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Will more powers improve school discipline?

09:06 UK time, Wednesday, 7 July 2010

Head teachers in England are to be given the power to search pupils for items such as drugs, alcohol, mobile phones, pornography, fireworks and MP3 players. Will this improve discipline?

Currently, heads can only authorise a search of pupils, without their consent if there are reasonable grounds to do so, but only to look for knives or other weapons.

The government also plans to simplify the guidance on the use of force and to give anonymity to teachers when accused of malpractice, amongst other measures to ensure good discipline in schools.

Can these measures help to improve discipline? What other measures would help? Will these new powers help teachers in their daily job? How will this affect pupils?

This debate is now closed. Thank you for your comments.

Comments

Page 1 of 7

  • Comment number 1.

    It's a start in the right direction, but more needs to be done where my eldest

    child goes to school, a child walked into class late, the Teacher asked "why

    are you late?" The child, infront of the whole class, SWORE at the Teacher

    several times & for that, was not allowed to come back to school for ONLY 7

    days! What sort of respect does that show the poor Teacher and the children

    watching, laughing/listening to that. That child, should have been banned from

    school for 6 months or thrown out! We can ALL have a bad day but that showed

    total lack of respect! I wouldn't want to teach it!! I mean that child!!

  • Comment number 2.

    No. Labour has damaged the education system beyond repair.

  • Comment number 3.

    I think giving Teachers more power like this can also backfire for those who

    want to abuse children could have a field day! I wouldn't want anyone

    searching my child. But, if there were 2 Teachers of each sex, then that would

    be ok by me. What a dangerous place schools are now, compared to when I went,

    many moons ago!

  • Comment number 4.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 5.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 6.

    If I were a parent I would object to my child being searched if I were not present. Surely this new power for Head Teachers could be abused and may lead to accusations being made against teaching staff.

    I doubt it will improve discipline as standards have been allowed to deteriorate over many years.

  • Comment number 7.

    Some actual discipline will improve school discipline.

  • Comment number 8.

    Re No1
    It's a start in the right direction, but more needs to be done where my eldest
    child goes to school, a child walked into class late, the Teacher asked "why
    are you late?" The child, infront of the whole class, SWORE at the Teacher
    several times & for that, was not allowed to come back to school for ONLY 7 days

    I think the child should have been made to be at school on time and stay after school for two hours everyday for a month also the parents should have to pay the costs to the school of this punishment.

  • Comment number 9.

    Head teachers in England are to be given the power to search pupils for items such as drugs, alcohol, mobile phones, pornography, fireworks and MP3 players. Will this improve discipline?

    You mean to say that they weren't allowed to do this already?

  • Comment number 10.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 11.

    1. At 09:24am on 07 Jul 2010, EBAYTKMAX wrote:

    It's a start in the right direction, but more needs to be done where my eldest
    child goes to school, a child walked into class late, the Teacher asked "why
    are you late?" The child, infront of the whole class, SWORE at the Teacher
    several times & for that, was not allowed to come back to school for ONLY 7
    days! What sort of respect does that show the poor Teacher and the children
    watching, laughing/listening to that. That child, should have been banned from
    school for 6 months or thrown out! We can ALL have a bad day but that showed
    total lack of respect! I wouldn't want to teach it!! I mean that child!!


    Suprised the kid didn't get offered 7 A**s in order to repair the damage done to his human rights. Oh and I bet he/she goes on to be a top celebrity chef.

  • Comment number 12.

    If pupils are carrying illegal drugs or weapons, isn't that the job of the police to stop them? They'd certainly stop me (or kill me) if I was walking down the street doing the same.

  • Comment number 13.

    Like everything else we know all about our "rights" but are oblivious to our responsibilities. A few disruptives can ruin the prospects of the many. I'd say invert the system and say you have a state school place as long as your attitude merits it. If it does not, you lose your place and become your parents' responsibility during normal school hours. People might value what they're getting.

  • Comment number 14.

    Bring back the birch, the basket & the stocks.

    That'll teach them.

  • Comment number 15.

    "Head teachers in England are to be given the power to search pupils for items such as drugs, alcohol, mobile phones, pornography, fireworks and MP3 players."
    What the hell is going on? If kids are found in possession of drugs, the police should be brought in immediately and the dealers tracked down and arrested. In the case of alcohol, the parents should be arrested. It's 'zero tolerance' time.

  • Comment number 16.

    no they will not work! kids will be kids and the teachers have to acept that :) we're 2010 not 1950 so its about time the tories stopped living in the past.

  • Comment number 17.

    This is the sure time for British parents to pull their children out of schools and start homeschooling. These once respected institutions are now nothing more than prisons for control and conditioning of children, being treated by criminals for having their bags searched, whatever happened to innocent before found guilty?

  • Comment number 18.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 19.

    I don't think bringing back the cane or anything like that would help now, as

    that would be going backwards instead of forwards. But giving the children who

    are well behave REWARDS such as trips out, say a choice of 4 places of

    interests & for the children to pick the place that most chose, that would be

    the place where they would go & in school time; maybe this could be done 3

    times each year. At the moment it's the naughty children who get the rewards

    to encourage them to 'keep up the good work', but that's unfair to the

    children who are always good. This could be maybe a points system with 90% and

    upwards got the rewards those with less nothing! Kids need to get real, and

    start living in the real world, for once. Protecting them and moving the goal

    post, bacause we or the Teachers feel 'sorry for them' will not help them

    develope into adults with backbone! So 90% good work in school, with not

    bringing in items mentioned above, good grades, again 90%, respect for the

    Teachers & each other isn't much to ask. I have one child that does that

    anyway. That child gets 'nothing' yet this child has always been respected by

    Teachers & pupil alike, yet our other child is naughty & gets all the

    rewards!!

    What I have said has nothing to do with been CLEVER/BRIGHT but just following

    school rules. I know children are not Angels I wasn't, I HATED school, but I

    never, ever got the cane or detention. I was neither bright or clever. My

    brother got the cane & dention many times & he was clever/bright. He went on

    to do very well for himself!

  • Comment number 20.

    The problem stems from the inclusion policy where kids who have no desire to work are mixed with those who do. The troublemakers should be taken out of mainstream education and taught in special schools where the facilities exist for giving them the support they need. This will then allow the other students (and teachers_ to learn in a safe environment.

  • Comment number 21.

    Empowerment for teachers is one thing but the Heads & Senior Management of the Schools ought to set a good example i.e. go into the Classrooms & do some teaching. They are often so detached from what actually goes on in the Classrooms & what teachers have to put up with: this is the prime cause of poor morale. A similar situation obtains in the NHS: doctors are being managed by people who have no inkling about Medicine & patient care &, often, of much lower intelligence than the practitioners of the profession.

  • Comment number 22.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 23.

    Most kids at most schools behave reasonably well most of the time.They accept that a school should be a safe place to learn.
    All kids have lapses, there are a small minority who appear to lack any social skills whatsoever who cause the most disruption. This relates to their lives outside of a school and any amount of stop and search or increased school discipline is unlikely to have any significant effect on them.

    Consequently I suspect what will happen ,not what is intended to happen, will be applying these powers in relation to generally well behaved students to catch minor infringements of petty rules.

    I had to move our eldest daughter (a well behaved and academically strong student) from Her previous school because the Head Teacher there had become obsessed about the length of the school tie! Ignoring serious and persistent bullying and theft problem He had teachers on tie patrols outside of the school!

    I suspect this new move will be utilised to search for mobile phones and ipods not knives and stolen property.

    All it will then do is irritate willing and trustworthy students and annoy their parents.

  • Comment number 24.

    In a word - yes!

    But this is because the pupils will misinterpret the new guidelines as badly as they did "you can't touch me" previous ideas.

    It was a myth that a teacher couldn't "touch" the child - but both children and many teachers believed it to be true.

    Discipline in class is due to the teacher's presence and tolerance - It was always thus.

    In my own days of being a school boy in a private school - caning and other punishments - were rife - but some teachers simply could not control a class

    When I became a teacher in the days of caning - some teachers simply could not instill a sense of discipline - they had rowdy classes that were detrimental to the whole class learning. Mainly because the class did not "respect" (I can't think of a better word) the teacher. My classes were quiet and industrious in a very slum school - my lessons being enjoyed by most. Basically never used the cane - but the pupils thought I would - and I could 'see' misbehaviour before it happened "eyes in back of head" syndrome.

    Abolition of the cane - more teachers found it more difficult to 'command' a class. My classes continued to be quiet and industrious. Because I demonstrated that I was a 'hard man' - the pupils believed I was - and I could still 'see' misbehaviour before it happened.

    We had a deputy head at our very slum school - She was 5 feet high shorter than most children and slim - she only talked very quietly. She could walk into a hall of 200 children effectively noisily rioting - and stand by the door. Silence and discipline would radiate from her instantly - without a word being said. THAT was presence.

  • Comment number 25.

    It can only help, but after 13 years of telling the little darlings that their rights are more important than either their teachers or their parents it is, quite simply, too little too late.

  • Comment number 26.

    Won't make any real difference. It doesn't work in Jails so how do you expect it to work in Schools. The modern undisciplined learning methods used today are useless in an undisciplined self centred society we have today
    Disipline neeeds to be a way of life for children from an early age. It is the way they learn the self-discipline to survive in society.

  • Comment number 27.

    Speaking as a teacher, parent and school governor, what I believe schools need are better and enforceable sanctions to use against misbehaving students.

    I do not wish to search my students or engage in a brawl with (i.e. forcibly restrain) them. These are actions best left to the proper authorities like the police.

    I do want to see support for the removal of badly-behaved students from the classroom and their containment elsewhere, support from management within the school and from the commuity as a whole, especially parents. Exclusion is no answer: most of them are quite happy to be told not to attend school.

    I do want to see students trained from the outset in appropriate behaviour. They need to learn discipline and self-respect.

    I also - to refer back to Sunday's discussion on 'inadequate' teachers - require that OfSTED and others realise that disruptive behaviour is the STUDENT'S responsibility, correct management of it the TEACHER'S... too often is a teacher marked down because of badly-behaved students irrespective of how well that teacher addresses each instance of disruption during the course of the lesson.

  • Comment number 28.

    Its hard to see how these measure will have a fundamental effect on school displine.
    Currently there is little consquents for bad and disruptive behaviour; or reward for good behaviour for that matter.
    Only when parents are made accoutable for their childrens behavour will there be an incentive for (many) parents to make sure their children behave.
    Of course, the sad truth is that some children have appalling home lives; and there appears little that can be done by society to improve either their lives, or stop these parents having yet more children who in lifetime can't cost the state literally millions of pounds.

  • Comment number 29.

    Not until pupils have self discipline, and if they lack that, like a puppy they may need the occasional reminder. But our namby pambys would have heart attack over that!!

  • Comment number 30.

    So, deadbeat children from deadbeat families cause trouble at school. What a suprise! Don't expect any change while children are a passport to state benefits and social housing and schools are a convenient minding service for feckless parents who are not fit to bring up society's future.

  • Comment number 31.

    When I was in school I was caned if I did wrong, the level of caning depended on the teacher administering the punishment. I was caned, and it included from one teacher a ruler being rapped, by it's edge, on the back of my hand, and it hurt, and that was when I was no more than seven years old. In my view the punishment did me no lasting harm, what it did was teach me what pain was like, it was part of the learning process. The caning punishment instilled discipline but it also taught me not to harm others because it would cause them pain. Yet again a minority of do-gooders have done the lions share of making schools places of indiscipline. As long as physical punishment does not affect a childs dignity then it should be part of a schools armery in keeping discipline. What happens in school spills over in to the rest of the community eventually, noticed all the knife attacks. A man called Silverman was another do-gooder, he was the main architect of the abolition of capital punishment. Before capital punishment was abolished, in a year, there were very few murders. Since then there have been tens of thousands and why? Because there's no deterent, any right minded person will think twice before harming someone to the extreme, that deterent factor should start in school. If you know you will be caned for wrong-doing, you probably won't do wrong.

  • Comment number 32.

    The school is responsible for the child during school hours.

    The power today lies firmly with the children and this has to be reversed.

    Reasonable powers should be made available to the headmaster and teaching staff, including exclusion, as a last resort.

  • Comment number 33.

    2. At 09:27am on 07 Jul 2010, Edwin Schrodinger wrote:

    No. Labour has damaged the education system beyond repair.

    = = = = = = =

    Oh Please - the education system was damaged severely for many years before Labour came into power.

    I know I worked as a teacher during the whole sorry TORY INSTIGATED MESS lasting well over 20 years before Labour.

  • Comment number 34.

    Head teachers in England are to be given the power to search pupils for items such as drugs, alcohol, mobile phones, pornography, fireworks and MP3 players. Will this improve discipline?

    HA! Half the list contains items which require police intervention never mind teachers!

    How well our liberal society has done! Since abolishing corporal punishment and 'modernizing edukashun' child on child murder has reached unprecedented heights, teenage pregnancies are up (we're No 1 in Europe), spiraling drug use, casual violence and utter lack of respect for anyone and anything. On top of which the majority of schools churn out feckless kids who can barely speak but are good at swearing!

    Well done Liberals! How very proud you must be of yourselves!

  • Comment number 35.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 36.

    EBAYTKMAX wrote: I wouldn't want anyone searching my child.
    ziggyboy wrote: If I were a parent I would object to my child being searched if I were not present.
    Rufus McDufus wrote: If pupils are carrying illegal drugs or weapons, isn't that the job of the police to stop them?

    With such overwhelming support, no wonder schools are in the state they are.

  • Comment number 37.

    "This country is going more and more like America daily, What is next metal detectors on the school gates, and private police force, to watch pupils? This country is going backward.

  • Comment number 38.

    10. At 09:46am on 07 Jul 2010, Peter Bridgemont wrote:

    Having taught in Australia and the continent I'd ask why don't these countries need search powers?
    We are too slow to look around and see why eg. Germany, Denmark, have better education and less violence. Maybe it's our jingoistic tabloids, but we need to learn from others, not just in education.

    = = = = = = =

    Because those countries have far more responsible PARENTS!!! Often coupled to that responsibilty are LAWS!

    There are far too few enforceable laws on behaviour in this country.

  • Comment number 39.

    Labours has allowed for pupils drugs, alcohol and mobile phones - Now it comes time to ban them.
    Labours has allowed for pupils bad disciple in schools - Now it comes time to improve it.
    I think also we have to ban Labours to propagate greadful communist ideas or we will end up like USSR. I do not want to have here like Putin U.K. & Medvedev U.K.

  • Comment number 40.

    2. At 09:27am on 07 Jul 2010, Edwin Schrodinger wrote:
    No. Labour has damaged the education system beyond repair.
    __________________________________________________________________

    Great! An important topic and with no constructive critiscm at all we get a daily fail rant against a political party that was in power for only thirteen years, and with a gap of 18 years five years before that.

    Get it into your stupid toree heads. MARGRET THATCHER CLOSED DOWN GRAMMER SCHOOLS! ITS NOT ALL LABOURS FAULT.

    I'll wage a pound to a penney that if one of your children is searched and found to have something on their possession they shouldn't have you would complain louder than most.

  • Comment number 41.

    9. At 09:46am on 07 Jul 2010, robbo wrote:

    Head teachers in England are to be given the power to search pupils for items such as drugs, alcohol, mobile phones, pornography, fireworks and MP3 players. Will this improve discipline?

    You mean to say that they weren't allowed to do this already?

    = = = = = = =

    Basically they can - but the idea is to make those powers public, clear and not negotiable.

  • Comment number 42.

    No 16, meanstreak, 'kids will be kids' you say, so it's OK for them to be carrying knives etc is it? i hope to God you are not a parent.

    Parents who take no responsibilty for their children and allow offensive weapons and drugs to be taken into school should be prosecuted.

    Once children walk onto a school premises they should abide by the rules of the school and if that means being searched for banned items, then tough.

    Children do have certain 'rights' but they do not have the right to threaten others, be abusive to others or bully others.

  • Comment number 43.

    No no no no no no no.

    A teacher does not have the right to search anyone, the job they have is to teach.

    If they believe that the child has a weapon or drugs on them then call the POLICE.

    It's been 10 years scince I was at school, in my 5 years there we had 2 teachers dismissed over abuse cases.

    As a parent I would refuse to allow a teacher to search my son.

    A sad but simple fact is, in the UK we DO have a problem with abusive teachers, childrens workers, priests/bishops along with the rest of the world.

    The scary thing is, the UK's problem is considered bad, but in actuality its ALOT worse than most people think.

    The amount of sub-human acts that go on in society, of abuse and neglect that DONT get reported far outnumber those that do.

    Opening the door to yet more acts of depravity by scum is the last thing we need.

  • Comment number 44.

    When your child is in your home, you, the child's parent, have authority over that child. As the child's parent, it is your responsibility to ensure that your child behaves him or herself.
    When your child is at school - and whether you like it or not - the school is acting as a 'stand-in' parent and should have the same rights and responsibilities that you, the child's parent, has. And this means discipline MUST be enforced. If you refuse to discipline your off-spring, then do not stand in the way of teachers who are doing your job for you. Disruptive children are that way because of their upbringing.

  • Comment number 45.

    Pupils are generally malleable and respond well to disciplinary measures ...

    Parents, however, are another matter!

  • Comment number 46.

    At 09:42am on 07 Jul 2010, ziggyboy wrote:
    If I were a parent I would object to my child being searched if I were not present. Surely this new power for Head Teachers could be abused and may lead to accusations being made against teaching staff.


    *********************

    Brilliant, another potential parent that wants to undermine teachers authority, I've lost count the amount of times I've heard parents at my children's schools get a detention overturned or refuse to believe that their child has been naughty enough to be put on report. Discipline starts at home, it's time to start going after the parents.

  • Comment number 47.

    6. At 09:42am on 07 Jul 2010, ziggyboy wrote:

    If I were a parent I would object to my child being searched if I were not present. Surely this new power for Head Teachers could be abused and may lead to accusations being made against teaching staff.

    I doubt it will improve discipline as standards have been allowed to deteriorate over many years.

    = = = = = = = =

    Actually your type of attitude is EXACTLY why we are having the problems we are having.

    As far as I'm concerned - If I had a suspicion that some little scroat was carrying an illegal item - I'd search TO SAFEGUARD THE REST OF THE SCHOOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I would then like to impose a £1000 fine on the scroat's PARENTS.

    Irresponsible parents are the root cause of much of the discipline problems now

  • Comment number 48.

    12. At 09:49am on 07 Jul 2010, Rufus McDufus wrote:

    If pupils are carrying illegal drugs or weapons, isn't that the job of the police to stop them? They'd certainly stop me (or kill me) if I was walking down the street doing the same.

    = = = = = = = =

    NO - It's the job of the PARENTS!!!!!!!!!!

    This is not the USA.

  • Comment number 49.

    16. At 09:51am on 07 Jul 2010, meanstreak wrote:

    no they will not work! kids will be kids and the teachers have to acept that :) we're 2010 not 1950 so its about time the tories stopped living in the past.

    ________________________________________________________________________


    So long as people have this attitude, our problems won't go away!

    How is the desire to have children who are respectful and hard working living in the past?


  • Comment number 50.

    Re 19
    "My brother got the cane & dention many times & he was clever/bright. He went on to do very well for himself!"
    Maybe the cane & detention showed your brother how far he could push before he was pushed back.
    I am glad he did well for himself I wonder how well he would have done had he just been allowed to do anything he liked as happens in many schools today.

  • Comment number 51.

    On their own these new measures will achieve little.

    Firstly schools need sanctions which can be applied by Headteachers to pupils and when required to parents. These should include corporal punishment and sequestration of Child Benefit to cover costs to schools of enforcing discipline.

    Secondly we will need to replace all those heads who are unfit for the job of disciplining pupils because they do not believe in using the new sanctions which will be available to them.

    Thirdly we will need to repeal any EU legislation which interfers with the new sanctions.

    Do you know - I almost feel like coming out of retirement if we really are going to do something about bad behaviour!!

  • Comment number 52.

    For those who are blaming Labour for our schools they either have short memories or do not fully understand the history of our schools.

    Discipline in our schools started to erode from the early 1970’s and that erosion was mainly due to parents and not just political liberalism.

    Around 1967 seven-lads at our school set about a teacher giving him a black eye and cut lip. All seven were rightly publicly flogged on stage in front of the school.

    There was no police or court involvement, no criminal records to tarnish the lads future and discipline was enhanced that day, but most importantly none of the parents of either the lads involved or the viewing audience complained, not one.

    Today a teacher only has to say the wrong word and they are disciplined and undermined whilst the little cherubs can do what they want with impunity.

    The whole system was tightening up including preventing kids leaving school between school hours but most importantly parents need to support the teachers and authority after all you reap what you sow!

    If you want a better Britain then we need to work for it as a handful of politicians and legislation will not do the job for us.

  • Comment number 53.

    Should've been done years ago. The school my mum works at had metal detectors for one day and they found 3 hammers and a knife hidden just outside the entrance. You wouldn't suspect stuff like that. I came out of schooling recently, and the amount of drugs passed around at a grammar school was even surprising to me, and I was there!

    While we're at it, blah blah Tory scum blah blah immigrants blah blah human rights are more important than children living drug-free lives.

  • Comment number 54.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 55.

    Firstly - the article mentioned that teachers would be permitted to search for mobile phones and iPods, and a teacher defended this move by saying "We'll be searching for items that are illegal".

    When exactly were iPods and mobiles phones made illegal? Because I have one of each, and would like to know if I am breaking the law.

    Secondly - teachers can now use "reasonable force" to subdue pupils or prevent them from leaving the classroom? Who gets to define what "reasonable" is? The teacher? The Headmaster? The governors? The police?

    All this will lead to a glut of law suits when a teacher uses what he thinks is "reasonable" force and the parents disagree.

    Thirdly - does the teacher need "reasonable grounds" to search a bag or locker? Or can they just use this as an excuse to harass kids they don't like by routinely and repeatedly searching the same students bags and lockers without finding anything? Either as a way of getting some measure of revenge for real/imagined slights or as a way to drive the kid out of the school or to provoke the kid in to doing something the can legitimately be expelled for?

    Fourthly - if they can keep kids behind and after school without giving advance notice, I take it someone will inform the parents that the child is being kept behind? So that parents all over the country don't think their children are being raped and murdered?

    Fifthly - why are they taking phones and iPods exactly? If the child has one in his bag, and isn't using it, what reason would a teacher have for taking it?

    As you'll have gathered, I think these are ludicrous rules. They are going to turn schools in to virtual prisons, with the kids being treated as criminals the moment they walk through the door. And while this might improve discipline in the short term, sending the message to children that they can't be trusted, that they are criminals by default and that the authority figures in their lives have absolute power to make their lives a misery is not a good thing.

    (But it does help with the the Tories plans to privatise the entire education system. They started it in the 80s/90s, and are now back to their old tricks. You make state schools virtual prisons, you cut their funding, you stop the money to fix the buildings, then you say to parents "Look - you can open your own school where you will be free from this sort of control". Cameron will destroy the state school system, and will do it to the sounds of cheers and applause).

  • Comment number 56.

    Does not go far enough! I think if a student is seen with a working MP3 player or mobile phone in class time then the school should have the legal right to crush such items.

    All this rubbish about “my child has to have one for their safety or I may need to get in contact with them urgently” by parents shows how quite frankly how pathetic they are. Ever heard of a school office telephone? Fine for your kids to switch their electronic goods on when they walk home.

    Then the argument about rising abuse really does show what a sad world a lot of people live in. Facts state that most abuse on children is done by family or close family friends so I’m more worried about you… not a headteacher!

  • Comment number 57.

    The little darlings could do with a good dose of reality early in life. Search them all. Confiscate iPods; mobile phones; spray on tan bottles; fags; drugs; designer handbags; sunglasses from their heads; tooth whiteners; make-up wipes.

    That should do for a start.

    Now get them in school uniform.

    Now make them work.

  • Comment number 58.

    Yes teachers should have more powers to use at their discretion but isn't it a bit late by the time the (secondary school) teacher has to do this? What happened to parental responsibilities or have parents abdicated these and are now using schools as an extension of the social services sector?

    I sense an endemic lack of discipline in many secondary school children not just in terms of rowdiness but things like tidiness, punctuality. As we old fuddy-duddies well know, it wasn't always like that. This is deep-seated. Personally I would bring back the right of teachers to smack children - I'm not talking about 'savage beatings' but an appropriate smack at a young age with a hand or ruler won't kill them. We used to get the slipper and the threat was often an effective way of controlling the class with ultimate use rather rare. Use of the cane was confined to the most serious offences and only by the head. Don't tell me we are 'too civilised' for that now - it is quite clear that we are not, in fact we are regressing. Another knife killing of a youngster in London last week.

  • Comment number 59.

    I'm shocked that teachers don't have the power now to search children for drugs, drink, porn, mobile phones what sort of country do we live in when teachers don't have the right to search the thugs who pass themselves off as school children these days.

  • Comment number 60.

    Labour spent 13 years taking away authority from the Schools so that teachers worked in fear of of abuse, with the rotten apples in classes allowed to hold back the rest. These ferral youths were allowed to make a mockery of the educational system by being made untouchable by a Labour Government obsessed with looking after the wasters in our society rather than those who want to better themselves.

  • Comment number 61.

    Won't make any real difference. It doesn't work in Jails so how do you expect it to work in Schools. The modern undisciplined learning methods used today are useless in an undisciplined self centred society we have today
    Disipline neeeds to be a way of life for children from an early age. It is the way they learn the self-discipline to survive in society.

    = = = = = ==

    It should work in schools because all research shows children are far more malleable than adults.

    But it would certainly help if we imposed an enforceable contract with the PARENTS with heavy fines for non - compliance.

  • Comment number 62.

    It really depends on what's meant by 'search'. Emptying out pockets and bags, with witnesses present, is fine but anything more personal must have a parent present. This would protect the staff as well as the pupil from alleged abuse.
    Searching will only help locate potential dangers, weapons, drugs etc. It will do nothing much for classroom discipline. The route cause of classroom disruption is the home environment. Investigate what's going on there and I'm sure many classroom problems will be solved.

  • Comment number 63.

    No, these powers will not work because a significant number of headteachers will not use them (or any others). There is a new breed of headteacher in this country which is so frightened of parents, adverse publicity and children themselves that they are reluctant to 'disturb' children's feeling that they are in control. Often ineffective classroom controllers themselves (good teachers normally do not want to become headteachers,)they put their energy into controlling their staff, not the pupils. They cover up acts of violence,drug-taking/selling, serious discipline breaches etc to maintain the 'image' of the school. As for the contributor who wrote that a child was excluded for seven days for swearing at a teacher and the writer argued that this was too lenient, I can assure him/her that by national standards that was an extremely severe punishment and in most schools in England swearing at teachers is routine behaviour for a steadily growing minority of pupils (except during Ofsted inspections when,unusually, the children will have been given a very severe warning about their conduct) often ignored or punished merely by a very polite request not to do it again. Pupils are rarely excluded for seven days for assaulting teachers. You have no idea, believe me.

  • Comment number 64.

    After so many years of pathetically lax discipline it is going to take some considerable time to change attitudes of the core number of those who are the worst behaved.

    Not long ago, we had introduction of CONTRACTS at some schools, especially ones with serious behavioural/achievement problems.

    What happened to those.

    Pupils as well as parents signed contracts regarding behaviour. If such a system which is directed at the CORE problem pupils/parents has failed so completely, then how will this new system work any better.

    Is it a "ZERO" tollerance" policy, because we know how well this has worked with the police, or should I say what a massive failure.

  • Comment number 65.

    EBAYTKMAX says about rewards systems. My school did have a reward system, for good work or behaviour you got a Merit, at the end of the year those with the most Merits were allowed to go on a trip to Camelot - a small a pretty rubbish theme park in Chorley. This might have worked quite well if, a week later, the entire school hadn't gotten the chance to go to Alton Towers - arguably the best theme park in the UK.

    I agree with rewarding children for good behaviour and work, but make the reward better than what everybody else gets as well.

  • Comment number 66.

    I am not going to play the blame game here because there is no point. There are people/political figures out there who have made errors of judgement and they should know who they are but, if they don't there is no hope.

    In my son's high school, they openly talk about if a teacher so much as touches you they can be sued. I mean what kind of society have we become when the kids think so little of the teachers? In my view teachers should be allowed to pick the kids up by the scruff of the neck and throw them out. I include my own children in this because if they break the rules they should be punished.

    Part of the problem is the parents being way too over protective. I have heard parents of children who are total bullies talking about how if a teachers says anything against my child I will be straight in too see the head teacher. This is where extra powers need to be brought in. The power for the head teachers to tell these parents that their kids are actually making the lives of others a misery and the offenders should be segregated.

    There should be a published list of rules which, if broken, would result in the child being sent home immediately and this would include carrying any of the list in the HYS question and more.

    One last thing.... why should my child, who is in the majority of kids at his school, have his education ruined by a monitory of no hopers who are hell bent on making the lives of others a misery?

  • Comment number 67.

    I agree with Jan Robins-This country has gone down,in many ways-and that is also Education-where it seems,the pupils are the "force"-no the Teachers-and disapline is almost nil-My son,has taught in Inner Mongolia,for over a year,and on his way back to china-where he has taught for 6 years,at different Universities,while his wife,teaches young children-and son said-no way would he teach here-no respect either way=and if he lays down the laws-it is taken-he teaches 18-24 and so on-Languages and Business Studies-where young people-"want to learn"-and parents are proud of the efforts made-He also taught in norway-and is only 43-he said too-many Brits take yearly contracts there in China or HKong and see the difference-compared to here-and he knows what it was like here,when he was at School-and little help from Teachers-who also said-he was advanced-so ?I told them-to let him help those who were behind!guess what ?he helped some at 14-then was told-to stop-as others were upset-and should not be in the class!This,would not hapen abroad-as I was brought up abroad-and at 13-I was advanced-as with a lot of others,and we were "applauded" for our efforts-each year-in the hall-and I mixed with Chinese-Malays and Indians-oh,a few Brits-who were behind in studies!so,there you go.So get tought-and if kids have to be searched-then be it-and show-who is in Control!

  • Comment number 68.

    Posts 6,16 & 17 show the problem. Parents don't socialise or discipline their chidren and then don't support the school when it tries to instill the school's code of conduct into it's pupils.
    A teacher is legally in Loco Parentis during school time the problem is that the definition of 'a reasonable parent's actions' has changed over the years, this coupled with 'children's rights' makes running a achool a nightmare.
    If parents don't ensure that their child sees adults as authority figures before they start school what chance do teacher's have to do their job.

  • Comment number 69.

    My 15-year old nephew has shown me a whole host of "happy-slapping" incidents, which he has recorded on his mobile phone and that have occurred at his school and in his classroom!!! These would be arrestable offences outside the school boundary, as most of them constitute assault occasioning actual bodily harm.
    Absolutely disgraceful and a real eye opener for me, having gone through the Grammar School system and then into the Armed Forces. I really was shocked, appalled and stunned at what I considered to be a more dangerous place than the streets of Iraq!!!!!!!!!!
    He told me that schools are a place where violence is random and often, drugs are available, teachers are treated with no respect, kids turn up to class if they want to.
    What have we done to ourselves?!!! We really have hit rock bottom. Thanks again PC brigade.

  • Comment number 70.


    Teachers are dealing with the symptoms of a much greater social problem. The level of respect and decency child have is directly related to their upbringing and guidance in part. If the children are born into broken homes then gangs usually become family and there is no disciple or loving protection or guidance. The broken homes happen because marriage and sex has been undermined in the secular west and reduced to some hobby to abuse. All types of immoral acts have been legitimised and condoned under a banner of tolerance and if the man made toys used to prevent the natural consequence of the weighty act fails then killing the newly developing human in the womb has become a late form of contraception.

    The social chaos, the crime rates, the abortion rates, the broken homes and the disorder and disrespect among the youth all comes back to a dishonouring and debasing of the significance and sanctity of sex and marriage.

    And the dishonouring and devaluing of sex, marriage and human life is born from the cultural decent into secular naturalism which teaches all life is a blind unconscious physical accident and has no ultimate value or worth.

    You have to break this down and see where the problem stems from. Why are children unruly and have no respect? Unloving environments, broken homes and poor parenting usually influence this. And why is the parenting poor or home broken? because marriage and the sanctity of sex and life has been devalued through secularist values or lack thereof. Children are being put through a secular schooling system and being taught they are essentially accidental cosmic mutant animals with no higher moral law or value. So they will grow into adults with no guidance or value or decency, and see no reason to live together if they have one too many arguments. And the child is brought into this chaotic environment and then indoctrinated with the same blind secularist materialist world view. The problem increases. In fact it is amazing there is some degree of social order and decency at all in humanity consider this pattern and system.

    Acknowledgement of God who is implied in the order, systems, consciousness, beauty of life is the foundation of order and sanity. From this basis worth and value for human life and actions are reestablished. Sex is then seen as weighty and full of responsibility as it is naturally. The act is only consumed within a life long committed relationship so that the natural God given consequence of intercourse, children, can have a stable and loving relationship from two parents who value the child and God more than their own ego and whims. Then we have more selfless families, instilling value and worth, reverence to children from birth. The child is then taught with love and disciple and learns respect and self worth and worth of others. The proper and right use of intercourse. Everything is then brought into order and decency.

  • Comment number 71.

    Jeremy Clarkson's article in the Sunday Times provides the answer, COMMON SENSE, applied to all walks of life.

    Remove all laws and regulations relating to this in schools and let each school have its own 'rules of engagement'.

  • Comment number 72.

    It doesn't matter how many powers teachers have, without support from parents/guardians it is all a waste of time.

    I had very few problems maintaining discipline in my classroom and I never had to resort to physical threats or punishments to control any of my pupils and I doubt the abilities of any teacher who would.

    The most effective tool I ever used with unruly pupils was to call their parents in, advise them of the problems we had been having with their child and then offering them the chance to observe their child in a lesson.
    You would be amazed how well children behave when they walk into a classroom and see one of their parents sat at the front of the class, especially when they weren't expecting them to be there.

    I only ever had to do this with three different children during my career and it worked first time with each of them. Their behaviour improved, as did their attendance, punctuality and the quality of their work, so much so that it became a standard policy at the school I was working in at the time and is a policy that was still being used long after I retired.

    If you want to help children then you need everyone working together but the most important people in a child’s life are its parents and without their help teachers are left fighting an uphill battle that more often than not ends in failure.

  • Comment number 73.

    33. At 10:25am on 07 Jul 2010, RichardGrey wrote:
    2. At 09:27am on 07 Jul 2010, Edwin Schrodinger wrote:

    No. Labour has damaged the education system beyond repair.

    = = = = = = =

    Oh Please - the education system was damaged severely for many years before Labour came into power.

    I know I worked as a teacher during the whole sorry TORY INSTIGATED MESS lasting well over 20 years before Labour.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Oh no, not again. Please can we stop the tit for tat polics of who is worst?

    The largest expansion of comprehensive schools resulted from a policy decision taken in 1965 by Anthony Crosland, Secretary of State for Education in the 1964-1970 Labour government, a fervent supporter of comprehensive education. This had been the party's policy for some time. The policy decision was implemented by Circular 10/65, an instruction to local education authorities to plan for conversion.

    In 1970 the Conservative Party re-entered government. Margaret Thatcher became Secretary of State for Education, and ended the compulsion on local authorities to convert. However, many local authorities were so far down the path that it would have been prohibitively expensive to attempt to reverse the process, and more comprehensive schools were established under Mrs Thatcher than any other education secretary. However, she went on to be a ferocious critic of comprehensive education.

    I am a product of the mess, my Grammar school went Comprehensive in 1969. I spent the next year a one of about 120 boys in a Girls school of about 850. Great fun, but it did little for my (formal) education.

    Labour has now dumbed everything down so much that the University where I work has had to introduce equalising course in Maths because the entrants cannot manage Thermodynamics etc without them.

    'nough said

  • Comment number 74.

    40. At 10:30am on 07 Jul 2010, JohnH wrote:
    2. At 09:27am on 07 Jul 2010, Edwin Schrodinger wrote:
    No. Labour has damaged the education system beyond repair.
    __________________________________________________________________

    Great! An important topic and with no constructive critiscm at all we get a daily fail rant against a political party that was in power for only thirteen years, and with a gap of 18 years five years before that.

    Get it into your stupid toree heads. MARGRET THATCHER CLOSED DOWN GRAMMER SCHOOLS! ITS NOT ALL LABOURS FAULT.

    I'll wage a pound to a penney that if one of your children is searched and found to have something on their possession they shouldn't have you would complain louder than most
    ============================================================
    Please see my earlier comment at #73, and use facts.

  • Comment number 75.

    Another anti-child or 'Toxic Kid' rant straight from the front page of the daily wail.

    I would like to know how many children are coming to school with items they shouldn't.

    This is not equal to the number excluded because they are disruptive.

    I think you will be suprised at the low level of this problem.

  • Comment number 76.

    Recently there was an incident at my daughters school where older pupils were befriending younger pupils with the sole intention of getting into houses and stealing booze.

    The school handled the incident very well, action was taken against those involved, warning letters were issued just in case all those involved hadnt been caught and a series of meetings held with parents.

    What shocked me most about the whole incident was the parents meetings - even when the entire audience knew who the guilty parties parents were, guess which set of parents kicked off about the rights of their kids? Cries of 'oh no - not my little darling' round the room despite them having been caught red handed.

    Whilst I think the new proposals cannot hurt, until we sort out parents like those what chance do schools, teachers or indeed any of us have......

  • Comment number 77.

    Well as an ex teacher I would not like the job of searching - You can bet some kids will say they were tampered with. That teachers life will then take a real down turn - there have been numerous stories in the press of innocent teachers who have been wrongly accused of "illegal contacts" and the subsequent hell it put them through. And you can bet, those who need searching will be just the people who will try and exploit the situation - they have no reason not to? I suspect these days most teachers avoid "difficult" situations like the plague.

    I dont know what the answer is - maybe on site police.

  • Comment number 78.

    No 16 - Kids may be kids but that in no way excuses the behaviour in schools. Teachers being physically and mentally abused with no way to defend themselves. I have worked as a teaching assistant in a main stream school and was shocked by the language and behaviour of some of the children. I haven't been out of school long but I would never have dreamed of speaking to teachers the way some people do.

    Maybe political correctness needs to back off and allow us parents to discipline our children so they learn to have respect for, not just teachers, but everyone in general. There is a HUGE difference between discipling a child and beating them! And maybe some parents should stop expecting the school to do everything for them and take some responsibility for their children.

  • Comment number 79.

    All this user's posts have been removed.Why?

  • Comment number 80.

    Highly disruptive students tend to be students that want to be treated more equally. Pushing the boudaries of rules when they see teachers getting away with similar behaviour.

    My daughter is considered disruptive because she wears her school skirt shorter than the rules state, but I have witness teachers with skirts of a similar level. She is also consider disruptive as she has a tendancy to point out teachers mistakes on board work.

    These powers would give the schools further powers to victamise students they don't neccassarily like for one reason or another.

  • Comment number 81.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 82.

    Can we please get these stupid parents to understand what discipline is all about its not wandering into school late , scruffy , swearing carring mp3 players and the like thats why it carrys on into later life with no one respecting authority and morales collapsing. Its all that there little jonny who would not hurt a fly import knives , drugs etc lets have more of it stop these spoilt brats ruining the system where other children want to learn if you dont like it get out.

    Also ban parents from storming into schools being abusive and threatening what image does that give get them arrested,

  • Comment number 83.

    Will the poor teachers ever be allowed to TEACH? They are not supposed to be baby sitters for society at large.

  • Comment number 84.

    I hope so, it certainlt needs it. Self discipline and selfless behaviour seems to be a thing of the past, Parliament is full of such.

  • Comment number 85.

    I'm confused. Surely tackling indiscipline and empowering staff to search pupils are nearly mutually exclusive.

    Searching pupils allows the member of staff to confiscate accessories, which may cause disruption in the class. It also allows the member of staff to invade to pupils privacy, potentially to the embarassment of that pupil, giving unreasonable power to the member of staff.

    The issue of discipline is one that requires us to act in a much wider context. It is behavioural and learned (accepting there are some conditions that affect some pupils) from the pupil's environment. Disruptive behaviour does not require accessories, so searching and confiscating only removes the chance of video recording of disruptive incidents. To correct behavioural problems we should have kept the option for specialised schools to deal with the various issues.

    As an example, some pupils DO require much more care and nurturing, and may well have learning difficulties that mean they would be better managed and taught separately from "mainstream" pupils, to the advantage of both. Others who are disruptive, for whatever reason, would also benefit from a more personalised education. dealing with such matters in an emcompassing classroom means that those who have no learning issues and are not disruptive are constantly failed by our unwillingness to revoke inclusiveness.

    I guess what I'm saying, and I await the onslaught, is that we need special schools for those with learning difficulties and special schools for those who are disruptive. I hesitate to call them borstals because of the connotations, but the policy of inclusiveness has created many of our discipline problems of today.

  • Comment number 86.

    As a template for "blame" please just cut and paste any of the below, this will enable you to just on the bandwagon far quicker, thus saving you time.

    FAULT

    LABOUR

    BLAME

    GORDEN BROWN

    *rolls eyes*

    It's easy to blame a political party for the youth of today, but it's the youths who're at fault. British youths are out of control and the situation is only going to get a LOT worse. Blaming Gorden Brown may seem the popular "let's jump on a bandwagon" choice, but he and his ex party are not directly to blame.

  • Comment number 87.

    With regards to a child being searched if suspected of being in possession of illegal or illicit materials I am completely in favor of these ideas. Children cannot be allowed to run amok in school or anywhere else. They must learn discipline and respect for others as it is only then that they will learn to have respect for themselves. As long as more than one teacher is present and a full report written I am happy that we can move against teachers abusing these new powers.

    With regards to punishing exceptionally abusive peoples I believe that a few days of "holiday" at home is not good enough. A few months of isolation from school plus a compulsory program of social re-education should be introduced. Again this sort of corrective action will again allow the nations children to mature properly and with dignity.

  • Comment number 88.

    the problem of bad behaving is caused by the lack of discipline at home ,you cannot blame the school or teachers ,
    if parents don`t control them at an early age ,they give in to thier tantrums too easily , then blame anyone but them selves

  • Comment number 89.

    About time ! At last we are seeing some acknowledgement of the rights of the teachers and the law abiding pupils, instead of pandering to the "rights" of unruly pupils. Wholeheartedly in favour here.

  • Comment number 90.

    49. At 10:44am on 07 Jul 2010, Cronk wrote:
    16. At 09:51am on 07 Jul 2010, meanstreak wrote:

    no they will not work! kids will be kids and the teachers have to acept that :) we're 2010 not 1950 so its about time the tories stopped living in the past.

    ________________________________________________________________________


    So long as people have this attitude, our problems won't go away!

    How is the desire to have children who are respectful and hard working living in the past?

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Cronk or crank?

    I suppose that you think the little darlings should "be allowed to express themselves freely".

    These views should not be allowed outside the pages of The Guardian. (Or is it The Sun?) Depends on the type of little darling.

  • Comment number 91.

    I don't envy the teachers if they have to implement such searches, they are likely to get a bloody nose, or worse. The minority of children who behave agrressively/violently in school, meriting expulsion, are the criminals of tomorrow and one has to question their homelife and upbringing. Until parents are brought to account for their poor parenting skills which produces these hoodlums, then I don't think the situation will change.
    Too many parents are working to satisfy their desire for the latest, 'must have', luxuries, nights down the pub and exotic holidays that their children are left unsupervised, undisciplined and without anyone taking responsibility for teaching them what is acceptable behaviour and what is not. For such parents, out of sight out of mind is their mantra - and look at the offspring this produces!
    It's time to make parents face up to their responsibility. If their child commits criminal damage, then they should reimburse all costs incurred to make good the damage caused. If their children misbehave at school, or on the street, then the parents should be held accountable for their child's behaviour and prosecuted. Time to get tough on parents as well as their offspring(s).

  • Comment number 92.

    20. At 10:04am on 07 Jul 2010, surely not? wrote:

    The problem stems from the inclusion policy where kids who have no desire to work are mixed with those who do. The troublemakers should be taken out of mainstream education and taught in special schools where the facilities exist for giving them the support they need. This will then allow the other students (and teachers_ to learn in a safe environment.

    = = = = = =

    Oh we USED have these in London until THATCHER DESTROYED the ILEA and GLC - and decided that disruptive children should be taught in main stream classes - and increased classes from 20 to 35.

    I really can't see the CONDEMS having those sort of aims especially for the POOR.

  • Comment number 93.

    I feel strongly that time management in schools is being adversely affected by the discipline vacuum. The amount of time teachers have to spend to gain control of their classes, rather than teach the subject in hand, redefines the role as more prison warden than pedagogue.

    Very often, children are under the impression that it is not they who err in terms of misdemeanours or misbehaviours at school, rather, it is the adults who chastise them who are at fault. There is a sense in which if their will is over-ridden, then the adults are coercive or railroading them. Why are they under this impression? I believe it is linked to the cult of the self - parents propagate this notion that individual rights take precedence over social. For example, I recently intervened in a play area when a boy of about 11 hit a two-year-old girl for trying to take the ball he was playing with - I remonstrated with him gently that you don't hit younger children - his mother came up and started shouting at me. I may have felt that I was helping the boy by pointing out socially transgressive behaviour that might land him in trouble with the law in the not-too-distant future. To this eleven-year-old child however, the only lesson or lingering impression he will have been left with, is that it was not that he who was in the wrong for using physical violence against a defenceless toddler, but that it was an adult (me) who was at fault for telling him what to do, as I was castigated in front of him by his mother.

    If children are under the impression that incorrigible antisocial behaviour is part of their freedom, or right to self-expression, then it is no wonder that teachers are having such a hard time. Many schools have done away with detention, so precisely what deterrents are in place? When just a handful of children run amok, the whole class's learning experience is taken hostage.

    Prosocial female children are the least likely to be bullied at school, but the converse is also true - children who have conduct behavioural issues (are perceived as not understanding the rules) are more likely to be bullied. It is within the child's own interests to have supportive disciplinary structures in place to ensure they understand implicit contracts of conduct. I think it is hideous that children can sexually bully others by photoshopping photos taken on mobile phones and effectively pornographize one another's images and then distribute it - even in non-sexual images, a common trick is to splice on a pig-nose or animal body. Image captivation equipment should not be allowed in schools, particularly mobile phones.

  • Comment number 94.

    6. At 09:42am on 07 Jul 2010, ziggyboy wrote:

    If I were a parent I would object to my child being searched if I were not present. Surely this new power for Head Teachers could be abused and may lead to accusations being made against teaching staff.

    ------------------------------------------------

    I am sure you would just as I am sure you would have a lot to say if your child was stabbed by another child who had taken a knife into school. If people wonder why day by day the UK goes further downhill they only have to look at the attitude of people like yourself for the answer.

  • Comment number 95.

    16. At 09:51am on 07 Jul 2010, meanstreak wrote:
    no they will not work! kids will be kids and the teachers have to acept that :) we're 2010 not 1950 so its about time the tories stopped living in the past.

    Kids will be kids - agree. But parents have stopped being parents. They just think that school is a place to dump their children whilst they go out to work and abdicate responsibility. If a child misbehaves then punish the parent.

  • Comment number 96.

    the real problem is poor and inadequate parenting. While spending billions on defence and nuclear weapons we never use but never ever educates children in their most important role family life, relationships and child care.

    This measure while welcome fails to address the failing parenting of numerous parents in the UK. They are forced to work by economic circumstances and so rely on their children being taught about life at school.

  • Comment number 97.

    If teachers had the power to instil discipline into their pupils and if parents that are negligent or just don't care were able to bring up their children correctly, there really wouldn't need to be any searching in the first instance. Why is there such a lack of discipline in schools these days? Is it a Labour thing? Is it something started by the Conservatives and perpetuated under the Labour government?

  • Comment number 98.

    Powers only work if they are applied but trying belatedly to impose discipline on a generation that has never known any will not be easy.

    Are modern teachers strong enough to insist on real discipline and hand out real punishment or will they just run to their unions?

    Having banned corporal punishment these kids have no experience of their ‘personal space’ being infringed and having got used to thinking they are somehow special and perhaps even invulnerable it will be a shock to the little dears to have to come back down to earth.

    There really is no more effective method of training to the young, of any species, than direct and proportional physical punishment metered out as close to the time of the causal event as possible, as Pavlov proved so admirably.

    So, will we repeal the anti-corporal punishment rules or just carry on talking hot air at these kids?

  • Comment number 99.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 100.

    Discipline SHOULD start from home and I think it all started to crumble when the government started to get involved with family life.

    Why put the blame on school teachers when 70% of the work starts within the family circle?

    Every child is different but I know that many will try to test the waters to see how far they can get away with things without punishment. The longer the leeway you give them the more encouraged they feel to further test their bounderies.

    Rewards system is good. But it is more important to show and teach them at home and school that they can't get away (naughty, breaking the rules, etc) without facing the consequences of their actions.

    Personal example:
    My children knows that when I start cooking dinner, they should start tidying up their room and get things ready for bedtime. A while ago I noticed that they start ignoring that rule and will only lift a finger when I start shouting.

    Now, I find that keeping things from them works as well. So I changed tactics. The longer it takes them to get ready the longer it takes me to serve the food. They have healthy appetites so this way works.

    As I said, each child is different and it is the parents responsibility to first know their strengths and weaknesses.

    Why waste a teacher's time writing a reports to multiple government bodies when the teacher can spend a bit more time preparing lessons, teaching or even getting to know the class?

 

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