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From tenantspin, residents John and Margo

Science

  • Margo Hogg
  • 5 Sep 06, 03:54 PM

I am by no means an expert on this particular subject. But, I’ll give it my best shot.

I have often wondered what it would be like to become a cryogenic statistic. Having seen Mel Gibson in the film For Ever Young, I felt drawn to the possibility of being frozen for a hundred years, and returning to this planet.

How I would react to the differences from the previous century is a mystery I would very much like to solve. How valuable an attribute will technology in the form of computers be? could people from all parts of the world be linked up to a giant screen to witness me being iced up and preserved until my need to re-emerge from the realms of permanent sleep be fulfilled.

This is never going to happen to me, as I could not afford the horrendous expense of saving my body for posterity, but, some wonderful medical breakthroughs may, in time to come, be achieved, all because, someone, somewhere, had such a fantastic brain.

How can we praise our brilliant scientists enough? The answer is, we can’t. Sometime, some day, science and technology will become one intertwined piece of ingenious force, and my only fear would be that everything those who have worked through the centuries to master, will fall into the wrong hands.

Death and destruction happen all too frequently as it is, But used properly, in years to come, then we might hear of a treasured friend, or a member of her family not dying of Cancer. If I could have one wish, it would be, if there is a god, and, as we are led to believe, he is good, then please let all the collective knowledge concerning Science and Technology be used wisely.

Comments

  1. At 08:11 PM on 05 Sep 2006, Fitz wrote:

    Ah - the pray of all ages - I think Mother Theresa prayed it everyday!

    It is of course possible but as the statisticians say "highly improbable"

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  2. At 09:20 AM on 06 Sep 2006, jason wrote:

    now now, natural selection is at work, you see, disease, competition between organisms and all that, tis the way of things

    check out darwin

    anyway, the world is overpopulated, dwell on that more

    www.vhemt.org

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  3. At 05:25 PM on 06 Sep 2006, Eman wrote:

    Anxieties about science (what used to be called "natural science") have been coming on for a long time. Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" suggests that understanding life, and the consequent meddling that some will engage in, might be a usurpation of what should be left to God.

    And at that time there wasn't cloning, wasn't the idea that one could almost freeze people (which can be done for some unquestionably ethical treatments), or even the idea that new organisms might be created from the blueprint of life. If anything, what can be done exceeds Dr Frankenstein.

    But the public's anxieties are probably in the wrong places. A few weird experiments are neither here nor there. The way that understanding us is used to then put pressure on our decisions is very much here.

    Governments are in the wrong because they don't stand against the short-term gains manipulation brings, don't stand for principles people can identify with, would support, and which wouldn't wreck our collective future.

    And what's the premier dangerous manipulation? Advertising. The creation of what may, for our race, be fatal greed. That to acquire and to hold property (in the widest sense) should take precedence over any phase of benevolence.

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  4. At 03:07 AM on 09 Sep 2006, Fitz wrote:

    I remember puzzling for years over what 'domestic science' really meant!

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  5. At 11:01 AM on 09 Sep 2006, Andrew Lyall wrote:

    Jason is wrong to invoke natural selection when talking about disease in the modern world. Natural selection acts over periods of time of tens of millions of years. The modern world has only existed for a hundred years or so. The big killers today; AIDS, Malaria, Diarrhea etc, have nothing at all to do with eveolution. They are caused by lack of access to sanitation and education, particularly for girls. People use natural selection as an excuse because they do not want to do anything to help the people who are suffering from these terrible scourges. By claiming that the deaths are just part of a 'natural process' they can abdicate all moral responsibility. Check 'micro-credit for women' Jason. The cost is negligable and it will solve many of the worlds most serious problems.

    Andrew Lyall

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  6. At 05:08 PM on 09 Sep 2006, Mark Smith wrote:

    Very true, we cannot praise scientists enough. Human greed has got us into a terrible mess, and we need those brilliant scientists to save us. The problem is there is too much politics in science now, and great minds are not being funded.

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  7. At 11:17 AM on 12 Sep 2006, fitz wrote:

    well science has gone down the gurgler a bit as it often does - they often want to fiddle the results don't they or create a monster out of genetic material!

    Next topic please!

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  8. At 04:51 PM on 16 Sep 2006, stephen whittam wrote:

    science make you brain think becouse you brain is more powerfull in the human body

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