painful.

  • Comment number 73.

    Mandog99 wrote: "Please correct me if I'm wrong, what Muslim country would your average Brit dash off to with the wife and kids for a better life?"

    Koweit, if you please, or Marseille (oops, I mean France)

  • Comment number 74.

    NO, no, no!!!!

    Turkey is not a European Country - Its Asia!

    Whether they do or do not join the EU however is of little interest to me.

    I DEMAND my right to vote on the UK's continued participation in the European Union.

  • Comment number 75.

    If I were Turkey I would keep well out of the EU. Apart from anything Turkey depends to a fairly large degree and increasingly so, on tourism. This would fall off dramatically if Turkey joined the EU and their prices almost certainly rise.
    Apart from this the EU is apparently about to spread beyond Europe. Will it be Syria next ?

  • Comment number 76.

    At 10:08am on 27 Jul 2010, Togodubnus wrote:
    Yes.

    Give them a basic economic health check and if they pass, then let them in immediately. Its a huge market representing a wealth of oppurtunities.

    Soooo, who's going to be the first to claim that the entire population of Turkey will try to move to the UK if they are allowed to join?
    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Do you want to take the chance??

  • Comment number 77.

    Actually thinking about it now, is it just a coincidence that Cameron has made this somewhat bizarre announcement straight after having visited Obama?

    We all know Barack Hussein Obama is a big fan of Turkey joining the EU. After all, he isn't the one that will have to deal with the 70 million new Muslim guests in Europe. So is Cameron trying to get Britain back in the good books with the extremist Obama, by trying to fast track Turkey into the EU?

  • Comment number 78.

    Presumably Mr Cameron lives in a parallel universe where Turkey is a democratic European country that respects human rights and right to exist of minorities such as the Kurds and Armenians, the territories of neighbouring countries and future partners in trade and union. Because in this universe we live Turkey behaves in the exact opposite way.

    "When I think about what Turkey has done to defend Europe as a Nato ally..' : Please Mr Cameron tell us because I cannot think of anything they have done.

  • Comment number 79.

    46. At 11:05am on 27 Jul 2010, I_amStGeorge wrote:
    To safeguard Britain, Turkey should not be allowed to join the EU imagine the influx of islamic migrants to this country. we cant stop the east europeans let alone Turks, Get us out of this community NOW we cant afford to subsidise the world. We should never have joined this is another ploy to get rid of the British people and confine us to history Wake up Britain.

    ---

    Just to clarify, who exactly do you think is trying to get rid of the British People?

  • Comment number 80.

    Do we need another Million unskilled people walking into this Country?
    Now i know why Conneron wanted a limit on Non-Eu immigration.

  • Comment number 81.

    Yes.

    The original member states (and by that I mean the 1957 Treaty of Rome states - France, Germany, Italy and Benelux), have for too long treated the EU (and previously the EEC) as a special club. But that's not what it is anymore.

    The EU is more than the sum of all its parts, and when Turkey is allowed to join, then the EU's influence, prosperity and community will finally be able to start achieving its true potential.

  • Comment number 82.

    12. At 10:19am on 27 Jul 2010, mandog99 wrote:
    I think we all know that Islam is incompatible with the West and this would only serve in the pursuit of Islamification of the UK. I know that there are some extremist commentators who champion the Islamification of the UK, but - unless I'm mistaken all Muslim countries have human rights issues, poor sanitation/education to name a few. Please correct me if I'm wrong, what Muslim country would your average Brit dash off to with the wife and kids for a better life?

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I understand your concerns I am married to a Muslim man and it was my choice that we should live here.

    As for people dashing off to Muslim countries - I think Dubai's ex pat community is quite large.

  • Comment number 83.

    Let Turkey in, get the UK out, they can take our place.

  • Comment number 84.

    In a word, no.

    Morocco was refused entry to the EU in 1987 because it was not considered to be a European country. Surely the same applies to Turkey.

  • Comment number 85.

    we know of course who it is to blame for david cameron's stupidity. he is in a coalition with the liberal democrats, who would love to sign all of our powers and freedoms away and join the eu federal project. they have the strange belief that the eu is not an evil, beaurocratic empire. this is unfortunate because as long as they are in the coalition, then mr. cameron will not be able to follow up on any of his campaign pledges.

    i've said it before, and i'll say it again- the eu is a greater threat to the uk than the ussr was. this is simply because the ussr would never have really risked losing it's major cities in return for destroying the uk. the eu does not have this problem. the eu is destroying us by subterfuge.

  • Comment number 86.

    Why would Turkey join the EU? Only 1% of Turkey is in the continent of Europe.

    It is also a country which has a substantially different culture and different values. I don't think Membership has to be ruled-out on this basis, but it's a discussion people in the current EU haven't been given the opportunity to have; and very likely a discussion that people in Turkey haven't had the opportunity to have either.

    How do Turkish people feel about accepting the mountain of EU law? How do they fit with their religious beliefs? (There's no point joining on the tacit assumption that Turkey will not subject itself to all existing legislation.) And about the future? It's all very fine for David Cameron to be angry about the slow pace of Turkey's accession... why doesn't he start telling us how Turkey is culturally aligned with us, and why don't media interviewers start asking him "what if..." questions?

    Personally, if we're talking about Turkey which is 99% in Asia joining the EU; I think there is a stronger argument for Japan to join the EU. Japan has much more in common with EU countries than with its Asian neighbours, and it could (possibly) be mutually beneficial for Japan and the EU. (Of course, Japan would probably feel differently.) (^_-)

  • Comment number 87.

    many have commented that Turkey isn't in Europe, in actual fact part of it is and any way that arguament soesn't hold water, look how many countries are consodered European for the Eurovision Song Contest. That being said untill Turkey betters it's human rights record (Kurds being murdered and the Occupation of Northern Cyprus) they shouldn't be allowed in. For David Cameron to compare Gaza to a prison as a reason to let a country like Turkey join the EU, just goes to prove that he doesn't have a clue here either. He's kow towing to the US, kow towing to the Turks, who's next?

  • Comment number 88.

    Should Turkey join the EU?

    No. Europe geographically has always stopped to the West of Turkey. If the EU is now to ignore European boundaries then why not invite North Korea to join as well?

  • Comment number 89.

    NO! NO! NO!

    If Turkey is admitted this will be the beginning of the end of Christianity and its values in this country.

    Do we really want more Islamification in UK? Haven't we already got enough of it here already?

    Those who advocate more Islamification should visit places like Luton, Bradford, Dewsbury etc to see what a mess has already been created, not to mention even the terrorist threats that exist already. We do not need more.

    It will be interesting to see if this post passes the BBC censorship team

  • Comment number 90.

    I keep hearing that he is "angry" about the slow pace of EU accession talks. It says he is "angry" about it on the news every half an hour.
    So why have I heard no florid rhetoric from him on this subject yet?
    Why has he been so silent on the topic?
    I suggest his anger is of a synthetic, press release type, and as such is easily seen through. Inviting Turkey to join will involve a major adjustment, like a snake eating a wild boar, when we try to absorb her massive agriculture into the EC's dreadful Common Agricultural Policy. Also, Turkey is becoming more and more Islamic. Just like Europe!!

  • Comment number 91.

    Whilst I am happy for Turkey to join, it could be that their attitude regarding the equality of their female population, conflicts with the Laws and traditions of the EU and Great Britain. Their membership, therefore, would bring them into immediate conflict from the outset. Perhaps, as a precursor of their membership, they can introduce complete equality into their legal system and make sure that it is effective. Thus, they would then enter membership on an equal footing with other members of the EU.

  • Comment number 92.

    I am sure that huge/massive expense and subsidy of Turkish industry or agriculture is just what Europe needs and wants and can afford right now.

    Reality check please!

    Cameron, as new UK PM, is just doing the international rounds to say what jolly good friends we are of everyone and have loads and loads in common and that we love everyone dearly and as such a jolly good friend support them in their endevours.

    Basically its a political photo album opportunity, if Cameron was to say "say cheese" , there would be frowns and other funny face reactions at non understanding, hence instead of saying "cheese" Camerons spin doctors come up with other relevent things which those he visits understand enough and make them smile happy smiley faces, at least for the cameras.

    In reality, it is my opinion that you can believe and trust Camerons words to the Turkish parliament as much or less as you can believe and trust and rely upon his words to the UK public pre-election.

    Much of the UK public understand these visits, in many views/opinions it basically involves the word licking!!!

  • Comment number 93.

    Turkey can have our place in the EU. Mr Cameron shows he is a pro-EU man and thus out of touch with the British people on this matter. Give us, the people, "our" chance to say yes or no to staying in this union. No one voted for the EU, people back in the 1975 referendum voted on staying in the EEC, which while a mess, is nothing like the EU we have today.

  • Comment number 94.

    No I do not think that they should join the EU. Turkey is mainly based in Asia. Plus they will join and who will be left to fund them, France, Germany and the UK. David Cameron is wasting his time with this.

  • Comment number 95.

    I don't think Turkey should be invited to join. It isn't European, its Islamic and the EU has enough different agendas anyway without adding that one to the list. Also as someone mentioned above, how many more people do we wish to give an unrestricted right to live and work in Britain?

    Cameron is interesting though. He seems to say whatever the person he's talking to wants to hear. Hmm. Principles anyone? I wonder whether Tony Blair has been running seminars?

  • Comment number 96.

    yeah great ! Nice to see DC is serious about our immigration problem. He must know that if Turkey join the EU we will have another lot of immigrants to take our jobs and before anyone says that this is not the case as I quite often see on HYS... it is true, anyone in the construction industry knows this.

  • Comment number 97.

    15. At 10:20am on 27 Jul 2010, dazzlingpuddock wrote:
    So Dave is angry that Turkey is not getting a free pass into the EU is He?



    Invading Northern Cyprus, Non recognition of Cyprus, wholesale racism towards the Kurdish people, rising Islamic extemism and shocking human rights record count for nothing in Cameron's eyes as long as a few business opportunities are forthcoming!!

    What a buffoon!!
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    I agree entirely, best comment so far

  • Comment number 98.

    No. The European Union has grown too big too quickly.

  • Comment number 99.

    "
    29. At 10:41am on 27 Jul 2010, Lazlo_Woodbine wrote:

    I'm not sure what industry Turkey does have or what they could contribute to the EU but as long as it keeps the insufferable red tape merchants occupied
    "

    The only contribution Turkey will make when joining the EU is 2 million Turks coming over here looking for work, benefits, housing etc.

  • Comment number 100.

    No, not until they give up their illegal occupation of Northern Cypres.

 

Page 1 of 7

BBC iD

Sign in

BBC navigation

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.