William Horsley

is international director, Centre for Freedom of the Media

Blog posts in total 24

Posts

  1. As a new Secretary-General begins work at the Commonwealth, expectations are raised about the ability of the organisation to tackle human rights issues, especially those of the freedom of journalists in some of its countries.

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  2. The court verdict and jail sentences in the re-trial the al-Jazeera journalists have dashed hopes for a relaxation of President al-Sisi’s vice-like grip on the information sphere.

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  3. Increasingly sophisticated and widespread internet surveillance together with attacks on journalists by governments and non-government organisations made a grim background to this year’s World Press Freedom Day.

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  4. Charlie Hebdo’s security defences proved useless against a military-style assault. And we now know that it could happen to someone else in another European city, not just in Syria, Iraq, Somalia or Mali.

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  5. Shocking numbers of journalists have been killed while working. Where once a press badge offered protection, today it can all too often make the holder a target.

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  6. An international approach to supporting journalists' safety and freedom is needed to allow audiences to get news of what's happening in world trouble spots, argues William Horsley of the Centre for Freedom of the Media. 

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  7. The assassination attempt last weekend on Pakistani TV anchorman Hamid Mir looks like becoming a symbol of a wider challenge to the survival of free journalism.

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  8. The jailing of three al-Jazeera journalists in Egypt heralds an age of high risk for journalism and an urgent need for new defences: is help on its way?

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  9. June 2013 may go down as the month when the prime minister of Turkey lost the image of political invincibility that helped him to win three landslide elections.

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  10. In this oppressive landscape for free expression across large parts of the world, I found signs of hope while taking part in the UN meeting to mark World Press Freedom Day and in a debate at the Frontline Club in London, on Stamping out Impunity.

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  11. World Press Freedom Day celebrates its 20th anniversary on Friday 3 May. And the United Nations has decided to make protecting journalists from increasing threats of violence the key theme of this anniversary.

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  12. On Friday the United Nations fired the starting gun for a global campaign to reverse the toll of murders and attacks on media workers which has risen alarmingly in recent years.

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  13. Here is some relief for much-battered journalists: after months of uncertainty and sometimes tense diplomatic negotiation, the main human rights body of the United Nations has adopted a resolutions which raises the banner of the particular role of journalists on matters of public interest.  

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  14. The United Nations has recognised the growing patterns of violence and legal harassment of journalists as a pressing problem which deprives whole populations of the right to reliable information.

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  15. Two years ago, after some NGOs and media organisations complained about evasion and delay, the United Nations started to focus on the task of improving the safety of journalists. And last week, the first UN plan for effective safeguards against targeted killings and attacks on journalists was pu...

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  16. It is high time journalists, media owners and editors stopped being passive in the face of the continued slaughter and silencing of journalists. They should demand protection for their colleagues who face violence and suppression. That was the surprising message from a recent United Nations me...

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  17. Journalists are by reputation busy people. Hard-bitten, cynical even. But in times like these it's obvious how much everybody owes to their courage and skill, working in war zones like Libya, and in dangerous places - especially for journalists - from Mexico to Russia. Next Tuesday, 3 May, is...

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  18. The Prime Minister says he feels physically sick about letting some prisoners vote in elections, as the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) insists the UK should. And Parliament has forcefully expressed its opposition to prisoners' votes. David Cameron is also "appalled" at a UK Supreme Cou...

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  19. The 30-year Sri Lankan civil war ended last year with government forces crushing the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) rebels. Some reports say there may have been as many as 30,000 civilian casualties in the final months of the war. Calls for an international war crimes inquiry were rejec...

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  20. This is something new: on Monday 3 May, the spring bank holiday in the UK, journalists in newsrooms in many parts of the world will stand for a minute's silence at 11am to honour other journalists who have died in the course of their work.   It's an initiative of UNESCO, the lead United Nati...

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