Archives for July 2011

Should Libya's rebels be internationally recognised?

Africa HYS team | 11:49 UK time, Thursday, 28 July 2011

Tripoli has condemned the UK for recognising Libya's rebels as the North African country's "sole governmental authority" after similar moves by France and the US.

Khaled Kaim, deputy foreign minister in Muammar Gaddafi's government, told reporters the decision was unprecedented and irresponsible.  Do you agree?

Libyan opposition supporters outside the Libyan embassy in London 
Libya says it will seek to reverse the decision through the courts. 

Meanwhile Britain has ordered the expulsion of all eight remaining pro-Gaddafi diplomats in the UK.

The UK Foreign Secretary William Hague said the National Transitional Council (NTC) had shown its commitment to a "more open and democratic Libya... in stark contrast to Gaddafi whose brutality against the Libyan people stripped him of all legitimacy".

Should the Libyan rebels be internationally recognised as the sole representatives of the Libyan people?  Or are the British, French and US governments setting a dangerous precedent?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Thursday 28 July at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

Is Africa taking the Olympics seriously?

AfricaHYS Team | 12:15 UK time, Wednesday, 27 July 2011

In exactly a year's time, the 2012 Olympic Games will commence in London.

So with just a year to go, is your country taking its Olympic preparations seriously?

Are you excited about the London Olympics? What do the games mean to you? Which sports do you enjoy watching and which African stars do you think will shine at the games? What sort of flavour would you like the London Olympics to reflect? 

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Wednesday 27 July at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

Why is Africa still struggling with power shortages?

Africa HYS team | 11:53 UK time, Tuesday, 26 July 2011

This week parts of Kenya will plunge into darkness as the country joins a long list of African nations that implement power rationing.  What impact does lack of power have on you?

Power shortages AP 

 

Kenya Power says the rationing will take effect for a few hours in the evenings when demand is highest, in many parts of the country.


Tanzania's chronic energy crisis has also deepened recently with the announcement of a 12 hour power rationing schedule.  This is due to a drastic drop in the water levels of the Mtera hydroelectric dam.

With so much progress being made in the development of alternative power sources, why is Africa still grappling with power shortages?

How do you cope when the electricity fails? What impact are these power shortages having on industry and the economy?  How does lack of energy hold the continent back?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Tuesday 26 July at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

Why are so many youths in Africa unemployed?

Africa HYS team | 13:14 UK time, Thursday, 21 July 2011

The International Labour Organisation (ILO) says global unemployment among youths aged  between 15- 24 has reached the highest level on record. What is the situation in your country?
 
unemployed youth

 

 

The ILO claims 80 million people are unemployed world wide and says that the situation in sub-Saharan Africa needs urgent attention.

Lagos based recruitment expert Funmi Wale-Adegbite says "over parenting" is to blame for giving young people the wrong attitude towards work.

"A high-proportion of unemployment is due to parents not cutting the cord, and not leaving that young man or woman to make something of themselves," she says.  Do you agree?

Where do you think the problem lies? 

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Thursday 21 July at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

What is behind the riots in Malawi?

Africa HYS team | 14:43 UK time, Wednesday, 20 July 2011

Riots have broken out in Malawi's capital, Lilongwe, as opposition groups protest against President Bingu wa Mutharika's government. 
Protesters in Blantyre

 

The trouble started after a court ruled on Tuesday that nationwide protests, called against the high cost of living, were illegal.

The BBC reporter says despite the ruling, protests are also taking place in the main commercial city, Blantyre, and the northern city of Mzuzu.  

But the situation is most tense in Lilongwe, where angry crowds have been shouting, "Let him [Mr Mutharika] go".

If you're in Malawi, what's happening where you are?  Why are these protests happening now?  

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on 20 July at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number.  It will not be published.

 

 

Has the phone hacking scandal changed your perception of Britain?

Alex Jakana | 17:00 UK time, Monday, 18 July 2011

The massive phone hacking scandal unfolding in the UK has gripped the imagination of millions of people in Britain and around the world.

 

 

The affair centres on the media tycoon Rupert Murdoch's News of the World newspaper and allegations that the paper unlawfully intercepted telephone messages. The News of the World ended up closing down last week after almost 170 years in circulation.

Britain's police force has now been embroiled in the scandal. Top police officers have been criticised for their handling of the investigation into phone hacking and allegations of wrongdoing have led to the resignation of Britain's top two police officers.

The media mogul Rupert Murdoch, and his son, James, will be questioned by British MPs about the affair on Tuesday 19 July.

This scandal has raised embarassing questions about press regulation, media ownership, the police, and potentially corrupt relationships between politicians, journalists and the police.

So as Prime minister - David Cameron concludes his trip to Africa, we ask: do you think Britain's reputation has been tarnished by the corruption revealed by the scandal? How do you feel about the way the press is regulated in your own country? Do you worry about how the police and politicians either manipulate or are being manipulated by the media?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Tuesday 19 July at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

 

Has the Egyptian revolution stalled ?

BBC Africa HYS Team | 13:37 UK time, Thursday, 14 July 2011

Egypt's interim government has dismissed hundreds of policemen because of abuses committed during the revolution earlier this year.

In spite of this, thousands of Egyptians have come back to Cairo's central Tahir Square to demonstrate against the authorities. Protesters demand much faster political reforms.

 

 



In its strongest response to the protests so far, the Egyptian military has issued a warning to those who "... deviate from the peaceful approach during demonstrations and sit-ins and obstruct the institutions of the state".

So, five months since the ousting of President Mubarak, why are the protestors back on Tahir Square? Should they have never left in the first place? Has the Egyptian revolution stalled?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Tuesday 12 December at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

 

Should Kenya allow another refugee camp?

BBC Africa HYS Team | 15:52 UK time, Wednesday, 13 July 2011

The drought in East Africa has been making headlines for the last few weeks. Somalis are streaming into Kenya due to the worsening situation in their own country.

Thousands of are heading for Dadaab, a town in northern Kenya which already has three camps hosting an estimated 370,000 refugees. The existing camps are overflowing with long term residents and the newcomers: they were built to accommodate only 90,000.  Many people have trekked for days or weeks and are in desperate need of food, water and medical attention.

The Kenyan government has so far refused to allow a new camp to open, even though it has been built and ready to receive refugees for the past two years.  The argument is that it will act as a magnet, and pose a risk to national security. 

The Islamist insurgent group al-Shabaab controls much of the territory of Somalia from which the refugees are fleeing. 

At this point should Kenya allow another camp?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air TODAY at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

Have the Nigerian security forces gone too far?

BBC Africa HYS Team | 12:14 UK time, Tuesday, 12 July 2011


 

As the University of Maiduguri shut its doors this morning, in response to the violence rocking the northern Nigerian city, another blast went off in the Baga Motor park area.

Residents have locked themselves in their houses in fear of reprisal raids from the military. Eyewitnesses told the BBC on Monday that the army had shot civilians and burned down their houses in response to a previous attack. The army has denied that they have been targeting civilians.  

Legislators from Borno state held a press conference today criticising the strategy being employed by the military and calling for an amicable solution. 

Are the army's tactics acceptable?  Are these tactics effective in tackling the threat that Boko Haram poses to security in the region?  What would you like the army to do to solve the problem?  What should the state government be doing?  

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Tuesday 12 July at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published. 

What is the future of the north of Sudan?

BBC Africa HYS Team | 15:10 UK time, Wednesday, 6 July 2011

Africa is getting ready to celebrate the birth of a new nation.

On Saturday 9 July South Sudan will officially come into existence after a hard won independence. But as the world anticipates this event, how will life change for the residents of the rest of what has been Africa's biggest country? Around three quarters of Sudan's oil, upon which Khartoum's economy has relied, is in wells in the territory of the new South Sudan.

Aside from tensions with South Sudan, Khartoum faces conflict in other regions within its borders.  It has been fighting rebels in Darfur since 2003.

Now South Kordofan has descended into violence.Disturbing images from South Kordofan have made their way into the world's media in recent days, and church groups have talked of "ethnic cleansing" of the region's Nuba people, who supported the southern rebels during the civil war.

What is the future of the Republic of Sudan? Could the celebrations in South Sudan on Saturday trigger similar cries for independence in other regions? What can be done to prevent more bloodshed?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Wednesday 6 July at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published.

Why is food security still a problem in Africa?

BBC Africa HYS Team | 14:06 UK time, Wednesday, 6 July 2011


People queueing for food in Mogadishu

 

The United Nations has appealed for urgent international assistance to help ten million people in the east and horn of Africa who are in need of food aid. Parts of the region are experiencing their worst drought for 60 years, despite millions of dollars in development support which have been poured into the area. 

Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, Uganda and Djibouti are amongst the countries which are hardest hit. Mali, Chad and Niger also still struggle with food shortages. 

But why is food security still a problem on the continent? Climate change and conflict may be factors, but are government policies also at fault? Who is to blame for the recurring problem? Is it right that African countries are still dependent on food aid from western donors? And what is the solution to Africa's food shortage problems?

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Thursday 8 July at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published. 

 

Should Nigeria embrace Islamic banking?

BBC Africa HYS Team | 12:38 UK time, Tuesday, 5 July 2011


Nigerian naira notes being counted

 

The Nigerian Central Bank (CBN) is hosting a two day conference to discuss the introduction of Islamic banking in the country.  

Under Sharia Islamic law, making money from money, such as charging interest, is usury and therefore not permitted.

The customer and the bank share the risk of any investment on agreed terms, and divide any profits between them.

Wealth should be generated only through legitimate trade and investment in assets. But investment in companies involved with alcohol, gambling, tobacco and pornography is strictly off limits.

The CBN says Islamic banking will give depositors another choice of where to keep their money and a different way of doing business.

But Christian clerics in the country are up in arms saying it will magnify religious divisions in the country. What do you think? 

If you would like to debate this topic LIVE on air on Tuesday 5 July at 1600 GMT, please include a telephone number. It will not be published. 

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