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Interesting Stuff 2009-06-25

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Dave Lee | 17:50 UK time, Thursday, 25 June 2009

Since our announcement last week about the new, higher quality BBC Radio streams, we've had a variety of interesting feedback. CNet considers the implications of the announcement on DAB radio:


[U]pgrading iPlayer's streams is a walk in the park compared to upgrading a national digital broadcast infrastructure and the hardware that receives it. Pair this with wireless broadband technologies such as WiMax, and DAB's lifespan could be cut shorter still.

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AVReview reports on Danielle Nagler's blog last week about HD programming this summer.

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Anything that comes from the keyboard of Tim 'Father of the Internet' Berners-Lee should be listened to. The BBC's Tom Scott sent this our way: Berners-Lee's report into putting government data online. In his conclusion, Berners-Lee cites the BBC's Programmes pages as a good use example.

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Silicon.com has published this neat 'Cheat Sheet' for Project Canvas.

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Microsoft's Bing blog has a complete run-down of the interactive maps in use across BBC Online. It's an impressive collection!

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Blogger Dave Cross logs his frustrations about some support he got from the iPlayer team on his blog. Thankfully he managed to catch 'Leonard Cohen: Live in London' in the correct ratio in the end. (And thanks to Jonathan for sorting it out at our end - Ed)

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Congratulations to the BBC mobile team who have won a "Meffy" award for "TV & Video Service" for BBC iPlayer on mobile.

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And finally, this will be my last post as co-editor of the BBC Internet Blog as I move on to other sections of the BBC. It's been a pleasure being on the frontline of BBC relations with the tech community. If you're interested, I blog here, and tweet here. I'd like to thank Nick Reynolds for taking me on, and wish the new editor, Paul Murphy, the very best of luck.

Dave Lee was co-editor, BBC Internet Blog.

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