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Your memories of Malcolm McLaren

01:25 UK time, Friday, 9 April 2010

Malcolm McLaren, the former manager of punk group the Sex Pistols, has died aged 64. What are your memories of Malcolm McLaren?

Mr McLaren set up a clothes shop and label with designer Vivienne Westwood on London's King's Road in the 1970s and was later a businessman and performer in his own right.

He also managed a number of other bands, including the New York Dolls and Bow Wow Wow. Music journalist Jon Savage said: "Without Malcolm McLaren there would not have been any British punk.

Did you meet Malcolm McLaren? What influence did he have on British culture and music? How will he be remembered?

This debate has now been closed. Thank you for your comments.

Comments

Page 1 of 2

  • Comment number 1.

    In a world gone mad with noise, he was an architect of lunacy.

  • Comment number 2.

    Malcolm McLaren was a man with his own mind; a true non-conformist who made being awkward fashionable. Rest In Peace.

  • Comment number 3.

    McLaren was a manipulating, devious player whose behaviour tore away the cloack of malaise, pretence and hypocrisy that shrouded 1970s Britain. He was at heart a contradictory chracter, both an anarchist and a conniving capaitalist, whose cash from chaos mantra was the IED of a post-consenus UK in decay. He gave voice to a disillusioned generation when fascism and reaction could have taken control. We owe him big time and he will be missed.

  • Comment number 4.

    On the eve of punk, I was a Liberal activist, helped by several Young Liberals, aged around 14 - 15. Almost overnight, they changed from virtual choir boys to worldly-wise young men, testing out the occasional expletive, and ears awkwardly adorned with huge paper clips. I was too busy to know what was going on, so I asked them. About an hour later, I knew all there was to know about punk, I still play Anarchy in the UK and God Save the Queen - so do my grandchildren! The Pistols were special because they started it all in the UK, and McLaren made it happen. Without the energy and irreverence of punk, there would have been no New Wave, and none of the great British bands that graced the early 1980s. In my view, not better than the Beatles, but much more important at the time. RIP Malcolm - the world would be a much poorer place without your genius for marketing.

  • Comment number 5.

    God Bless You Malcolm...you helped kick the music world up its arse...without you NOTHING...you will be missed by many.R.I.P

  • Comment number 6.

    A huge loss.... I worked with Malcolm on the Duck Rock Album. What an experience. He gave me the phrase "there's no such thing as cant,it gets confused with wont" My thoughts are with the family.

  • Comment number 7.

    A wily PR operator and merciless exploiter of the fallout. I laughed my head off when the Pistols ripped-off EMI and then Virgin; it made a refreshing change from bands being ripped-off by them.

  • Comment number 8.

    Punk culture was no better than Yob culture is now. Both have ruined countless lives with their violence and drug abuse.

    Those who work for real social justice have no use for rioting anarchists with no agenda except to destroy. That is all Punk Rock ever was.

    The real heroes of our time were all the young people who gave their lives fighting the Nazis, or visionaries like Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela.

  • Comment number 9.

    McClaren certainly showed the way, didn't he? How to get on in life and make a fortune when you possess a negligible amount of talent.

    If you ever wonder how we came to have a celebrity culture of talentless nobodies, start here...

  • Comment number 10.

    McLaren put London back on the map when it had become a faded, tawdry City in awe of New York, Los Angeles and Paris. After the fabulous pantomime played out by the Sex Pistols here in 75-77 it became a City that attracted anyone with cutting edge ideas.

  • Comment number 11.

    RIP Malcolm you blew away the monotony of music in the mid seventies and created a voice for the new generation through the music the true energy of a million disolute and directionless kids was focused in an explosion of creativity from every backstreet from every culture creed and ethnicity punk made the politicians of the day sit up and take notice.

  • Comment number 12.



    McLaren was an opportunistic pseudo intellectual, he did not have a master plan to change the world or make a fortune.

    I saw Grundy as a very innocent 15 year old somewhere just beyond suburbia, before that time we were stuck in a malaise, nothing had happened since the 60's. the UK needed just such an non-conformist individual to provide the sparks. Helped helped break down the barriers against exploring our own routes and ideas, we see this reflected back today in figures such as McQueen and the vibrant music scene.

    He changed my world and teh worlds of many others

  • Comment number 13.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 14.

    #8 "Punk culture was no better than Yob culture is now. Both have ruined countless lives with their violence and drug abuse.

    Those who work for real social justice have no use for rioting anarchists with no agenda except to destroy. That is all Punk Rock ever was.

    The real heroes of our time were all the young people who gave their lives fighting the Nazis, or visionaries like Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela."

    Don't throw me into the same "group" as yob culture.

    Punk has given my life a meaning, which it didn't really have before. It has pushed me to do more, and do things I never thought i'd ever do....

    So before you tar us with the "yob" brush remember this. I may like a beer or two, and play my loud music which isn't to many peoples taste, and shout at the tele when the football isnt going my way ..... but i don't go round stabbing people, causing fights, stealing, scribbling on walls and destroying where I live.

    Its called respect. And i'd appreciate it if you showed some.

  • Comment number 15.

    With all the fawning over McLaren it seems to be forgotten that he was the man who flew the Sex Pistols to Brazil to record with Train Robber Ronnie Biggs. This lead to John Lydon quitting the band because he did'nt want anything to do with a man who was partly responsible for clubbbing a worker - the train driver- who later died. John Lydon has principles- MacLaren did not. He also co-wrote the "No one is Innocent" track with Biggs which contained the line: " God save all nazis on the run / they was'nt being wicked God / they were only having fun" How charming. The track was also sub-titled "Cosh The Driver" Shock value? Well thats Malcolm for you. John Lydon's tribute must have been very hard for him to say because John knew what MacLaren was really like.

  • Comment number 16.

    RIP Malcolm.

    #14 I agree wholeheartedly. #8 has no idea what Punk means.


    We could do with another Malcolm now!

  • Comment number 17.

    All Punks and Punk lovers come together, Saturday 8th of May, Trafalgar Square, to remember Malcolm McLaren

  • Comment number 18.

    I worked briefly with Malcolm McClaren in the early eighties. I was a robotic dancer, a part time member of the Top Of The Pops troupe Zoo. He had just had a hit with Buffalo Gals in the UK and was about to go to Italy to promote the single on italian tv. He needed some breakdancers to go with him and somehow I got the job. I couldn't breakdance to save my life but I looked pretty good and thought I'd just wing it! I remember there was a mix up with the cars to take us to Heathrow. I lived in a council flat in Vauxhall and a huge black limo pulled up outside to take me to the airport. His manager Nils Stevenson, who had finished with Siouxsie & The Banshees, was inside and when we got to Heathrow it transpired that a minicab had arrived for Malcolm instead of the limo. I thought it was hilarious, he was not pleased at all! There were photographers and camera crews everywhere and Malcolm loved the attention. When we got to Italy it was a breakneck tour of all the main italian tv companies and he would lipsynch to the track while I pretended to breakdance. There were two other dancers as well who basically went 'round the outside' as I electric boogalooed my heart out. Everywhere we went he was hailed as the 'Sex Pistols man' and he never tired of it. At the end of the day we would all wind up in some restaurant where he would sit at the head of the table and regale us with tales of the Pistols and his views of the world. No one else really got a word in, Malcolm could talk for Britain. It was so exciting and a lot of fun and I will always remember his energy and bravado.
    A few months later I was booked to do a show with The Rock Steady Crew and it was clear that they also had great respect for Malcolm as it was he who put the spotlight on them in the first place.
    Malcolm McClaren RIP. You won't be knocking on heaven's door, you'll be blagging your way in on the guest list....

  • Comment number 19.

    He was one of the few that shaped my life that i didn't know personally and for that i will always be thankful. He gave me a liking for the music that I and my daughter still listen to with a passion to today. I hope he's kicking arse somewhere. Thank you.

    RIP Malc

  • Comment number 20.

    8. At 07:55am on 09 Apr 2010, VforVictory wrote:
    Punk culture was no better than Yob culture is now. Both have ruined countless lives with their violence and drug abuse.

    Those who work for real social justice have no use for rioting anarchists with no agenda except to destroy. That is all Punk Rock ever was.

    The real heroes of our time were all the young people who gave their lives fighting the Nazis, or visionaries like Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela.
    -----------------------------------------

    I'm no fan of McLaren (RIP) and think he was a chancer who's influence, along with that of the Pistols, has always been overstated, and had very little to do with the real ethos of punk.

    Your post is completely ignorant and shows no understanding of what punk is about. Punk is about people doing things for themselves and about self-empowerment. It's an insult to compare it to yob culture.

  • Comment number 21.

    According to the BBC news this morning he introduced Rap 'music' to this country. I won't forgive him for that.

  • Comment number 22.

    Loss a era changing man. Reflective, not the cause of real social breakdown and the falling away of deference to our betters at a time of IMF strife, unburied coffins and the oncoming conservative backlash.

    Musically they may have taken the headlines but they weren;t up to much.

    I thought Lizo Mzimba presented Newsround? Whats next, a blog on the Middle-East peace process?

  • Comment number 23.

    malcom was the king of punk movment and will be sadly missed by the music industry , and by friends,and fans, "GOD SAVE THE KING" of punk

  • Comment number 24.

    I never really got punk,it was before my time but what little I know,there were groups like The Ramones already around and The Pistols were already a band so I think its wrong to say Malcolm helped start the whole punk scene.I know from reading John Lydon's autobiography(No Blacks,No Irish,No Dogs) what his views are on the situation.

    Still he was unique and it was a shock to read he had died.

  • Comment number 25.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 26.

    Punk was a joke, short and simple.

    Music from people who couldn't sing or play for people who couldn't listen.

    With the same mentality we got rap, (rhymes with c**p).

    From this 'anarchy' we got 'celebrity'.

    Just remember this when the next 'Svengali' comes along, any time soon.

  • Comment number 27.

    Did punk and Malcolm McLaren really change anything? Not if David Cameron becomes Prime Minister. Eton Rifles anyone?

  • Comment number 28.

    terrible typing from me there. I apologise!

  • Comment number 29.

    WHO?

  • Comment number 30.

    #8 I disagree that there was 'no agenda other than to destroy'. I think the agenda was to destroy and then rebuild. With a much better soundtrack and improved hairstyles!

    Punk rock made the 15 year old me start to really care about the world. They were right to shake things up, our culture needed that shake up. Nothing meant anything to me until Punk happened. Punk made me open my eyes and my mind and question my world. it made my try and put my world right. I had endless talks with my friends about political and social issues.

    Punk rock was nothing like yob culture. I can only guess that you were not a part of it, VforVictory. Also, you need to look up what the word Anarchy actually means.

    Malcolm McLaren and Punk Rock were extremely important in the development of our culture in the 20th & 21st centuries. They changed everything, mostly for the better. Martin Luther King and Nelson Mandela spoke for their societies, Malcolm McLaren and John Lydon spoke for ours.

  • Comment number 31.

    Not a bad life for a half talented chancer. Lets not forget the current celebrity madness encompassing british cultural life was built on the back of his er, achievements.

  • Comment number 32.

    Rest in Peace.

    Malcolm McClaren(real name Malcolm Edwards)was a fellow pupil at
    Orange Hill Grammar, in the early sixties.

    At registration, he was Edwards M to my Edwards D.

    Before registration, he would regale us with stories of his visits to London clubs the night before.

    I remember, he told me one night he had heard a record
    'The Lion sleeps tonight' which he earnestly recommended me to buy.

  • Comment number 33.

    McClaren & Thatcher: Two of a kind - - "..anarchy in the UK.." - - glib, self-centred, uninformed 'punk' attitudes to the whole fabric of society - - not a shred of genuine concern or talent in either of them!

  • Comment number 34.

    He had his flaws but at least he helped give music the kick up the backside it so desperately needed. God, how we need someone like him now! RIP Malcolm McLaren.

  • Comment number 35.

    Your memories of Malcolm McLaren?


    A yob, nothing more, nothing less.

  • Comment number 36.

    Love him or loathe him (I'm in the latter camp) credit has to go to the man for what he did for music. So many of my favourite bands have come about due to the likes of the Sex Postols and The Clash etc.

    Trog rock and 30 minute guitar solos were the thing before he came along. Music needed a big welly in the bottom and he did that.

    McClaren showed us all that it was ok to be your own person, do what YOU think is right and always question what the "Establishment" tells you to do because it ain't always right. If only people today still listened to that message the country might not be in the state that it is in.

  • Comment number 37.

    I was too young for punk, but stumbled across "Duck Rock" in 1983. I listened to this album, and nothing else, for months and months. I dug it out again recently, and was astounded about how innovative it still sounds and how listenable it remains. The sign of a genuine and timeless classic. Thank-you Malcolm, you shaped my world.

  • Comment number 38.

    I worked for Malcolm, especially on the Bow Wow Wow project. I discovered Annabella for him. We were pretty close, I got to know him about as well as he would ever allow anyone to know him! I remember him fondly as a profound man, highly intelligent and extremely articulate. He had personas within personas - but deep down, there was sadness. I think he kept that at bay with his incessant flow of ideas and tremendous energy. When young people, hoping to break into 'the business' would as his advice, Malcolm would most often say, "Shit, or get off the pot". We used to laugh a lot.

  • Comment number 39.

    When Michael Jackson died, some of the most popular comments on the HYS topic were things like:

    "Come on, more important things have happened."

    "so what?"

    "Beethoven was a musical genius. Bach was a musical genius. Michael Jackson was ... a pop singer. Get a grip, people!"

    I have no idea who this man is but I don't deny people whose lives were touched or influenced by him to remember him fondly and acknowledge his death in the news without a barrage of comments like the ones above. It's a shame that people didn't give those who were touched (no jokes please) or influenced by Michael Jackson the same respect.

    In my view, if you don't have anything nice to say about someone who has just died, then don't say anything atall. And in order to practise what I preach - even though I do not know who this man was, I can see that he meant alot to some people and my thoughts are with his friends and family.

  • Comment number 40.

    Didn't he do a double dutch skipping thing a few years ago? That's all I remember him for.

  • Comment number 41.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 42.

    To # 39

    Michael Jackson was a musician who made music.

    Malcolm McClaren changed society and his influence lives on in music still being made today, over 30 years later.

    The two cannot, and should not, be compared.

  • Comment number 43.

    I had never even heard of him before I turned on BBC news early this morning. So he obviously hasn't had that much of an influence.

  • Comment number 44.

    Being Asian growing up in 1970's Britain was hard and didnt really fit and this guy came along and spoke of unity and shared values, the bovver boots racist skin heads had met their match and the simple anarchy of humour and freedom made me proud to be a part of this social awakening! absolutely fantastic freedom of thought and expression which spoke to all in its own way, how can you be both unified and individual, pure genius! Dont rest in peace Malcolm, just trash the place!!!

  • Comment number 45.

    A true and honest lunatic , we are sadly lacking more like him in this mad world , a remnant of my youth , safe journey mate .

  • Comment number 46.

    I agree with MarcusAureliusII. This is insanity. The punk movement in reality represented violence, intimidation and loss of hope. The music was and is vastly overrated. You may not like it but the artistic approach of being provocative was very old hat - think Dadaism and Schoenberg back in the 1910s. The BBC and broader society should not be lionising such an individual. There is a sneering trend in the BBC that likes to abuse the values of decency by this nonsense.

  • Comment number 47.

    Have just been reading through the comments and am dissapointed to see there are quite a few negative ones when clearly this discussion has been set up as a tribute to Malcolm McLaren. The guy was the most influential man behind punk so please let him RIP and give him the respect he deserves even if punk is'nt your taste.

  • Comment number 48.

    "I still play Anarchy in the UK and God Save the Queen - so do my grandchildren!"

    EXACTLY. McLaren was as revolutionary as Perry Como. He and those like him, in punk, fashion and elsewhere, were meretricious, false "revolutionaries", at heart traditional, sentimental and in an appallingly obvious way "patriotic". You can draw a direct line from them to today's vicious tabloid crassness, to a smirking Me attitude masquerading as creative individualism and to a manipulative, opportunistic, DEEPLY cynical and spurious authoritarianism. The sex pistols could only have been manufactured in a country where the word "intellectual" is seen as an insult.
    "Always question what the establishment tells you to do"? Like Jagger, they were the establishment's shock-horror pets, and still are. Pure spectacle. Fundamentally, not only did they change nothing, they hindered what might have been done. Most of these posts, both pro and anti are, I believe, extremely naive.

  • Comment number 49.

    I never knew the man, had no time for his 'musical' prodigies and saw through the blatant self-promotion of a man with no discernible talent in the sphere of music or entertainment, but hey, I'll give him a terrful tribute and say how the world will 'never see his like again' because that seems to be what everyone else is doing.

  • Comment number 50.

    McLaren is dead. Long live Sardine & Tobleroni. Conceptual Art Brutists and visual anarchists extraordinaire. We Love 77.

  • Comment number 51.

    A very, very weird person.

  • Comment number 52.

    In my previous comment I said he was "very, very wired". But would he have made any less a Mayor of London compared to Red Ken, had he decided to run in 2000?

  • Comment number 53.

    A sad man, who inspired sad music, all of it forgettable. And thankfully, judging by other comments, I am not alone in my thinking.

  • Comment number 54.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 55.

    I blinked and missed him five minutes after he claims to have changed the world in the 70's.

  • Comment number 56.

    My only 'real-life' memory of Mclaren is not a good one. He was a judge at the final of 'Live and Unsigned' - a competition looking for the next Indie/Rock band - and was set to make some bucks off of the winning band. He was rude and dismissive, and made it obvious that he didn't want to be there (though quite happy to be picking up the cheques).

    Not a fan.

  • Comment number 57.

    Punk really formed who I am, my views and ethics. It gave me an outlet to express myself (and annoy my parents) and it's something that I still feel and believe in today.

    Malcolm McLaren and punk gave me and many others, the confidence to have a go at creating music and challenging society. I have fond memories of our first band, the Crapettes, with cheap guitars, three chords and no drummer, performing two minute comments on what we saw and felt. We had fans, we got bottled, but most importantly we spoke out about what mattered to us. In this time of economic and political crisis we need punk again.

    Thanks Malcolm, long live PunK

  • Comment number 58.

    For a few minutes in the 70's musicians had the upper hand. MMc wasn't the whole reason for this he was part of the whole, but his contribution should not go unrecognised. Mainstream music, today, needs another MMc to give it the kick up the arse it needs and another punk/hippy revolution to give the power back to the artist, not the fashionista that are controlling the minds of the majority of young adults today.
    Thanks Malcolm for everything you did and the enjoyment you gave.

  • Comment number 59.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 60.

    I'm in my 40's and i still go to gigs whether that be in the local pub or at one of the bigger venues. My family, kids included are regulars in the summer at the better smaller festivals. I have no doubt this is down to the influence of punk.My informitative musical years(I like to think they are still not over)were dominated by attending punk gigs. I just want to say to Malcolm Mclaren a big THANK YOU.

  • Comment number 61.

    Punk was never music in a month of Sundays. All it was and is, is proof that you can make money if you have no talent.

  • Comment number 62.

    Not a man who you would trust with your life savings, Malcolm. But I enjoyed what he gave us - just glad I didn't know the guy

  • Comment number 63.

    Who was this guy anyway and why all the fuss just because he's popped his clogs? The SP's were one hit wonders and punks were only invented to bring customers to Camden Market - a whole market full of utter tat. Rather sums up this whole punk fing dunnit bruv!

  • Comment number 64.

    'Have just been reading through the comments and am dissapointed to see there are quite a few negative ones when clearly this discussion has been set up as a tribute to Malcolm McLaren. The guy was the most influential man behind punk so please let him RIP and give him the respect he deserves even if punk is'nt your taste.'

    HYS is a free debate, so anyone can voice an opinion, irrespective of what anyone thinks. Me ? I have no time for punk, it was not music as I know it. But didn't folk say the ame about Rock'n Roll ?!

  • Comment number 65.

    The ignorance by some of the posters in here is astounding, linking Punk to Yob culture, slating Punk as crap and talentless.

    Go and read your Daily Mail and shut up if you are unable to post anything respectful regarding the late Malcolm McLaren.

  • Comment number 66.

    So it was all about fashion and 'seeming to be' an anarchist, was it? I think that just about sums up were we have arrived. He simply replaced one kind of pretentiousness with another. I always suspected as such, when I watched the then Johny Rotten's attempts to be anti-establishment. What deception! What a fraud!

  • Comment number 67.

    He managed to democratise music - in other words he made not being able to play an instrument or sing in tune acceptable. Tuneless loud shouting became the norm rather than musical craftmanship and virtuosity. He helped turn the magical into the mundane.

  • Comment number 68.

    The architect of probably the most meaningless and overrated musical movement in history.

  • Comment number 69.

    Who?

  • Comment number 70.

    He was responsible for the Sex Pistols, which in turn inspired lots of other great bands to form, so was a great man. I doubt however that I would have got on with him if I had met him, he seemed a bit strange and a loose cannon.

  • Comment number 71.

    Malcolm McLaren was a joker who had a whale of a good time by trying to be the opposite of the pre-existing culture. He was fortunate to be associated with the Sex Pistols who did one albums worth of outstanding music as his own output was rubbish. As a commentator and stylist he was terrific value for money. His youthful sneering pretty much destroyed anything of value left from the 70's. I didn't like him or the negative and destructive side of the Punk revolution, but it was exciting for a couple of years at the end of the 70's. Unfortunately the nihilism destroyed progressive rock in all its guises, which is a pity as there hasn't been any variety in popular music ever since. Popular music is whatever can be marketed at people or recycled at them from years gone by as they get older. Things were getting better as people found alternative sources of music on the internet but it looks like we are going to be consigned to another few decades of rubbish now that the so called Piracy Bill has handed them the consumer on a plate. I'm not overly impressed with the results of McLarens work but admit that he did what he did with a great deal of style and he wont be forgotten quickly.

  • Comment number 72.

    "29. At 09:35am on 09 Apr 2010, rjimmer wrote:

    WHO?"

    Why do people like you bother to post when you have no idea who the person is under discussion?

    You make yourself look like a complete idiot and get in the way of those who do wish to say something.

  • Comment number 73.

    As a child growing up in the seventies I was afraid to go to my local park because of the punks that would hang about there. I'm sorry, but to me; punk culture = yob culture and I don't think that is anything to celebrate, or commemorate.

  • Comment number 74.

    Some say this is a tribute thread and therefore we should only say positive things.

    OK being positive I will say this illiterate nonentity who lived of the 'talent?' of others will not be missed.

    I can remember all of popular music from Bill Haley to the present day. From the begining we have had chancers, no-talent wannabe's and so called 'svengali's' who 'discover' the latest 'new talent'.

    The number of good musicians and vocalists all had one thing in common, they stould the test of time. Punk is dead, it died the moment it lost it's novelty value, which was limited.

    This guy just got lucky and was attached to one (in)famous short-lived group.

  • Comment number 75.

    Mclaren created the template for fame without talent

    It is laughable that all those 16 year old punks who thought they were anarchic rebels were simply dressing up as requested by a 36 year old woman.

    The punks had very little effect on the music scene and the bands the punks had supposedly seen off went on to outlast the punks by decades

    Mclaren and Rotten were so anarchic that they spent years using the establishment (barristers etc) to fight their increasingly bitter legal dispute.

    What a con

  • Comment number 76.

    I wonder it McLaren would be more pleased about the negative commments than those saying nice things about him. Punk was never my scene (more in to heavy metal) but no one can doubt the impact it has had and McLaren was a major player. Will he be missed - by some. Will he be forgotten - never. And I think that's the epitaph he would have wanted.

  • Comment number 77.

    Rest in Peace Mr McLaren. However, this man did not follow the Christian Way, and indeed turned many young people away from the true path. He could have used his talents in promoting a Godly lifestyle and asking "what would Jesus do?" He unleashed a veritable torrent of satanic filth and abuse on the youth of Britain. Well, he must now account for his actions.

  • Comment number 78.

    So..Speech on the HYS is not exactly free,Why was my post taken down? If I upset McLarens family,I'm sorry for that..but is it wise for them to be reading the posts,there were others who were less than complimentary..I'm sure that they are potentially upsetting as well...I did not like the punk movement...and I was a "teenager" at the time...the clothes,the hair,the "music",the spitting and general "Roughhouse" attitude was and is baffling and alien to me..anarchy never seemed a good idea to me...mob rule...lord of the flies..for me it has typified this country's descent into the abyss of "celebrity culture", with all the distracted and impoverished mentality that is endemic in modern life..Maybe I was a "Young Fogey" but even if I was,that does not invalidate my views.Or are we all to remain within specific parameters of opinion? Stepping outside is not on?Are complaints ALWAYS upheld?I'd like to know....

  • Comment number 79.

    My first memory of the sex pistols and Malcom was in a care home.
    For a treat they brought in the group Middle Of The Road"
    They sang their song chirpy chirpy cheap cheap.
    Where's your mamma gone.
    This song to a group of kids with no parents..

    So for making people sit up and take notice of the fact the working class were ignored right up till then i thank him and the boys..

  • Comment number 80.

    It came as a shock to me to hear about Malcom's death.
    First we lost John Peel and now Malcolm. It is a sad day indeed for British PopCult.
    To all those who are slating McLaren and the punk movement, I wonder if any of you are old enough to remember the seventies? If you are then you must have very short memories. Before the punk movement came along, we were all listening to Disco (now that is real cr*p!) Abba and Roger Whitaker! If that's your idea of music you are very welcome to it. But please don't slate off Mclaren, this is supposed to be a tribute thread; the man was a genius, he knew exactly how to play the media and was the original music merchandiser. He paved the way for the likes of Luis Walsh and Simon Cowell; he showed them how to do it.
    And by the way, punk has nothing to do with yob culture, how dare you liken us to that!; we didn't all take drugs you know, and certainly did not go around stabbing people, mugging them and hounding old ladys and disabled people to death! We kept ouselves to ourselves and enjoyed the music we still love today.
    RIP Malcolm, sorely missed.

  • Comment number 81.

    Malcolm was an organic intellectual, who could apply lofty ideas to the everyday and make them vital, exciting.

    On a personal level, I met him a couple of times and found him most charming. His death is such a loss.

  • Comment number 82.

    MersonTuffers wrote:
    Michael Jackson was a musician who made music.
    Malcolm McClaren changed society and his influence lives on in music still being made today, over 30 years later.
    The two cannot, and should not, be compared.



    Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones changed the face of popular music and their influence can still be heard in music that is being made all over the world today. Off the Wall, Thriller and Bad contain more musical innovations than the whole Punk movement has ever achieved.

    The two can not be compared but only because McLaren's influence was miniscule in comparison, while Michael Jackson was filling stadiums all over the world, collaborating with a wide variety of artists and entertaining people in every continent on the planet Punk has only ever been big in a few places such as London, New York and Berlin and never managed to become a worldwide movement in the way Punks likes to pretend it has.
    The musical establishment in the UK love to pretend that Punk changed the world, the reality is that it barely made an impression in America outside of a few cities and was passed over as little more than a novelty by most people who preferred listening to people who could actually play and sing at the same time.
    The outward displays of aggression and the general obnoxiousness of most Punks prevented it from ever becoming really big in the way that the hippy/folk rock movement had a generation before.

    Michael Jackson changed the world in many ways, Malcolm McLaren gave us an uninspiring, clichéd and pretentious band that could barely play their instruments or string a few lyrics together before they fell about in a pool of their own spit, blood and urine. They struggled to break America or the wider world and will be forever consigned to be a foot note in the history of world music and culture.

  • Comment number 83.

    I'm one of the lads who auditioned to be the next Johnny Rotten, I can't sing a note but punk meant that I at least thought I had a chance. The audition got filmed for the Rock 'n' Roll Swindle film, Eddie Tenpole Tudor not surprisingly got the slot! I subsequently went on to earn a living as a record plugger, I ran into Malcolm a few times and in the 90's he was going to hire me for some mad project but it never happened. He once said this, and I often quote it to new bands and music industry people. "The only notes that count are the ones that come in wads". I regard this as good advice.

    I'll also never forget hearing the Sex Pistols for the first time. Never mind the swearing on TV it was just a bloody good record, well done Malcolm!

    Dylan White

  • Comment number 84.

    He said it loud & proud! Even though I'm no fan of punk, I can appreciate the influence Malcolm McLaren had on popular culture. In this country we have a very healthy disregard for pompous authority, and as others have said above, we could do with someone now to pick up the batton, because popular music has never been in such an awful mess as it is now. Is there anyone out there ready to kick the likes of Cowell off their smug perch?

  • Comment number 85.

    My observation is that with time, pop music genres were targeted at increasingly younger and younger audiences. With the arrival of the genres of punk rock, acid rock and heavy metal, it reached a point where its target audience was infants, its sounds much more closely resembling shrieks and screams for attention than anything even a toddler would recognize as music.

  • Comment number 86.

    Over hyped nobody who revelled in the stupidity and gullibility of others.

  • Comment number 87.

    72. At 12:32pm on 09 Apr 2010, Claire Herbert wrote:

    "29. At 09:35am on 09 Apr 2010, rjimmer wrote:

    WHO?"

    Why do people like you bother to post when you have no idea who the person is under discussion?

    You make yourself look like a complete idiot and get in the way of those who do wish to say something.

    Fair comment Claire, as long as you realise that what people say may not be to your liking. Overrated egotistical pedlar of dirge, watch as all those who hated him and his music flock like sycophantic hordes to the alter of mediocrity - truly stomach churning; like his music. Ham and Eggs indeed...

  • Comment number 88.

    I still get that old adrenalin rush when I hear the opening bars of Anarchy in the UK, or God Save the Queen!

    I remember turning up at a school 'disco', the sleeves of my blazer ripped off and safety-pinned back on, and wearing a dress made from 2 bin liners - gods, I looked fabulous!

    Thanks for all that Malcolm!

  • Comment number 89.

    65. At 12:12pm on 09 Apr 2010, Jock wrote:

    The ignorance by some of the posters in here is astounding, linking Punk to Yob culture, slating Punk as crap and talentless.

    Go and read your Daily Mail and shut up if you are unable to post anything respectful regarding the late Malcolm McLaren.

    Oooohh - Get you with your high moral stance. This HYS is about Malcolm McLaren -right! It's not a praise Malcolm site, it's for people to put their feelings about him, i and others like me could not stand the odious man man. Just accept that some people did not like him.

  • Comment number 90.

    The Sex Pistols weren't the best punk band, that was the Clash, they weren't the first punk band and punk wasn't by any possible description a British phenomenon. Thanks to Malcolm hardly anybody realises any of these facts and that is probably the greatest and most lasting tribute to his warped genius there will ever be. I never liked him much but, as I care about music, by god I needed him. I am surprised and saddened to realise that I will miss him. Goodbye Malcolm.

  • Comment number 91.

    My first comment regarding this man was rejected by the gods at HYS. However, my memories of the man, (and this is the question) are not pleasant ones. It is really only out of respect for his family & friends that I do not write a substantial paragraph on the chap, concluding that the sun shines more brightly today, than it did a few days ago!

  • Comment number 92.

    82. At 12:58pm on 09 Apr 2010, General_Jack_Ripper wrote:
    MersonTuffers wrote:
    Michael Jackson was a musician who made music.
    Malcolm McClaren changed society and his influence lives on in music still being made today, over 30 years later.
    The two cannot, and should not, be compared.


    Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones changed the face of popular music and their influence can still be heard in music that is being made all over the world today. Off the Wall, Thriller and Bad contain more musical innovations than the whole Punk movement has ever achieved.

    The two can not be compared but only because McLaren's influence was miniscule in comparison, while Michael Jackson was filling stadiums all over the world, collaborating with a wide variety of artists and entertaining people in every continent on the planet Punk has only ever been big in a few places such as London, New York and Berlin and never managed to become a worldwide movement in the way Punks likes to pretend it has.
    The musical establishment in the UK love to pretend that Punk changed the world, the reality is that it barely made an impression in America outside of a few cities and was passed over as little more than a novelty by most people who preferred listening to people who could actually play and sing at the same time.
    The outward displays of aggression and the general obnoxiousness of most Punks prevented it from ever becoming really big in the way that the hippy/folk rock movement had a generation before.

    Michael Jackson changed the world in many ways, Malcolm McLaren gave us an uninspiring, clichéd and pretentious band that could barely play their instruments or string a few lyrics together before they fell about in a pool of their own spit, blood and urine. They struggled to break America or the wider world and will be forever consigned to be a foot note in the history of world music and culture.


    Extremely well put!Many kudo's General! Like I mentioned before, I had no idea who this guy was before I turned on the news this morning. I'm from abroad, currently living in the UK. Everyone knows Michael Jackson and his musical achievements around the world, the same cannot simply not be said for Maclaren nor for punk 'music'.

  • Comment number 93.

    (q) Michael Jackson and Quincy Jones changed the face of popular music and their influence can still be heard in music that is being made all over the world today. Off the Wall, Thriller and Bad contain more musical innovations than the whole Punk movement has ever achieved.(q)

    I can't let Gen Ripper get away with such nonsense. Off the Wall was an influence on pop, quite a few albums that followed like Dare! and Cupid & Psyche 85 were influenced by it. However, listening to parts now - the McCartney part and the ballads...it sounds quite dated and less cutting edge than the work of Edwards & Rodgers. The Chic-organisation are the chaps to have mamjor influence...

    Jackson after Off the Wall was just a reduced exercise in pop - Thriller isn't a very good LP, despite selling lots and a classic-status. It has about 2 or 3 good singles on and an excellent promo video. It is an exercise in empty pop played by slick session musicians associated with Steely Dan and the antithesis of great NEW POP albums like The Lexicon of Love or New Gold Dream.

    There was nothing musically innovative about Bad either - like every Jackson record after Thriller, it was just a dilution of that LP. Not good and far from the best work of Quincy Jones...

    Back to the late McClaren - as a manager he was involved in the Pistols/Punk (which influenced most bands in the US & UK in the underground and overground - from immediate peers like the Clash and the Banshees to Neil Young to post-punk (Joy Division, Raincoats, Scritti, Slits etc) to hardcore to grunge etc, as well as the fashion/culture side to the movement. Heck even Bob Marley recorded a song about punk and mainstream stuff like The Police and Oasis have shown influence. Personally I prefer PIL, but without the Pistols and punk rock 1976 stylee, popular music would be very different.

    Lydon would probably have not made those first two great PIL albums without the influence - good or otherwise of McClaren - and Lydon's Time Zone-single was probably a response to McClaren's own forays into hip-hop. The reason why Adam & the Ants went from post-punk to 'Kings of the Wild Frontier' pop was that of McClaren and Ant's response to his behaviour.

    McClaren's own work tapped into the NY hip-hop revolution of the 80's and brought that to the UK, while he managed records that continued the Afro-directions of Eno & Byrne and preceded Paul Simon's Graceland and Vampire Weekend (Double Dutch, Soweto).

    The 'Madame Butterfly' promo and single was great, while Waltz Darling, The Ghosts of Oxford Street, and Paris were all interesting and underrated records. Add to that his managerial influence on the late Tony Wilson and the alive Alan McGee and you have a vast influence. Much more than an empty pop album that shifted a lots of units and certainly nothing that leaves a bad taste in the mouth like 'Pretty Young Thing' or creates nausea like 'The Girl is Mine.'

    McClaren was a hugely significant figure in British culture and managed to be involved with some great records too. He was always interesting and it's always sad when someone interesting isn't around.

    Some of the comments on here are hugely misinformed, I do wonder the point of writing about someone you don't even like.

  • Comment number 94.

    This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Explain.

  • Comment number 95.

    A scoundrel and a chancer but never dull and someone who took action rather than sit back and moan about his lot in life.
    There's no good without evil, Bible thumpers.

  • Comment number 96.

    Never mind the Bullocks, they're sitting two tables over in section D.


    Why was the band staring at me staring at the audience? . . .What was going on over there?

    Leeds, England? never been there before.

  • Comment number 97.

    There wasn't a night before I went out that I didn't listen to your music or the sex pistols back in the day....
    I'm so glad to be apart of this small tribute to you, just to say you were also apart of my life here in this small town in Texas. The music you helped bring to everyone's attention along with your own will live on in my most FUN, outrageous memories of my youth & with so many of my friends. I can't out do what has just been beautifully written to praise you , listed just here on this site but I wish your family well ...thank you for your creative evil genius contributions & may you rest in peace.

  • Comment number 98.

    To all of you who admire the man, haven't you understood his own line "the great rock and roll swindle"?
    He perpetrated it, on you!
    An insufferable egotistical misfit, he recognised he had no talent other than that he was able to dupe, how shall we put it, the "intellectually challenged". Or the thick and/or pretentious twit. Especially the soft, slightly effeminate middle class twit who wanted to upset mummy and daddy with a pathetic "rebellious" phase. That supposedly street-wise working class kids fell for the punk lie amazed me at the time, it was so contrived I thought they would see through it.
    However, mesothelioma is a horrible way to die, and even though the man inflicted punk on us, helped to promote hip-hop and rap (mispelt of course, and typical of a musical failure to skip the C) and worst of all - made a "celebrity" of that obnoxious pr*t john lydon, he didn't deserve that. Approbrium and mockery yes, death by cancer no.

  • Comment number 99.

    Only a depraved mind could take delight in sound whose sole purpose seems to have been to offend. That a market existed for it at all was a comment on a segment of society of its time.

  • Comment number 100.

    A cunning capitalist who seeked controversy as a means of making a fortune.

 

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