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  1. Keeping safe when reporting ebola

    Friday 24 October 2014, 09:22

    Charles Miller Charles Miller edits the College of Journalism blog and produces documentaries for BBC History and Business. Twitter: @chblm

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    We asked the BBC team which recently returned from Sierra Leone to show us how they kept themselves safe from ebola. Here's Tulip Mazumdar's report on the extensive precautions they took and the help they received from a dedicated medical expert who travelled with them.

    With thanks to the BBC team in the film:

    Tulip Mazumdar, international health correspondent

    Mark Georgiou, producer

    Rachel Price, camerawoman/editor

    Mac McGearey, biohazard adviser

    The College of Journalism’s safety section

  2. Ben Bradlee: Don't give up on newspapers

    Thursday 23 October 2014, 12:32

    Charles Miller Charles Miller edits the College of Journalism blog and produces documentaries for BBC History and Business. Twitter: @chblm

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    I was lucky enough to spend some time with Ben Bradlee in his office at the Washington Post in 2009.

    The sad news of his death this week reminded me of his unfailing enthusiasm for newspapers. As the legendary editor of the Washington Post put it in the interview he gave me (above), "I think the best newspapers have an energy to them. You can't keep a good newspaper out of doing what they're supposed to be doing."

    And Bradlee wasn't one for the prevailing pessimism about the future of the industry: the best newspapers today are "really good compared to what they used to be... what's going to replace us?"

  3. Google’s ‘right to be forgotten’ tour comes to London

    Friday 17 October 2014, 11:21

    Charles Miller Charles Miller edits the College of Journalism blog and produces documentaries for BBC History and Business. Twitter: @chblm

    Eric Schmidt, executive chairman, Google Eric Schmidt, executive chairman, Google Why would a tech business organise public meetings to discuss its legal problems? London got the chance to find out this week when Google’s roadshow visited as part of a seven-city European tour.

    The legal problem for Google is the European Court of Justice’s ‘right to be forgotten’ ruling earlier this year which forces it to ‘unlink’ search terms from particular stories at the request of people who don’t want the stories to be found. Google must unlink if it thinks the person making the request has a good case.

    But how would Google know? Well, that’s what the roadshow is about.

    This all started three years ago when Spain’s Data Protection Agency heard a complaint from an attorney who was upset that searches for his name produced links to old newspaper stories referring to his debts. Since he was no longer in debt, he didn’t want these references popping up when people ‘Googled’ him.

    The Agency ruled that the newspapers could leave the stories online (after all, they were true), but that Google must stop linking to them when people searched for the attorney’s name. This year the case landed up in European...

    Read more about Google’s ‘right to be forgotten’ tour comes to London

  4. Learning in the digital age: A new idea for curated content

    Thursday 16 October 2014, 15:14

    James Harrod James Harrod is a senior trainer for the BBC College of Journalism. Twitter: @jamesharrod

    Bibblio search for volcanoes Bibblio search for volcanoes Is online education as effective as traditional methods of learning? Can Moocs (massive open online courses) really replace the lecture theatre? And do we learn better when we’re studying in our own time, on our own computer, rather than in a classroom?

    No-one’s come up with definitive answers yet, but in the past few years big organisations - both companies and universities - have surged ahead in creating content across multiple platforms. Like it or loathe it, technology is acting as a powerful catalyst in the supply and demand of learning material.

    But...

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  5. The smartphone revolution and why training matters

    Tuesday 14 October 2014, 12:51

    Mark Wray Mark Wray is head of the BBC College of Journalism

    Marc Settle using an iPhone Licence fee money has been ‘blown’, cash has been ‘splashed’ and critics have ‘blasted’ the expense.

    What has caused this media maelstrom? This wailing and gnashing of teeth?

    It’s the fact the BBC has invested in bringing its reporting into the digital age by equipping many of its journalists with iPhones and has trained them how to use these multi-faceted devices to their fullest extent... all for the benefit of our audience, the licence fee payer.

    But surely, you ask, couldn’t any child use a smartphone without the need for training? Do BBC staff need hand-holding for the...

    Read more about The smartphone revolution and why training matters

  6. “Cheeriness and smiles - then long waits”: Young people’s experiences of working with the media

    Friday 10 October 2014, 09:33

    Charles Miller Charles Miller edits the College of Journalism blog and produces documentaries for BBC History and Business. Twitter: @chblm

    Through my experience in the documentary Now's the Hour, I saw how the producer and the director can decide what will happen to a show. They have the power to decide who will play what part, who will say what, and basically how the show will go.

    However, this doesn't mean that they abuse their power. They are always all ears to any ideas anyone has that would help the show. And mostly they make the best decisions about who will play what part, because they know everyone in the cast well enough to know which part suits who. 

    A group of young Scottish voters were invited by the BBC to take part...

    Read more about “Cheeriness and smiles - then long waits”: Young people’s experiences of working with the media

  7. What price democracy? Almost a tenner, since you ask

    Wednesday 8 October 2014, 14:24

    David Cowling David Cowling is editor, BBC Political Research

    Eastleigh by-election result Eastleigh by-election result Before we go any further could I suggest you guess the cost of a Westminster by-election, and keep that figure in your mind?

    In November 2013, I was astonished to discover that the 2010 general election cost £113 million - just to administer.

    As to the cost of Westminster by-elections, the answer lies buried in the less-than-sensationally titled Returning Officers’ Expenses, England & Wales Statement of Accounts 2013-14. This document records the costs of the 14 by-elections in England & Wales plus the Scottish by-election of Inverclyde. In summary, the document...

    Read more about What price democracy? Almost a tenner, since you ask

  8. The death of local TV has been greatly exaggerated

    Monday 6 October 2014, 10:02

    David Hayward David Hayward of Hayward Black Media is a writer, journalist and consultant for local TV. Twitter: @david_hbm

    Sheffield Live! website Sheffield Live! website For those of us who have long believed in the potential of quality local TV, recent headlines have been discouraging: poor audience figures, businesses going bust and a torrent of negative articles. So does this spell the end of Ofcom’s local TV plans, or are we still on the cusp of a revolution in local news and broadcasting?

    Since 2012, the media regulator Ofcom has granted more than 30 licences to companies wanting to provide local news and programmes. In August the company that was awarded the licence for Birmingham went into administration. Then an attempt by...

    Read more about The death of local TV has been greatly exaggerated

  9. Russia's journalists join wave of disillusioned emigrants

    Friday 3 October 2014, 09:50

    Stephen Ennis Stephen Ennis is Russian media analyst for BBC Monitoring.

    President Putin chairs a government meeting, March 2014 President Putin chairs a government meeting, March 2014 The increasingly harsh and reactionary political climate in Russia has sparked a fresh wave of emigration among middle-class professionals, including some of the country's leading journalists.

    Modern Russian history has been marked by waves of emigration: from the left-wing revolutionaries in Tsarist times and the writers and artists who fled Bolshevik tyranny after the October Revolution, to the great brain drain that accompanied the collapse of the Soviet Union at the start of the 1990s.

    The latest wave stems from the crackdown against...

    Read more about Russia's journalists join wave of disillusioned emigrants

  10. Translating money: A new tool for understanding between Chinese and English

    Wednesday 1 October 2014, 11:34

    Frank Ip Frank Ip is a senior producer at the BBC College of Journalism

    Chinese financial glossary page Chinese financial glossary page Our Chinese financial markets glossary has been launched!

    It is the fruit of a long process of cooperation between the BBC College of Journalism's international language sites team and Chu Hai College of Higher Education, Hong Kong.

    The origins of this unlikely sounding collaboration between two institutions on different sides of the globe can be traced to a conference in November 2013. It was jointly organised by the BBC College of Journalism and the Hong Kong Baptist University on the theme ‘independent journalism: language and impartiality’.

    During our...

    Read more about Translating money: A new tool for understanding between Chinese and English

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A blog for the College of Journalism at the BBC Academy, discussing current technical, ethical, production and craft issues in journalism.

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