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Who is right about Egypt?

09:45 UK time, Thursday, 10 February 2011

Egypt's President Hosni Mubarak has stepped down. What is your reaction?

A senior member of Egypt's governing party, Hossan Badrawi, said on THursday he didn't expect Mr Mubarak to be president on Friday.

Earlier, Egypt's foreign minister, Ahmed Aboul Gheit, said Washington should not "impose" its will on "a great country".

In reply, the White House said Egypt's transition plans were not yet enough to satisfy those calling for change.

What did you think of Mr Mubarak's speech? What do you think is likely to happen next? Is it right that the US and other countries speak out about the crisis? If you are living in Egypt, what would you like to see your government do?

Thank you for your comments. This debate is now closed.

Comments

Page 1 of 5

  • Comment number 1.

    Revolutions tend to be short, sharp and extremely bloody. Stable changes take time, patience and a lot of good will on all parts. That´s the only constructive way forwards.

  • Comment number 2.

    While the government of Egypt procrastinates, the leaders of the pro-democracy movement will be picked off one by one by the secret police. Leaving more extreme people, who have been keeping their heads below the parapet so far, the opportunity to exploit the growing anger of the population.

    The more extreme leaders will have learned from previous experience, and are likely to wait while the popular movements weaken the government, before taking over to administer the coup de grace.

    The international community should be doing all it can to speed up change. It really is disingenuous of the UK and US governments to say that they should not interfere, when for many years they have been doing just that, by funding and supporting the existing regime.

  • Comment number 3.

    I don't see a problem with the US or UK government giving advice, however, I don't want to see us getting too involved in another countries politics, it will only make us seem like we're busy-bodies & further blacken the way the world sees us.

  • Comment number 4.

    It's usually safe to assume that if the US government says one thing, you can bet the opposite is the best thing for the country involved.

  • Comment number 5.

    America is one voice and this makes it a target and panders to the present regimes insistance that the USA and outsiders organised these protests. They can paly this over and over again on their TV stations and the less well informed will believe it.

    Waht is required is that all nations as one should send a letter of condemnation to the present regime and in support of reform if that is what the peole want.

    Other than that we wmust stay out.

    What I think will happen is that the America comments will be used as suggested and this will allow the present regime to enfoce military law. This will lead to bloodshed and many young people dying.

    I feel for the protesters as they are now neatly bundled up in one area with cameras everywhere. Even the media playing their comments evry 15 minutes on the TV identifies them to the present regime.

    The military will be used to crush them and the rpesent VP, ex military, will become the new dicatator.

    My thoughts are for the people down in Tahrir SQ. who have stood beside each other, supporting each others individual faiths and who now are threatened with the coup d' etat by the VP.

    I saw a glimmer of hope for the protesters now I see Egypts chances dwindling as the noose is tightened.

  • Comment number 6.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 7.

    Egypt should be left to sort out it's own internal affairs -as should any independent state- the USA should not interfere - I'm sure US citizens would take umbrage if the Egyptian Government started giving "advice" to them . The only time interference could be argued for is somewhere such as Somalia, where internal meltdown is allowing unacceptable behaviour outside it's own borders - I haven't noticed much positive action or "advice" here !
    The "we are right so you must be wrong" philosophy can only be justified if the advice comes from an omniscient source - and no one is that !!
    Keep your noses out of other countries internal affairs MR. Obama, Mr. Cameron and any other sticky beaks who want to get in on the act "

  • Comment number 8.

    As the US has donated $28.6 billion in aid to Egypt since 1975 one can only assume that they think they should have a say in who runs the country.

    http://www.usaid.gov/locations/middle_east/countries/egypt/

  • Comment number 9.

    Should the US stop calling for speedier change ?

    Everyone should have the right to free speech and therefore members of the US government have every right to call for speedier change if that is what they believe to be right.


    Or is it right that the America and other countries speak up for Egyptian protesters ?

    I don't believe that the American government is speaking up for the Egyptian protesters; they're speaking up for their own interests and the interests of American businesses. So far no government has spoken for the Egyptian people; they're all just trying to promote their own agenda.


    What would you like to see your government do about this crisis?

    Nothing, our government should stay out of the internal affairs of other nations. The Egyptian people should be left to decide upon their own future and the future of their country without having to deal with the interference of foreign governments.

  • Comment number 10.

    Who cares? I notice that all the TV stations have returned their presenters to the studio, who were having difficulty making news stories of pictures of people milling around.

  • Comment number 11.

    Al Qada dominated Egypt for the last twenty or thirty years. This move puts an anti-American face on Cairo. The terror org threatens Israel into a diplomatic tact. Without their friend Mubarak, the Israelis must negotiate honestly with Palestinians.

  • Comment number 12.

    The USA/UK should leave Egypt to sort out it`s own affairs instead of threatening a big stick on behalf of Israel. USA/UK needs to sort out their own mess. Massively rich nations that still keep millions of people below the poverty line. A total reliance on ignorance means that the underclass still wave flags at the rich & the only goal in life is to be a celeb.

  • Comment number 13.

    Should the US stop calling for speedier change?
    I think that every one has right to express his own opinion in this matter specially USA, it s world heard in every where, it is the powerful country in the world and the affairs of Egypt affects a lot on it, but of course the last decision should be at last for the protesters and for Egyptians. is it right that the America and other countries speak up for Egyptian protesters?
    I don t think so even they try that, eventually that s up to Egyptians, they decide and determine their own future.
    What would you like to see your government do about this crisis
    It should be in the side of protesters and people of Egypt

  • Comment number 14.

    6. At 11:34am on 10 Feb 2011, Trench Broom wrote:
    I do worry that Obama's misty-eyed, Allah-tinted glasses are blinding him to the dangers of the Islamic brotherhood getting into power.
    ------
    Trench, you really have a chip on your shoulder about Islam don't you? Looking back over your previous posts, you have trouble keeping Islam/Muslim out of everything you comment on.
    I also wouldn't want the Islamic Brotherhood getting (even in coalition) into power. The Egyptians will hopefully have the sense to not vote to bring them in, however, it's not up to us to say who runs that country.

    I do think that your Anti-Allah-tinted glasses are taking over your thoughts.

    I believe that Politics & Religion should be completely separate beasts. Most of us will never trust Politicians & many of us don't trust the intentions of Religions. Unfortunately, they are both here to stay.

  • Comment number 15.

    The Egyptian people have the right to decide who runs their country.

    Its nothing to do with any other government including ours or the US.

  • Comment number 16.

    The only people who are right are the majority of the Egyptian people. They, hopefully, will decide through free and fair elections who will lead their country next.

    In the mean time all other so called democratic countries BUTT OUT AND SHUT UP. If the Egyptians tried to get involved in who should run the UK or US there would be screaming and shouting from everybody in both countries. So stop interfering in other peoples affairs

  • Comment number 17.

    Knowing that my hard earned tax money is going towards the aid of Egypt (military and economic)yes the U.S. should have a minor say in the whole affair. I often wonder if the U.S. withdrew all aid how much criticism would be levied towards the United States? I'm sure the mods at BBC would have no problem posting a question of that nature.

  • Comment number 18.

    I thinks the Egyptians could give valuable advices to the US government as well on this and/or many other subject matters.
    That 'patronising all enemies and friends' US policy might help to bankrupt the US sooner or later.

  • Comment number 19.

    I don't mind who gets in - But it must be a freely elected secular Government. Not a dictatorship or a Religious State

  • Comment number 20.

    The more people call for this change the better, and the threat of sanctions should hurry it a little. The change is needed and needed now.

  • Comment number 21.

    The U.S. should keep its nose and money out of Egypt and allow it to properly de-evolve like the other great "democracies" of Africa and find it's own rightful level. Oh, the Canal. That's Europe's problem.

  • Comment number 22.

    Never been to Egypt, never wanted to go to Egypt, I have no interest (apart from historical) in Egypt so consequently I could not give a monkeys about Egypt, I have about as much interest in Egyptian politics as the average Egyptians have in UK politics.

    Anyway it’s not up to the UK, the US or anyone else what happens in Egypt, IT’S UP TO THE EGYPTIAN PEOPLE, it’s their country not ours, we in the UK, The US or anybody else around the world have no say in Egypt’s future, let’s try to keep our noses out this time and not provoke yet another war in that region.

    By the way BBC, your coverage of this has been way way over the top, your news website and your TV coverage has been jammed from top to bottom with this for over a week to the point where it has become so boring, there are other issues that are just as important especially to us in the UK, Please give it a rest and try reporting other issues and stories.

  • Comment number 23.

    I don`t think it would be wise of Egypt to lift its state of emergency until it has more stability than it has at present. We have an international responsibility to show concern but that`s where it ends. What we must not do is get involved in internal politics in another sovereign country.

  • Comment number 24.

    One million people have demonstrated for change. That is one person in eighty.

    Why should a small minority dominate the other 98.75% who have not demonstrated?

    I cannot see the logic here.

  • Comment number 25.

    "14. At 12:19pm on 10 Feb 2011, ProbMan wrote:
    ...Politics & Religion should be completely separate beasts. Most of us will never trust Politicians & many of us don't trust the intentions of Religions. Unfortunately, they are both here to stay."


    It would take some courage to do something about that.
    Trust the next generations...

  • Comment number 26.

    We should all butt out of other people's affairs. Mind our own business.

    Are we so perfect that we have the authority to tell others what to do? No, certainly not.

    Anyone remember when some EU committee started to pontificate about how we were handling the Northern Ireland situation (long before the Good Friday Agreement)? We didn't like that one bit ... deeply resented the external interference in fact.

    Offer to help if needed, now that would be a good move.

  • Comment number 27.

    Having just returned from a 4 year stint in Cairo (out of 25 in total), I can tell you that comment 2 by stanblogger has hit the nail on the head. The regime is now playing a delaying game hoping the people will lose interest. Then, any future uprising, (probably around September), won't happen because of numerous pre-election arrests. The security forces will be better prepared and any public disobedience will end in a bloodbath. The free world governments have to cut out the evil excesses of Mubarak's regime,(though the seeds were planted by Nasser). Get this revolution right and security threats from the Middle East could be a thing of the past.

  • Comment number 28.

    I seem to recall people in the previous Hys on this topic were calling on the US to show solidarity with the egyptian protestors by getting more politically involved, now it seems if early indications are anything to go by people want them less involved.

    After 1900 comments on Egypt already on the previous HYS, everything that can possibly be said on this subject has already been said, so I don't feel the need to comment further.

  • Comment number 29.

    The western media are making a hero out of Mr. Wael Ghonim, a marketing manager that wanted to emulate the Tunisians. By crying in public, Mr. Ghonim has garnered sympathy. In recent interviews, emboldened by the attention the likes of CNN and the BBC are giving him, Mr. Ghonim is challenging the Egyptian regime while his country is suffering economically. What is he realistically offering the public to resolve their bread and butter problem?
    The worsening situation in Egypt will not help the Egyptian people; this situation will not lower the Egyptian unemployment rate nor will it put food on the table of the poor.
    Instead of fanning the flames of revolution in Egypt, the international community needs to recognize that their first priority in Egypt is the ECONOMY. Even if FULL Democracy is implemented today in Egypt, democracy will not help the Egyptian unemployed nor will it put food on the table of the poor. The democratic West is experiencing financial problems too; is anybody calling for regime changes in the West?
    The West needs to come clean and stop blaming the problems in the arab world only on democracy. The aid the West has been paying Egypt was not to improve the Egyptians' standard of living; it was mainly military aid. We need to ask why? What was their aid bying them?
    If the likes of CNN and the BBC want to help, it is more important for them to offer thoughtful and credible solutions to the Egyptian economy. Both CNN and the BBC have access to experts in finance. Instead of focussing on stirring the emotions of Egyptians and providing superficial reporting, let the West offer solutions rather than cheap sloagans. It is my belief that if the Egyptians were not suffering economically, the current unrest would not have occurred. If we look at history, revolutions are always induced by poor financial conditions.
    Another important question needs to be answered: who is benefitting from the current turmoil in the Arab world?

  • Comment number 30.

    in all honesty iraq and afghanistan are prime examples of what happens when you create a power vaccum. clearly egpyt is on the edge but the best thing that can happen, is a universal agreement for free and democratic electictions as soon as possible. the US has had its fingers burnt so many times, it needs to tread lightly here

  • Comment number 31.

    22. At 12:57pm on 10 Feb 2011, Alan Baker wrote:

    Never been to Egypt, never wanted to go to Egypt, I have no interest (apart from historical) in Egypt so consequently I could not give a monkeys about Egypt, I have about as much interest in Egyptian politics as the average Egyptians have in UK politics.

    -----------------------------------------

    Lol, for someone who has no interest in Egypt you don`t half talk a lot about Egypt.

  • Comment number 32.

    The US is trying to say as little as possible about the course of events in Egypt. But it can hardly get away with saying “no comment” or “sort it out yourselves and call us when you’ve decided” can it? The story just is not about the US this time. Go find some other excuse for US-bashing.

  • Comment number 33.

    Er..........the Egyptians?

  • Comment number 34.

    The people of Egypt have displayed tremendous courage over the last 18 days. It is the most easily identifiable characteristic of most or all of the people in the country. After that, there are all kinds of differences of opinion, attitude and orientation. It seems that diplomacy, public or private, would benefit grreatly from listening to various constituencies and developing approaches based on that.

    The Brotherhood is looking for some things, the military others and so on. The opposition has multiple leaders. I believe that we should be listening to all of them. Please no more boogeyman Muslim Brotherhood narrative in the news.

    It is time to call for regime change if your foreign policy is based on the universal priciple of a right for freedom but if the policy is realpolitic and all of its attendant complications, the proper response gets murkier. This president was elected because of percieved priciples. So the present murkiness and confusion is because Mr Mubarak has been our secret jailer for some time now and I expect that there is some kind of blackmail in America's relationship with Egypt. While it would be nice to see some kind of pricipled policy stance, I don't think it's likely.

  • Comment number 35.

    The US, together with the UK and other European countries have been happy to deal with Mubarak for the last 30 years. It now looks as if his time is up.
    The pronouncements so far on the situation in Egypt would appear to favour an 'orderly transition' to another compliant Egyptian leader, so business as usual can be resumed.
    The problem is this, a cosmetic change at the top, together with some meaningless political 'reforms' which leaves things essentially as they have been, will not do.
    If this happens and the regime cracks down on the opposition(which is likely) then that which the West fears will happen later. The violent overthrow of the regime and it's replacement with a virulently anti-Western government.
    The people on the streets don't want Egypt to go the way of Iran or Iraq, they want free elections, free speech, like in the West, their preferred political model is a secular state. That is what they are saying.
    However the Army is arresting the opposition as we watch ,we are told the US is in discussions with the Army, on what? Do they know about the arrests?
    If we in the West are seen to undermine the attempt to free Egypt from stagnation, corruption and oppression, we hand the ME over to the extremists.

  • Comment number 36.

    If we take the Magna Carta as a convenient starting point, we can say that democracy in Britain has been work in progress for 800 years.
    Have we got it right after that length of time?

    I think that the order of magnitude of a couple of weeks is a bit too short for Egypt.

  • Comment number 37.

    I guarantee you that behind the scenes the Americans want Mubarak to stay and continue his iron grip on Egypt and oil and so Suez...

  • Comment number 38.

    The USA should not be supporting any Country above its own people, BILLIONS pumped into Egypt's Army and Americans are dying who are poor, all Egypt is doing is propping up Israel and has allowed Egyptians to be tortured for frankly they don;t give a damn but the Arms industry does!

  • Comment number 39.

    The danger with giving good advice is that it is often seen by the recipient as 'interference'. Be that from Mum in Law or from a superpower. I found that often advice I rejected initially turned out to be good advice.
    Even the fact that the USA and the UK cares may well be of help to the progress of Democracy in Egypt. There will be enough comments from other nations whatever the USA says or does.

  • Comment number 40.

    Pls correct the question to from: Has the US gone too far? To:

    !!! Where to Obama policy leads ?????

    Obama Middle East policy castigates Bush for being unrealistic regarding the promotion of democracy in the Arab world.

    A:Obama policy outcomes:
    *Lebanon takeover by Hisbula terror group sponsored by Iran
    *Disappearance of Iranian anti Islamist opposition following the brutal crackdown of post election demonstrations
    *Erdogan leads Turkey to pro Islamist policy n and partnership with Iran
    *Palestinian refusal to direct peace negotiations with Israel
    *Taliban get stronger in Afghanistan and Pakistan
    *Increase in home made terrorism attacks

    Bush's support for democratization led the rise of Hamas Islamic terrorists-a branch of Muslim Brotherhood in Gaza.

    B:Obama repeats Bush's mistake in Egypt, the leading country in Arab world.
    Obama calls for the inclusion of "non-secular" groups in the new government.

    Remember and avoid repetions of:
    -"Tehran 1979" a pro-Western dictator ,the Shah ,was overthrown by an alliance of reformists and Islamists. After Shah fall, Islamists smashed the reformists, establishing an anti-Western regime, sponsoring no, human rights- no democraticy- no woman equality- values using terror and radicalism to promote Islamic Shia domination worldwide.

  • Comment number 41.

    As is so often the case, the BBC is asking the wrong question. A more pertinent question would be 'was the US wrong to help Mubabarak stay in power for 30 years against the wishes of his own people?" One could have asked similar questions for Pakistan, Iraq, or Romania (amongst others).

    Another pertinent question would be "What right does the US have to make any demands on the Eygptian Government or its people and the governments of other states have the same rights with respect to the US Government?"

    A third useful question, in light of the concerns expressed here about the Muslim Brotherhood, would be 'Should the US end its support from radical Islamic terrorism -by ceasing its aid to Saudi Arabia?"

    As ever, the BBC - which like the rest of the mainstream media- provides intellectual support for US imperialism - concerns itself only with state approved criticism.

  • Comment number 42.

    I wish the BBC could forget its obsession with America.

    How about talking about Europe for a change?

  • Comment number 43.

    At the very least the British and the US Americans should cut off diplomatic ties with the dictatorial regime that they've kept propped up for the last three decades. So at the very least they should send the Egyptian Ambassadors home to signal that they disapprove of Egyptian citizens being murdered and disappeared by their Government for asking for their democratic rights.

  • Comment number 44.

    The Egyptians are the ones who are right so i suggest all the western hypocrit governments butt out and leave them to it.If as a result we lose access to the Suez Canal and its trade shipping we can go and take it back quite easily because every westernised government in the world including china,russia,india and the U.S knows only too well the worlds economic welfare depends on it so we would all have to unite and get it sorted out quickly.

  • Comment number 45.

    The US may be expressing the will of the majority of Egyptian citizens but it is up to them and NOT the US to bring about what is hoped will be PEACEFUL and democratic change.

  • Comment number 46.

    " 4. At 10:54am on 10 Feb 2011, steve butler wrote:
    It's usually safe to assume that if the US government says one thing, you can bet the opposite is the best thing for the country involved. "

    Just as safe to assume that any discussion on HYS, on any subject, can, will and is intended by the BBC to degenerate into the same tedious tirades against the USA and Israel.

  • Comment number 47.

    I would like to see my Government - and anyone else's - keep it's nose out of another country's internal affairs ! The days of Gunboat Diplomacy are long gone and the more we huff and puff the more ridiculous we appear. This is the sort of mind set which led us into Iraq and Afghanistan - need I say more !

  • Comment number 48.

    *

    * AMERICA IS 100% RIGHT . WE ALL SHOULD SUPPORT THIS MOVEMENT FOR DEMOCRACY .

    *ALL PHARAOHS OF ARAB WORLD HAVE TO GO AND DEMOCRACY HAS TO BE ESTABLISHED AT THE EARLIEST .*FEW PREDICTED THE COLLAPSE OF THE SOVIET EMPIRE AND MOST WERE ASTOUNDED WHEN IT HAPPENED .


    WHEN DEMOCRACY CAN COME INTO BEING IN USSR ,WHY NOT IN ARAB WORLD ?


  • Comment number 49.

    Yes and ofcourse it has - how will Barrack Obamam and Co feel if the rest of the world asked them to return the US of A to the right full owners the Red Indians!!!!! Not that the UK ever would but what if

  • Comment number 50.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 51.

    28. At 1:26pm on 10 Feb 2011, Challis wrote:

    I seem to recall people in the previous Hys on this topic were calling on the US to show solidarity with the egyptian protestors by getting more politically involved, now it seems if early indications are anything to go by people want them less involved.

    After 1900 comments on Egypt already on the previous HYS, everything that can possibly be said on this subject has already been said, so I don't feel the need to comment further.


    ===========================================================================

    Just wait it will hot up when Llaregub, moreham, phosgene and abraham get on board...

  • Comment number 52.

    The minister should be ashamed of himself. Egypt is not a "great country" as he says, thanks to these corrupt politicians. The country does not need a perpetual state of emergency to contain crime. If Egypt is great, as the minister says, it should then be ready for democracy, and Mubarak and his cabal should listen to the people. The people have no confidence in the government. A caretaker government should be formed immediately and elections should be held within a reasonable amount of time - six months at the most.

  • Comment number 53.

    Er... ultimately the Egyptians

  • Comment number 54.

    * WHO SAVED ARABS FROM PHARAOH ?


    *THE ANSWER IS PROPHET MOSES (pbuh).MOSES BLESSINGS ARE WITH THOSE WHO WANT TO REMOVE PHARAOHS OF ARABIA .

    *we must take actions to assist the campaign for democracy--------
    R.Reagan-while addressing British Parliament in 1982

  • Comment number 55.

    * WORLD SHOULD NOT REMAIN SILENT ,IF ARMY TAKES ACTION AGAINST THIS MOVEMENT FOR DEMOCRACY.


    USA AND ISRAEL SHOULD LISTEN THE VOICE OF MASSES AND SUPPORT THEM .

  • Comment number 56.

    Giving advice is one thing. Giving advice as "world leader" is another, causes resentment and may be counter-productive.

    Unless there is a referendum in Egypt of some kind, no one actually knows at the moment what the majority of Egyptians want.

  • Comment number 57.

    The US should be apologizing to the Egyptians for supporting the dictator for over 30 years. I find it highly dubious when Israel, a democratic country, calls for the status quo - in support Mubarak.

  • Comment number 58.

    A considered, careful transition is needed to prevent a dangerous power vaccuum. However this must not be used by Mubarak as a delaying tactic to cling onto power or gain overall control of the military.

  • Comment number 59.

    Western governments should maintain an arm's length relationship to the Egyptian crisis. It would be a mistake to favour one particular political person or group. The success of western foreign policy lies in being able to cope with any possible outcome.
    I support a moderate secular government for Egypt. Such a government would introduce political and economic reforms. It is within the purview of foreign affairs departments of government to support similar objectives.
    I believe the best way of achieving both reform and a calming of the civil environment in Egypt is to hold national elections in the Spring or Summer of 2011. It is important that Egyptians decide the fate of Egypt. National elections should be the focus for foreign governments encouragement of reform. I contend that such elections do not compromise either the rights of those now in power or those seeking power. The Egyptian revolution should be democratic with all on an equal footing in a free, legitimate election to determine the new government leadership.

  • Comment number 60.

    WHO THE HELL DOES MUBARAK THINK HE IS.....EVEN THE BEST DANCER LEAVES THE STAGE......

  • Comment number 61.

    I am wondering do Americans or Egyptians living in either Country pay the BBC licence.........for when the hell do we ever comment about this Country - England!

    Its disgusting its bad enough the UK government ignore us, but get your act together BBC put up something for a change other than foreign news shouldn't this be on World?

  • Comment number 62.

    If we drag our feet or seem reticent, we will lose credibility and currency with the new rulers that will undoubtedly emerge in the coming months and years. The strategic cost to us by dithering will be seismic in the long run – and to the benefit of countries like China.

    WAKE-UP AND SUPPORT THIS MOVEMENT
    -----------------------------------

  • Comment number 63.

    24. At 1:11pm on 10 Feb 2011, zrzavy wrote:
    One million people have demonstrated for change. That is one person in eighty.

    Why should a small minority dominate the other 98.75% who have not demonstrated?

    I cannot see the logic here.

    __________________________________________________

    Yes, the maths don't stack up, but so-called 'duly-elected' governments are also guilty of pushing their agendas against majority public opinion. (e.g. UK invasion of Iraq).

    Democracy and dictatorships are just two extremes of the same thing: in both the minority effectively rules the majority, and the only difference is the degree to which that minority listens to the majority. (Follow that logic and my comment about UK invasion of Iraq and you have to conclude: the UK is NOT a democracy).

    In Egypt, as in many other corrupt regimes, many have been scared to voice their opinions for decades and the only way to move in the direction of democracy has now been for the courageous to demonstrate... especially if the elections have been rigged as widely suspected. The fact that some people are staying at home should certainly not be seen as support for Mubarak and his cronies!

    That's what a revolution is all about: the masses deciding that the existing system is inherently rotten and that change has to come from people working outside - not inside - the system.

    I don't think the USA is out of line for its comments... other than it's being hypocritical: it should have been making them long before now. What rancours a bit in the West is that we always hear what the USA says... what is China saying? Russia, India, Brazil etc? That gets reported far less prominently and presents the view that 'The West' has one agenda the same as people imagine that 'The Arabs' 'The Muslims' 'The Israelis' have one agenda and so forth.

    More BALANCED reporting please, BBC people! (...not that many of us are happy to be judged by the actions and rhetoric of 'London' or 'Washington' in any case!)


  • Comment number 64.

    *60//


    WELL WRITTEN / WELL SAID .

  • Comment number 65.

    Egypt has never been anything close to a "democracy" in its long history. Ever. To ascribe the lack of it to the macchinations of the USA is the usual facile HYS nonsense. In fact, successive American administrations have urged and prodded Mubarak to reform. Indeed, you can (and have) accused the USA of "interferring" in doing precisely that. The fact is that Mubarak has been a staunch ally of the USA (and the West) for three decades, that Egypt has been a relative oasis of peace and progress in the Middle East and committed to peaceful relations with its neighbours. Not many countries in the region can boast of that. It's again facile to urge upheaval and revolution in hope of something better as too many did in Iran in 1979. Anyone who would suggest Iran or the world is a better place now as a result is a fool. Anyone who can suggest Egypt cannot slid into the same abyss is a dreamer.

  • Comment number 66.

    Mubarak has to GO, but there could be a vacuum created if he leaves in a rush. The best scenario is to get the Armed forces under the wings and ask them to enforce the rules of the law, stop the assembly of people in the Tahrir square. Without normalcy there is a very good chance that the fundamentalists will take over. Egypt has a very large population that is poor, poorly educated, illiterate and in despair, these are the people who will support the fundamentalists, all they need to hear is that Allah is angry with them for the loose morals in society, their problems can be controlled by the application of Koranic rules into society. Soon you will see on the streets of Cairo, "Begging for Alms without Arms". I think America should monitor the situation but NOT put pressure on Muabarak to go immediately.

  • Comment number 67.

    63/


    YOU ARE SAYING- THOSE WHO ARE NOT DEMONSTRATING ARE PRO MUBARAK ?

    YOU ARE WRONG . PLEASE REMOVE FEAR FOR UNKNOWN, ARMY AND POLICE. THAN SEE THE REAL FIGURE .

  • Comment number 68.

    I think the US and other countries of the have gone too far.As i wrote last time, Obama is not the president of the nations of the world.Every nation has its realities and therefore the pace for them to open up for more democratic practices should be left for them to decide.You can not fully understand the realities on the ground while you are thousands of kilometers across the ocean.There is always a silent majority that is not often on the streets to demonstrate.The west always thinks those on the streets are speaking for the majority.Gradual change is preferred to drastic change which at times leaves wounds that are difficult to heal.
    Let the Egyptians( the government inclusive) decide on the pace of the changes not the US.

  • Comment number 69.

    So does giving Egypt one billion dollars a year buy the right for the US to interfere in that country? Perhaps it does to some extent but not as far as trying to select the government. However, Egypt must be aware that if the Islamic hard liners take control then the mighty dollar money cow will stop.

  • Comment number 70.

    We should be more worried about what China thinks rather than the US.
    The Chinese own the USA (who are now going down the same road as the British Empire)

  • Comment number 71.

    I am no fan of Obama but he can't win with the BBC and the other America haters in the media:

    If he says nothing the U.S is supporting a dictatorship

    If he gives an oppinion about change he iis intefering.

    BTW HYS never has a thread when Obama criticizes Israel about going too far in inteference

  • Comment number 72.

    Of course Egypt's transition plans are not enough to satisfy those calling for change. Neither will they ever be. The people calling for change all have different ideas. This is the curse of ALL revolutions. Even those that appear at first to be solid.

    As for America. They should stay well clear of the situation. And not just because it's hypocritical or meddling, but because the last thing the US needs is it's fingerprints on a mass movement which could well turn violently Islamist. They already made that mistake supporting the Mujahidin against the Soviets in Afghanistan in the 1980's.

  • Comment number 73.

    Egypt has just committed suicide.
    Tourism 13% of Egypt's income has gone in one night. That is some 2,543,000 jobs using last years figures
    Arms deals with Egypt will have to cut quick before the new government start using it against us.
    The USA is the biggest exporter of wheat and grain to Egypt some 40%. Will that continue I think not

  • Comment number 74.

    we have enough problems of our own,we need to keep our nose's out of other peoples business.

  • Comment number 75.

    US policy is solely concerned with US interests, they are not concerned with the Egyptians welfare but formulate their influence to serve US interests. They should allow the outcome in Egypt to take the course laid by the Egyptians themselves and stop formenting more discord in regions that do not align with American Policy.

  • Comment number 76.

    Who cares.

    Let the middle east sort their own problems out or they become our own.

    Look at Iraq and Afghanistan. We interefered there and are now a terrorist target. It also opens the border up to more immigration which we cant cope with and adds fuel to the fire for the radicals we already have allowed in our country

  • Comment number 77.


    24. At 1:11pm on 10 Feb 2011, zrzavy wrote:
    One million people have demonstrated for change. That is one person in eighty.

    Why should a small minority dominate the other 98.75% who have not demonstrated?

    I cannot see the logic here.
    ------------------------------------
    You are assuming that the 98.75% are against demonstrations, and that is illogical. Take a random poll and use statistical methods to find out whether the people are in favor or against the corrupt regime. You may be surprised to find that the majority of the people support the demonstrators. I don't know where you pulled the 98.75% figure from. It is not statistically relevant.

  • Comment number 78.

    The west has no right to dictate when a another country wishes to apply democratic principals, if a country wishes to be democratic, it should fall directly onto the people of that country.

    If we look at our history in uk, we witness our own country going through phases to become democratic, yet even when in that term "democratic" our elected persons often acted in a very autocratic manner, and doing what they think is right, without asking the people.

  • Comment number 79.

    73. At 3:36pm on 10 Feb 2011, HonestMP wrote:

    Egypt has just committed suicide.
    Tourism 13% of Egypt's income has gone in one night. That is some 2,543,000 jobs using last years figures
    Arms deals with Egypt will have to cut quick before the new government start using it against us.
    The USA is the biggest exporter of wheat and grain to Egypt some 40%. Will that continue I think not
    ---------------------------------
    What makes you figure that the new government will be hostile to our interets? Would you rather that Egyptians remain under the rule of a corrupt dictatorship?

  • Comment number 80.

    An African Proverb says, 'if your son is not intelligent, you do not speak to him in parables!' US has not gone far enough as Washington kept speaking in parables to a man that does not appear sensitive to the plight of the Egyptians who are dying (no pun intended!) to get rid of Mubarak. Since US has influence on him so much, Mubarak should have been told to GO unequivocally. That would have spared the lives of the dead brothers and the disruption to the economy of the nation. A lesson is only a lesson if it is ploughed into the present to influence the future. If a quick intervention that meets the demand of the people is not implemented, who can predict the direction of this uprising had the army decided to use its force against the people? So emphatically NO, the US has not done enough. Mubarak should have been gone since last week!

  • Comment number 81.

    I would like to see the UK Government doin g their job which is to govern Britain. So far as Egypt is concerned, this is a matter for their Governement and to achieve an orderly transfer will take time. Otherwise one dictatorship will simply replace another.

  • Comment number 82.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 83.

    67. At 3:19pm on 10 Feb 2011, abraham wrote:
    63/


    YOU ARE SAYING- THOSE WHO ARE NOT DEMONSTRATING ARE PRO MUBARAK ?

    YOU ARE WRONG . PLEASE REMOVE FEAR FOR UNKNOWN, ARMY AND POLICE. THAN SEE THE REAL FIGURE .

    _______________________________________________________________


    No! I'm saying that it is WRONG to think that just because someone is not demonstrating they are therefore in favour of the regime. I was contradicting someone who seemed to suggest that only 1 in 80 Egyptians were against Mubarak!


  • Comment number 84.

    Am not sure number 71-magic---,has heard Obama speak.He is not advising ,he is giving instructions.His tone, the words he uses are clear that he thinks being the US president places him as the president of the world.
    Same kind of tone and words are often used when it concerns third world nations.Today no nation talks to China any how,why ,it is now an economic power house.

  • Comment number 85.

    Egypt is being controlled by thugs! Maburak and his ilk have raped this country for 30 years! In view of their criminal antics and anti democratic slant I encourage ALL countries to pressure these thugs to leave. Unfortunatly, the US have supported this regime for years and have a lot of "dirty laundry" they don't want the public to know about. Having said that, they should simply ensure that the gang of thugs know they disapprove of this regime and keep the pressure on, until they ride out of town. (I also think that there should be a criminal investigation to determine how much monies these thugs have taken from the country and attempt to seize it.

  • Comment number 86.

    there is so much unrest dissatisfaction in the world going on...each country is like family unit... but when atrocities within that family gets out of control somebody has to step in.... but it should be done cautiously.....and there are so many other issues too where superpowers need to step in... those should be looked into why are we having so many children in the world who cannot be looked after...? let me write this on my blog...

  • Comment number 87.

    I am simply stunned that some readers believe the United States acts out of self-interest in international affairs! Seriously, friends, is there any nation that does not do so? That said, and without any claim to American exceptionalism, I believe one can reasonably agree with Winston Churchill who claimed that one can always count on the Americans to do the right thing...after having exhausted all other possibilities.

  • Comment number 88.

    " 75. At 3:41pm on 10 Feb 2011, casual_observation wrote:
    US policy is solely concerned with US interests, they are not concerned with the Egyptians welfare but formulate their influence to serve US interests. "

    Really? How extraordinary. It's amazing that the only country in the history of the Planet that acts in its own best interest in the USA. Or rather more to the point, the only one blamed for it. Well at least in the parallel universe that is HYS.

    I look forward to the day when a nation elects a leader who promises to act against the best interests of his or her country and citizens. Maybe Britain will be the first. Given what's happened to you lot since 1945, perhaps you already have.

  • Comment number 89.

    EGYPT AND THE WORLD

    Egypt is goingthrough a very sensitive ordeal. All other countries should be cautious of giving the impression of over-advising or appearing to interfere in the internal affairs of another country.

  • Comment number 90.

    Do nothing and if Western govts are to do something, they should do it behind the scenes and encourage President Mubarak to step down. That's what many Egyptians want so the Country can move forward but he shouldn't be humiliated because it is Western govts that propped him up and didn't provide him with appropriate feedback all these years neither did they forsee what was coming. Provide him with political asylum in Saudi Arabia/the US or to remain in his country having stated earlier that he wishes to remain and die in his country as an elderly man/octogenerian. Twenty something years is enough for one individual to be in power in a Country with a population of eighty million/over. Hopefully, Western govts will learn a hard lesson from this.

  • Comment number 91.

    refr #77
    , nyakairu wrote:

    24. At 1:11pm on 10 Feb 2011, zrzavy wrote:
    One million people have demonstrated for change. That is one person in eighty.

    Why should a small minority dominate the other 98.75% who have not demonstrated?

    I cannot see the logic here.
    ------------------------------------
    You are assuming that the 98.75% are against demonstrations, and that is illogical. Take a random poll and use statistical methods to find out whether the people are in favor or against the corrupt regime. You may be surprised to find that the majority of the people support the demonstrators. I don't know where you pulled the 98.75% figure from. It is not statistically relevant.

    ________________

    Where did you get your figure? I he4ard some protesters say it is time for the country to get back to work. Some of these protesters are oblivious to families who can't buy food and pay their bills.

  • Comment number 92.

    73//


    YOU ARE SUPPORTING DELUSIVE STABILITY .THIS IS VERY DANGEROUS .PLEASE CHANGE YOUR CALCULATOR

  • Comment number 93.

    Even Obama can't change America to any good direction how could he change Egypt. Once America was rich and superpower nation in the universe and that time US can change any country for good direction but today America is powerless and the White House is colorless. How could be?

  • Comment number 94.

    israel not happy with america's advice to the egyptians why?
    Is america forcing Israel into a conflict with the arab world which would give america a reason to go into iran.

  • Comment number 95.

    egypt is right about egypt!!!!!!

  • Comment number 96.

    What we should be aware of is that if Egypt falls to Islamic extremists they could cut off the Suez canal effectively causing mass starvation in Africa as the food supply route would be cut, we could also look forward to the doubling of the price of oil due to increased transport cost with £2.50 a litre petrol a reality by Summer.
    As the old saying goes, be careful what you wish for, you may just get it

  • Comment number 97.

    The USA/UK and EU should rein back their tendency to preach to other countries about how to run their internal affairs. Democracy, in its many guises, is not necessarily entirely suited everywhere, so leave Egypt alone to sort things out for themselves. By appearing to take sides, our political classes could so easily store up further trouble in the future. Trying to be the world's policeman is a futile exercise.

  • Comment number 98.

    The United States has done nothing to support the Egyptian people's struggle to remove a hated tyrant. NOTHING - ZILCH! Why should it Mubarak is America's own paid man. The US has taken no action whatsoever other than mouth a few uesless pusillaminous words of "concern". That does not sound like pressure on Mubarak just the opposite it shows support for the continuing presence of Mubarak. Has the US declared it will no longer give $Biilions to the Mubarak government? No. Will the US stop military aid to Egypt? No. Will the US end its political support of Mubarak? No. Will the US initiate UN sanctions against the Mubarak regime? No. The US through Secretary Clinton only mumbles some nonsense about a "peaceful transition" whatever that means and it means nothing. The thugs around Mubarak who are looking out only for their own private interests that they have grown fat on need Mubarak to remain for them to survive with their ill-gotten gains and priviledges. The present Egyptian government is a gang of criminals and corrupt sycophants living high on American dole. They have been usefull stooges to the US regarding regional policy concerning Israel which is all that ever truely "concerns" the US. The charges that the US is exerting undo pressure on Mubarak to leave is an invention to pretend that the governement still has legitimacy. They are acting like rats on a sinking ship looking for a foreign boogeyman to accuse for all the troubles. It's a cheap shot to divert public attention from themselves because they know the US can not afford to abandon Mubarak. The Egyptian people have to carry out their revolution for true democracy to the bitter end overthrow the American backed dictator Mubarak.

  • Comment number 99.

    *83/


    I AM SORRY ,REALLY SORRY . IT SHOULD BE *24 INSTEAD OF *63.

    Mr. zrzavy IS IGNORING THE GROUND REALITIES .

  • Comment number 100.

    I hope Obama knows what he's talking about. Changing a government based on a street mob numbering less than one percent of the population is risky business.

 

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