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  1. Translating money: A new tool for understanding between Chinese and English

    Wednesday 1 October 2014, 11:34

    Frank Ip Frank Ip is a Senior Producer, BBC College of Journalism

    Chinese financial glossary page Chinese financial glossary page Our Chinese financial markets glossary has been launched!

    It is the fruit of a long process of cooperation between the BBC College of Journalism's international language sites team and Chu Hai College of Higher Education, Hong Kong.

    The origins of this unlikely sounding collaboration between two institutions on different sides of the globe can be traced to a conference in November 2013. It was jointly organised by the BBC College of Journalism and the Hong Kong Baptist University on the theme ‘independent journalism: language and impartiality’.

    During our time in Hong Kong, my colleague Najiba Kasraee and I made use of a rare opportunity to visit another Hong Kong institution, the aforementioned Chu Hai College. We arrived at its Department of Journalism and Communication, exchanged views, and explored opportunities to work together. 

    One of Chu Hai’s lecturers, Sherman Li, mentioned a glossary he had prepared for use in teaching his students. It listed entries in English alphabetical order and gave details of how the respective terms are used in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Having discussed this a little further and shown our interest, Mr Li...

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  2. Wielding an iPhone as deftly as McIlroy handles a seven iron

    Monday 29 September 2014, 12:18

    Marc Settle Marc Settle specialises in smartphone reporting for the BBC College of Journalism. Twitter: @MarcSettle

    How the BBC's Conor McNamara used his iPhone at the Ryder Cup to share a stunning range of photos and videos across social media:

    Blogs by Marc Settle

  3. Another competitor for news? Confessions of a Kindle convert

    Friday 26 September 2014, 12:31

    Charles Miller Charles Miller edits the College of Journalism blog and produces documentaries for BBC History and Business. Twitter: @chblm

    Original Kindle model Original Kindle model The founder of Amazon, Jeff Bezos, promoted the original Kindle e-reader with the line “the physical book has had a good run”, saying it was a 500-year-old technology that was due for an update. As a book-lover I was among the old fogeys hoping he would be proved wrong.

    Bezos claimed to be a passionate fan of what he called “long-form reading”, insisting he just had a better idea about how to present text.

    The first Kindle appeared in 2007, looking like the poor relation of an Apple product. Bezos had apparently over-ruled his designers, insisting on extra buttons on its white plastic exterior, making it more complicated than the simple, purpose-built reader his colleagues had intended.

    Today’s top-of-the-range Kindle has only one button - to wake it up. Apart from that, everything is controlled through the touch-screen, which is used to turn pages, input text, buy books, make notes, adjust its brightness - even search the internet.

    I know this because a few months ago I bought one. Of course there are plenty of rival e-readers around, such as the Nook or the Kobo, and indeed the original Kindle wasn't even first into the market. For me, the decision...

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  4. Five key findings about hyperlocal journalism in the UK

    Wednesday 24 September 2014, 16:05

    Damian Radcliffe Damian Radcliffe is a journalist and researcher. Twitter: @damianradcliffe

    Creative Citizens website Creative Citizens website Last week a host of academics and community activists from all over the world came together for the UK’s first Creative Citizens conference. For me the highlight was the way the event and the research project behind it offered insights into hyperlocal initiatives and questions of creative citizenship.

    From a journalistic standpoint, perhaps the most striking element of the research was the conclusions of the UK’s largest ever survey of UK hyperlocal news producers. Covering publishers from 183 sites, the survey addressed everything from what subjects hyperlocal...

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  5. Apple iPhone 6: Expect steady stream of updates to squash the bugs and glitches

    Monday 22 September 2014, 15:46

    Marc Settle Marc Settle specialises in smartphone reporting for the BBC College of Journalism. Twitter: @MarcSettle

    Tweet by Mark Gurman, a tech editor at 9to5Mac. Tweet by Mark Gurman, a tech editor at 9to5Mac. As expected, Apple has sold its new iPhones by the pallet-load: 10 million units in just three days. The queue to buy one direct from Apple stretched - as I found to my cost - quite some distance early on Friday morning. But not everything is well in the garden of Apple - be it for owners of the newest iPhone 6+ or the oldest device that runs iOS 8, the iPhone 4s.

    Before iOS 8’s release to the public, hundreds of thousands of app developers and others had access to the beta version; their feedback on faults and failings helped Apple tweak and...

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  6. How to make sense of social media information avalanche: SocialSensor

    Monday 22 September 2014, 13:52

    Nic Newman Nic Newman is a digital media and product strategist and former head of products for BBC Journalism

    If you’re looking for a way to control an avalanche of information on social media, new tools are being developed all the time. Here’s how one of them, SocialSensor, represented the Scottish referendum (see the animated version of this):

    SocialSensor's Scottish referendum coverage SocialSensor's Scottish referendum coverage

    SocialSensor is being developed with EU money, with help from our former BBC colleague Nic Newman. Nic is appealing for people to give feedback on the current beta version. We invited him to explain more:

    Journalists are always looking for new angles and ideas and increasingly these emerge from social media....

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  7. Maybes aye, maybes no! Covering the overnight count at the Scottish independence referendum

    Friday 19 September 2014, 15:08

    Suzanne Lord Suzanne Lord is the editor of TV news training at the BBC College of Journalism

    Suzanne Lord in the BBC's Glasgow headquarters Suzanne Lord in the BBC's Glasgow headquarters As I walked into work at 22:00, the polls were just closing. In a few hours we would find out if a union which has existed between Scotland and the rest of the UK for hundreds of years would continue. It felt like when I was a small child on Christmas Eve: wanting time to go faster, as if any further delay would be just too long to bear.  

    My job for the night was as package producer - editing packages for the breakfast show. This was going to be busy as the formal result was expected while we were on air. As polling stations closed, a new poll...

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  8. Kelvin, Cleggy, Stringys and the News Bunny: The wonderful world of Nick Ferrari

    Thursday 18 September 2014, 10:41

    Charles Miller Charles Miller edits the College of Journalism blog and produces documentaries for BBC History and Business. Twitter: @chblm

    Nick Ferrari, left, and Phil Harding Nick Ferrari, left, and Phil Harding In the Boat that Rocked, Richard Curtis depicted the larger-than-life world of popular UK media on a pirate radio ship. If he wanted to write a follow-up he could use tabloid newspapers as the setting. And if he did Nick Ferrari would make a great central character - with very little invention required.

    Today Ferrari hosts the morning show on LBC, where he also invites politicians - Nick Clegg, Boris Johnson and recently Nigel Farage - to take questions from listeners in their own regular shows. It was Ferrari who hosted LBC’s Euro debate between Clegg...

    Read more about Kelvin, Cleggy, Stringys and the News Bunny: The wonderful world of Nick Ferrari

  9. Changing media: E-books and the smooth highway between amateur and professional

    Monday 15 September 2014, 12:36

    Charles Miller Charles Miller edits the College of Journalism blog and produces documentaries for BBC History and Business. Twitter: @chblm

    Self-published author Nick Spalding BBC Radio 4’s You and Yours last week had an item about how self-published writers no longer want to be thought of as second division, below writers of books from what they call ‘trade publishers’.

    Self-publishing was once called ‘vanity publishing’ because it was mainly for those with money to pay for their own printing and the books were unlikely to interest anyone outside their family circle. The arrival of e-books has changed that. Today, self-publishing is free: you just have to upload your document and it’s available globally as an e-book. You can choose your own cover and...

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  10. The new iPhones for journalists: Improvements and disappointments

    Thursday 11 September 2014, 18:39

    Marc Settle Marc Settle specialises in smartphone reporting for the BBC College of Journalism. Twitter: @MarcSettle

    The new iPhones are bigger and thinner The new iPhones are bigger and thinner Trying to assess what the new iPhones will mean for journalists using them in the field when I've not actually tried one may seem an unenviable task, but here I go anyway.

    The iPhone 6 and its bigger brother the 6 Plus will run on iOS 8, which I've reviewed elsewhere. Now they’ve both been unveiled we know the hardware which will take advantage of the new iOS.

    It’s also a matter of judgement as to which improvements benefit journalists specifically. For example, the faster processors in the new devices get tasks done quicker, which will obviously help...

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