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N-Dubz ft. Bodyrox - 'We Dance On'

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Fraser McAlpine | 13:15 UK time, Tuesday, 18 May 2010

N-Dubz

Here's a question I never thought I'd ask: has anyone reading this ever been brought to actual tears by an N-Dubz song? I don't mean in a snarky sense, y'know like someone would overdramatically claim that the 'Dubz are so appalling that it makes them WEEP for the FUTURE OF MANKIND ITSELF.

No, what I'm asking is whether you have ever found yourself misting up while listening to 'Ouch' or 'I Need You'. Genuine misting, OK? Proper actual tears of unadulterated melancholy (or, at a push, ecstatic joy). Anyone?

Well if you haven't, maybe now is the time to start...

(Here's the video. Don't be sad, but I have to tell you that it does not feature N-Dubz, or Bodyrox, to any noticeable degree.)

The early signs are promising. The massive churning string section from Pachelbel's 'Canon in D Major' - or the Farm's 'All Together Now' if you are your own dad - is well recognised as a sure fire tear-jerker. Throw in a few "everything's gonna be alright" chants, inspired by Bob Marley's similarly eye-moistening 'No Woman No Cry' and we are well on the way to a total blub-fest before we even LOOK at the video.

Normally I'd say the song has to work on its own merits, and you can't take the video into account, but this is a rare exception. It's a selection of dance clips from Streetdance 3D, intercut with a slightly mizzy kid in a red tracksuit. So you've got effort and skill and spectacle, juxtaposed with insecurity and comfort. A lip-trembling mix, and one which represents the heart of the matter in hand.

And here's N-Dubz, puffed up with how far they've come, proud of everything they've achieved and, yes, STILL doing that blessed "nana-naii" because that is their trademark (albeit one which is less useful to the band than the fact that they sound so very much like themselves. Just sayin'). They know they have the strength to get through the bad times, because they have already had to find this out, the hard way. And so long as they've got each other to rely on, the way they always have, well there's nothing they can't do...

...sorry, just give me a minute. My, er, contact lens has moved out of place or summink...

Four stars Download: Out now
CD Released: May 25th
www.ndubz.com
BBC Music page

(Fraser McAlpine)

Mojo's Redonkulous Blog says: "Not bad, quite catchy with the violins."

Comments

  • Comment number 1.

    I see N-Dubz aren't really getting the love here. :P

  • Comment number 2.

    Hmmm, yes, it is good with the violins.

    This is not the results of careful composing on N-Duz's behalf, I can assure you, neither is it the work of Bodyrox. The string accompaniment follows the exact same progression as Johann Pachelbel's 'Canon in C', which was written over 250 years ago.

    Very clever, that.

    Pedantic-ness aside, it's nice to see N-Dubz do something that doesn't make me want to rip my ears off and feed them to my goldfish, it's also nice to see they've got some friends in high places, so they can continue spurting out barely listenable collaborations, AND IT'S ALSO NICE TO SEE A SOUNDTRACK FROM A RUBBISH FILM GET MORE VIDEO AND AIR-PLAY THAN A SOUNDTRACK FOR... OOOH, I DON'T KNOW - ONLY THE MOST SUCCESSFUL FILM OF THE YEAR SO FAR.

    I think it was called 'Kick Ass'?

    Mika and RedOne were ROBBED, mind you, the producers of the film pretty much shot themselves in the foot because instead of playing 'Kick Ass (We Are Young)' at the beginning of the credits like any other normal producer would do, they shoved some random song no-one had ever heard of and quite frankly wouldn't care if it wasn't even there.... THEN they played 'Kick Ass (We Are Young)', a good five minutes after everyone in the cinema left.

    And that, my friends, is why it did not chart, because TV and Radio (practically) never even knew it existed.

    [/rant]

    Anyhoo, this song?.... 3 stars.

  • Comment number 3.

    i liked it more when they thought they were hardcore

  • Comment number 4.

    i loved n-dubz, then this song came out? ow :(

  • Comment number 5.

    I hated N-Dubz, then this song came out. Nothing changed.

  • Comment number 6.

    I like this, and I'm shocked.
    I don't know what's wrong with me, I've liked 3 n-dubz songs in a row.... ('Playing with fire' was very catchy, 'say it's over' was great and now this)
    Before the album came out I would have given anyone that shuggested I liked ndubz a good telling off.
    Forgot swine flu, there's a new pandemic- ndubz-itis

    4 stars

  • Comment number 7.

    *suggested
    Sorry, terrible typo

  • Comment number 8.

    Okay, I can understand 'Playing With Fire' (because of Mr. Hudson) but 'Say It's Over'? Are you feeling alright Haducon?

  • Comment number 9.

    I don't know, I honestly can't say why I like it.

    Perhaps dappy has some sort of hypnosis tool hidden under his hat, or 'nah nah naaah's' really a sinister subliminal messages?

  • Comment number 10.

    @2 Seriously? 'Make me wanna die' was MUCH better than 'we are young'! But maybe that's just because I have a soft spot for Hot rock-chicks and I really dislike Mika \"

  • Comment number 11.

    I was referring to this song, Adam, 'We Dance On', and how I think 'Kick Ass (We Are Young)' is much better.

    Incidentally I think it's better than 'Make Me Wanna Die' but that's probably because I'm gradually growing onto Mika... until his next unbearable racket.

  • Comment number 12.

    For the love of God, STOP TALKING ABOUT MIKA!!!!!! He's awful, Kick Ass(We Are Young) was an alright song, sure, but let's not get carried away, the chorus was basically "Remedy" by Little Boots, such is RedOne's blatant use of recycled beats and backing. The song starts off well, but ends really weak, with the chorus being repeated over and over again until I am left singing Remedy's chorus to the beat just to block it out!!

    End of Rant! Phew, that felt good, I've been silent on the topic of Mika for too long!!

 

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