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Being Human creator writes vampires into Doctor Who

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Dana Stevens | 12:49 UK time, Friday, 7 May 2010

Doctor Who: The Vampires of Venice If, like me, you've been missing your weekly dose of vicious vampires since Being Human finished then you're going to love this. The creator of Being Human. Toby Whithouse, has written the latest episode of Doctor Who and it's full of fierce female vampires.

The new episode is set in Venice where the Doctor has taken Amy and Rory for a spot of romance in the beautiful old city. But there's no time for passion as it soon becomes clear that 16th century Venice is full of blood-sucking vixens. Sounds right up our (watery) street.

Watch this introduction to the new episode...

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Toby Whithouse And here's some top trivia fact fans, this isn't the first time Toby's written an episode of Doctor Who. He also wrote the 2006 School Reunion episode which featured some rather creepy bat-like aliens.

If that's not enough to have you howling at the moon there are more demonic delights in Doctor Who Confidential this week, as Toby Whithouse takes us behind the scenes on location in Venice. He gets Matt Smith (who plays the Doctor) and historian Francesco da Mosto together so they can freak each other out with dark tales of real life Venetian vampires.

You can watch Doctor Who: The Vampires of Venice on Saturday at 6pm on BBC One or on Sunday at 8pm on BBC Three.

Doctor Who Confidential is on Saturday at 7pm on BBC Three.

Being Human will return for a third series later this year. You can find out more about the new series on the Being Human blog.

Dana Stevens is content producer for BBC Three online.

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