BBC Three

Archives for October 2011

Sarah Solemani on Him & Her

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Sarah Solemani Sarah Solemani | 15:10 UK time, Monday, 31 October 2011

In the audition for Him & Her I had to snog about six blokes. That's because they picked the first scene of episode 1 where Steve compliments Becky about being good at oral sex. Look, we can't all be Kate Winslet. They could have used other scenes from the episode in the audition, but they opted for the embarrassing snogging one which just shows you the kind of perverts that work in television. Russell always asks me who was the best kisser, out of all those possible Steves. I make it a rule not to kiss and tell, but I will say that he was definitely in my top four. We had a ridiculous number of auditions. I remember telling my agent that I'd only go in again if they paid me fifty quid. They agreed. So off I went the next morning, to a sweaty Soho basement to earn a quick fifty by snogging more blokes in front of strange men holding cameras, wondering why I had bothered to get a degree. Still, as I say, we can't all be Kate Winslet.

Sarah Solemani (Becky) and Russell Tovey (Steve)

Russell is the only person I know who finds the term performing monkey a compliment. He will stop at nothing to get a laugh. Songs, voices, mime, flashing - Russell has a massive arson of funny. He uses it frequently with great success. I would say my contribution is more anecdotal than cabaret. In fact Russell once said I was the best anecdotalist he'd ever worked with. And he's worked with Alan Bennett, so.... I'd say we spend about eighty percent of our day laughing. We're all terrible. All the actors. We don't stop. We are relentless. We drive our director mad. Sometimes we have to be reminded we're making a TV show. Well I say 'we' but it's mostly me that gets in trouble and told off. I have no idea why I always get the blame, but I'll put it down to sexism. It's easier.

Neither of us want to work on a serious set, it's too enclosed to have any tension. Everyone has to be open, because we are basically all sharing one room for two months. And it works, the cast, the crew, we tell each other everything. We don't hold back. There is no room for secrets on the set of Him & Her.

The cast of Him & Her

Him & Her going to a second series is literally the best thing that's happened to me since the Applicator (that's what is known in the industry as a female skewed joke). We are so happy that people love our dirty, pokey, crazy love-in of a sitcom. We love making it and we all talk about what should happen next - though the writer, Stefan Golaszewski, presides over it like an all-knowing writing-God so we leave it to him to come up with the magic. I'm very lucky to play Becky. She's a top lass. She's got a bit of an edge but she loves her man and she's got her sister's back, despite her unsavoury taste in men. Who could ask for more than that? Best of all she's happy being who she is. She doesn't want to be anyone else, not even, I would hazard a guess, old Winslet-face herself.

Sarah Solemani plays Becky in Him & Her. Watch the new series every Tuesday starting tonight at 10.30pm.

- Him & Her website
- Him, Her & Their First Fight
- Writer Stefan Golaszewski on Him & Her

Work diary: Fashion designer

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Jane Fitz-Gerald Jane Fitz-Gerald | 15:07 UK time, Thursday, 27 October 2011

Bethan Silverwood only graduated from her MA at London's Central Saint Martins in April. In that short time, the 24-year-old has already been featured in Dazed, Love and I-D online, shown at London Fashion Week and Milan Design Fair, works for Greek designer Mary Katramtzou and is in-house print and embroidery designer for Lulu Guinness.

Name: Bethan Emily Silverwood

Lives: London

Childhood dream job: Fashion designer

Bethan Silverwood

Other jobs I've done: The usual: shop work and waitressing during my summer breaks from study.

Current job: Print and embroidery designer for Lulu Guinness.

Number of years in the industry: This is my first year in the industry.

Typical hours: 9.30-5.30. I am very lucky in this industry to have a job where there are set hours that don't extend into the early hours of the morning!

Qualifications/courses I took for this job: BA Fashion and Textiles Design and MA Fashion Central Saint Martins.

First job: My first unpaid job was work experience with Laura Lees. My first paid job is this one at Lulu Guinness, which I found on the Jobseekers website!

Funniest/strangest day at work: There was one memorable day during my masters. The day of fittings, the day before showing at London Fashion Week, where I had to remake about six pairs of shoes within about seven hours. I survived off pure adrenaline and coffee of course! It was exhilarating and extremely stressful as well.

Toughest career moment so far: Behind the scenes at London Fashion week everything was going wrong. We almost had to pull a couple of looks because the models refused to walk in the shoes. I could see all of my hard work falling apart just as I got to the most important moment in my career so far. I was so anxious I didn't even watch my own show from backstage!

The biggest myth about my job is: That it is glamorous! It's all about hard work and dedication, not manicures and high heels!

If you want to work in this industry you need: You need to either have a lot of money or be willing to work very hard, quite often for free, for a long period of time.

The tip I'd pass on to anyone starting this job is: Work hard, but don't take it too seriously at the end of the day, it should be a job, not your whole life!

If I hadn't had done this job..: I would have been a baker - I love cakes!

Jane Fitz-Gerald is part of the Up for Hire Interactive team.

- Tips and advice - Up For Hire on Facebook
- Entrepreneurs Uncovered: Jamal Edwards
- Up for Hire: Entrepreneurs
- Entrepreneur of the Day: Nailgirls' Joanna Burrell
- Get Yourself Hired test
- BBC Three Blog: Up for Hire?
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- Up for Hire website
- Watch Up for Hire episode 1 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 2 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 3 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 4 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 5 on iPlayer
- Catch up on the Up for Hire live chat: How to make it as an entrepreneur

I want to be... a pilot

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Jane Fitz-Gerald Jane Fitz-Gerald | 10:55 UK time, Wednesday, 26 October 2011

It takes a lot of money, brains and ambition to become a pilot. But once you've made it, get ready to see the world. EasyJet First Officer JF Zachopoulos is known as a baby pilot, as he's only been piloting passenger jets for three months. Here he gives his tips on breaking into the industry.

Name: JF Zachopoulos

Lives: London

Current job: Pilot. I'm a First Officer, which is number two in command of an aircraft.

JF Zachopoulos

Number of years in the industry: I'm a baby pilot in this position, just three months. I started training in September 2008 and finished March 2010. Then I was out of work. The quickest route to finding work is go to the training school and then apply through their links with the airlines. You do your basic commercial license then with EasyJet you spend six weeks learning to fly the Airbus.

Typical hours: It's quite random. Depends on your rota, but you have maximum hours you can fly. I can fly up to 100 in a month, 900 in a year. I usually have about six-seven flying hours in a day, but then you have to be there early to prepare so it's about a 10-hour day. You usually have four flights a day. If you're not flying you could be on standby - which means you're either waiting at the airport or you're at home with your phone on.

Qualifications/courses I took for this job: You have to get your commercial license, but you don't need any qualifiactions beforehand. To go to the training schools you usually need five GCSEs and 3 A levels or a degree (usually in numerate subjects). I had a private pilot's license but you can be totally inexperienced.

Childhood dream job: To be a pilot. There is a picture of me as a kid holding a fire engine in one hand and a plane in the other. And I was in the fire brigade before I became a pilot. I went to uni first, but with the idea of being a pilot afterwards.

First job: I was in the fire brigade doing engineering.

Other jobs I've done: Office temping jobs as a student.

Most useful skill I've learnt: Dealing with people. In the industry it's called CRM - crew resource management. It's basically teaching you about how you interact with the person next to you (the other pilot) and what's going on in any situation. You become a better communicator. It's a massive part of the job.

My first job helped me get where I am today because..: It taught me about working with people. If you go into being a pilot with life experience or job experience, it's a help because you can deal with situations and with people.

Best thing about my job: The views.

Weirdest day at work: We were coming back from Nice and we were just about to push back from the airbridge and we heard this horrible screeching grinding noise. I looked at the pilot next to me and we were asking the ground whether it was coming from outside, on the airbridge. It was actually the PA system on the aircraft but we tried everything. Oh and we had a bird strike coming into Nice. It was pitch black, and then I saw a bird coming through the cloud - which made a nice thud.

Toughest career moment so far: The training - it's intensive. By the end you feel a bit brain dead. By the fifth day you don't know what's up and what's down. It's all very technical.

The biggest myth about my job is..: That's it's a glamorous lifestyle. If you're working long haul for BA you do get to go away to some amazing places though. Also that it's very lucrative. The industry has changed quite a lot. To get into it you are saddled with a massive debt - I'm £120,000 in debt. The training school costs about £60,000 then your course on the aircraft with the airline is about £30,000. You can get a professional loan for about £50,000 but then you have to come up with the rest yourself. I guess the younger you are the harder it is. I started when I was 26, so I had a few years working. Forget it if you're coming out of school though.

If you want to work in this industry you need to..: Study hard, and think hard about it as it's expensive. If you really want to do it work to get the cash and work hard for it. And also remember that it's not a guaranteed job, even if you train. I know people who graduated and still haven't got a job. I was out of work for a year, it's not easy. You also have to be medically fit. And get an eye check.

If I hadn't had done this job, I would have..: Working for the fire brigade. I enjoyed working there in the engineering department. But I had always wanted to be a pilot.

Jane Fitz-Gerald is part of the Up for Hire Interactive team.

- Tips and advice - Up For Hire on Facebook
- Entrepreneurs Uncovered: Jamal Edwards
- Up for Hire: Entrepreneurs
- Entrepreneur of the Day: Nailgirls' Joanna Burrell
- Get Yourself Hired test
- BBC Three Blog: Up for Hire?
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- Up for Hire website
- Watch Up for Hire episode 1 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 2 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 3 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 4 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 5 on iPlayer
- Catch up on the Up for Hire live chat: How to make it as an entrepreneur

I want to be a... scientist

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Jane Fitz-Gerald Jane Fitz-Gerald | 12:50 UK time, Tuesday, 25 October 2011

From working on farms to technical assistant through to postdoctoral researcher. Find out how Jon Travers got to where he is now.

Name: Jon Travers

From: Cambridge

Jon Travers

Childhood dream job: To be an environmental campaigner.

First job: Technical assistant at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute.

Other jobs I've done: Working on farms, in a food hall, on a market stall, as a DJ, as a Research Assistant in industry and for Cancer Research UK.

Current job: Postdoctoral researcher.

Number of years in the industry: 10 years.

Typical work hours: 40+

Qualifications/courses I took for this job: BSc, MSc, PhD. Sometimes it takes time to get started in a career in science after your degree since employers are unwilling to take people on who have no workplace experience. It can be a pretty depressing experience but not a hopeless one. The best way to avoid this is to try to do a sandwich degree course with a year in industry or be prepared to work lower grade technical position for a few months. It is not essential but it enhances your CV and additionally gives you networking opportunities, which are another important component of progressing your career.

Most useful skill I've learnt: Critical reading of other scientists' research.

Other experience I've learned along the way: Collaborative work in multidisciplinary teams; getting people to understand what I do when they are not expert in the field.

My first job helped me get where I am today because..: It demystified scientific research for me, giving me confidence that I, as anyone else with sufficient application, could enjoy working in science.

Toughest career moment so far: Getting to the end of the PhD; it is the hardest, loneliest moment of your career as a scientist.

The biggest myth about my job is..: That you need a PhD to be a scientist - there are many career paths in science whatever your aptitude, and not everyone is suited to do a PhD. The only path of these that requires a PhD is academic tenure.

If you want to work in this industry you need to..: Realistically, get a BSc. You need be flexible about the field in which you want to work at first and be prepared to move around geographically to find the best jobs for you at the time. Jobs are not easy to come by in the current economic climate and you may have to work below your skill level at times. But it's surprising how this can open doors for you in areas that you wouldn't have imagined otherwise.

The tip I'd pass on to anyone starting this job is..: Never stop reading about and learning the developments in your field - knowledge and technical expertise are the currencies of science.

If I hadn't had done this job, I would have..: Probably worked in music.

Jane Fitz-Gerald is part of the Up for Hire Interactive team.

- Tips and advice - Up For Hire on Facebook
- Entrepreneurs Uncovered: Jamal Edwards
- Up for Hire: Entrepreneurs
- Entrepreneur of the Day: Nailgirls' Joanna Burrell
- Get Yourself Hired test
- BBC Three Blog: Up for Hire?
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- Up for Hire website
- Watch Up for Hire episode 1 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 2 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 3 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 4 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 5 on iPlayer
- Catch up on the Up for Hire live chat: How to make it as an entrepreneur

Entrepreneur of the day: Fraser Doherty

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Jane Fitz-Gerald Jane Fitz-Gerald | 18:49 UK time, Saturday, 22 October 2011

Scottish entrepreneur Fraser Doherty made it big with his business SuperJam. Find out how made it to the top.

Business: SuperJam
Age you started your business: 14

Fraser Doherty

How I spotted the gap in the market for my business: When I started selling jam to neighbours I thought it would be a bit of fun and I might make some pocket money. It was only when I started selling my product at farmers' markets and got feedback from people that wanted a jam made 100 per cent from fruit, that I started to make it. As it grew I became ambitious. I met Waitrose at a meet-the-buyer day and they said it was a great idea and that I should give it a shot. It makes me proud now that hundreds of people put something I made on their toast every morning.

What's your USP: That the jam is made 100 per cent from fruit - it's all natural with no added sugar. I experimented for about a year in my parents' kitchen. I was at school, so I did my exams, then left at 16 to concentrate on making jam for a year. Then I went to uni for a year but by that time we'd got SuperJam into supermarkets.

How many hours you work a day/week: Probably 60 hours. I work quite a lot but I enjoy it and it doesn't feel like work.

What have you sacrificed for business? I don't think I've had to make any sacrifices. People ask me if I missed out on a childhood making jam. But no, I have tons of friends and am just lucky enough to have had this adventure. I've had to work hard, it wasn't easy.

What's the biggest surprise about being your own boss? That every day is different, as long as you go around willing and are open to new ideas. It's amazing to employ people - SuperJam is as much their baby now as it is mine. It's exciting to see them get excited and get ideas. We make jam in the factory of a 130-year-old family of jam-makers, I don't own one! It was a bit heartbreaking to see a label machine putting labels on the pots after I used to sit at home and hand make them all.

My school report said...: I did well at school, I'm not a drop out. It would probably have said I was into business because even when I was really young I was always coming up with ideas of things to sell. And teachers were really supportive.

I wish they'd taught me in school: There are things you can't learn in a classroom that you can only learn from making mistakes. For me that would be understanding how supermarkets and factories work. We did a bit of business studies, but so much of starting your own business is just trying things. And not being afraid of things not working, but you can't teach that anyway.

Did you ever feel like you might give up? Well you have to not mind failing, because you learn from that. There was one moment I almost gave up. I'd spent ages finding a factory, perfecting my recipes, designing labels. But I showed it to Waitrose and they told me it was all wrong and that I'd have to start from scratch. That was heartbreaking. When you start a business there will be moments where you think of giving up, but what kept me going was belief that that was what I wanted to do.

What advice would I give about this job? Do not be afraid. A lot of people have a dream so they should go for it. And to start small; especially with food, you can make a few, go to farmers' markets, sell those, make some more, and grow slowly. And find a mentor, someone you trust who can give you advice.

What advice would I give about going it alone? When you come up with a brand be focused and try and find one message about why people should buy your product. You only need one reason and if you can communicate that well then that is good.

What one skill/talent has helped you? Probably generally being not afraid. I realised young that I didn't have much to lose from doing this. So I gave it my best shot.

Best thing about my job is: Meeting lots of people. Travelling to some amazing places, I find that fascinating. I went to Australia and I'm just getting ready to go to Russia to launch SuperJam over there - it's exciting and I'm learning a lot from it.

And the worst thing about my job is: It changes every day, but also sometimes you wish it would move on... sometimes it's like you're waiting for a bus!

Business hero: The Body Shop founder Anita Roddick. I love the idea that you can start a business and you can use your business as a way to do good.

If you could go back in time and do one thing differently in your business, what would it be? I've made millions of mistakes, but making them taught me a lot of useful stuff!

Jane Fitz-Gerald is part of the Up for Hire Interactive team.

- Tips and advice - Up For Hire on Facebook
- Entrepreneurs Uncovered: Jamal Edwards
- Up for Hire: Entrepreneurs
- Entrepreneur of the Day: Nailgirls' Joanna Burrell
- Get Yourself Hired test
- BBC Three Blog: Up for Hire?
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- Up for Hire website
- Watch Up for Hire episode 1 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 2 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 3 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 4 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 5
- Catch up on the Up for Hire live chat: How to make it as an entrepreneur

Up for Hire Live Chat: How to make it as an entrepreneur

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Annabel McLeod | 17:00 UK time, Thursday, 20 October 2011

Got a great idea? Fancy being your own boss? Today's Up For Hire Live is all about turning your ideas into a job. And from 10pm today we'll be joined by three top entrepreneurs under 30.

Jamal Edwards spotted a gap in the market and is now one of the UK's top online youth broadcasters with his own imprint on a record label. We've also got the founder of YES (Young Entrepreneur Society), Carly Ward too.

Don't forget to join us at 10pm tonight!

Up For Hire Live tackles one of the biggest issues for you, unemployment. Get involved! Tweet @bbc3tv using #upforhire.

Annabel McLeod is Up for Hire's Interactive Producer.

- Tips and advice - Up For Hire on Facebook
- Entrepreneurs Uncovered: Jamal Edwards
- Up for Hire: Entrepreneurs
- Entrepreneur of the Day: Nailgirls' Joanna Burrell
- Get Yourself Hired test
- BBC Three Blog: Up for Hire?
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- Up for Hire website
- Watch Up for Hire episode 1 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 2 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 3 on iPlayer

Entrepreneur Uncovered: Jamal Edwards

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Jane Fitz-Gerald Jane Fitz-Gerald | 12:20 UK time, Thursday, 20 October 2011

At 15, Jamal Edwards launched his online music channel, SBTV. SB comes from his MC name Smoky Bars, and the stars of the show were his mates rapping to camera. Within months, SBTV grew as the go-to channel for upcoming artists, outgrowing its grime beginnings and launching the career of acts such as Ed Sheeran. In five years and 50 million YouTube hits later, SBTV has earned the Simon Cowell seal of approval and 21-year-old Jamal heads his own major label imprint and is the face of Google Chrome.

Business: SBTV: online youth lifestyle broadcaster

Age you started your business: 15

Jamal Edwards

How many hours you work a day/week: 24/7... no time to rest!

Motivation: To reduce the stereotype of young people being the lost generation and to inspire.

Education: Acton High School and Ealing College (BTEC National Diploma in Media Moving Image).

My report card said: 1 B, 2 Cs, 2 Ds 1 E (I think)... I can't remember!

My careers advisor said I'd be: Not successful and would get a job in a supermarket or a fast food chain.

Subject I wish they'd taught me in school: Media/Entrepreneurship.

What advice would I give about this job: Be prepared to work long and hard hours and limit your social life.

What advice would I give about going it alone: Don't be scared and don't let any obstacle come in your way.

What one skill/talent has helped you: Being transparent because it's an important asset, and having a diary to plan.

What's the most useful thing you've learnt while doing this job: You can't please everyone.

Best thing about my job is: Working with my team. There are 12 people in the SBTV team and we all have a collective vision and drive, which is necessary.

And the worst thing about my job is: There isn't anything that's bad, it's all good right now.

I take inspiration from: The people around me doing great things.

If I was out of work now I'd...: I dunno what I'd be doing, probably still working in men's retail as I was there before SBTV!

Up For Hire Live tackles one of the biggest issues for you, unemployment. Watch episode 4 tonight at 9pm and episode 5 at 10.30pm. Get involved! Tweet @bbc3tv using #upforhire.

Jane Fitz-Gerald is part of the Up for Hire Interactive Team.

- Tips and advice - Up For Hire on Facebook
- Up for Hire: Entrepreneurs
- Entrepreneur of the Day: Nailgirls' Joanna Burrell
- Get Yourself Hired test
- BBC Three Blog: Up for Hire?
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- Up for Hire website
- Watch Up for Hire episode 1 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 2 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 3 on iPlayer

Entrepreneur of the Day: Nailgirls' Joanna Burrell

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Jane Fitz-Gerald Jane Fitz-Gerald | 15:00 UK time, Wednesday, 19 October 2011

Joanna Burrell and her sister Lynda-Louise are the Nailgirls. On returning to the UK from her former New York base, ex-fashion editor and stylist Lynda noticed with her sister the lack of proper clean and affordable nail spas. So they set up their own and also set about developing their own chemical-free ethical nail polish too. They are now launching a new limited edition range of nail polish to match the fashion catwalk collections each season.

Business: Nailgirls spa and the Nailgirls chemical-free nail polish product. My sister, Lynda is the creative director and I handle the sales, marketing and financials.

nailgirls

Age you started your business: Lynda is 34 and I am 37. We started the business about three years ago.

How I spotted the gap in the market for my business: I lived in London and Lynda was in New York and the one thing I noticed when I visited her was that were really nice clean nail spas. And for her and her friends it was a very normal event to go for a manipedi [manicure and pedicure]. In England, there were only nail spas in hairdressers and nothing that was stand alone.

Your USP: Our nail polish is chemical-free, which is great for mothers who are breastfeeding and women who are pregnant. Also, Nailgirls is a British company and one of us is always at the spa at all times.

How many hours you work a day/week: When I was employed I used to work 8am to 8pm, so I would say now it's those hours or more. You put in more hours than actual employment and for me it's been the biggest shock. Everyone I have spoken to has put in more hours running their own business. But I am passionate about what I do and I love nail polish.

What have you sacrificed for business? You sacrifice your social life to an extent. You can go out but you have to be up in the morning. You can't really take a holiday. Although you're not able to go out or have a holiday it's not necessarily a bad thing. Even when we're not in store we're still working. Also the wages are not as good as being employed by someone else, but there is fulfilment in other ways. When I was in my job I used to get jealous of the people that were doing what they loved.

What's the biggest surprise about being your own boss? That there are never enough hours in the day. There's never a good time to stop working

My school report said: It always said something along the lines of that I always loved people, that I was ambitious and that I just got on with it. In my business, it's helped, because I am required to communicate with people and develop relationships with clients. If things need to get done, I get them done. I think when schools look at your qualities they are usually right, but you have to know how to channel those qualities. I think schools always put more emphasis on the academic, but there are other jobs. I think it's important for young people to think about what they enjoy and make a career out of it.

I wish they'd taught me in school: There are a lot of sexy careers. I didn't know about being a music producer. We were never encouraged about these careers. We were never told that you could be a business development management in music or fashion. You think in order to be in these industries you have to be creative but there are other possibilities.

What advice would I give about this job? I think you've got to have a plan. You can lose focus, because you'll always have people telling you how to go about doing things. But you need to stick to your plans and keep focussing on your goal. Also you should keep an eye on your figures.

What advice would I give about going it alone? It's hard not to get distracted with people so you should always try to stay focussed.

What one skill/talent has helped you? Not being scared to try new things. It might be the wrong thing but at least you've tried it. You need to follow your gut.

Best thing about my job is: The diversity.

The worst thing about my job is: I can never really switch off. Some people can, but I am always thinking.

If you want to be like me/work in this industry: You need to be a people person and have to have some business acumen - you need to understand the commercial process.

Business hero: My parents because they have always said we should try everything. My sister, because if she hadn't said just do it, I would have never left my career. I know some people who have started internet companies from scratch, and then have gone on to sell them. For me those sorts of women are my business heroes.

If you could go back in time and do one thing differently in your business, what would it be? I would have pushed. I would have gone back and started some projects earlier. I would have taken more risks - you ponder on some decisions because you are so nervous and worried.

Up For Hire Live tackles one of the biggest issues for you, unemployment. Watch episode 3 tonight at 9pm. Get involved! Tweet @bbc3tv using #upforhire.

Jane Fitz-Gerald is part of the Up for Hire Interactive Team.

- Tips and advice - Up For Hire on Facebook
- Up for Hire: Entrepreneurs
- Get Yourself Hired test
- BBC Three Blog: Up for Hire?
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- Up for Hire website
- Watch Up for Hire episode 1 on iPlayer
- Watch Up for Hire episode 2 on iPlayer

I want to be... a director

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Jane Fitz-Gerald Jane Fitz-Gerald | 18:55 UK time, Tuesday, 18 October 2011

Lee Salisbury works on a couple of Britain's most popular soaps. Find out what life is like as a director and how to get there.

Name: Lee Salisbury

Lee Salisbury

Lives: London/Leeds

Current job: Director EastEnders and Emmerdale.

Number of years in the industry: Eight years. A year and a half on EastEnders.

Typical hours: It really varies. EastEnders is filmed in blocks of four episodes. So you have four weeks of prep, two weeks of filming and then the edit. During the prep, you can devise your own time scale, so it's not a 9-5 job. Sometimes you work weekends or nights. The filming is pretty much 7am-7pm though.

Typical day: A lot of my work is prep time. You have script meetings, you have to camera plan, which is going through every scene and working out how you're going to film it. On set when you're filming, you have a read through with the actors and map how you planned it. But when you're actually filming you only really get 20 minutes for a scene, so the preparation is so important. You also film out of order, so you need to be on top of it all. On set, you lead the way. You're in charge of production, crew, actors, costume and everyone's got questions, so you don't have a minute. You're dealing with a lot of pressure, so my aim is to not be stressed. It's all about establishing trust with the cast and crew.

Qualifications/courses I took for this job: I went to university to do media studies. I did loads of work experience while I was there. It's the only time you can work for free really, so you should do it. You have to put your time in. I worked on Live and Kicking, Watchdog and Talking Telephone Numbers as a runner. I didn't know what I wanted to do. So I worked my way up, then I was a researcher, then an AP, then I started directing on Holiday and worked in factual - What Not To Wear and Location, Location, Location. Then I took a director's traineeship on Emmerdale. It's sort of like an apprenticeship into directing drama. You had to be a director already. I'd just done Crimewatch so I had the experience of directing reconstructions. In a soap, it's hard because it's a hard pace. I was on Emmerdale and I'm actually a freelance director so I still work on it.

Have you directed any of the big storylines? Yes. I did the Queen Vic fire, I did Barbara Windsor's leaving, I just did Ronnie's exit episode. I mean, I watch EastEnders, and that is big! That's when I realise I'm meant to be to doing this job, because I know I can cope with it. You do go home and go "Oh my god, I can't believe I've been telling Barbara Windsor what to do!" But the buzz is fantastic! For everyone on set, there are constantly big stories, it's so great. It's constantly changing.

Childhood dream job: I always wanted to be in telly but I thought it was unachievable.

First job: Runner on the Ozone. Runner on the Holiday programme.

Other jobs I've done: I worked in a supermarket and I delivered flowers.

Most useful skill I've learnt: Being able to deal with a variety of different people. And I think I've honed the skill of knowing how to instantly treat someone. On a soap you could be dealing with execs or actors or runners, so you need to be able to speak well with each one of them. People skills are important.

Other experience I've learned along the way: Because in telly there's often a time pressure, I've learnt how to really control my own time. You really need to be self-controlled to get everything done. And I wasn't prepared for it being so lonely, when you're working in the prep stages you're on your own. And I've learnt loads of technical skills. I'm still learning loads now.

My first job helped me get where I am today because..: I got made a post production runner. So I learnt how an edit works, technical formats - so it wasn't just making tea. That was really useful.

Weirdest day at work: I remember when I was on Holiday, all of my friends were jealous because I was constantly away. But to me it wasn't glamorous because it was full-on, exhausting. I remember sitting in an infinity pool with a beer in Madagascar going, I don't know how much longer I can do this job. I look back now and I can't believe I couldn't enjoy it more.

Toughest career moment so far: Probably the Queen Vic fire because of the pressure. As a director, you're really only as good as your last job. So if people had hated it that would have been my name muddied. It was a risk doing it. But I'm glad I did!

The biggest myth about my job is..: That it's glamorous.

If you want to work in this industry you need to..: Start doing your own stuff. Especially with the technology available, you can start making short films. When you go for jobs they want to see your own personal stamp on stuff. When you're studying you have time to do it so do it, so you should put the work in.

If I hadn't done this job, I would have..: I really don't know. I would have been happy to go into print or radio. But it was always going to be in the media.

Up For Hire Live tackles one of the biggest issues for you, unemployment. Watch episode 2 tonight at 9pm. Get involved! Tweet @bbc3tv using #upforhire.

Jane Fitz-Gerald is part of the Up for Hire Interactive Team.

- Tips and advice - Up For Hire on Facebook
- Blog: CV Uncovered - Tina Daheley
- Get Yourself Hired test
- BBC Three Blog: Up for Hire?
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- Up for Hire website
- Watch Up for Hire episode 1 on iPlayer


CV Uncovered: Tina Daheley

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Annabel McLeod | 11:28 UK time, Monday, 17 October 2011

Tina Daheley is, along with Richard Bacon, presenting Up For Hire each night. Tina is proof that if you put the effort in and are prepared to work your way up in broadcasting, you'll make it. She's juggled internships and other jobs and made the most of her opportunities and breaks. She even jacked in a dream TV job in New York to start again from the bottom to chase her dream.

Name: Tina Daheley

Tina Daheley

Work: Broadcast journalist / Up For Hire presenter / Chris Moyles Breakfast - sports presenter

Childhood dream job: Fashion designer. I used to do little catwalk shows with my friends.

My school report said..: A straight-A student, hard working, conscientious... I was a bit of a swot at school and head girl. I was quite sporty as well so a bit of an all-rounder.

My careers advisor said I'd be: Lawyer, although that was probably because I said I was interested in law! I did go to uni to study law, but I hated it! I transferred to a degree in information systems, which is computer science and business.

Subject I wish they'd taught me in school: Drama.

I wish I was given this advice: You can be anything you want to be.

Most memorable interview: My first ever interview at a hairdressers.

First job: Apprentice hairdresser.

Funny day at work story: When the singer Cher asked to have her hair dyed the same colour as her car. It was a metallic red.

My first job helped me get where I am today because: It sets you up for the working world, handling your own money. Any paid work you can do at a young age is a good thing. Even if it's doing something you don't plan to pursue as a career.

I got to where I am today by: Working hard, having the right attitude and persistence. I did work placements at ITN, Look North and at a radio station called Club Asia. When I was there they didn't have enough reporters to send people out so I had an opportunity to go on a helicopter with June Sarpong. She was lovely and said, "Why don't you come and do something with T4?" So I did that and became a production assistant, helping out with guests. Then I went to Pop World. It was great. You're working a job where you're seeing bands all the time, working with really cool people. Then I joined the Channel 4 researchers' scheme and trained in pitching and writing. I did that for a year, and then carried on working on programmes. I got up to assistant producer (AP) level.

Toughest career moment: Leaving a well paid job in New York to pursue journalism. I was working as an AP, having a great time and I got offered another contract to work on some short films to do with Madonna. And I remember thinking, if I carry on down this way, the next step is producer, then director. But I set out to do journalism. So I quit and moved back to London and started from scratch. I got all my contacts, and contacted them one by one and eventually broke into the BBC. I got freelance work, then a contract, and worked my way up to where I am now.

The biggest myth about my job: That it's glamorous. People think you meet stars every day working in the media and yes, you get to do some amazing things and meet great people but it's hard work. On Chris Moyles' show you get there for 4.30 every morning. It's still a job. You have to be switched on as soon as you come in - I have my 6:30 am news ready, and my 7:00 am news written and ready, all my clips edited, because we'll do a 45-minute link talking about what was on TV the night before or just chat. So as well as being on the ball I contribute to a wider role to the show.

Oddest thing I've ever done for my job: There are many working on The Chris Moyles Show - a few include reading a news bulletin with Will Ferrell in the character of Anchorman and singing a Rihanna song at a gig in front of hundreds of people.

Tip for working in my industry: Make good contacts and use them - be persistent, but not annoying.

Over five shows this week Up For Hire Live tackles one of the biggest issues for you, unemployment. Starts tonight at 9pm. Get involved! Tweet @bbc3tv using #upforhire.

Annabel McLeod is Interactive Producer for Up for Hire.

- Tips and advice - Up For Hire on Facebook
- Blog: CV Uncovered - Tina Daheley
- Get Yourself Hired test
- BBC Three Blog: Up for Hire?
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- Up for Hire website

Up for Hire: Entrepreneurs

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Annabel McLeod | 14:27 UK time, Friday, 14 October 2011

Video game fan Jess Ratcliffe was just 15 when she came up with the idea of for a game-swapping website. Her pocket money couldn't stretch to start-up funds, so she finally started GaBoom! when she was 19, in her first year at university. One year and a trip to Dragons' Den later, the site has 10,000 members and is 21-year-old Jess' full-time job.

Name: Jess Ratcliffe

Jess Ratcliffe


Age you started your business: 19. I first had the idea when I was 15 but it didn't happen. I hired a web developer in the US but he wasn't a good egg. That experience left me with no money and no website. But I kept developing the idea as a hobby and picked it up again at uni.

How I spotted the gap in the market for my business: I used to swap my games with friends and I thought wouldn't it be a good idea to do this with people in the UK.

What's your USP (unique selling point)? That gamers can swap with each other. There are stores that take secondhand games, but with my site it's a fair value swap for gamers with each other. We cut out the middle man.

How many hours you work a day/week: It varies - all I need is a laptop to work, so I can go into the office and work, then I usually come home and do some more, so maybe 10 hours a day. It doesn't really feel like work though.

What have you sacrificed for business? I haven't really thought about that until you asked the question. But I guess potential relationships; I live at home, so since I gave up uni there is less opportunity to meet as many people. I'm fortunate that i have a close group of friends already, because building new friends takes time and effort.

What's the biggest surprise about being your own boss? Being able to decide what you want to do in a day. The surprise is that I don't ever hate what I do in a day. I hear friends say they've had a bad day at work but I can't relate to that. So that's a surprise, doing what I choose and having the power to do that.

My school report said: It used to say I was quiet, and that, even when I knew the answer in class, I wouldn't put my hand up. And I think that's funny that my younger me was too shy, because now I have to stand in front of people and pitch. I went in front of the Dragons. I can't believe I was worried I might get things wrong when I was younger.

What was it like in the Dragons' Den? Fantastic. I had a great experience. I was offered a job and they said some nice things. Deborah Meaden said whatever 'it' is, then I have 'it'. I didn't get any investment but it didn't matter - the whole experience helped confirm that I was on the right path. I gained some valuable advice too. James Caan didn't invest and mentioned how some of the logistics with the swapping options hindered expansion, so I learnt from that and could look into it. And lots of gamers heard about the site for the first time on there too.

What I wish they'd taught me in school: Web development. I'm trying to teach myself now. And I wish they'd taught me about entrepreneurship, to let me know that is an option. It's a route people think is too risky. I think they should raise awareness of it in schools and let children know that it can be so easy, especially with technology. Also I think if I could have gone to someone at 15 at school, and talked about my idea with them, maybe I wouldn't have made the same mistakes.

What advice would I give about this job? If you have the spark of an idea, just do it. Take the action to make it a reality. There is support out there if you go looking for it. One thing I heard about was the business centre at the British Library when you can get a free one-on-one chat with an expert so that you can bounce your idea off them. And they gave me leaflets about how to write a business plan.

What advice would I give about starting your own business?
Maybe try to find a team of people from the start - it would have been good to have had a co-founder, so you can go together to a business meeting and share the work. So if you have an idea, and they have the technical side, it would help.

What one skill/talent has helped you? The fact that I'm persistent. I'm not gonna give up. And I don't look at failure as failure, to me it's just a result that you can learn from, and then move on.

The best thing about my job is...: Being able to communicate with my members. When they email, it comes straight to me. Just to know that they're using your website is so rewarding. Or when someone says they have heard about the site - that's the craziest thing that someone's heard of my business.

And the worst thing about my job is: Maybe some of the sacrifices I mentioned earlier. But honestly, I can't really think of a worst thing. I don't regret anything about it.

If you want to be like me/work in this industry: Find a website online and get some ideas. Speak to people who might have started a business, meet and have a coffee with them and get feedback on your idea. I was fortunate to know people who started businesses, so I bounced ideas off them.

Business hero: Richard Branson, definitely. But I have a number of people who inspire me: Mark Zuckerberg, eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, Steve Jobs, Bill Gates - they are people who used their business to change the world. I think if you aim big enough to want to change the world then anything is possible. And my dad is an inspiration, he started his own business when he was 16.

If you could go back in time and do one thing differently in your business, what would it be?
Quite a few things! I've come across some real snakes in the grass who have knocked my confidence or slowed down the process, so I would choose not to do business with them. But then from that I've learnt how to spot dodgy people.

Up For Hire Live is a whole week of programmes with Radio 1 tackling unemployment. Starts October 17th at 9pm. Tweet us on @bbc3tv using #upforhire.

- Up for Hire: How to be a... plumber
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- For more advice, check out the Up for Hire Facebook page

Junior Doctors: One Year Check Up

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Keir Shiels Keir Shiels | 15:30 UK time, Thursday, 13 October 2011

It's hard to believe that it's been a year since we first wrapped our stethoscopes around our necks, pocketed our pen torches and stepped onto the wards as doctors for the first time.

Junior Doctors (L-R): Andy Kong, Adam Beaney, Lucy Holmes, Katherine Conroy, Keir Shiels, Suzi Bachelor & Jon Barclay

Of course for everyone reading this post, it won't feel that long either, because Junior Doctors: Your Life in Their Hands Series 1 was broadcast in March, but it was filmed between August and November and we have all changed so much and yet so little - in the intervening months. We've been stopped in the street, chatted to by complete strangers, and hilariously parodied by a group of medical students on YouTube...

We're still all the same people out of work, but we have all surprised ourselves with how far we've come since those early days. We all catch up with each other regularly - we're still good friends and love to catch up with each other regularly. Here's a bit of an update:

Adam (or "The One With That Car") has been at the coalface of medicine, looking after the sickest patients in Intensive Care, which has given him the hands-on experience and critical care management he so craved in his first few months. Adam recently got a taste of medicine from the opposite end of the bed, when he was injured in a road accident and needed to get treatment in hospital. He has fully recovered and is back at work now. Based in A&E, he is following in Suzi's footsteps dealing with all sorts of cases from the trivial to the life-threatening. He's still subjected to an avalanche of paperwork from time to time, but is achieving the level of responsibility that he so craved in those first few weeks.

Andy (or "The One With That Joke") is sorely missed. He has moved to Hong Kong and so is not seen as much as the others. He's living with his family having spent so many years in the UK and is taking exams to start practising medicine in the Far East. Unlike driving licences, medical licences aren't necessarily accepted overseas. If you want to practise abroad, you have to sit even more exams before you can be let loose on the wards. So Andy has let himself in for a lot of work before he can kick off his new career!

Katherine (or "The One With That Handbag") and Suzi have silenced their critics by sitting their professional exams a year early and passing all of the papers first time. Katherine is pushing on with her ambitions for a career in surgery, and has recently survived one of the toughest jobs in Newcastle - working on the Liver Surgery Wards. She's now looking after patients undergoing Ear, Nose and Throat Surgery, with responsibility not just for her patients but also for the first year doctors who work on the ward. She's now in the same situation I was when she started off: helping the first years organise their time and helping them out in times of need.

Jon (or "The One With That Song About Him") is still working towards a career in surgery, juggling his work life and social life in a way that only Jon can. Shortly after episode 2 of Junior Doctors aired, he guest-starred in an episode of Harry Hill's TV Burp, chasing a giant shepherd's pie down a corridor, much to the delight and hilarity of his colleagues, who won't let him forget it.

Lucy (or "The One With That Tear in Her Eye") has split her time between academic research in genetics and working on the wards. A radical new short haircut hasn't stopped her getting noticed (or indeed being photographed for magazines). Lucy has had an exciting year, not only developing her medical skills, but progressing in research and baking incessantly. She also has recently become engaged! Her fiancé proposed in New York. We can't wait for the wedding!

Suzi (or "The One With That Toilet Brush") is loving her new medical job in South Shields. Having knocked her Barbie-like image into touch, she has a lot of responsibility on her ward, looking after some of the sickest patients and being responsible for their management when on-call. Suzi and I often take a cheeky evening out to the cinema or theatre; but nowhere is safe without someone coming up to her and asking about that toilet brush... Suzi will be taking the last of her exams soon, and risks being qualified to be a registrar two years early!

Which leaves me, Keir or "The One With That Heel-Click". I have moved from Newcastle to London to pursue a career in Paediatric Medicine. Currently at Whipps Cross Hospital, I move to Great Ormond Street next year, which I'm really looking forward to. I've dabbled in a few conferences and talks here and there, telling students and doctors alike about my experiences as a Junior Doctor. In three years' time, I have to make up my mind as to which area of paediatrics I wish to specialise in and I'm finding the decision difficult... Plus ça change...

Watch Junior Doctors One Year Check Up tonight at 9pm.

Up for Hire: How to be a... plumber

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Annabel McLeod | 19:18 UK time, Wednesday, 12 October 2011

Entrepreneur and 2011 Inspirational Woman of the Year finalist Hattie Hasan shares her work history and tips on becoming a plumber.

Name: Hattie Hasan

Hattie Hasan

Lives: Yorkshire

Childhood dream job: Surgeon. But I was too squeamish to ever be one.

Other jobs I've done: Primary school teacher for eight years.

Current job: Plumber / owner of Stopcocks Women Plumbers / entrepreneur / author of Joy Of Plumbing

Number of years in the industry? 21

Typical hours: You choose your own hours so I don't really have typical ones. It's never nine-to-five. Some people are on 24-hour (although I wouldn't recommend that).

Qualifications/courses I took for this job: City & Guilds and Advanced Craft Certificate, equivalent to NVQ Level 6. I also have a BSc and a PGCE.

Most useful skill I've learnt: Handling tools. It helped build up my confidence. When I could do that, I remember I had the feeling of, 'Now I've made it. I can cope with anything!' Any other experience I've learned along the way? There is only so much you can learn from a book. You have to learn on the job. I was always working while I was training. And you need a mentor, who doesn't mind you asking questions while you're learning.

First job: I did a half day in hairdressers for £2.50.

My first job helped me get where I am today because...: It taught me I didn't want to be a hairdresser! But it also taught me that you shouldn't just do something for the money, because you won't last, you'll resent it. You're work/life balance is important.

Funniest/strangest day at work: There are plenty of nasty things, like finding dead rats in attics. I work rurally quite a lot, and one house's water came from a spring. This customer said her water had stopped. I went to look and there was a live frog stuck in the end of the pipe. I got it out and it just hopped off.

Toughest career moment so far: I think the fear of 'will I succeed?' early on in my career.

The biggest myth about my job is...: That women can't do it!

If you want to work in this industry you need to...: Have a thick skin. Unfortunately, there are not many women plumbers so be prepared to work on your own. It's hard being isolated, which is why I want to establish a community of women plumbers. But I've never regretted it. Oh, and go to college, and learn.

The tip I'd pass on to anyone starting this job is: Get a good knee pad! And as a woman plumber, look after your body. Women are not as physically strong as men and we tackle things, the heavy jobs, differently, so you have to look after yourself.

If I hadn't had done this job, I would have been...: A scuba-diving instructor. It's still water and it's still teaching... but in hotter places!

Up For Hire Live is a whole week of programmes with Radio 1 tackling unemployment. Starts October 17th at 9pm. Tweet us on @bbc3tv using #upforhire.

- BBC Three Blog: Up for Hire?
- 60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?
- For more advice, check out the Up for Hire Facebook page

60seconds Sam: How can we help more young people into work?

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Sam Naz Sam Naz | 17:04 UK time, Tuesday, 11 October 2011

Lately, stories about job cuts have featured heavily in our bulletins. With youth unemployment reaching almost a million, it's become clear that young people are bearing the brunt of the current economic downturn. We'll be tackling this issue and passing on top tips on how to improve your chances of getting a job in BBC Three's new series Up For Hire Live next week.

Jobs Portal

Latest figures show that between June and August the number of young people out of work jumped by 74,000 to a total of 991,000. Overall, 2.57 million people are now unemployed across the UK - a 17-year high.

What's being done to help young people get jobs?
In May, David Cameron vowed to reverse the trend of rising youth unemployment. The coalition government announced measures worth £60million to help vulnerable young people get into work. They include 250,000 more Apprenticeships over the next four years and 100,000 work placements over the next two years.

Job Centre Photo by AP

However, Labour was quick to dismiss the package as "inadequate". They believe the real problem is the lack of growth in the economy leading to fewer jobs for young people. Last month, the Shadow Education Secretary Andy Burnham told Labour's party conference that school leavers were being left to "fend for themselves" and more needs to be done to help kids who don't plan on going to university. He's calling for a clearer central system for Apprenticeships.

Unions have also been pressing for more action to tackle the problem. The TUC general secretary Brendan Barber criticised the government's decision to axe the Future Jobs Fund - a scheme that created temporary jobs for young people who were long-term unemployed. He's urged ministers to stop their deep spending cuts.

So, where do you think the problem lies? What should the government be doing to get this huge jobless figure down? Or should big businesses be doing more to help young people get a job? Let us know what you think.

You can watch Up For Hire Live nightly from 17th-20th October on BBC Three at 9pm and get involved by tweeting @bbc3tv using #UpForHire or go to the Up For Hire Facebook page where you can also read up on advice given by the different companies involved in the show.

If you're struggling to find work check out the Up For Hire website - there's lots of help and advice on putting together your CV, applying for jobs and preparing for interviews.

Journalist Sam Naz presents the 60seconds news bulletins on BBC Three

Up for Hire?

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Mars Elkins Mars Elkins | 17:02 UK time, Monday, 10 October 2011

Looking for work can be tough, especially if you're not having much luck. And if it seems like there's nothing out there for you, or all you get is knock-backs, it's not long before your confidence and enthusiasm start to fade. That's where Up For Hire comes in and why BBC Three is tackling the issue, head on.

Up for Hire Live Logo

Wish you could quiz a company on how to make it in their industry?
Or ever wondered when the best time to apply for a job is? We'll have a bunch of the UK's biggest companies waiting to speak to YOU on Up For Hire Live's official Facebook page for the next two weeks, till October 21. Think of it as a sort of online career fair, but without all of the standing. They'll be ready with advice on how to get your foot in the door of their industries, or any questions about the companies themselves. They won't be hiring from the page though, so please don't ask them for work directly.

Some people have got the coolest jobs
But how did they get them? We'll be quizzing a handful of different professions on Three's blogs to find out whether it was luck, talent, hard work, persistence or something else that landed them their plum jobs - and they give you the inside track on how to land one for yourself.

Watch one of our Insider's Guides on how to equip yourself with all the right tools for finding work - from working out what job's right for you, to spring cleaning your CV, to preparing for interviews - these films will help you stand out.


In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. Visit BBC Webwise for full instructions


Up For Hire Live will be hitting your screens on October 17 at 9pm
It will be presented by Richard Bacon and Radio 1's Tina Daheley. But some of you will know about us already, if you answered our ads to apply for work placements at Argos, Greggs, Hilton Worldwide, ScottishPower, Starbucks, Timpson and Virgin.

Richard Bacon and Tina Daheley


Over the next month, we'll be tweeting clips and tips as BBC Three using the hashtag #upforhire and hollering from BBC Three's Facebook where, if you keep an eye, you'll be able to pick up work tips from well-known entrepreneurs and celebs. Look out for the Lab UK's test, and for us on Radio 1 and 1Xtra who'll be joining in too.

There's never been anything like Up For Hire on British TV, so if you're keen to sharpen your job seeking skills, get involved.


- Join us on Facebook
- Check out the Up for Hire site
- Tweet

Mars Elkins is the producer for BBC Three online.

2011 MOBO Awards

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Mars Elkins Mars Elkins | 10:00 UK time, Thursday, 6 October 2011

Last night, the cream of the urban music scene gathered in Glasgow for the 2011 MOBO Awards. Strictly Come Dancing judge and performer Alesha Dixon and Don't Wanna Go Home singer Jason Derulo hosted the star-studded night, which also paid tribute to the late Amy Winehouse.

Jessie J

The fabulous Jessie J, Adele and Rihanna were amongst the big winners. London singer Jessie J has bagged four awards: Best Song for Do It Like A Dude, Best Album for Who You Are, Best Newcomer and Best UK Act at the glitzy bash.

Rihanna was voted the Best International Act, while Adele picked up the award for Best R&B/Soul Act.

Best Video went to Tinchy Stryder and Dappy for their duet Spaceship, and Tinie Tempah was named Best Hip-Hop/Grime Act.

Here is the list of winners:

Best UK Act - Jessie J
Best Newcomer - Jessie J
Best Hip-Hop/Grime Act - Tinie Tempah
Best Video - Tinchy Stryder & Dappy: Spaceship
Best International Act - Rihanna
Best Song - Jessie J: Do It Like A Dude
Best Album - Jessie J: Who You Are
Best Reggae - Alborosie
Best Jazz Act - Kairos 4tet
Best African Act - Wizkid
Best Gospel Act - Triple O
Best R&B/Soul Act - Adele
Outstanding Contribution To Music - Boyz II Men

- Radio 1 Newsbeat: In pictures: Jessie J wins four awards at the MOBOs
- Offical MOBO Awards site
- Wikipedia: Music of Black Origin Awards

Mars Elkins in the producer for BBC Three online.

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