Tagged with: Media freedom

34 posts about Media freedom on this blog

  1. How free will Russia's new public service TV channel be?

    Friday 20 April 2012, 12:00

    Stephen Ennis Stephen Ennis is Russian media analyst for BBC Monitoring.

    Outgoing Russian President Dmitriy Medvedev has ordered the creation of a new public service television station to come on air on 1 January 2013.

    Unveiling plans for the channel on 17 April, he pledged it would be free of "excessive state influence". There are, though, grounds for doubting whether the...

    Read more about How free will Russia's new public service TV channel be?

  2. China's role in Africa: pitting development against media freedom?

    Monday 19 March 2012, 16:13

    Suzanne Franks Suzanne Franks is professor of journalism at City University, London

    Last week, I spoke at the Oxford University China Africa Network on the implications of China's media interventions in Africa.

    There is ample discussion of China's role in the overall frame of African development. Opinion is divided on whether these interventions are a reinforcing of previous colonial...

    Read more about China's role in Africa: pitting development against media freedom?

  3. UN calls on journalists to help stop the killing of journalists

    Monday 3 October 2011, 15:38

    William Horsley William Horsley is the international director of the Centre for Freedom of the Media and media freedom representative of the Association of European Journalists

    It is high time journalists, media owners and editors stopped being passive in the face of the continued slaughter and silencing of journalists. They should demand protection for their colleagues who face violence and suppression.

    That was the surprising message from a recent United Nations meeting aimed...

    Read more about UN calls on journalists to help stop the killing of journalists

  4. Libya coverage exposes China's internal split

    Tuesday 30 August 2011, 16:15

    BBC Monitoring BBC Monitoring

    As the fighting continues in Tripoli, a war of words is taking place in the Chinese media and blogosphere. The revolution in Libya has become a subject of heated debate which may reveal more about China than the Libyan conflict.

    As they have for the past six months, China's state media are still focusing...

    Read more about Libya coverage exposes China's internal split

  5. Undercover in Syria: how Sue Lloyd-Roberts became a student of Byzantium

    Friday 24 June 2011, 15:29

    Sue Lloyd-Roberts Sue Lloyd-Roberts

    Sue Lloyd-Roberts reported from Syria for Newsnight this week. Because foreign journalists are not allowed into the country, she went undercover. This is her account of the trip:

    I have been working undercover in countries which are unfriendly to journalists for 20 years now and I follow a strict code...

    Read more about Undercover in Syria: how Sue Lloyd-Roberts became a student of Byzantium

  6. Super-injunctions: a landmark in press freedom

    Tuesday 24 May 2011, 17:13

    Kevin Marsh Kevin Marsh is director of OffspinMedia and a former Today editor

    I thought this might be a good moment to think a bit about some of the important landmarks in press freedom here in the UK... or, more accurately, England.

    1641: The abolition of the Star Chamber

    This had been the monarchy's most potent tool of repression for centuries: a court that held secret sessions...

    Read more about Super-injunctions: a landmark in press freedom

  7. Ten years on from the 'storming' of Russia's NTV

    Thursday 21 April 2011, 16:28

    Stephen Ennis Stephen Ennis is Russian media analyst for BBC Monitoring.

    Russian media watchers marked a grim anniversary last week. Ten years ago, on 14 April 2001, security guards and police acting on behalf of the state-owned Gazprom-Media took control of the premises of the independent broadcaster NTV.

    The takeover is seen as a turning point in the recent history of media...

    Read more about Ten years on from the 'storming' of Russia's NTV

  8. The case of the disappearing newspaper campaign

    Thursday 31 March 2011, 14:46

    Stephen Ennis Stephen Ennis is Russian media analyst for BBC Monitoring.

    The relaunch of one of Russia's most prestigious newspaper titles has been beset by a mystery surrounding a provocative advertising campaign which may be further evidence of a rift in the country's political establishment.

    The Moscow News began life in the 1930s as an English-language newspaper aimed...

    Read more about The case of the disappearing newspaper campaign

  9. French media embrace Sarkozy's Libya action

    Tuesday 29 March 2011, 10:52

    Veronique Forge Veronique Forge is a freelance print and television journalist now based in London. She was previously a journalist and presenter on the TV channel Direct 8 in France.

    Nicolas Sarkozy has not had it this good for years. Despite his dismal personal poll ratings, more than 66% of French people approve of their president's Libya initiative, and the media are mostly behind him too.

    Christophe Barbier, editor of L'Express, said: "Nicolas Sarkozy will be the president...

    Read more about French media embrace Sarkozy's Libya action

  10. How social media gets information to Libyan population

    Tuesday 22 February 2011, 15:05

    Muhammad Shukri Muhammad Shukri is Middle East Media Analyst at BBC Monitoring.

    With severe restrictions imposed on the media in Libya, the internet has emerged as an important window through which traditional media outlets, particularly pan-Arab TV channels, can provide coverage of the unrest.

    Libya does not allow foreign media to operate freely on its soil, which has made it difficult...

    Read more about How social media gets information to Libyan population

  11. How did British journalist offend Russian security services?

    Tuesday 15 February 2011, 10:14

    Stephen Ennis Stephen Ennis is Russian media analyst for BBC Monitoring.

    After the Guardian's Moscow correspondent, Luke Harding, was briefly barred from entering Russia early in February, most commentators in Russia's liberal and opposition media rallied to his cause and attacked the security services for discrediting the country in the eyes of the world.

    The one exception...

    Read more about How did British journalist offend Russian security services?

  12. Twitter-versus-TV debate after Moscow airport bombing

    Thursday 27 January 2011, 11:51

    Stephen Ennis Stephen Ennis is Russian media analyst for BBC Monitoring.

    Reporting of the bomb blast in Moscow's Domodedovo airport has sparked a new round in the debate on the merits of social versus traditional media in Russia.

    Russian users of Twitter have been crowing about how the story broke on the microblogging service well before it was reported on TV and radio...

    Read more about Twitter-versus-TV debate after Moscow airport bombing

  13. Andy Coulson: my part in his downfall (with apologies to Spike Milligan)

    Monday 24 January 2011, 09:02

    John Mair John Mair is a journalism lecturer and former broadcast producer and director. Twitter: @johnmair100

    On 25 November, my Coventry Conversations series featured David Yelland, former editor of the Sun, now a PR man and an alumni of Lanchester Polytechnic, the forerunner of Coventry University.

    Yelland was 'back home' and unloaded himself honestly about his life, his alcoholism, his alopecia, Rupert Murdoch...

    Read more about Andy Coulson: my part in his downfall (with apologies to Spike Milligan)

  14. Jeremy Hunt meets protesters - in the best LSE tradition

    Thursday 13 January 2011, 08:21

    John Mair John Mair is a journalism lecturer and former broadcast producer and director. Twitter: @johnmair100

    Student demos were all the rage when I was at the LSE in 1968. They are again today, thanks to the coalition government's hike in tuition fees.

    As an LSE alum, and the producer of last night's Media Society/Polis event with Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt, I guess I should have expected trouble.

    It...

    Read more about Jeremy Hunt meets protesters - in the best LSE tradition

  15. Inconvenient truths

    Tuesday 11 January 2011, 11:35

    Barnie Choudhury Barnie Choudhury

    Jack Straw's comments that some UK Pakistani men see white girls as "easy meat" for sex abuse has really set the debate over what is taboo and what isn't alight.

    Two of his Labour colleagues have rounded on him for "stereotyping" an entire community. The former Home Secretary has urged the Pakistani...

    Read more about Inconvenient truths

  16. The ambitions of a young journalist in Southern Sudan

    Tuesday 11 January 2011, 10:04

    Matthew Wells Matthew Wells contributes to a range of British media outlets from his home in New York.

    By any standards, Deng Kooch Diing is a remarkable young journalist. He's the parliamentary reporter for the Juba Post, in Southern Sudan. Juba will soon become the capital of the world's newest country, if the voters there hold sway following the referendum taking place this week.

    That vote for separation...

    Read more about The ambitions of a young journalist in Southern Sudan

  17. No live riots please on Russian TV

    Thursday 23 December 2010, 10:21

    Stephen Ennis Stephen Ennis is Russian media analyst for BBC Monitoring.

    Vladimir Putin in Moscow (credit: Associated Press).

    When violence flared up during the student protests in London on 9 December, Britain's news channels were on hand to provide virtually uninterrupted coverage well into the night. The disturbances also dominated the main news bulletins that evening.

    Two days later, serious disorder erupted in central...

    Read more about No live riots please on Russian TV

  18. Wikileaks spawns European imitator

    Tuesday 14 December 2010, 10:52

    The European Journalism Centre The European Journalism Centre

    Emma Brewin

    Emma Brewin:

    Wikileaks spin-off Brussels Leaks launched out of the blue last Thursday, to much excitement in the European capital and Twittersphere beyond.

    The European Journalism Centre's exclusive email interview with an anonymous representative is amongst the first media contacts with the aspiring...

    Read more about Wikileaks spawns European imitator

  19. When is a paywall not a paywall? When it's ajar

    Friday 3 December 2010, 10:28

    Torin Douglas Torin Douglas is the BBC's media correspondent. Twitter: @BBCTorinD

    The news that the Daily Telegraph is likely to charge online readers for some of its content was revealed by FT.com, which itself charges its readers. This meant that many people could not read the full story - an irony not lost on those frantically tweeting the news.

    This was a pity because one of the...

    Read more about When is a paywall not a paywall? When it's ajar

  20. The dangers of Russian journalism

    Friday 12 November 2010, 09:55

    Stephen Ennis Stephen Ennis is Russian media analyst for BBC Monitoring.

    The vicious beating of journalist and blogger Oleg Kashin outside his apartment in Moscow in the small hours of 6 November is yet another reminder of the dangers facing media workers in Russia - there was a report by Richard Galpin on the BBC's News at Ten last night (starting at 21 mins 56 secs)...

    Read more about The dangers of Russian journalism

About this Blog

A blog for the College of Journalism at the BBC Academy, discussing current technical, ethical, production and craft issues in journalism.

Blog Updates

Stay updated with the latest posts from the blog.

Subscribe using:

What are feeds?

Follow us on Twitter

New twitter image News and comment about journalism and interaction with the College:

@BBCCollege

Also from the College

 

Expert tips for finding people online by Paul Myers

Searching for people online

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to shoot video on a smartphone by Marc Settle

Marc Settle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finding original stories locally by Hayley Brewer

Hayley Brewer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work in a multimedia newsroom at BBC London

Multimedia newsroom

Blogroll

Other great places to follow debates about journalism and media:

George Brock: thoughts on journalism past, present and future from City University's head of journalism

The Media Blog: lively and often funny topical detail about UK media output

British Journalism Review: selected pieces from the authoritative quarterly journal

MediaShift: PBS monitoring of the changing media world from a US perspective

Arts & Letters Daily: more interesting ideas and good writing than you will ever have time to read

Alltop Journalism: links to the most recent posts on many journalism blogs

About the BBC: varied BBC blog about all things BBC-ish

Columbia Journalism Review: US academic perspectives

Facebook + Journalists: Facebook's own guide to its use by journalists

Jon Slattery: UK media news from the former deputy editor of Press Gazette

Meeja Law: Judith Townend's guide to media and legal issues 

Roy Greenslade: Guardian blog by the former Mirror editor now journalism prof

Wannabee Hacks: information and experiences from aspiring journalists.