First cold snap of the season

Thursday 25 October 2012, 16:23

Paul Hudson Paul Hudson

After a relentlessly gloomy week, much clearer but colder air is on its way from the Arctic in the next 12 hours, giving us our first cold snap of the season, albeit a short lived one.

Some of us, mainly in eastern parts of the region will see showers, and the air will be cold enough for some of these to have a wintry flavour - with hail, sleet and some snow.

By Friday night, the North York moors and Wolds could have a slight covering of snow, as you can see on the figure below, although this will melt very quickly on Saturday.



Further west, skies will be mainly sunny on Friday and Saturday, with excellent visibility for those who enjoy a bracing walk in the Pennines, but a widespread frost expected at night.

It's perfectly normal to get a cold snap at this time of the year, and it will prove to be temporary, as less cold Atlantic air moves back in on Sunday, bringing cloud and some rain.

But it comes after what has been quite an exceptional few weeks of below average temperatures.

According to climatologist Philip Eden, the period from mid-September to mid-October was the coldest such period since 1974, and in the last century only 1952 and 1905 was colder.

As for next week, it's a familiar story, with low pressure set to dominate, leading to changeable and unsettled weather across many parts of Yorkshire and Lincolnshire, with temperatures at best close to average.

But with winds from the west, there will be some dry, bright weather at times, with eastern areas most favoured.

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    Comment number 1.

    "According to climatologist Philip Eden, the period from mid-September to mid-October was the coldest such period since 1974, and in the last century only 1952 and 1905 was colder. "

    Whilst the Met Office report:-

    "Top ten: Mildest temperatures recorded last night"

    I think they were referring to Monday 22nd and I don't think they are claiming that they are records? They just seem to have listed the 10 warmest places?

    http://metofficenews.wordpress.com/2012/10/23/top-ten-mildest-temperatures-recorded-last-night/

    I wonder if such announcements will become a regular feature?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 2.

    I have just got some Cold Snap out of the freezer for dinner to celebrate Diwali lights turn on in Barnsley

  • rate this
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    Comment number 3.

    October looking to be sub 1961-1990 average for UK which means only 4 months this year have been above average so far in a period since 1988 where it's normal to have at least 8 months above average. Are November and December going to rise above the average?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 4.

    Strange how these cold snaps are becoming more and more regular now the sun has gone into a slumber.

    Interesting stuff about the Michael Mann. I wonder how the upside down sediments will look in court?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 5.

    3. ukpahonta wrote:

    "... only 4 months this year have been above average so far in a period since 1988 where it's normal to have at least 8 months above average."

    Sorry, what do you mean by "in a period since 1988"? Have we suddenly got a new start point from which to adjudge 'average'?

    According to the MO's own data (since 1910), five months are above average and four are below average. I prefer to follow the MO's advice and base averages on the previous 30 years. Using that baseline yields the same 5/4 warmer/cooler result.

    Another point worth making is that already in 2012 two months (Feb and March) are inside the top ten warmest on record. No month has been in the top ten coolest on record.

    According to the MO data, UK to date is about +0.3C above its Jan-Sep average.

 

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Hello, I’m Paul Hudson, weather presenter and climate correspondent for BBC Look North in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. 

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I worked as a forecaster with the Met Office for nearly 15 years locally and at the international unit, after graduating with first class honours in Geophysics and Planetary physics at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1992. I then joined the BBC in October 2007, where I divide my time between forecasting and reporting on stories about climate change and its implications for people's everyday lives.

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