BBC Three

Archives for December 2011

BBC Three 2011 highlights mash up

Mars Elkins Mars Elkins | 10:40 UK time, Thursday, 29 December 2011

How was 2011 for you? It's been an exciting one for BBC Three, with shows that made you think, laugh and cry. As we welcome 2012, there's time for a quick look back at some of the highlights from the last 12 months thanks to mash up whizz Swede Mason. Him & Her and Wilfred were two of his favourite Three shows, and check out what he came up with after he was let loose on some Three goodies, taking his inspiration from Wilfred's 'tock, tock' clip, which gave him a tempo and beat to build on.

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. Visit BBC Webwise for full instructions. If you're reading via RSS, you'll need to visit the blog to access this content.

What were your favourite shows on Three this year?

Mars Elkins is the producer for BBC Three online.

Festive movies on Three

Post categories:

Mars Elkins Mars Elkins | 17:30 UK time, Thursday, 22 December 2011

We've got Shrek, Donkey, robots, the Pumpkin King and even the end of the world here on Three as we give you a filmtastic selection of movies to watch during the holidays. Here is a list of films we've got for you, so you don't miss them:

Shrek
Friday, 23 December, 7.05pm

Shrek (Donkey, Shrek, Princess Fiona, Lord Farquaad)

Shrek (Mike Myers as Shrek)

If you're a big Shrek fan, there's also Shrek the Halls (Friday, 23 December, 7.10pm) where Shrek faces a mad dash to create the perfect first Christmas for the baby ogres. Plus, narrated by David Tennant, Shrek: Once Upon a Time (Friday, 23 December, 9pm), looks at how an ogre with a Scottish accent single-handedly changed the face of animation. It features exclusive interviews with some of the biggest stars.

The Nightmare Before Christmas
Friday, 23 December, 11.45pm

The Nightmare Before Christmas Copyright: Disney Enterprises, Inc.  All rights reserved

The Nightmare Before Christmas Copyright: Disney Enterprises, Inc.  All rights reserved

Son of Rambow
Saturday, Christmas Eve, 24 December, 9.20pm

Son of Rambow (Bill Milner as Will Proudfoot and Will Poulter as Lee Carter)

Armageddon
Sunday, Christmas Day, 25 December, 8pm

Armageddon (1998) Copyright: Touchstone Pictures and Jerry Bruckheimer, Inc. All Rights Reserved Photography Credit:	Frank Masi

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Friday, 30 December, 7.55pm

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Copyright: Disney Enterprises. All rights reserved

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Copyright: Disney Enterprises. All rights reserved

Wall-E
Sunday, New Year's Day, 1 January, 7pm

Wall-E Copyright: Disney/Pixar. All rights reserved Photography Credits: Eric Charbonneau, Deborah Cole

Ratatouille
Sunday, New Year's Day, 1 January, 9.40pm

Ratatouille Copyright: Disney/Pixar.  All rights reserved

Ratatouille Copyright: Disney/Pixar.  All rights reserved

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian
Tuesday, 3 January, 7pm

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian Copyright: Disney Enterprises, Inc. and Walden Media, LLC.  All rights reserved Photography Credit:  MURRAY CLOSE

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian Copyright: Disney Enterprises, Inc. and Walden Media, LLC.  All rights reserved Photography Credit:  MURRAY CLOSE

To find out when they are on, check out the BBC Three schedule. Happy watching!

Mars Elkins is the producer for BBC Three online.

60seconds Claudia-Liza: Living with Tourette's

Post categories:

Claudia-Liza Armah Claudia-Liza Armah | 12:30 UK time, Monday, 12 December 2011

Imagine a life where almost every moment of the day you swore, had spasms or tics, constantly shouted out at inappropriate times and you had no control over it.

Well that's what life is like for Ruth Ojadi. She suffers from an acute form of Tourette's Syndrome, a neurological condition that makes people do and say involuntary things. It affects about 300,000 people in the UK, there's no cure and it's pretty much misunderstood. Only 10% of sufferers swear and act inappropriately. This severe and rare form is called coprolalia.

In fact, Pete Bennett's stint in the Big Brother house back in 2006 was probably the first time many people were made aware of the condition and how it affects sufferers' lives.

Tonight, in Tourette's: I Swear I Can Sing, BBC Three follows Ruth, a talented singer, as she tries to rebuild her life after being diagnosed with the coprolalia form of Tourette's three years ago.

Ruth has dreams of getting back on the stage and gives us an insight into what everyday life is like, revealing her frustrations, fears and hopes, and how she is coming to terms with living with Tourette's Syndrome.

In this clip, you'll see how simple everyday activities like shopping can be a struggle for Ruth, but when she starts to sing all signs of Tourette's disappear:

In order to see this content you need to have both Javascript enabled and Flash installed. Visit BBC Webwise for full instructions. If you're reading via RSS, you'll need to visit the blog to access this content.

So what exactly is Tourette's Syndrome?

The truth is doctors are still puzzled by this condition, and don't know its precise cause.

But this is what they've been able to find out:

- It's a neurological condition, which causes involuntary tics, sounds and movements
- At its worst, twitches can be severe and frequent, and outbursts of swearing are constant
- No two people have the same symptoms
- For many, it starts in childhood and continues on to adulthood
- A Tourette's sufferer might be able to suppress it for a while but will eventually have to let out the tics
- Doctors believe the condition might be genetic
- It's linked to other behavioural conditions such as Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD).

What can be done to treat Tourette's?

There is no cure or remedy for Tourette's, but with more and more research into the condition, there have been some developments in reducing its effects on people:

- Medication can be given in severe cases to reduce any tics or sudden moves, but it can come with unpleasant side effects
- Some sufferers say taking part in relaxation exercises, like yoga, can help in the short term
- Psychotherapy and behavioural therapy have also been adopted as a way of controlling the symptoms
- New treatments are being developed and tested all the time.

If you want to find out more about the condition, or if you're a sufferer in need of support, check out these websites for help and advice:

- BBC Health - Tourette Syndrome
- Tourettes Action
- British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies

And we'd love to hear your thoughts on Ruth and the documentary.

Journalist Claudia-Liza Armah presents the 60seconds news bulletins on BBC Three

More from this blog...

Categories

These are some of the popular topics this blog covers.

BBC © 2014 The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. Read more.

This page is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with style sheets (CSS) enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets (CSS) if you are able to do so.