Last night, Sandbox at the British Film Institute saw the beginning on something very interesting: an eclectic mix of film-makers, online journalists, bloggers, students, foreign correspondents, lecturers and editors gathered to discuss - and, as it turned out, have a number of heated arguments about - video journalism. 

The event was organised by David Dunkley Giymah, the video journalist and artist in residence at the Southbank Centre in London, Paul Egglestone of the University of Central Lancashire and myself.

The idea was to start a conversation about what makes good video journalism and, more precisely, to try to establish what video journalism is. It sounds a very simple question - but the first five people I spoke to had very clear definitions and they all differed widely.

Does video journalism work best in news, documentaries, long-form programmes or online? Can video journalists work in teams, or are they better off working alone? Is video journalism observational or reporter-led?

This event was the first in a whole series of discussions we're planning. There'll include workshops, critiques, show-and-tell sessions and keynote speeches. Keep an eye on the BBC College of Journalism website for details.  

Tagged with:

Loading...

More Posts

Previous