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Glasgowbury 2011 - A Plastic Rose

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ATL | 15:04 UK time, Sunday, 24 July 2011

Small But Massive, 5:30-6:00pm

Describe in a tweet: Good music and ridiculous stage antics.

What happened: With an anthemic songwriting formula that seems to be focused almost exclusively on playing main stages at festivals, this performance has been a long time coming for A Plastic Rose. A small crowd slowly increased bit by bit into a formidable, excitable gathering, singing along to the more well known tracks and respectfully embracing a brand new song in "Lizard Tongue", that doesn't rip up the band's form-book but is enjoyable nonetheless. It's Ian McHugh that steals the show though: his vocal performance in "The Metal Man" manages somehow to be strong enough to silence a crowd, but vulnerable enough to allow a little emotion in when things get a little bit more rock and roll with a dirty guitar riff that harks back to Zeppelin et al.

It's a tidy and fun performance that edges toward histrionics at times. The band's loyal fans will not be disappointed and they'll have picked up a few new followers on the basis of this set, but we feel there's even more to come from A Plastic Rose in the next few years.

Goldstar: While tongue was firmly in cheek as Norman described "Kids Don't Behave Like This" as Belfast's anthem it provides one of the great festival moments of Glasgowbury. A significant crowd rush forward to the barrier, taking directions from the band and provide an ample backing choir for the epic finale.

Lost at Sea: The band are well known for their ability to interact with a crowd but in all honesty they don't need to push the envelope so much. They have the music to captivate most audiences: there's no need to distract them with what some may regard as gimmicks, and finding the balance between the two will help A Plastic Rose reach that next level.

Rating: 8/10

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