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Should a team criticise its manager?

11:20 UK time, Monday, 21 June 2010

Do you work in a team? How does your team spirit compare to that of the France and England teams at the World Cup?

On Sunday, France's players boycotted training in protest at the decision to send striker Nicolas Anelka home - an action some described as a "mutiny".

Meanwhile, there are rumours of disharmony within the England team dressing room following reports the players are unhappy with aspects of manager Fabio Capello's management style.

Contrast this with the glowing reports of team spirit within the USA squad after two dramatic fight backs. "This team understands how to fight for 90 minutes," said coach Bob Bradley, while captain Landon Donovan said: "I'm proud of our guys... there are not many teams in this tournament that could have done what we did."

Are you a member of a team? Or the manager of one? What do you find are the ingredients of good team spirit and harmony? Does a team member have the right to speak out and criticise their manager? At what point does healthy criticism become indiscipline?

From 606: Who is right in this France fiasco?

This debate has now closed. Thank you for your comments.

Comments

Page 1 of 3

  • Comment number 1.

    I can't comment on the situation with France's football team and what they are up to.

    But as for the discord I have read about within the England camp, I would say this.

    These pampered pre-madonnas are paid a FORTUNE to do what they do. My suggestion is that they stick to their football, keep their mouths shut and do as they are told by their managment.

    I am sick to the back teeth of hearing about footballers complaining about this and that as if they have SOOOO bad, poor little lambs.

    No doubt they are too blinded by the pound signs in their eyes to be able to play decently and bring us home that trophy.

  • Comment number 2.

    Whilst the current situation in the Rngland camp is providing much amusement for me as a Scotsman, I believe the problems are mainly caused by the media. Cappello wont give interviews, doesnt enjoy talking to the press whatever the press decide to persecute him.

    However it appears that along with a lot of overpaid ball kickers the England team seem to think that they are individually more important than the team. France seems to have the same problem and are acting like spoilt brats, which if we are honest is what they are.

    Whatever happened to having pride in playing for your country?

  • Comment number 3.

    Its fine to criticise an international football manager - thats why they get paid the big bucks, and in Fabio's case if gets sacked he also gets around a £10,000,000 pay off to cushion the blow.

    Its also fine for fans to criticise or boo the team, after all some of them have been saving up for years and will have spent thousands to get to the matches.

    Its fine for Wayne Rooney to get upset at the booing - I'd be far more concerned if he did'nt care about the aprobation of the fans.

    Everythings fine - now lets all stop panicking & get behind the team for wednesday - England's World Cup is a long way from being the disaster most of the tabloids are ranting on about so lets at least try to stay positive - at least until after wednesday's game.

  • Comment number 4.

    In my opinion, any team are better than the England football team. A team of old grannies using knitting needles to cut down a tree would be more successful than that bunch of overpaid simple-minded muppets.

    Recession? Here's an idea. Pay footballers a justifiable wage, and use the other COUNTLESS MILLIONS to sort out this countries economy. Stop putting up the price of fuel and pay those mummys-boys less money.

    I would LOVE to see Beckham and Rooney play a game of rugby. No laying around clutching your leg that wasn't even touched shouting "Oooh referee did you see that" in rugby! They have to be TOLD to STOP playing to stop them BLEEDING! Now thats a sport!

  • Comment number 5.

    Yes, any team whether in sport or in the workplace should be able to offer constructive criticism and advice to a manager. However, it should be in private and the content not disclosed to anyone outside of that group.

  • Comment number 6.

    I am sick to death with the footballers complaining. If they've got it so tough the next time they see a soldier returning from Afghanistan I suggest the footballers tell him about it.

    I am disgusted in the lack of good sportsmanship I see from these over paid fairys. How difficult is it to run up & down a field kicking a ball for 90 mins once a week? They're paid well enough. It is pathetic that the managers always take the blame for a teams crappy performance, I mean the manager is not the person on the pitch doing the playing. I suggest that if we want a good team we pick those from lower down the league, those who play for a love of the game & who have not been blinded by exorbitant wages.

  • Comment number 7.

    I think generically a good team leader should accept feedback from the team members to allow the team to flourish positively.

    I used to date an Italian and he took any kind of criticisim very badly resulting in an arguement on several ocassions. If this is the kind of man Capello is then there is no wonder the England camp is in turmoil.

    From a football point of view the captain (and a good captain like JT) would express his views without any fear of the manager.

    I also think Capello's disapline regime is too strict and that has contributed to the players losing the will to play - hence no win so far.

  • Comment number 8.

    "Does a team member have the right to speak out and criticise their manager?"

    If the criticism is reasonable and useful to the Manager and is done in private - why not? Foolish is the Manager who ignores potentially very useful constructive criticism - EVERYONE is fallible...

    I actually think that the England team are OVER-Managed. They would play better if they were free to manage themselves to a greater extent. The Team know better how to play together. They know the strenghs and weaknesses of their own individual players and who plays better with which other player etc. We've tried everything else, give them more freedom to play as a 'natural' collection of characters and abilities - and see how they perform - it can't be any worse than what has been tried SO many times in the past - and at such a financial cost.

    I also believe that having foreign Managers - that have absolutely NO inherent, natural 'nationalism' towards England - except for the Cash - will not gain the confidence of the Team, to the appropriate level.

  • Comment number 9.

    It somewhat depends on the 'product' of the group. The disarray shown in both the French and English teams is based on the weaknesses of the teams, chosen from 'Prima Donnas' rather than from real team players. But that has long been a 'Football' problem.
    In business a real team does not need driving it simply needs leading. It needs strong guidelines, applied with fairness, the sort of shouting and ranting shown on some sidelines recently is counterproductive. The problem is that few 'Managers' can actually manage, most have to rely on position to impose their will, rather than using those skills they lack.

  • Comment number 10.

    4. At 1:57pm on 21 Jun 2010, Tom Camish wrote:
    In my opinion, any team are better than the England football team. A team of old grannies using knitting needles to cut down a tree would be more successful than that bunch of overpaid simple-minded muppets.

    Recession? Here's an idea. Pay footballers a justifiable wage, and use the other COUNTLESS MILLIONS to sort out this countries economy. Stop putting up the price of fuel and pay those mummys-boys less money
    ---

    To your first point - its still early days- if now go on to reach the semi's or further, none of us will remember the first 2 games.

    As for footballers 'disgusting' wages you seem to be under the same misaprehension as most Daily Mail readers - that if the money was not being paid to footballers it would all go charities or good causes.

    The money paid to footballers comes from private business - if it was not going to them it would be invested elsewhere - the average british citizen wouldn't see a penny - there might be an argument that the current wage level are destabilising the football industry but again thats a problem for the clubs - not you, I or anyone else.

  • Comment number 11.

    The one constant throughout the last few years of misery for England football fans has been the players. It is they who should step down, not the manager who should be forced to resign. Time and again this bunch of overpaid prima donnas have shown themselves to be unmanageable. Obscene levels of remuneration have distorted their views of their own self-worth to the point where they consider themselves to be beyond criticism and blame.

    I would rather England be represented by players from the lower leagues, but who actually showed some commitment and team spirit.

    I cannot understand why anyone in their right mind would want to take on the job of handling these clowns. Although maybe the £6 million had something to do with it.

  • Comment number 12.

    If you let yourself and team-mates down in the army it costs lives, you DONT have a 2nd chance, you DONT have 4 days to get your head/thoughts together.

    I personally would use video of Englands 2 latest football matches to teach teamwork skills especially in what teamwork FAILURE looks like!!!

  • Comment number 13.

    #1 " These pampered pre-madonnas are paid a FORTUNE to do what they do. My suggestion is that they stick to their football, keep their mouths shut and do as they are told by their managment. "

    You forget that the players are paid a fortune BY THEIR CLUBS to play in the English premiership not to play for England internationally. However the England manager is paid over £5 million a year (more than almost every one of his players).

    Likewise
    #4
    "Recession? Here's an idea. Pay footballers a justifiable wage, and use the other COUNTLESS MILLIONS to sort out this countries economy. Stop putting up the price of fuel and pay those mummys-boys less money."

    What a private company like Man United chooses to pay its staff is their business. The government has no powers to "confiscate" money from the clubs. It does however take 50% of the players wages in tax (and they then waste most of the rest buying sports cars which also boosts the economy) so if you want to see the economy boosted you should want footballers being paid even more. That way money is channeled from Sky subscribers, rich arabs and anyone else daft enough to buy a football club straight into the chancellors pocket.

  • Comment number 14.

    Of course.
    Papal infallibilty should apply to NO ONE .... including the Pope

  • Comment number 15.

    "Should a team criticise its manager?"

    In general, the players ought to refrain from criticizing the manager who recruited them in the first place.

    But the question is simply not black-and-white, and the answer depends on the circumstances.

    The English and French football players have no-one to blame except themselves for their recent lackluster performance. This poor performance is further compounded by the players' rejection of self analysis and self criticism, as evidenced by the blame on coaches and further ludicrous blame on assorted girlfriends and vuvuzelas.

    By contrast the Americans played well because they play as a team; are optimistic; never give up even during the last seconds of a game and put their country first before themselves.

    Taking responsibility & self-criticism are necessary for self-improvement. No amount of good coaching will help without that.




  • Comment number 16.

    Of course they should criticise. If something is wrong then management need to know. This applies to any business - not just football!

  • Comment number 17.

    shouldnt the question be, have the home team fans got the right to criticize the home team for a disgracfull performance

  • Comment number 18.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 19.

    French footballers that go on strike.

    English footballers that throw a tantrum after being booed for an abysmal display of incompetence.

    They should buckle down and earn their money like the rest of us, or we should send all the prima donnas home and put them on 3 months unpaid graffiti removal.

  • Comment number 20.

    George Osbourne should have a nice little surprise for the England team (should I call them a team?)when they get home from South Africa, an 80% cut in wages. I mean that would sort out the deficit on it's own. Then the players might come right back down to earth & start playing football again properly.


    Oh, & if you want a prediction for Wednesday, England 0...Slovenia 2.


    Now Portugal on the other hand beat North Korea, 7 nil today, which will definitely make Kim Jong-iL go to war with the neighbour & maybe with the rest of us.



    Jaker, London & Dublin.

  • Comment number 21.

    Should a team criticise its manager?
    Yes, but not in public, behind closed doors.
    Boycotting training in protest turned a provate team matter into public fodder, though I think calling it “mutiny” was a bit strong.
    The disharmony, confined to the England team dressing room, was the more professional way to go, but then again, the very fact that I am writing about it and that you have written about it, means there was some non-professional leaking.
    Contrast this with the glowing reports of team spirit within the USA squad after two dramatic fight backs: What do I find are the ingredients of good team spirit and harmony?
    Winning!
    It’s much, MUCH harder to maintain team spirit and harmony when a team is losing.
    At what point does healthy criticism become indiscipline?
    When it strays out of the locker room to make public fodder of team problems. Any team-member or coach who does this, is in fact: no longer a member of the team.

  • Comment number 22.

    #15 "The English and French football players have no-one to blame except themselves for their recent lackluster performance. This poor performance is further compounded by the players' rejection of self analysis and self criticism, as evidenced by the blame on coaches and further ludicrous blame on assorted girlfriends and vuvuzelas.

    By contrast the Americans played well because they play as a team; are optimistic; never give up even during the last seconds of a game and put their country first before themselves."

    Yet despite this the USA haven't actually won a game either. England have drawn two, the USA have drawn too. Both teams have exactly the same number of points in the table.

  • Comment number 23.

    20. At 2:39pm on 21 Jun 2010, Jaker wrote:
    George Osbourne should have a nice little surprise for the England team (should I call them a team?)when they get home from South Africa, an 80% cut in wages. I mean that would sort out the deficit on it's own. Then the players might come right back down to earth & start playing football again properly."

    Since when does the government pay their wages? Its the other way round. 50% of the players salary goes straight to Osbournes pocket. A £4M a year wage means £2M a year in income tax. If by some grotesque breach of the law Osbourne DID manage to slash players salaries 'rather than come back down to earth and start playing football properly' they'd get straight back on a plane and play football properly for Real Madrid or AC Milan'

  • Comment number 24.

    13. At 2:13pm on 21 Jun 2010, Peter_Sym wrote:
    #1 " These pampered pre-madonnas are paid a FORTUNE to do what they do. My suggestion is that they stick to their football, keep their mouths shut and do as they are told by their managment. "

    You forget that the players are paid a fortune BY THEIR CLUBS to play in the English premiership not to play for England internationally. However the England manager is paid over £5 million a year (more than almost every one of his players).
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    So what's ya point exactly? They are still paid a fortune, right?

    If anything, their behaviours and lack of effort and focus is even more disgraceful! They are paid a vast fortune, something they seem to forget is beyond the wildest aspirations of your average men - These footballers are not gods, neurosurgeons or even soldiers - professions worthy of a greater income.

    What incenses me even more is then that these pampered cry babies are there at the behest and privilege bestowed upon them by this country and this is how they treat such a privilege.

    If they return to this country without that trophy, it had better be quietly, unseen and through the back door!

  • Comment number 25.

    Should a team criticise it's manager'?

    The analogy is interesting and very relevant right now with the so-called 'Emergency Budget' this week?

    1) Front line services/people are dependent and failed by incompetent managers.
    2) Incompetent managers will move sideways - not sacked.
    3) Front line workers expect to be shafted by incumbent management by Tory permission.
    4) PM Cameron doesn't care about about front-line workers or the people they train and work hard to protect and care for.



  • Comment number 26.

    It is not a matter of criticism, but you should be able to discuss with your manager what is going wrong, what is not working, because these two games have shown that the decisions by management were not right, the players have to take some responsibility too of course. Come on Capello, make a better decision for Wednesdays game, don't have 3 strikers on the pitch at the same time, having 2 didn't work, because they had no back up as such, so why put on another one. Why have Rooney on for the whole game? He does not deserve to be there the way he is playing! So either play him for the first half and if he gets no results take him off, or don't bring him on until later in the game. And what about Joe Cole?

  • Comment number 27.

    We all know the saying, a donkey is a horse designed by a committee.

    Committees can work but they are lumbering beasts, slow to respond to situations and often deliveringa consensus view that no-one is quiote happy with.

    Teams, on the other hand, have a clear leader. Someone who gives clarity of direction and purpose and who values the views of team members who dont expect the leader to action all of their points but they do want a fair hearing. A good leader has the respect of the team members. Therein lies England's problem. The England players dont respect Capello; they fear him because he has imposed strict discipline. So, they dont perform at their best for him

    Simples.

  • Comment number 28.

    Of course there will be an exchange of views between the team and it's manager. This should take place on the training ground and in the dressing room, not with the press in tow.
    We are seeing a familiar pattern here, the team are not doing very well, well below expectations(which the media have hyped up), the media and fans are looking for a scapegoat.
    If we go out of the competition on Wednesday, the manager will be hounded, yet it is the team who are not performing. Perhaps we will realise that there is a reason why England have only won the World Cup once, in fact have won no international competition since 1966. The domestic football environment does not produce players who can compete at the international level and the inception of the Premier League has worsened the situation.
    The Premier League does not grow domestic talent, preferring to buy it in from abroad, the players do not have to time to hone the basic football skills, they play too many games. Their inadequacies are exposed when playing at the international level.
    The media bolster the players self-esteem by their myopic view of the game continually assuring us that the Premier League(the Greatest League in the World) is the home of world class players.
    Sadly England's record over the last 44 years belies that view.
    Of course if(it should be when.. but...) England win on Wednesday then the media will be off again stating that FIFA may as well just give Gerrad the trophy now and the England fans will agree, until they meet Germany/Ghana/whoever, in the knockout phase

  • Comment number 29.

    #24. My point is simple. They are paid a fortune to do a job for their team. Not their country. Its like criticising a lawyer (who is also paid a fortune) for doing a poor job when you pay him £5 to wash your car. His lawyer salary is completely irrelevant to whether you've got value for money for the car wash. The teams pay these guys a fortune to play for the teams, not to play for their country.

    What I really don't understand is that you constantly criticise the players attitude and performance while totally ignoring the attitude and performance of the manager WHO IS paid a fortune to manage the England team.

    And as for "If they return to this country without that trophy, it had better be quietly, unseen and through the back door!"
    Did you really think they were going to win it? Hahaha.

    Maybe if like me you were born in Scotland you'd be grateful if your team even qualified.

  • Comment number 30.

    I would love to find any walk of life where "the workers" were entirely happy with "their management".

    I bet the BA Cabin Crew staff are really happy with their Management.

    I'm betting the mineworkers were really enthralled with their Management and the pit closure program.

    I bet the London Underground staff are delirious with joy having their managment team organising them.

    The fact is that people are naturally reluctant to be directed and would prefer to be free to work as they chose but, in reality, someone has to be the Boss and make the decisions. "The workers" in this case the England Team and they have to obey and go with their instructions. They are welcome to discuss tactics with their Boss but, ultimately, Fabio Capello IS the Boss and he has to make the final decision and the Team do what he says or they don't play.

    Simples.

  • Comment number 31.

    If a manager cannot be criticised then he or she hasn't got a team.

    But to touch upon the essence of the tabloid media's (in this case including a none too thinly disguised BBC) preoccupation with game playing traumas, sometimes you are the better team and lose, sometimes you are the worse team and win. And most importantly, in one of life's little jokes, sometimes winners and losers think it is the high or low of existence until they wake up the next day and realise that they will do it all over again.

  • Comment number 32.

    I don't actually think the players are critising Capello, it is media Hype. Obviously the manager and players are not happy with the results so far, and will discuss why the results have been bad.
    Anyway England haven't done any worse as yet than the teams in 1986 or 1990. We weren't much better in 2002 or 2006 either.
    We are actually in no worse a position than France, Italy, Germany or Spain, who all need to win their remaining games to be certain to qualify. We even can still win the group.

  • Comment number 33.

    Any good manager is one who empathises with his team and is looked upon as a father-figure. Given what seems to be an impossible language barrier combined with a lack of communication, I'm not surprised there is disharmony in the England squad. They must wonder whether Capello is on their side, learning as an afterthought whether they're playing or not.

    The players, while clearly demoralised, should however be sufficiently professional to overcome their negative attitude. Another sport, I know, but I seem to recall Gary Player - a diminutive golfer against the likes of Palmer and Nicklaus when they were at their best - applying the power of positive thinking, and that's exactly what the USA have done.

    Come on England - you can still exit the Games with credit if you put in a good performance this week!

  • Comment number 34.

    Not much sympathy with the players I'm afraid. Not sure how their most recent "performance" can be blamed on the Manager. I'm quite sure no-one in the England management team asked them to play as badly individually & collectively as they did. Neither did anyone ask them only to run around about half as much as the Algerian chappies and not press them on the ball too much. HUGE contrast with what I saw from England rugby less than 24hrs later (and against much better opposition) and for much less money and whingeing.

  • Comment number 35.

    What we have in England is a bunch of overpaid club footballers. None of them deserve the spotlight that goes with world class players. The buck stops with the manager, but then again these players are paid to run and create space, they do not have to be intelligent, just fit with a little bit of common sense. To see the players against Algeria not creating space, drawing out Algerian players out of position. It was lazy and no excuse in the world will take that away. You could see the manager loosing the plot on the sidelines, I bet if he went on he would do better than most of the 'players'. What we need is players who are proud of wearing the England shirt. It does not matter if they loose, they have to show the England short the respect it is due. When I go to work, I do not take my wife with me. I am expected to be professional in all circumstances, regardless of how I feel. The problem is that these players are too young and have no idea about the real world. They think the sun rises and sets with them. They should realize that they kick a ball around a field. They do not save lives. They do not give life.

  • Comment number 36.

    No 27 and with no discipline how did England do? allow this bunch who think nothing of sleeping with their team mate's ex the run around? Geez , start by getting rid of that bloke and the rest and put in a team from the first division

  • Comment number 37.

    I worked in close-knit teams during my time in HM Forces. However, as the Senior in many of the teams it was not a democracy and what I said was what they did! Simple. To get the job done - someone leads and takes those tough decisions. And the leader lives with those decisions.
    Sadly, Capello is dealing with a bunch of Prima Donnas who have difficulty in comprehending their places in the "pecking order". Money does that to you.
    They should shut up, listen to the Manager and get on with it.

  • Comment number 38.

    i have to say if i was the manager after the two games i would withdraw from the tournament and fly the collection of people (i cannot call them a team)home economy class and they would not be upgraded

  • Comment number 39.

    Team members should be able to criticise the Manager. If the manager is good he/she will be onto and on top of a situation before it gets divisive.

    As for England and the World Cup, it's like a soccer version of eurovision, it always ends in tears. Go and play subbuteo until the start of the new season instead of making yourself miserable with this lamentable and predictable routine. You know that makes sense.

  • Comment number 40.

    #30 "The workers" in this case the England Team and they have to obey and go with their instructions. They are welcome to discuss tactics with their Boss but, ultimately, Fabio Capello IS the Boss and he has to make the final decision and the Team do what he says or they don't play.

    Simples."

    Extremely Simples and this is the point I'm trying to make. Fabio is the boss. He gets £5M a year to decide who to play and when. If the players are underperforming it is Fabio's job to rectify that. He either chose the wrong players in the first place or he isn't using the ones he's got correctly.

    Personally I lost all respect for him when he blamed 'the ball' for england conceeding a goal to the US. Funny how there was nothing wrong with the ball when Gerard whacked it in the net three minutes in....

  • Comment number 41.

    Why do I get this feeling that John Terry is turning into a bad apple in the barrel? Go back three world cups, everyone was saying Michael Owen should be in the world cup squad, it was the pally,pally attitude amongst the players. In reality, Michael Owen was propelled into super star status after scoring a hat-trick against the worst ever German side I'd ever seen. Michael Owen, by world standards was just a little better than ordinary. The next world cup it was Rooney that was everyones favourite yet he is just a little better than ordinary. The only player in the current England squad that has brain and invention is Stephen Gerrard. Could it be that Terry has a little grudge burning away in him that resents Gerrard having what he thinks should be his job? There's been too much of the pally,pally stuff in English football, the managers decision should always be his and final, if the players don't like it, go home. I'm a believer in settled sides, Liverpool under Bill Shankley and Bob Paisley didn't mess about with rotation, nor did Alf Ramsey, very successful winning sides.This England squad should have been a settled side, playing together as a settled side way before they came out to South Africa. I can see what's going to happen, we'll draw on Wednesday and be knocked out on goal difference unless Capello drops Terry and Lampard, get rid of the ill-feeling and include Joe Cole and Milner and the young goalkeeper Hart (James is a liability), and why have a striker like Heskey who doesn't score much in the league in the team when Crouch does score. So yes, Capello in my opinion has made mistakes, but lets not get away from the fact the England team always think they are better than they really are, this world cup is no different.

  • Comment number 42.

    England like the French will always whinge about everything but the obvious.The fact is these footballers DONT play as teams because there is no incentive playing for their country.All these overpaid footballers are just marking time before they go back to the day job in the various clubs.If you no longer have confidence in the manager then pack it in because the paying public would prefer to watch football regardless of the side.

  • Comment number 43.

    The england manager is not on the field the players are,thay play for them selves not as a team each one wants to be the heroe and blow the country thay represent,each cap thay gain means higher transfare fees for them.Some of them have no waist line it would be interesting to how fast thay could run 200mtrs.Sorry they can't have there nannies(wives) with them and it must be boring when not playing and going on trips gust like workers at week ends and like the armed forces are when thay are being shot at or blown up.England team? keep of the booze and grow up.

  • Comment number 44.

    Another trait of the Nu-Lab Celeb cult!
    The players are unhappy? How many players does England have? 11? I doubt it, many more who would be proud to play for their country are available, rather than some out there who seem to think that England should be proud they are playing for it! OK they ones at home may not have ex-wife who’s a celeb! But they would gladly play their heart out for their country!
    Time for a short sharp lesson:
    “You kick a ball, this isn’t going to last, and you’re value goes down easily. You get sent home in disgrace – and will be in ever paper – and you lose money! So hireling go kick the ball good, or off you go!”
    Ok those aren’t the exact words to use, but you wouldn’t print what the player would understand!

  • Comment number 45.

    Throughout his playing career, Nicolas Anelka has not been called La Sulk for nothing. Having said that, I'd speak my mind if I thought there was something wrong and would quite if required. As for the French world cup campaign, it's been hilarious to watch, more please. They have been absolutely embarrassing on the field, which as an Englishman, is great to see.

  • Comment number 46.

    #43 "Some of them have no waist line it would be interesting to how fast thay could run 200mtrs."

    £10 says faster than you could.

    How do they have no waist line? Have they suffered terrible injuries that mean their torso's end at the bottom of their rib cage? Even John Prescott has a waist line (its just a very large one!)

  • Comment number 47.

    Just for the interest of those claiming the England team are all overpaid:

    "England players pledge to donate wages to charity
    Football News - English Football News
    Thu, Jun 7th - WSN Staff

    England’s national football team has collectively agreed to donate their international match fees to various charities up until the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

    The players have pledged to donate a minimum of £1 million to various charities such as WellChild, the Association of Children’s Hospices, and the Bobby Moore fund for cancer research.

    The Bobby Moore fund honors the late captain of the 1966 England World Cup champions, who passed away in 1993 of bowel cancer (age 51). Bowel cancer, one of the most deadly forms of cancer in the UK, is the fund's primary concern.

    "Each player works in some way with local or national charities but as a team we decided to use our role as England footballers to not only contribute money and time but to also help raise awareness of particular issues," said captain John Terry.

    Chief executive of the Football Association (FA) Brain Barwick said of the gesture, “I am obviously very pleased the whole squad has taken this initiative. It puts an extra kick into them appearing for their country.”

    Bobby Moore’s widow, Stephanie, was also very appreciative of the generosity.

    She said, “I am overjoyed the squad have chosen to support the Bobby Moore Fund for Cancer Research and know Bobby would have been delighted.”

  • Comment number 48.

    The FA should arrange DUREX advertising on the England shirts

    At least then we'll be able to genuinely endorse the product rather than just being on the receiving end.

    For a national team its WORSE than embarrasing, probably only marginally less on par with North Koreas 7-0 whopping. At least our Dear Leader wont ship the players off to the salt mines when they come home.

  • Comment number 49.

    Only if it believes that it has demonstrated beyond any reasonable doubt its ability to be more successful in his absence; sadly, and in the context of this question, for the England team this is not the case and has not been for many, many years!

    I, for one, would like to know what Capello really thinks of this bunch of overpaid, over-hyped, over weight non-performers and I suspect that it would be less than complimentary; but, it would only reflect what every England fan is saying!

  • Comment number 50.


    England players can vainly blame the manager for their own terrible short-comings to deflect the attention from themselves, if they wish.

    It won't work - not that Cappello hasn't made mistakes but our players are very simply over paid, over rated and overly optimistic about what they actually need to do to be able to even compete at that level.

    Quite frankly our team are an absolute embarrassment - can we still take them out of the World Cup before they humiliate our nation even further?

  • Comment number 51.

    When I heard that Capello does not tell the players whether they are in the team until a couple of hours before the match I realised that urgent criticism is needed. This is the psychology of the nursery. For six million pa we need better management skills than this.

    The test as to whether the players should criticise the managers is if what they say is relevant. Lack of criticism of team leaders has lead to bad results in other activities as we see with the BP executive, Sir Freddy's banking staff, and the silent senior members of the Lib Dems.

    Having said this I believe that Capello will have the bottle to admit failure and go quietly if he fails. If he is successful in managing these overpaid prima donnas into a victory let us hear his praises loud and clear.

  • Comment number 52.

    IT IS AN OUTRAGEOUS INSULT TO CALL THIS GROUP OF OVERPAID MISFITS A TEAM or PROFESSIONALS.

    I should think that Accrington Stanley would have MORE passion and commitment on a rainy night in Georgia than these morons.

    Theres more life and movement in a meerkat run over twice by each wheel of a 22 wheeler lorry than in this bunch of childish incompetants.

  • Comment number 53.

    This may be a bit off the wall but here goes.

    How about an Englishman managing the England Football squad, and Italian managing the Italian squad and so on?

    These days I have reason to doubt the patriotism of the managers in international situations. At least if each country's football team was managed by a someone of the same nationality they would know that he was 100% behind them.

    On the broader subject of should players blindly follow managerial decisions even though they are patently wrong - No they should not. Without the loyalty of the team the manager has nothing and should be instantly replaced.

    We all know that football players earn big money for just kicking a ball around and we should also expect a reasonably enthusiastic performance in the international arena. Something has gone wrong - several teams in this World Cup have underperformed and had trouble with coaches and managers. All this should have been sorted out in the four years between tournaments.

  • Comment number 54.

    Why do we need managers if they place themselves above criticism?

    One important point of having a manager is to have a face to the world capable of dealing with critical attacks and reproaches.

    Any manager who does not realise that should start growing turnips for a living.

    Come to think of it, in the case of the current England football team, that's precisely what the manager has managed to do - pick the turnips!

  • Comment number 55.

    if i told my boss what i think to his face he might be quite angry with me. but he would not be right to sack me. if i told other people what i think of my boss then he would be very angry and i think then i could be sacked bacuse it is not behind closed doors and looks bad for us all. if i were payed what footballers get payed then i could say what i like because i would have all the money in the world. i might get sacked but there will always be one more stupid club to hire me. chelsea or man city anyone???????

  • Comment number 56.

    To me it sounds like the England team don't think they should listen to anyone but themselves. After the whole McClaren episode they think they're there just to look pretty and playing for their national side means NOTHING. I mean as so many people have pointed out they get paid peanuts for playing for England while their clubs (who couldn't care less about the national side either) pay them the big money. Their motivation is all wrong. The USA side have achieved the same results as England's with (supposedly)a far inferior quality side but a lot of National pride behind them. Someone should add up the wages of the USA side vs the sum of the England side and look at the difference. They sounds like a bunch of prima-donna's that don't like being told what to do and teddy got thrown out the cot.

  • Comment number 57.

    Team unity or lack thereof is all in the game when you play a team sport, some teams will have a strong cohesion while others will be found lacking, and there's a price to be paid for disunity and that price is usually defeat.

    If it's patently obvious to a player something's not working in the team, having a discreet word with the coaching staff is perfectly OK: note the key word in there, 'discreet'. Such is the pressure to get things right in the international arena that coaches should be prepared to take a limited degree of feedback from their players into account. On the other hand, unacceptable is barely the word to describe what Anelka - supposedly at 32 a senior figure in the squad - did, or how Evra and others reacted. Domenech may be a pitiful tactician and even worse motivator, but it's their own opportunities these players are throwing away.

  • Comment number 58.

    Should a team criticise its manager?

    Why not, aren't managers are always too eager to criticise their underlings? It should be give and take - a good manager will always listen to the concerns of the people under him/her, but how often does this happen these days? Managers always have to assert themselves, rightly or wrongly; their only concern are targets and getting their team to make them look good so they can brown-nose higher and higher. This managers' type of attitude is all too prevalent in today's work environment and society as a whole.

  • Comment number 59.

    At 1:44pm on 21 Jun 2010, Phillip of England wrote:
    "I can't comment on the situation with France's football team and what they are up to.

    But as for the discord I have read about within the England camp, I would say this.

    These pampered pre-madonnas are paid a FORTUNE to do what they do. My suggestion is that they stick to their football, keep their mouths shut and do as they are told by their managment."

    You can't comment on the French, but you think you are qualified to talk about the English team? How is that? Merely being English doesn't make you an expert on English football. Incidently, it's "Prima Donnas" not "Pre-Madonnas". Sheesh!

  • Comment number 60.

    Of course the team should be able to criticise their manager. A worker's job relies on good management. Whilst the manager has the right to manage, they also have an obligation to manage effectively in the interest of the firm and their staff. An employee has the right to be managed effectively and not simply expected to obey every command. Respect has to be earned not ascribed. If they don't manage effectively they should be 'moved on'. If an employee does not perform tey are usually sacked. There are many good examples of corporate failure where employees were not allowed to criticise - ENRON for example.

  • Comment number 61.

    There shouldn't be any need to criticise in public if players and managers agree strategy beforehand. Since they clearly don't, then presumably the manager is imposing a playing-style on unwilling/unable players.

    If this is the case, then he's either:
    a) Picked unsuitable players (no matter how good they are)
    b) Picked an unsuitable strategy
    c) The wrong manager for England

  • Comment number 62.

    Players should be able to have their imput and good managers allow this. Arrogant managers who believe they are totally right and their words are law are poor managers. Sure a team needs discipline but not a dictator

  • Comment number 63.

    The England players are not a team. They're just a crowd of overpaid prima donnas who might win a game of football, once in a while, if we're lucky. There's no pride in wearing the England shirt, there's no motivation and no effort expended. They're an absolute disgrace and although Capello deserves plenty of criticism, as far as I can see they are in no position to dish it out.

    Capello is useless, he came in and carried on the way his predecessors had done; no vision, no major changes in the squad, carry on picking the same old, same old even though they've never won a single thing between them.

    Here's an idea - dump the current useless bunch and their equally useless coach; give the coaches job to the highest placed English Manager in the Premier League and pick a squad of 22 players who have never played for England before. Sure, they might not win a match, but then neither have the current crowd of wasters so far in this World Cup!!

    The French? Who cares?

  • Comment number 64.

    Your allowed to critisise a manager in a normal company, so whats the difference, yeah in a normal company they sack you, again so whats the difference. The only right to it is that the criticism should be relative and not over them top.

  • Comment number 65.

    For every ten people you ask you will get ten differing opinions about tactics, team selection and formation. All could be right on their day and none are wrong when they work and we win.
    Capello changed formation and personnel against Algeria, perhaps a little late, but it did not work.
    The psyche of the brits is, we work best when our backs are really to the wall and that is where we are now, backs to the wall.
    If we are good enough, we will win on Wednesday and nerves, tactics, balls, selection etc will not matter a jot.

  • Comment number 66.

    22. At 2:52pm on 21 Jun 2010, Peter_Sym wrote:

    #15 "The English and French football players have no-one to blame except themselves for their recent lackluster performance. This poor performance is further compounded by the players' rejection of self analysis and self criticism, as evidenced by the blame on coaches and further ludicrous blame on assorted girlfriends and vuvuzelas.

    By contrast the Americans played well because they play as a team; are optimistic; never give up even during the last seconds of a game and put their country first before themselves."

    Yet despite this the USA haven't actually won a game either. England have drawn two, the USA have drawn too. Both teams have exactly the same number of points in the table.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Yes, but the English team is much better than the US team (the English press were touting the three lions as one of the favorites). The Americans shouldn't have been able to tie England, and probably shouldn't have been able to comeback the way they did against Slovenia (a games that most think they won), would this current English team have gotten past their egos to come back from 2 to nil down at the half?

  • Comment number 67.

    It's not the manager that loses, its the team. A good team can function perfectly well without a manager, after all that's what the captain/forman/supervisor is for - or used to be.

  • Comment number 68.

    There are quite a few players in this team who played under Sven Goren Eriksson, then again under Steve MaClaren and now under Fabio Capello. I understand that the manager can make mistakes. But how can three managers make mistakes? Especially Capello, who has proved himself as a player and manager with numerous different teams.

    The England team, however, have failed under three managers in the past four years.

    We can't continually blame the managers. It has to be the players.

  • Comment number 69.

    I used to work in a team and found input from the staff vital IN PRIVATE. You do not slag off your team leader in public nor should comments made in these meetings become common knowledge. In other words I would hope that the team players have a full and frank exchange of views and then buckle down to getting the result.

  • Comment number 70.

    Constructive criticism is not a bad thing. In situations such as World Cup football it needs to be done with discretion.

    But if you feel that strongly about your manager - you can always walk away. Hanging around and complaining loudly isn't constructive.

  • Comment number 71.

    No he's a good manager. What i would do is not pick premier league players for England as all they want is the money and the glitzy lifestyle then when critisized they blame all but thereselves (look at Rooneys outburst, now in the same league as Murray in my book).

    Pick players who want to play football, look at the championship or below at least we know they want to play for England for the right reasons. In fact they would probably put up a good show against even the best.

  • Comment number 72.

    I'm appalled at the attitude of most of the English footballers.
    They seem to think that its the managers fault that they played 2 thoroughly lousy games. Why should Rooney be surprised at the boos and catcalls that the fans gave his team? He is paid enormous amounts of money to display his undoubted talents. The only way the fans can tell him and his team that their performance was unacceptable is vocally.
    England: grow up, stop blaming the manager, and play the game as you are supposed to. Maybe the criticism will then stop - who knows?

  • Comment number 73.

    Any team should be able to bring its grievences within the private walls of its offices, publicly crying foul may not be the ideal method, it does demoralize the team and brings-in negative feelings in the public. A Manager is like a circus ring master, some time he is also the clown, in all the cases he depends on others to do the job while he has no authority to fire or hire them.

  • Comment number 74.

    They're entitled to their free speech, but at the end of the day, they'll have to do what they're told or they don't have much of a future.

  • Comment number 75.

    YES, if the manager is not doing a good job...in private.
    If the team is over paid over rated self cantered egotists, then they need to play at world standard or go home. Not blame the manager.

  • Comment number 76.

    It is apparent that F. Capello's style is authoritarian & that does not sit easily with British players after the relaxed reign of Sven Eriksson. In any case, the players have no right to buck the system specially as they have so many skeletons in the cupboard vis-a-vis their personal lives. Bear in mind also the British illness: if they can get it wrong, they will!

  • Comment number 77.

    News media and ratings creates an expectation. If managers and players do not fulfill that expectation with success the void will be filled with disappointment. We all believe these players and managers are capable of doing better!

  • Comment number 78.

    In private yes; in public no.

  • Comment number 79.

    If anyone feels they need to criticise their manager, they must be qualified to do so, they must be sure of their facts and they must be discreet. Terry made self serving comments which display disrespect and arrogance.
    Capello is an intelligent man with a wealth of knowledge and experience, which has seen him succeed everywhere he has been employed. He deserves better than the oafish ranting of a player very lucky to be in the England team.

  • Comment number 80.

    No criticism in public or media. but Capello is not English good or bad he should not be in charge of an English team,

  • Comment number 81.

    Capello is not the one on the pitch and not playing well. These individuals are reported to be the best of the premiership and have supposedly done wonders on their home teams. Why can't they do the same for England? If they played like they have been on their home teams they would be looking for new employment by days end. Capello is the boss, you don't like it, quit. You will not be missed.

  • Comment number 82.

    The best doctors & scientists in the world all have several things in common - the drive, and ego, that it takes to push them to be the best. In sport, this drive and ego also needs a hefty dose of testosterone (and don't tell me women don't have it - just look at Serena and Henin). In a physical sport such as soccer, there are NO superstars who don't have these three items. Drive + ego + testosterone = temper. There are no exceptions. Do I think Anelka and Rooney were right in their actions? No. But I'm not a sport superstar, and I think those like me (99.99% of the world's population) should be very careful in passing judgement.

  • Comment number 83.

    Invoking the almighty to give England an edge . Sorry Your Grace thats wrong . IMHO the Diety doesn't take sides in football matches .

  • Comment number 84.

    Only if it is justified.

  • Comment number 85.

    A manager is part of a team and if they all respect themselves and each other they will solve their problems in private not in the media.

  • Comment number 86.

    Better to criticise to the face because otherwise it will be behind the back. Actually as a manager you have to accept that there will always be a bit of bitching even at the very best. It is just the way with that hierarchy set up of things.

    With the Football - it is pretty obvious there is an issue that needs sorting. The England players the other night looked like they would rather be anywhere else than there. That stinks of bad management or at least a pretty major issue.

  • Comment number 87.

    Sure be critcal of your manager but don't expect to get to play.
    Team players who are at odds with their manager should not have gone to South Africa. Anarchy will not solve any problems, they have had nothing bad to say in all the matches up to now, so they should shut up and get on with the game. They are supposed to be men, instead of moping around and giving disinterested lack lustre performances they should be trying their best for the faithful fans who paid a fortune to go support them.

  • Comment number 88.

    Why shouldn't the team criticise their manager?

    And by extension, why shouldn't the fans (loyal, hardcore or fair-weather, it doesn't matter which) criticise the team?

    The upshot of it is that England have been disappointing thus far, and that's down to both the players and the manager. I'm not a fan of the vuvuzelas or the ball either, but it still amounts to a bad workman blaming his tools. They've had weeks of training for this and if they're not getting the results that they want, perhaps it just might be that they aren't as good as their opponents.

  • Comment number 89.

    These guys (the players) are all experienced professionals and you would think that they would not need a lot of managing, but the manager picks the team and decides the tactics so he usually carries the can. I don't think that the normal discussion which goes on in all team situations, in all manner of work or sport should neccessarily be construed as critisism of the manager. It's more likely to be the media hyping things up to create a story. England will probably win their next match, get to at least the quarter finals and all will be forgiven.
    Anyway, I don't know what you are all moaning about. You could be like us here in Scotland. We didn't qualify and are not even in South Africa

  • Comment number 90.

    Any criticism or discussion over tactics etc should be behind closed doors! They should follow the maxim that you praise in public and criticise in private!

  • Comment number 91.

    No1 - Philip of England: Just for the record - its Prima Donna as in "First Lady"

    Anyway - any manager who can't face criticism shouldn't be a manager. Football or otherwise.
    I have had a number of run-ins with past managers. One of them respected me for my outspokenness, the rest made my life hell. I guess that's why I now work for myself...

  • Comment number 92.

    Regardless of how they feel they should raise their issues with their manager in private. Regrettably this grossly overpaid, under achieving, self pitying, bunch of wingeing prima donnas don't seem to feel any sense of shame that they have have had the honour to have been picked to represent their Country in a major International contest and yet are woefully underperforming. True to type their immediate instincts are to try to pin the blame on their Manager and even openly resent the fans who have spent their savings to travel half round the World to watch this bunch and yet dare to have the temerity to voice their displeasure. They in fact seem to want to blame anyone except themselves. They seem to have lost all touch with reality from within their over privileged cocoon. Maybe the Manager should treat them with sensitive kid gloves, maybe they should fly out the WAGS to sooth their fevered brows, or maybe they should just grow up, regain touch with the ground, get a grip, and perform.

  • Comment number 93.

    Overpaid prima donnas who don't deserve to be there - perrenial under-performers like Lampard need to do their talking on the pitch.
    I'd rather see them try to entertain, show a little flair, be creative and lose than put up with the mind numbingly boring dross they're subjecting us to.

  • Comment number 94.

    I don't wish to sound negative (much) but let us not forget that most Premiership players are foreign. For the world cup they play for their own country, and possibly they are ineligible to play for England. This means we end up with the average players who are fair-to-middling
    If we want to win the world cup ever again we need to start training home-grown talent instead of buying in the world's top players.

  • Comment number 95.

    Criticisms of management or indeed any member of the team should initially be made direct to their face, but in private. This gives them a chance to reflect, respond and resolve. This reduces the chance of appearing to be wrong in public and to lose face. Public criticism can be so counter-productive.

    The next step, if required, is to approach that person's line manager to help mpve matters forward.

    Overt public criticism should only be used when you have already gone through proper channels.

    Gossip and secretive undermining should never be used.

  • Comment number 96.

    Whilst there is a competition in progress the players and staff must work as one ..surely this is still a sport and as such you take the good with the bad and present a united front and that is what the public want to see....On another tack on this one what we do not want to see during the competition is the press vying with each other to pull the team to bits and in the true British way trying to reduce the morale of the team..I listened to a bit of something on Radio 5 today and the female reporter was in her glory trying to denigrate the team...very sadly our press are never positive they only deal in negative ..they like to pull everything and everyone to the lowest possible....The place for all the soul searching is after a competition has finished not whilst it is on and England are still a part...Wayne Rooney was right get behind the team...you know they are good players but I despair with fickle supporters and media types

  • Comment number 97.

    Yes, I think it is fair for any team to criticise a manager.

    I was once dragged into a meeting over some argument where the workers wanted to do something their way and the manager chairing it asked ‘is the management here for the staff or the staff for the management?’, to which I replied I thought we were all here for the company. The meeting ended, the staff did it their way and it was a great success.

    Managers are not always right no matter how much they are paid and a good manager is one who can change, adapt and accept other people’s ideas.

    Having said that, how many managers does England need to go through before they play a decent game?

    Silk purse and sows ear spring to mind.

  • Comment number 98.

    There is nothing wrong with constructive criticism. If a manager cannot take it he should not be managing.

  • Comment number 99.

    #94 Take your point about the extent of foreign players in the Premiership - but the likes of Terry, Rooney, Gerrard and Lampard are paid colossal salaries and regularly lauded as "world class" - they've got the reputations and trappings - now they need to earn them.

  • Comment number 100.

    This is becoming a joke.Are we forever going to keep sacking the manager each time we fail to win the world cup? The manager must be meeting with all the right criteria before he is given the job.If the players for England were paid a lot less money than they are when playing for their own teams it would make more sense.They would be kicking that ball for the joy of playing for their country and nothing else.Their prize would be the glory and their mindset would change.Don't sack Fabio-the mann has just learned the language.

 

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