Antarctica sea ice & latest global temperatures

Monday 12 November 2012, 16:05

Paul Hudson Paul Hudson

ANTARCTICA

The record breaking Arctic sea ice minimum recorded this summer (based on satellite data) was well documented in the media and on this blog.

Conversely, at the other end of the world, little mention was made of the Antarctica ice extent which approached a record high in September, according to the US National Snow and Ice Data Centre (NSIDC).

According to new research conducted by the British Antarctic Survey, published in Nature Geoscience, changing wind patterns around Antarctica are thought to have caused the increase in ice, with wind flows pushing sea ice outwards helping to increase its extent.

Climate models have failed to reproduce this overall increase in sea ice.

The new research says that sea ice is not able to expand by the same mechanism in the Arctic because if winds push the ice away from the pole it quickly hits land, as the Arctic is an ocean surrounded by a continent - whereas because Antarctica is a continent surrounded by water, ice can expand.

But according to the British Antarctic survey, the Arctic is losing sea ice five times faster than the Antarctic is gaining it.


Latest Global temperatures

Global temperatures in October remained at elevated levels.

According to the UAH satellite measure the global temperature was 0.331C above the 30 year running average in October.

Adjusted to the standard 1961-1990 measure, global temperatures were 0.584C above average, making it the 2nd warmest October globally since the start of satellite data in 1979.

These warm global conditions are despite temperatures in equatorial Pacific areas remaining neutral.

In fact, a continuation of neutral temperature conditions (neither colder La Nina nor warmer El Nino) are now favoured during the Northern Hemisphere winter, and the El Nino watch has been cancelled.

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Comments

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  • rate this
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    Comment number 21.

    I liked the attendance of Jon Plowman, Head of Comedy. I guess they need to ensure that even jokes are on message.
    I worked at the BBC for 10 years and took great pride in that before the need to move back north led me to the dark-side of commercial television. I don't think I would have the same pride these days.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 22.

    @20, quake wrote:

    “ Continued eurozone financial cloud … “

    I didn't think that that was a crisis; I thought it was the intention of your friends.

    What else could you possibly expect when ludicrous carbon targets based on unbalanced reporting force industries out of Europe?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 23.

    Quake @ 6
    "Rural stations have warmed as fast, if not faster, than urban stations. The fastest warming parts of the world, such as the antarctic peninsula and the arctic are more rural areas."

    Very funny. I hope your tongue doesn't get stuck there permanently.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 24.

    #20. - quake wrote:
    "Current irrelevant happenings at the BBC in order of irrelevance:

    -A list of attendees at a BBC meeting 6 years ago."

    If so irrelevant, why did the BBC wish to keep it a secret?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 25.

    #21. - RobWansbeck wrote:
    "I liked the attendance of Jon Plowman, Head of Comedy. I guess they need to ensure that even jokes are on message. "

    That isn't as daft as it sounds.
    You only have to listen to programmes such as "The Now Show", to know that even comedy on the BBC is biased in favour of "climate change". They even get away with making up "facts", and exaggerations, because that is apparently allowed in comedy programmes. However, it's all part of the propaganda.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 26.

    @25 QuaesoVeritas

    "That isn't as daft as it sounds.
    You only have to listen to programmes such as "The Now Show", to know that even comedy on the BBC is biased in favour of "climate change". They even get away with making up "facts", and exaggerations, because that is apparently allowed in comedy programmes. However, it's all part of the propaganda."

    Hmmm either the BBC is biased propaganda machice or they see that the overwhelming evidence points towards climate change...

    I though you coolers didn't believe in conspiracies?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 27.

    overwhelming evidence, let me guess.......' Russell Howard's Good News'

  • rate this
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    Comment number 28.

    #26. - john_cogger wrote:

    "Hmmm either the BBC is biased propaganda machice or they see that the overwhelming evidence points towards climate change..."

    Yet they are afraid to allow the other side of the argument?

    "I though you coolers didn't believe in conspiracies?"

    It isn't a conspiracy if its true!

  • rate this
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    Comment number 29.

    #26. - john_cogger wrote:
    "I though you coolers didn't believe in conspiracies?"

    Oh, and I'm not a "cooler", I'm a realist!

  • rate this
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    Comment number 30.

    #26. - john_cogger wrote:

    "I though you coolers didn't believe in conspiracies?"

    Of course, what I meant to say was:

    It isn't a conspiracy THEORY if its true!

  • rate this
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    Comment number 31.

    # ukpahonta

    Never heard of this 'controversy' before but it is clearly a made up one trying to create a false conspiracy that you seem to have wholly swallowed since you believe The Register, with its easily checked errors and distortions, is an authoritative source for news journalism.

    It only took me seconds to realise that the seminar wasn't a 'a climate policy direction meeting' but an event focusing on climate change and its impact on development, and explored the challenges facing television in covering this issue. The list of attendees included a wide cross section including representatives from universities, climate related groups, business groups like the CBI and even CBBC and the Head of Comedy! Not exactly the A-List of the Illuminati.

    It isn’t a 6 year legal battle – the FOI wasn’t even made until 2008. The process didn’t go through the court system it ended up being considered by a an Information Rights Tribunal which has already ruled in favour of the BBC. Apparently there is an appeal though the names are now known.

    As for claims that this seminar somehow ended up with the BBC breaking its charter, all I can see is it reporting the overwhelming scientific view more often than not.

    In the unlikely event that this ‘contraversy’ ever becomes worth a reporting in the real news media with actual evidence, it can be safely be ignored by real sceptics until then.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 32.

    Oh I just notice some Cherry picking in The Register article where it quotes form the "From Seesaw to Wagon Wheel" document;

    "The BBC has held a high-level seminar with some of the best scientific experts, and has come to the view that the weight of evidence no longer justifies equal space being given to the opponents of the consensus"

    It missed the bit before;

    "There may be now a broad scientific consensus that climate change is definitely happening, and that it is at least predominantly man-made. But the second part of that consensus still has some intelligent and articulate opponents, even if a small minority."

    And the bit after;

    "But these dissenters (or even sceptics) will still be heard, as they should, because it is not the BBC’s role to close down this debate. They cannot be simply dismissed as ‘flat-earthers’ or ‘deniers’, who ‘should not be given a platform’ by the BBC. Impartiality always requires a breadth of view: for as long as minority opinions are coherently and honestly expressed, the BBC must give them appropriate space"

    How is that against the BBC Charter for impartiality? And Harrabin is getting pillored for allegedly influencing this decision?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 33.

    #31 Lazarus

    'Never heard of this 'controversy' before'

    Really, you surprise me?

    'Not exactly the A-List of the Illuminati.'

    You've been watching too many films. The question is whether this is the seminar referred to by John Bridcut in your #32 comment?

    As you state:

    'It only took me seconds to realise that the seminar wasn't a 'a climate policy direction meeting' but an event focusing on climate change and its impact on development, and explored the challenges facing television in covering this issue.'

    Doesn't really tie in with:

    'The BBC has held a high-level seminar with some of the best scientific experts'.

    Perhaps you could enlighten us as to whether the two are the same as your comment on the list of attendees suggests otherwise?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 34.

    #32 Lazarus

    'And Harrabin is getting pillored for allegedly influencing this decision?'

    It is interesting that whilst working for the BBC he was also a part of CMEP with Joe Smith, the organisation who helped organise the seminars. Obviously with the BBC's backing and instruction.
    http://www.bishop-hill.net/blog/2011/11/29/harrabin-on-cmep.html

    This comment:

    'Climate sceptics seeking more space on the BBC helped provoke the Trust’s investigation into science impartiality but the Trust said we were already giving them too much space – not too little.'

    compared to the statement in your #32 being rather contentious:

    'But these dissenters (or even sceptics) will still be heard, as they should, because it is not the BBC’s role to close down this debate. They cannot be simply dismissed as ‘flat-earthers’ or ‘deniers’, who ‘should not be given a platform’ by the BBC. Impartiality always requires a breadth of view: for as long as minority opinions are coherently and honestly expressed, the BBC must give them appropriate space'

  • rate this
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    Comment number 35.

    Lazarus et al
    Re 28gate as the internet has come up with.

    The argument here is that the BBC flouted a legal FOI request and when the named ''climate experts'' came to the surface there were no climate experts on the list only a bunch of left wing liberal activists who all have a problem with CO2. If there were a couple of real scientists with contrary views, of which there are many, on the list we would not be so up tight about BBC bias and poor reporting.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 36.

    The Met Office appears to be “warming up” for winter and having a go at some of the headlines:-

    “What’s in store this winter? Responding to the headlines”

    “So what are the facts behind the headlines?

    Some of the stories have taken a cue from parts of our current 30-day forecast. Today’s forecast for 26 November to 10 December reads as follows:

    As is usual, there are uncertainties in the forecast for this period, but there are signs that the changeable conditions will continue through the start of this forecast period. There is also a signal for temperatures to be close to or just below the seasonal average. Into December, although there are no strong indications that any particular weather type is going to dominate, on balance colder, drier conditions than at present are favoured, rather than milder, wetter weather, especially across the southern half of the UK.”

    Then tongue in cheek, well I think it is tongue in cheek they finish with:-

    “Ultimately, we’re heading into winter and we expect winter to be colder than the rest of the year – but it’s too early to say exactly what temperatures we can expect or where and when we might see snow.”

    http://metofficenews.wordpress.com/2012/11/12/whats-in-store-this-winter-responding-to-the-headlines/

  • rate this
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    Comment number 37.

    The UK Met. office has produced a poor winter forecast with lack of any recision as to it being colder or warmer than ''usual''. (whatever that means, not a very scientific term). I sometimes wonder why we as taxpayers gave them tens of millions of our hard earned money for a supercomputer. Does it not work?

  • rate this
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    Comment number 38.

    36 Greensand: but they 'know' it's going to 3.6 degrees warmer by 2035---or whatever.

  • rate this
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    Comment number 39.

    I wonder, is ENSO following the 2009/2010 pattern into El Nino?

    OLR anomalies heading negative:-

    http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/mjo/graphics/region.ts.dateline.gif

    30 day moving SOI heading down

    http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/enso/monitoring/soi30.png

    Weekly sea surface temperatures:

    “When compared to two weeks ago, sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the western tropical Pacific have warmed. Warm anomalies are present along the equator west of 150°W (see the SST anomaly map for the week ending 4 November). Isolated areas of warm anomalies are also present in the eastern equatorial Pacific. A significant area of warm SST anomalies has emerged around Australia’s northwest coast in recent weeks. “

    http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/enso/

    Next few weeks should tell

  • rate this
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    Comment number 40.

    As I subscribe to "Open Mind", I was sent an e-mail reminding people to watch Al Gore's 24 hours of "Climate Reality" broadcast:
    http://climaterealityproject.org/
    Not sure how much of this my blood pressure will stand, but I did notice a term being used, which is new to me, i.e. "climate disruption".
    Is that a new term, or did I just miss it up until now.
    What does it mean?
    It sounds like another term for "weird weather", but not quite as permanent as "climate change".

 

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Hello, I’m Paul Hudson, weather presenter and climate correspondent for BBC Look North in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. 

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I worked as a forecaster with the Met Office for nearly 15 years locally and at the international unit, after graduating with first class honours in Geophysics and Planetary physics at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne in 1992. I then joined the BBC in October 2007, where I divide my time between forecasting and reporting on stories about climate change and its implications for people's everyday lives.

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