Rare birds caught on camera

Wednesday 15 April 2009, 13:12

Martin Aaron Martin Aaron

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Now though, visitors to South Stack on the north west tip of Anglesey can get a close-up view of the birds nesting thanks to an RSPB nestcam which beams live pictures from deep inside a rock crevice to the reserve's information centre.

The nesting antics of other well-known South Stack species such as guillemots, puffins and razorbills could also be caught on camera as spring progresses, according to the RSPB.

Elsewhere in Wales, a pair of choughs have been regularly nesting for many years at the Llechwedd Slate Caverns where visitors can watch live webcam link-ups right through until 17 July.

So with the bird world's version of Big Brother in full swing, who needs binoculars anymore, eh?


Did you know?

Want to know more?

Check out the RSPB's chough guide.

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    Comment number 1.

    The first time we visited South Stack we spotted the choughsflying around the lighthouse bridge. We had to get our field guide, out as we were novices then.

    The next year we recognised their distinctive call from that of a jackdaw(easy for an expert maybe, but we were pleased as punch!)They moved freely around Elenors Tower,so close we could almost touch them!
    This is the first year in five we have been unable to get to the reserve so we contented ourselves with the RSPB webcam.

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    Comment number 2.

    I have spent some time on La Palma recently and have a little query:
    La Palma is one of the smaller Canary Islands.
    One of the reasons La Palma is famous is for their population of "Grajas".
    It is claimed that the Grajas only exist on La Palma.
    However, watching Springwatch today, I noticed a remarkable likeness between Simon's Choughs in North Wales and the Grajas of La Palma.
    Below is a link to a picture of a Graja:
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3595/3480699937_831c14f312.jpg
    The graja is certainly a type of crow and the name translates as "rook" in English but do you know if these are the same bird?

 
 

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